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Twisted Metal

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David Jaffe wants you to shoot his truck


Feb 12
// Liam Fisher
I love the idea of promoting a new game release with a contest; it's a pretty foolproof concept. I definitely like the idea of being allowed to shoot Sweet Tooth's ice cream truck with a machine gun. Sounds perfect, rig...
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Twisted Metal dev hit with layoffs, David Jaffe leaving


Feb 07
// Jim Sterling
[Update: Jaffe has responded to today's news, confirming that layoffs were had, but addressing talk of casual development by saying, "I have zero plans to make games like FARMVILLE and ANGRY BIRDS. I never said what I was doi...
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Twisted Metal delayed and censored in Europe


Feb 03
// Jim Sterling
Twisted Metal is suffering a few localization problems, resulting in the car-on-car violence being delayed in Europe. The game is now due out in March for PAL gamers, although a solid release date is yet to be confirmed. ...
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David Jaffe invites YOU to a Twisted Metal Tournament!


Jan 27
// Jesse Cortez
Upon the news that a new Twisted Metal game was coming out, many gamers couldn't wait to sink their sweet teeth into it. Well, if you live in or near San Francisco, you will have the opportunity to check out this game next...
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Sweet Tooth is gonna take you for a ride on January 31


Jan 27
// Chris Carter
[Editor's Note: Ladies and gents, welcome Chris Carter to the front page and the Destructoid news staff. Regular readers will surely recognize his face and name from our community. As always, that's where our best people come...
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Yep, Twisted Metal is getting an online pass


Jan 23
// Jim Sterling
Despite David Jaffe stating he didn't want one, Twisted Metal is getting itself a lovely, shiny, pretty little online pass. Because inconveniencing all your customers is what gaming is all about.  It's absolutely not sup...
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First-print copies of Twisted Metal include TM: Black


Dec 28
// Jordan Devore
Those who purchase a first-edition copy of Twisted Metal will receive a voucher that can be redeemed for a free digital copy of the original Twisted Metal: Black. News of this thoughtful freebie comes by way of co-director Da...

Twisted Metal: A different kind of multiplayer game

Dec 19 // Samit Sarkar
Twisted Metal (PlayStation 3) Developer: Eat Sleep Play Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment Release: February 14, 2012 In the hour or so that I spent with Twisted Metal, I kept noticing one aspect of the combat: it can take a pretty long time to kill someone. That’s not an accident, according to the Sony producer who demoed the game for me. He explained that the design decision was a result of Jaffe’s dislike of the pace in most multiplayer shooters -- the series co-creator isn’t a fan of the endless spawn-die-spawn cycle. In those games, it doesn’t take many bullets to kill you, and firefights rarely last long. Twisted Metal, on the other hand, offers a much higher degree of “survivability,” said the producer. You’re going to have to work for a kill, but the designers believe that increased survivability only makes the game more thrilling. Here, combat is “all about the chase,” which, I guess, makes sense for a game featuring vehicular mayhem. In addition, the folks at Eat Sleep Play are hoping that longer lives will help to reduce the amount of frustration that new players have to endure while learning the ropes. That decision makes a lot of sense, since it will likely take more than a few hours to understand Twisted Metal’s chaos. Multiplayer is the focus of this game, and it’s clear that Eat Sleep Play is devoting a great deal of development time to important facets such as balancing vehicles’ abilities and tweaking weapon damage, but the modes and options are so numerous and varied that I found myself overwhelmed during the demo. Jaffe has likened Twisted Metal to a fighting game, and the comparison seems apt -- I don’t have any understanding of the minutiae of fighting games, and it’s impossible for me to have fun with them unless I’m playing someone who’s just as clueless. The depth here is staggering; with such a steep learning curve, it’s important for the game to teach newbies well, and ensure that they can have fun, too. You can outfit vehicles with an arsenal of your choosing. Each car has two special attacks, in addition to its standard firepower. A high degree of destructibility means that level geometry is always in flux. Some of the cars are better used as support vehicles, like the Juggernaut, a slow tractor-trailer that can open its rear doors for up to two teammates to hang out and man turrets. Many weapons employ a risk/reward mechanic: charging attacks makes them more effective, but in many cases, also more difficult to succeed with. One of the playable vehicles is a damn helicopter, and Sweet Tooth can transform into a freakin’ mech. The variety of opportunities will likely give rise to high-level strategic play, and will hopefully lend Twisted Metal a long shelf life. I played in three different levels: one set in the suburbs, another in a theme park, and a snowy take on New York. Although there’s plenty of work to be done before the game’s Valentine’s Day launch, the environments impressed me with their size, destructibility, and variability. The level set in a fictionalized New York is full of secret shortcuts, and its verticality -- you can go up into buildings, or head down into the subway -- provides for great hide-and-seek gameplay. The theme park balances a large open area, complete with a Ferris wheel that can be detached from its moorings, and winding narrow paths on its outskirts. The suburban landscape is sparsely populated and offers near-total destruction. All of them seem to offer play spaces that are “fair” to both sides without having mirrored halves. I played with the classic control scheme, where the face buttons cover vehicle control and the triggers fire weapons. Eat Sleep Play is also including controls based on modern racing games, with acceleration and braking on the triggers. As I said earlier, Twisted Metal isn’t exactly a pick-up-and-play experience, but once I figured out the controls, I did manage to race around the maps and score some kills. The frame rate never dropped during the fast-paced action, and I didn’t see any silly AI bot behavior. While online play is the star of the show, the game also offers local split-screen action for up to four players, just like old times. However you play, you’ll need to invest a good amount of time to learn the ins and outs of Twisted Metal, even if you’re not new to the series. Thankfully, it looks like it will be worth it.
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Unless you count the continued popularity of Mario Kart, we’re a long way from the ’90s heyday of car combat games. Modern multiplayer combat primarily concerns games in which people shoot each other, but David Ja...

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Jaffe doesn't want online pass in Twisted Metal


Dec 08
// Jim Sterling
Twisted Metal director David Jaffe would rather not have an online pass in Twisted Metal, declaring that any lost sales due to used games would be acceptable if it generated new fans. He did, however, admit that it's ultimate...
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Twisted Metal sorts out my Halloween costume


Oct 31
// Jim Sterling
Of all the nonsense publishers dump on my doorstep, this latest offering from Sony is up there with my favorites. Just in time for Halloween, I stumbled upon this scary clown mask based on Twisted Metal's purveyor of ice crea...
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David Jaffe's PAX Prime 2011 keynote


Aug 30
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
David Jaffe kicked off PAX Prime 2011 this year and his keynote address was simply mesmerizing. Here's a man who has done amazing things in the videogame industry bearing it all, including all the hardships that's come with ...
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Twisted Metal gets romantic 2012 release date


Aug 25
// Nick Chester
After being pushed out of 2011, Twisted Metal has a firm release date: Valentine's Day 2012. (That's February 14 for those who aren't romantically inclined.) "What I predict is gonna happen is you're going to have people goin...
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Jaffe: $60 is a 'SH*T TON' to ask for a game


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
David Jaffe has joined Bethesda's Todd Howard in admitting that $60 is a significant investment for gamers to make. However, just like Howard, he's also decided that his own Twisted Metal provides enough to justify the asking...
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The DTOID Show: Nolan North, Skyrim, and Torchlight LIVE!


Aug 05
// Max Scoville
[The Destructoid Show gives a rundown of all the top news from Destructoid.com every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Subscribe to us on YouTube, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.] Hello my special ...
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David Jaffe says that they're going to miss the date of October 4, and that Twisted Metal has to be pushed back. They need time to polish the title, he says. "Thing is, you gotta trust me when I tell you that – with thi...

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Twisted Metal now an 'HBO serial killer' with an M rating


Jul 25
// Nick Chester
Remember when Eat Sleep Play was aiming for a T-rating for the upcoming PlayStation 3 Twisted Metal? It's given up that plan; the game will now ship with an M-rating. "Without the blood," Eat Sleep Play's David Jaffe told a c...
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E3: Jaffe reveals boss, stage and robots in Twisted Metal


Jun 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
David Jaffe has revealed what we'll be seeing of Twisted Metal this week at E3. The above trailer reveals a little bit of the story behind Sweet Tooth's deadly ramapage as well as a boss named Iron Maiden, a semi-c...
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New Destructoid Episode: Twisted Golden Potato Gears 64


Apr 16
// Max Scoville
Whenever I finish shooting an episode of The Destructoid Show, and I think "Yeah! Nailed it!" I'm always horribly disappointed when I see the episode. Today was one of those days. Is it a good episode? I have no idea, but I ...
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Get your extended shot of Twisted Metal in action


Apr 15
// Maurice Tan
Twisted Metal certainly seems to be shaping up very nicely, and now there's an extended trailer to check out some of the gameplay as well. Axel's big two-wheeler monstrocity of a vehicle in Dale's preview has also been announced as a pre-order bonus vehicle. I guess I'll finally have to buy a bluetooth headset now. Thanks Jaffe!

Preview: Twisted Metal

Apr 14 // Dale North
Down to the Metal Jaffe says that Twisted Metal does a good job of bringing forth the fantasy that the original team had for creating their game back in the 1990s. He says this is the first time they've been able to get close to achieving that original vision. I got a better appreciation of that when I saw how deep Twisted Metal could be, and just how much work the team has put into this game. On the surface there's these crazy vehicles and weapons, new modes, and online connectivity to impress you with. But underneath the hood you'll find lots of deep strategy and fine levels of polish on the control and balance. The end result of their work is the ultimate competitive playground. Twisted Metal is so balanced that I can't find issue with any of the vehicles. You'd think that with so many different types of vehicles and weapons there would be an imbalance, but I couldn't find one. Granted, the game isn't finished yet, and there were a few types of vehicles we couldn't play with at this preview event, but from what I've seen there was no doubt that the development team spent a good amount of time making Twisted Metal fair and fun. Amazingly, despite this balance, no vehicle feels gimped. You truly feel like a badass with nearly limitless power in all of them. The level of polish also shows in the vehicle control. In all my matches I never had to question steering or braking; it was never an issue. I loved being able to mash the X button to slam on the brakes, turn on a dime, spin around and send a missile right into the windshield of the guy that has been tailing me. That felt great every time. Knowing exactly where you'll turn, skid or stop goes a long way toward making this chaotic game fun, as with so much going on, it could have been a big, sloppy mess. Even the helicopter's controls felt like a lot of thought went into it. Hats off to the Eat Sleep Play on how much polish went into the balance and control in Twisted Metal. Maybe you could meet with some of the modern day fighting game makers and teach them a thing or two. Beyond all of this, it's clear that so much thought went into making these vehicles play nice together. Just about every unique function of each vehicle seems to promote teamwork. Some functions are completely obvious, while others are uncovered after a bit of play experience. Those with a few battles under their belt can get incredibly deep into vehicle choices and uses in the different mode types.  It should be noted that David Jaffe addressed the level destruction in Twisted Metal. Some people had beef with the destruction model when the game was originally shown at last year's E3. Jaffe made it clear that this had been addressed since then. Now shit blows up real nice.  Vehicles Much of the fun of Twisted Metal lies in the awesome selection of vehicle types. While there's a bunch of different modes in the game, all of them let you go nuts with your favorite vehicle type, and they all let you change your vehicles during a match. There's never a dull moment with so many choices. Even when I was getting my ass handed to me, I still was having a blast trying out all the different vehicle types.  Juggernaut is one of the most devastating vehicles in a game. A normal big rig with trailer would already do heavy damage on the road, but this particular one has quite a few advantages over a standard semi. The sides of the trailer open up to reveal giant mines that can be dropped on the road. Hitting one of these is deadly for just about any vehicle. In a very Spy Hunter fashion, the back of the trailer can be opened to hold up to two other vehicles. This comes in handy during team play. The teammates inside can then man either the top-mounted or rear turrets while being transported, making Juggernaut a moving fortress. There is a key weakness to this vehicle: Opening the back door to let cars in leaves the vehicle vulnerable, with damage counting up to three times normal when open. Talon, the helicopter, is the first flying vehicle in Twisted Metal. Flying might sound unfair at first, but know that ground vehicles can just as easily take down this chopper with a missile. First time players may be surprised to find that the helicopter fits into the support class more than it does offensive.  Its magnet can pick up other teammates' cars and haul them to safety. It can also bring them quickly to a conflict zone. That said, the same magnet can pick up an enemy car and drop it from up high, causing damage. It's also equipped with a Gatling gun that can be fired from a first person view. Talon was beautifully implemented and I found myself picking it more than any other vehicle. I had the most fun with the ambulance called MeatWagon. There's guns and alternates to use in this car, much like the others, but the main appeal is MeatWagon's special, which fires off hospital patients on a gurney. They're strapped with TNT to become a rolling human missile. What's great is that you can use RC control to move this gurney in a first-person view and then blow it up at a key location. Place: Sunsprings, California, Mode: Team Death Match In Sunsprings you'll blow up movie theaters and grocery stores, crash through office building doors and run over innocent bystanders. Jaffe says he has always wanted the destruction to go down in a place we can all relate to. So this is like trashing your own hometown. You know you've always waned to do this. The mode was the standard team death match. We played 10 minute matches in our first hands-on sessions to get a feel for all the vehicles. I was too busy testing all all the different car types and getting a feel for their control and weapons to pay attention to how bad I was doing. In the very first round of multiplayer, going up against other games press members, I came in dead last with one kill, eight deaths, and the highest amount of damage taken. A QA rep told me that I wasn't that bad. I told him he was full of shit. In a second try I sped around the city, avoiding the town center where all the action was happening. I snatched up power-ups and then came into the action fully loaded, spewing forth everything I could find at enemy cars. It was here that I really got to see how tight the steering controls are, as I had to dodge and hide from everyone that was out for me after they figured out what I was doing. This mode is Twisted Metal in its simplest form, but it's still a delight. I could have played this mode all night. Place: Black Rock Arena, Mode: Team Last Man Standing Black Rock Arena is insane. It's an underground battle arena out in the desert. It has a Mad Max vibe, with fire and electricity and metal tracks up high around the perimiter, surrounding a pit for lots of car bashing. The walls are sloped and it's easy to slip down into this battle pit...or worse. The level itself is alive, with moving platforms, ramps and walls that can rise or fall at any time. They'll reconfigure during gameplay, creating a sort of living maze. I had walls popping up in my face during matches that made me giggle at first, as they seemed to be playfully dickish. Going down a tunnel to find a wall pop up right before I could exit was a particularly good dick move. Later I found a ramp that popped up from the ground. I took the bait and took the ramp, and found out too late that it guided me right for a lava pit. In the ultimate dick move, lava pits have been placed at the ends of all platforms. Take a corner or edge too fast and you'll be molten metal.  The fun in this locale continues with spiked wrecking balls that swing right into the zone where the best pick-ups are. A room with spikes on the roof has you following a small, safe path very carefully. Floating health orbs that you can drive under will definitely save your ass in this level. The best power-up opportunity ever comes from a pad that you park on to charge up. Charged, it launches into the stands to bring pedestrians out into the course. Plow into these fans and you'll get health and item power-ups.  The mode Team Last Man Standing gives each team a pool of shared lives. This means that each life really matters, which is a great contrast to shooters where you'd just die and respawn over and over. The team still standing, with lives remaining at the end, wins. Making each life important really promotes team play. With communication you could use the helicopter to pick up a team mate and drag them to a healing orb. You could use Juggernaut to pick up vehicles and haul them to safety. A player using the tow truck could drop health for teammates. With good communication, offensive team play really makes a difference. In my first play of this stage I was a helicopter, and I worked to pick off unsuspecting victims from up above. When word got out on the other team, I found that many of them respawned as choppers themselves, and they worked hard to take me out of the air.  On the ground this stage is absolutely nuts. I could almost feel the developers laughing at me as I frantically sped around in race car Spectre, with machine guns blazing, firing at nothing in particular. I felt like I was up against both the opposing team and the stage itself. I was happy to see that everyone else playing was just as lost as I was. They were all doing their best to boost out of lava pits or find their way off a wall that popped up out of nowhere. I'm sure the dev team had a great time creating this stage. Place: Harbor City, Mode: Nuke Harbor City is a gritty, industrial town. It features two factories, one on each side of town. It features dive bars and strip clubs, and there's plenty of gas stations and oil refineries to blow up. A large water canal runs down the middle of the level, connecting the two factories. It's the perfect stage for one of the most interesting and deep modes of Twisted Metal: Nuke. In Nuke the goal is to destroy the opposing team's statue with a launched missile. This mode plays out in innings, with teams playing either offense or defense for a set time, and then switching. When playing offensive, you'll drive to quickly find the enemy's faction leader and "grab" him. Once kidnapped, you'll drag the faction leader behind your vehicle to a missile launch point. At this launch point, staying in the launch area safely for a set period of time will transform the captured faction leader into a sacrificial missile. You'll then fire this missile and take control of it, working to guide it to the enemy's statue without being shot down. A point goes to a successfully missiled statue, and two points go to taking one down. The team with the most points, after all the innings and rounds are complete, wins. In these stages there are two missile launchers: one in the back of the factory and another that's mobile, and requires you to follow it to launch. Getting to either and staying there is going to be hard when the defensive team is out to get you and anyone that helps you. This all may sound pretty crazy, but helpful icons on the heads-up display make it easy to know what you're doing and where you're going. Playing offense, the location of faction leaders is always marked, telling you exactly where to drive to pick one up. Once you do, you'll follow another icon to the launch area. For defense, an icon will give you the location of your kidnapped faction leader. They've made it really easy -- you just get in and go. Matches don't have to be coordinated, but they can be, and there's potential for very deep competitive play in this mode. There's much to be gained from careful planning of vehicle types and roles. For instance, each vehicle type has a different wait time before a missile can launch. Some vehicles are better suited for defense or support while others are better for snatching the faction leader up. Of course, you can also just go in and go nuts. It works nicely either way.  The Twist: Twisted Metal expands upon everything that was great about the old series titles and then adds a bunch of depth, connectivity and creativity. Competitive gamers stuck in yet another war shooter will happily crawl out of the trenches for this game come October 4th. Eat Sleep Play have created a beast unlike anything we've ever seen. 
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Oh, you're not ready for Twisted Metal. You think you are, but you're not. You may think that you're prepared, being a fan of this PlayStation and PS2 predecessors, but you're not even close to being prepared. This game is in...

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Twisted Metal dated for October 4


Apr 08
// Jim Sterling
The long-awaited vehicular violence romp that is Twisted Metal has been given a release date of October 4, 2011.  The game's looking set to be a hot one. It doesn't appear to have changed much over the years, but does it need to? It's about cars shooting rockets at each other. That's a formula you don't really need to fix.  I'll be picking this one up for sure. Who else is planning to?
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Sony lists twenty exclusive PS3 games for 2011


Jan 10
// Jim Sterling
When Sony feels it has something to aggrandize, it won't be shy about aggrandizing. In this case, it might well be justifies, as the official PlayStation Blog boasts not one, not two, but twenty PS3 exclusives, all slate...
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Jaffe loves PS3 exclusivity more than audience expansion


Nov 30
// Jim Sterling
Twisted Metal won't be coming to the Xbox 360. Obviously not, since Sony owns the game's license. Still, even if creator David Jaffe could put it on the 360, he apparently would not. According to the developer, giving the PS3...
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Twisted Metal goodies and art at Comic-Con


Jul 17
// Matthew Razak
Who's headed to Comic-Con!? Not me, that's for sure. I'll be not there and not enjoying the Twisted Metal panel where I will not see the designs for the post-apocalyptic Twisted Metal that was tossed around before the final d...
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Jaffe isn't expecting Twisted Metal to be a blockbuster


Jun 22
// Conrad Zimmerman
Twisted Metal is a name hardcore gamers likely all recognize but the series has never had the über-success we associate with major, AAA releases. Series creator David Jaffe knows this and doesn't seem to be deluding hims...
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Jaffe explains how twisted the T-rated Twisted Metal gets


Jun 21
// Nick Chester
Fans of Twisted Metal: Black might have been put off a bit upon hearing that Eat Sleep Play were aiming for a 'T' rating with its upcoming PlayStation 3 Twisted Metal game. The studio’s co-founder David Jaffe later turn...

E3 10: Twisted Metal PS3, a fighting game with cars

Jun 18 // Nick Chester
According to Jaffe, he and the Twisted Metal team have always seen the franchise as a fighting game with cars. Like "Mortal Kombat vs. Unreal Tournament," he says. The new Twisted Metal maintains that, with its "cars as characters" philosophy, and its standard deathmatch and team deathmatch. But with its latest installment, Eat Sleep Play wanted to add a new mode that would add another layer to the game, which it's calling "Nuke Mode." We detailed the team-based mode a little earlier this week (check it out), and it looks like a blast to play. Jaffe walked us through a match simulation in the game's city level, showing of the multiple access routes, ramps, and hidden pathways throughout the environment.  Most interesting, though, was getting a closer look at the game's vehicles, each with its own handling, armor, carrying capacity, and more. Jaffe explains that the team is looking to make each car feel like a character in a fighting game, and after seeing a few in action, it's easy to see what he means. Take Vermin, for instance, a grimy, yellow exterminator van that fires a rat-shaped rocket from its roof. Or Talon, the helicopter that can use its magnet gun to pick up teammates for long-range transport, or fire rockets. Reaper is a motorcycle that Jaffe calls the game's "most deadly" vehicle -- while riding it, you can throw chainsaws, or drag one along the ground behind you to heat up the blade before tossing the flaming tool though the air. My personal favorite: an ambulance that lets you unleash a patient strapped to a gurney. Strapped to the patient, a bomb; players can guide the table on wheels to enemy vehicles as the patient struggles wildly to break free. We didn't see it in action, but Jaffe also mentioned an ice cream truck that turns into a giant robot. Seriously. All told, they're shooting for roughly 12 to 16 vehicles, each of which can be driven or piloted by any of the game's characters. As far as returning favorites, Jaffe says roughly 40-50% of original favorites will be making appearances. As dark and, uh, twisted as the game is, Eat Sleep Play's aiming for a "Teen" rating. It won't be as dark as Twisted Metal Black, but don't expect the same light-hearted comic feel as Twisted Metal 2, we were told. Twisted Metal's release is still a ways out; it's currently scheduled for a vague 2011 launch. But it's already shaping up to be a killer multiplayer experience, with support for 2-4 players split-screen, and up to 16 players online (with two-player split-screen online play). The game will also have a single-player story, specific for each of the game's characters. We hope to hear more soon, as Sony and Eat Sleep Play reveal more about the game over the coming months.
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Eat Sleep Play's upcoming PlayStation 3 Twisted Metal title is sure to go down as one of the worst-kept secrets in gaming. Since the studio's formation back in 2007, rumors have swirled that the company was hard at work on a ...

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The big "surprise" announcement at Sony's press conference this afternoon was that, contrary to what David Jaffe had posted on Twitter a few months back, he is, in fact, working on a Twisted Metal game. As Sweet Tooth d...

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E3 10: New Twisted Metal revealed for the PS3


Jun 15
// Colette Bennett
Sony unveiled a ton of new info on Twisted Metal at this year's E3 press conference, and let me tell you, the sheer amount of screens and new footage we saw was overwhelming -- it was tough to keep up! I had to stop bitching ...
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New Twisted Metal! Jaffe: 'Soon bitch!'


Feb 19
// Nick Chester
Last night at the AIAS Interactive Achievement Awards in Las Vegas, David Jaffe may have gotten caught up in the moment and confirmed a new Twisted Metal as his next project. 1UP believes it heard an audience member shout out...

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