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Weekend PC download deals: Warhammer 40K, Square Enix


Jun 29
// Alasdair Duncan
Okay, so the inevitable Steam Summer Sale hasn't started yet but I for one am glad, since my work screwed up my time sheet and I'm not getting paid until Monday. Still, there's still the fantastic Dawn of War franchise and la...
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THQ talks Warhammer 40K: Dark Millennium's transformation


Apr 11
// Jordan Devore
Although scaling back Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium Online into something which doesn't require a subscription to play sounds more appealing to me than the alternative, the fact that this process even had to happen is wor...
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The DTOID Show: Journey, FEZ, and Wasteland 2!


Mar 31
// Tara Long
Happy Friday, folks! In case you missed it, The Destructoid Show went live earlier today, and in addition to giving out four codes for Waveform on Steam, we also covered a metric shit-ton of news that happened recently - som...
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Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium won't release as an MMO


Mar 29
// Jordan Devore
THQ has announced that Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium Online isn't going to release as a massively multiplayer online game as originally expected. The title has been "refocused" as an "immersive single player and online mu...
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This Warhammer 40k-turned-Doom army rules


Feb 12
// Jordan Devore
Sundays, in my mind, are best spent sleeping in late and dedicating an afternoon to looking at random things you cannot possibly hope to (and would never truly wish to) afford. Toys are a good candidate, given the absurd aski...
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Space Marine, Limbo, and more are on sale at Steam


Dec 22
// Jordan Devore
The Steam Holiday Sale is still going strong, and looking at my friends' activity, it's working -- they're getting us to play games we've only barely bothered to touch. A few of the daily deals today are worth pointing out: ...
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Today's Steam deals: Deus Ex, Space Marine, Dead Island


Nov 25
// Jordan Devore
By now, you almost certainly don't need little old us to point you in the direction of the Steam Autumn Sale, but surely this friendly reminder couldn't hurt. Today's daily discount selection is most tempting. Patrician IV (...
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Space Marine getting Chaos Unleashed DLC in December


Nov 03
// Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is due to receive its first paid downloadable content in December, with a "Chaos Unleashed" expansion to the freely released Exterminatus co-op mode.  Up to four players will be able to ste...
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PSA: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine co-op mode launched


Oct 26
// Jim Sterling
In a week dominated by Battlefield 3 and Uncharted 3, it seems incredibly silly Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine to release a new mode, but that's the situation we're in. For those of you still playing Relic's Ork-blasting acti...
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Exterminatus is declared upon Space Marine today


Oct 25
// Maurice Tan
I only just finished Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine last weekend and Relic is already showering me with more Ork stompah goodness thanks to the free 'Exterminatus' mode. Alas, it won't let you lay waste to an entire planet f...
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THQ denies Warhammer 40K: Dark Millennium Online details


Oct 14
// Jim Sterling
After yesterday's deluge of information concerning Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium Online, THQ has flatly denied that anything we know is true. That includes class info, studios involved, and the March 2013 launch window.&n...
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THQ: There may be 'no room' for a Space Marine sequel


Oct 14
// Jim Sterling
THQ's Danny Bilson has brought some bad news for those hoping to see more of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine. According to the core games boss, there might be no room at the inn for Relic's action series, since all eyes on the...
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Warhammer 40K: Dark Millennium MMO dated and detailed


Oct 13
// Jim Sterling
After ten thousand years of silence, THQ has come out of the woodwork with a bunch of details and a release date for Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium Online, the fabled MMO set in Games Workshop's sci-fi universe. ...
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Repaint your Captain Titus with this Space Marine mod


Sep 13
// Josh Tolentino
As everyone knows, Adeptus Astartes (read: Space Marines) of Warhammer 40,000 are awesome. They can probably beat up any of your favorite game heroes without so much as a rev of their phallic chainswords. And if there were an...
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The DTOID Show: Our Friday live show happened!


Sep 10
// Tara Long
Hiya, fellas! Sorry I'm late on posting yesterday's episode of The Destructoid Show, but Max and I stayed up all last night playing Dead Island with some of the guys from Bitmob. The things we do for work! Anyway, yesterday'...
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Warhammer 40K: Space Marine disappears from UK Steam


Sep 09
// Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is on sale in the United Kingdom today, but those looking to get the game on Steam will notice that it's suddenly not on the storefront. The game recently blipped out of existence, and nobody's ...

Review: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine

Sep 08 // Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Relic EntertainmentPublisher: THQReleased: September 6, 2011MSRP: $59.99 (console), $49.99 (PC) Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine's campaign tells the tale of Captain Titus, a hero of the Ultramarines Space Marine chapter. His squad is sent to a Forge World (essentially a huge, planet-sized factory) in order to deal with an invading mob of Orks and liberate the strategically crucial location. Unfortunately, all is not as it seems. The Chaos Space Marines show up, and Titus is locked in a three-way struggle for the planet, along with the experimental new energy source that it houses. Space Marine's story is not exactly deep, and in fact it only gets interesting at the end, where it is aggravatingly cut short by a sequel hook. That said, it takes the "grimdark" world of Warhammer 40,000 very seriously, and does an excellent job of representing the three races that drive its story. The Space Marines, Orks and Chaos forces look and sound incredibly authentic, presenting perhaps the best representation of 40K forces that I've seen in any entertainment medium.  While the narrative is a little unfulfilling, one cannot say the same for Space Marine's combat. Expertly merging melee hack n' slash violence with ranged warfare, Relic Entertainment has created a surprisingly tight, fluid action experience. I'm rather impressed by how well the sword-swinging and gun-slinging work together, as Titus swiftly moves from one style of play to the other. Using the shoulder buttons for guns and the face buttons for melee weapons, controls are streamlined and intuitive, making for a versatile game in spite of its inherent simplicity.  There's also a solid range of weapons to choose from, all lovingly taken from the tabletop experience. Ranged weapons include the standard rapid-fire Bolter and sniper-esque Lascannon, as well as more exotic weapons such as the Melta Gun -- which essentially fires an all-encompassing mass of energy at anything stood within ten feet ahead of the player, reducing enemies to paste. Players use the left trigger to aim and the right to fire, as one would in a standard third-person shooter, although some weapons are best suited to hip-firing, "spray and pray" tactics, especially when foes get close. Melee weapons come in four varieties -- the weak combat sword, the one-handed chainsword and force axe, and the two-handed thunder hammer. Titus performs standard melee attacks with one button and stun attacks with the other, while incredibly simplistic combos (hit, hit, stun and hit, hit, hit, stun) are used to create more effective stun blows. If an enemy is stunned enough to become dazed, Titus can perform a brutal finishing move. Executions are used to replenish health, and look ridiculously cool, with finishers determined by the enemy being fought and the weapon used -- for example, fighting a Bloodletter Daemon with a chainsword will see Titus grab it from behind and pull the chainsword through its throat. Yes, it's very pleasant. Titus has a regenerating shield, but once it's depleted, he loses health, which can only be recovered using executions or activating Fury. The Fury meter grows with each successful attack, and once activated, Titus regains HP while also dealing more damage. As the campaign progresses, he unlocks the ability to slow-down time while aiming his ranged weapons, too. Throughout the game, various upgrades are unlocked, although there are no real "RPG" elements to the game -- Titus gains upgrades at predetermined points, and they're only light enhancements at best.  Space Marine does a commendable job of throwing one into the thick of battle. Thinning an encroaching horde with gunfire before diving in with a chainsword makes for some engaging combat, and things can get quite challenging. Prioritizing targets is essential, as knowing when to take out the ranged opponents and when to deal with the melee troops is often the key to surviving. Tougher enemies, such as shielded Ork 'Ardboys and Chaos Space Marines, need to be dealt with above all else.  The combat system certainly has a few issues, though. For one thing, the deliberate lack of a cover system might be authentic when dealing with fearless Space Marines, but it can make for some frustrating fights. The game often places ranged enemies far beyond reach, and firefights become pretty tricky when all you have is a weak dodge roll to avoid machine gun sprays and viciously efficient explosives. Likewise, the lack of appreciable defenses in melee combat means that Titus takes huge amounts of damage when fighting even a small group of enemies -- a problem made worse by the lengthy execution animations and the fact that he'll still lose health while performing them.  Despite these annoyances, Relic has built a fighting system that's far more elegant than I expected it to be, and for that it deserves praise. There's a satisfying barbarity to the combat, with bolter fire tearing enemies to shreds and thunder hammers crushing Chaos Marines in their armor with beautiful severity. What I truly love is just how much like a genetically enhanced superhuman the game makes one feel. The screen shakes as Titus runs (an effect thankfully toned down from earlier builds), melee blows feel heavy and commanding, while the huge, audacious guns are a pleasure to use. Titus even enjoys a few levels with an Assault Jump Pack, allowing him to leap high into the air and then smash back down, devastatingwhole crowds caught in the blast. The biggest downside to the campaign is that it is a very short affair. A player storming through the game will likely be done within six hours, and while I found the gameplay fun enough to want to play it again, others will likely feel a little unsatisfied by the game's sudden conclusion and rather cheap cliffhanger.  Fortunately, there is a robust multiplayer mode to keep things spicy, and it's shockingly good. Two traditional game modes -- team deathmatch and capture point -- pit Space Marines and Chaos Marines against each other across a modest selection of maps. There are three classes to choose from -- the jack-of-all trades Tactical/Chaos class, the melee-based, speedy Assault/Raptor and the ranged Devastator/Havoc troop. Players can switch classes between deaths, and some maps are more advantageous to certain characters, encouraging players to swap out characters rather than stick with a single type.  Each class has a range of unique weapons and perks (earned with level increases) that enhance their combat prowess. Personally, I love the Devastator/Havoc, who can roll into battle with a heavy bolter (a machine gun the size of a motorcycle) and take a stationary braced stance to chew up the opposition. That said, the Tactical class' flexibility and the Assault's jump pack make them equally effective choices, and I've noted that players seem to be using a healthy variety of characters, rather than forcing games to become huge jump pack contests.  Classes are mostly well balanced, but I do think the Assault/Raptor class is a little overpowered and could possibly do with a reduced health meter to offset its huge close-quarter advantage. That said, no one class has a supreme advantage over another, and the maps are also really well designed, with sensible spawn points and excellent killzones that often house dramatic back-and-forth battles. I'd certainly have liked a few extras classes, too. Chaplains/Dark Apostles could have been cool healing/buff classes, and I'd love a Librarian/Sorcerer class as well. Perhaps something to think about for the future. Players get to fully customize their characters using almost every available paint color that Games Workshop produces. Each armor piece has a range of unlockable variants that players can use to create their perfect Space or Chaos Marine, and daub them in whatever color they wish. Relic has also gone to the trouble of including a huge range of pre-set, canonical Marine Chapter and Chaos Warband color schemes, so if you want to represent the Space Marine Salamanders or Chaos Alpha Legion, their schemes are readily included. I'm just a little disappointed that I had to cobble together my own Thousand Sons warrior, but that's just me being pedantic. Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is a wonderfully tight production that brings an authenticity and intensity befitting Games Workshop's beloved universe. While there are some vexing design decisions and the campaign is disappointingly brief, there's nevertheless plenty of content to get stuck into and exquisitely savage combat on offer. With its bloodthirsty gameplay, heartfelt atmosphere, and expectantly flowing mixture of ranged and brawling warfare, Space Marine is an exemplary entry into the action genre that will satisfy fans of the source material, and possibly make new fans of those less familiar.
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Warhammer 40,000, the tabletop game in which sci-fi depictions of fantasy creatures battle it out in a grim, perpetually violent future, lends itself well to the world of videogames. In fact, one can be quite certain it's ins...

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With Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine's release having crept up on people, it would be easy to forget that the game actually had a Collector's Edition release. It boasts quite a cool selection of goodies, and we got our paws o...

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[Contest is CLOSED. Winner will be notified via Dtoid Private Message!] We got a Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine chainsword in the mail. It's life-sized and designed for a ten-foot-tall Space Marine, so it's absolutely bloody...

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Live show: Mash Tactics plays Space Marine early


Sep 05
// Bill Zoeker
[Not sure what Mash Tactics is? I've included a clip from the most recent episode to show you just a glimpse of what you've been missing, you daft fool! You can see all of Destructoid's previously-aired live shows in our arc...
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The DTOID Show: Serious Sam, Skyrim Bugs, and CoD: XP


Sep 02
// Max Scoville
Good evening, Destuctikids! As it's a Friday, we shot today's Destructoid Show in front of a LIVE internet audience. In case you missed it, here it is. Today, in addition to giving away some Assassin's Creed Revelations...

Hands-on: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine 'Exterminatus'

Sep 02 // Jim Sterling
As you already know, Exterminatus is a four-player co-op mode featuring wave-based combat. Fans of such modes will already know the basics at play -- each wave gets harder and harder until you either win or get brutally slaughtered. At its most difficult, Exterminatus will start throwing Chaos Space Marines (or regular Marines, if players are using Chaos) at the team, and trust me when I say that those guys do not go down easy. The three classes from the competitive multiplayer mode are present, along with any unlocked perks, weapons, and ranking. Players can choose the flexible Tactical class, the melee-based Assault class, or the brutally ranged Devastator (my personal favorite). As with versus mode, experience points are earned with kills and accomplishments, which level up the player and provide further character bonuses.  Unfortunately (and quite possibly thanks to the fact we were using developer kits), my online experience was rather laggy, but I was able to play enough to get a good feel of what Exterminatus was like, and I quite enjoyed it. Rather than each player having a limited number of respawns, the entire team shares one pool of lives, and the game ends if everybody is down before a new one has been earned. After a certain score is reached, another life is earned. Points are earned with kills, but are also won by completing challenges that intermittently appear. These challenges include taking capture points on the map or scoring a certain amount of melee kills within a time limit. Despite their simplicity, some of these challenges can be tricky and the point bonuses are crucial, especially when lives are thin on the ground.  Although it's not deep and engaging enough to sustain an entire game by itself, Exterminatus is perfect as an addition to a title that's already looking satisfying. As I said, I adore wave-based challenge modes, and marrying the concept to Warhammer 40,000 is a terrific idea. The ability to take your multiplayer character, complete with weaponry and perks, is a nice addition, and the level of challenge presented feels just right.  It's just a shame to me that the mode is, indeed, coming a month after launch. THQ must be confident that a lot of people will still be playing the game thirty days later, but I can't say I share that assurance. I certainly hope they are, but I'm worried nobody will be around to play it when it finally appears. I guess we'll have to wait and see on that count.  I shall certainly keep my fingers crossed, because I want to play Exterminatus some more.
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Last night, THQ announced a new co-op mode for Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine. Exterminatus pits a squad of four Space Marines against increasingly intense waves of screaming Orks on a variety of maps. It's scheduled to arriv...

A Space Marine could beat up your favorite game hero

Sep 01 // Jim Sterling
Think of your favorite videogame protagonist. A Space Marine could beat it up. Not even a particularly powerful Space Marine, like Captain Titus in Relic's upcoming game. I'm talking about Novices, the ones fresh out of training and ready for battle. A new Space Marine recruit has cooler armor than Master Chief, features more muscles than Marcus Fenix, and has been augmented more times than Adam Jensen before he's even had his first real fight.  Space Marines are selected from across the universe, which, in Warhammer 40,000's depiction, contains hundreds of human-populated worlds with a wide variety of harsh environments. Billions upon billions of humans are considered for recruitment, and of those, only a handful actually get chosen. Before they're subjected to genetic enhancement and brutal training, they're already ridiculously outstanding examples of human accomplishment.  One selected, the recruits are then physically altered and brutally trained. Genetic alterations include a second heart and a pair of backup lungs. They get nineteen new organs in total, and a number of their bones are fused together to provide greater protection to the insides. They can survive and recover from the kind of wounds that reduce DOOM's so-called "Space Marine" to bloody gibs in seconds. They can breathe underwater and inhale toxic gas, because why not? They can also hibernate if they like.  Then, of course, we get the Power Armor. It's cooler than Master Chief's glorified bicycle helmet and makes what is already a twelve-foot-tall, bone-fused genetic freak considerably bigger and more intimidating. They have mechanical muscles inside that, once bonded to the Marine, feel as light and natural as normal flesh.  In short, a Space Marine is basically fan fiction that human beings have written about themselves. The ultimate Mary Sues, Space Marines are so perfect it makes you want to throw up. Granted, they're also massive dicks who think a half-dead guy glued to a chair is some sort of god, but they're pretty damn good at what they do. They also have swords with chainsaw blades on it, which is cooler than the chainsaw bayonet of Gears of War because it's even more ridiculously redundant.  As said earlier, this is all before a Space Marine gets anywhere close to being experienced. They've already suffered more physical trauma than most videogame protagonists put together before they're even given a bolt pistol, but the ones that actually live long enough to become veterans (and Space Marines can live for at least 500 years) are the really scary ones. They fight Orks, slavering daemons, undead metal skeletons, and even other Space Marines -- the Chaos-tainted ones that are a million years old and backed up by reality-shifting Gods. Unlike most videogame heroes, who go up against a single villain, the Space Marines are beset on all sides by aliens, monsters, and space elves. Compared to that, Mario looks like a pussy for having so much trouble with a shitty little turtle.  That's pretty much why it's awesome that we're finally getting an action videogame starring the Space Marines. They're basically better than you and everybody you've ever looked up to. If they punched Nathan Drake in the face, his face would become a rich, warm soup as eyeballs, hair and skull disintegrated into screaming paste. If a Space Marine kicked him in the bollocks, he'd suffer total body disruption and paint the walls as little more than squirming, gibbering ketchup.  Basically, my videogame hero could beat up your videogame hero, and if you disagree, you're horrible.
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is almost upon us, and it's looking set to be quite good indeed. I've long been enthralled by Games Workshop's expansive universe, and have thirsted for more videogames over the years.  Whi...

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Warhammer helps sexify your Xbox avatar


Aug 16
// Liam Fisher
We know you all love that spiffy avatar gear, and THQ's got your back this time out with an assortment of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine apparel and pets for your Xbox Live avatar. Seriously, get excited. Do it. For 80 points...

Not another Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine preview!

Aug 16 // Jim Sterling
THINGS THAT ARE AWESOME: Space Marine Meatiness: The game does a great job of making you feel like a genetically engineered super soldier. Regular humans are tiny in comparison, and constantly look up to you, cheering for your arrival. Every time you stumble upon am embattled squad of Imperial Guard, you really feel like a hero who's arrived in the nick on time. Ranged/Melee Attack Fluidity: Automatically switching between guns and melee weaponry is as simple as pressing two alternate buttons. The triggers are for shooting, the face buttons are for hack n' slashing, and both methods work pretty well. Neither side is really nerfed, either. You'll need to use both bullets and chainswords in order to deal with enemies, usually requiring the gun to thin the herd before the survivors surround you.  Jump Packs: These are, to be blunt, freakin' awesome. I was expecting them to be quite sloppily implemented, but they work really well. You press a button to boost into the air, then a target reticule appears on the ground. If you hit the melee button, you'll whizz down toward the target and deal huge damage to anything caught in the impact zone. It's incredibly fun, and very tightly controlled.  THINGS THAT NEED WORK: Movement Controls: Strangely, the gimmicky jump packs control really well, but general movement isn't so hot. Captain Titus is rather hard to steer left and right, and I noticed he had a tendency to clip on bits of scenery. It's nothing that makes the game unbearable, but it can be annoying.  Rocket Launchers: It took less than twenty minutes to determine that rocket launchers are the worst. Be it Orks or Chaos Marines, anything that explodes will deal huge damage to Titus, and things that explode are everywhere. Missile troops are great shots, too, so they'll nearly always hit their target if you're in range. They're everywhere, too. It's hard to feel like a badass when you're afraid of charging into combat before of all the rockets.  Camera Shake: The camera shakes when the player sprints. While it's a cool effect in limited doses, having it happen every time makes for some headache-inducing visuals. I can see it getting quite annoying over the course of a full game.  These are a few quick mental notes I took away from the preview build. Right now, it's looking like a very solid game, albeit one with a few issues. We will have a full review coming in the near future (probably!) and I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the full experience holds up.
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Both the single-player and multiplayer of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine has been previewed multiple times. We're less than a month away from release and THQ wants another! I've been playing a preview build of the game this p...

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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine getting a demo


Aug 15
// Jim Sterling
If you're undecided on whether you want to curbstomp Orks and melt Chaos Space Marines to slag, then you'll be glad to know that THQ is setting you up with a demo of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine ahead of time. The taster is...
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine getting co-op


Aug 10
// Jim Sterling
THQ has confirmed that Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is getting a co-op mode. The feature will be patched into the game thirty days after launch, and will be a free addition. It's been mentioned that it will only be free to ...
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Holy crap, Warhammer 40K: Space Marine customization!


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
This video is about a month old but nobody seemed to spot it until it popped up on NeoGAF earlier today. That's a shame because it's pretty damn great. The video takes us through the customization process in Warhammer 40,000...
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine multiplayer trailer


Aug 03
// Jim Sterling
Here's a trailer for Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine, detailing the class-based multiplayer. As Conrad already told you, there are three classes to choose from, and they can be fully customized with perks, chapter colors, and...






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