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Total War

Free Steam weekend photo
Free Steam weekend

A bunch of Total War games are free to play this weekend


Have a favorite?
Jun 25
// Jordan Devore
My goodness, Creative Assembly's tactical Total War series has been around for 15 years now. There's a sale for the occasion, naturally, but it goes further than that: Shogun: Total War and Medieval: Total War have landed on ...

Total War: Warhammer changes the game of war

Jun 18 // Alessandro Fillari
Moving away from the historical settings of Rome and Attila, the Warhammer lore opens things up considerably for some intense and incredibly over the top action. Set in the high-fantasy universe, players will be able to choose one of four factions (Empire, Greenskins, Dwarves, and Vampyre) and build their nations, either through diplomacy, economics, or the raw might of their military forces. When things come to blows, each faction possesses its own unique style of combat and tactics that the opposing armies will have to deal with.The combat mechanics during battles have been greatly expanded. Units can utilize more moves and abilities from close range attacks to long-range tactics through magic or muskets. Along with the Hero characters, which can be leveled up and imbued with new skills to boost their units, players will be able to summon monsters and other creations to help their armies in a pinch. During one battle between the Empire and Greenskins, one of summoned a massive spider known as Arcanarok, which spawned mini-spiders that mowed down enemy units. I was very impressed with the sense of scale and the pace. I'm interested in seeing more of what the units can do once developed further.Rest assured, the nation-building gameplay from past titles is still present in Warhammer. But naturally, how each of the factions will go about expanding its civilization will vary. As each faction possesses its own unique culture, traditional diplomacy and negotiation may not be as effective as the swing of an ax, and some factions will be more focused on engagements than others. For the Empire, it'll have the traditional and more civilized routes for expansion with politics, trade, and economics as its biggest tools. But when it comes to showing off military might, the Empire will utilize its siege cannons and Demi-grifs to lay waste to invaders.For the Greenskins (Orcs), players will have to use brute force and cunning to expand their own empire. As Orcs don't really have much interest for diplomacy and the political aspects of nation-building, they choose the more direct approach to get what they want. While they possess the standard warrior and shaman classes, the latter who can utilize spells to summon giant constructs to stomp their foes, they also make use of kamikaze goblins that use leather wings to fly into enemy units. Launching catapults, they can be manually aimed while in flight for precision targeting.While the title is in pre-alpha, and the build we saw was hands-off, I was incredibly impressed with what I saw. The new visual aesthetic and a rich setting offers so much potential for what the Total War series can do within the fantasy genre. As you can spend countless hours with just one faction, building them up and taking down opposing forces, I'm very interested in seeing how much lore they can fit into this title. Though Creative Assembly was very hesitant to share any details about the Dwarf and Vampyre factions, it was very clear in stating that all of the factions will be very developed and possess their own unique cultures that will alter how they function on the world stage.It's still a ways off, but the folks at Creative Assembly are on track with developing something unique. Obviously, it's quite a departure for what the series has done before, but it's still very much a Total War title through and through.
Total War: Warhammer photo
Creative Assembly changes the scenery
The Total War series is known for its focus on intense real-time combat and simulation-based nation-building gameplay. As one of the more historical games, the series has garnered a lot of respect from fans and many critics a...

Total War: Warhammer photo
Total War: Warhammer

Sega officially announces Total War: Warhammer


Missed opportunity for an easy portmanteau
Apr 22
// Darren Nakamura
Sure, we might have unofficially known about its existence since January, but Sega still wants to wow people with the reveal trailer for Total War: Warhammer. Pretend to be surprised! It's got the Warhammer staples: humans, ...

Art of Total War contest photo
Three copies up for grabs
Our friends at Titan Books have given us three copies of The Art of Total War to hand out to lucky Dtoiders! Clocking in at just under 200 pages, this hardcover art book features development and concept art, plus developer co...

Review: Total War: Attila

Feb 12 // Greg Tito
Total War: Attila (PC)Developer: The Creative AssemblyPublisher: SegaReleased: February 17, 2015MSRP: $44.99  In Total War: Attila, you can play as the Hunnic hordes, one of the various Germanic tribes, the entrenched Persians, or the Romans if you're a masochist split between your Eastern and Western halves. It is nearly 400 A.D., and the world is ending for the classical European empire. Creative Assembly has done a decent job translating this era to its well-trod mix of turn-based strategy and real-time battles, but the ruts feel a bit worn. If you've played any Total War game, you'll probably enjoy the slight wrinkles Attila provides in the new horde mechanic or the change in tone from empire-building to empire-smashing. But if the Total War series never clicked for you, there's little here that will suddenly make you a believer. The prologue campaign offers a bit of structure to learn the ins-and-outs. You're the Ostrogoths, embroiled in a civil war with those dang Visigoths and beset in the northeast by the Huns. The talking head advisor in the upper-left grumbles out some important concepts such as how to monitor taxes, trade and diplomacy. It's not as intrusive as some tutorials, but the voiceover does tend to be a bit long-winded. The basics of Total War are that your faction controls provinces and armies (or navies) on the strategic map of Europe, and vie against other entities to control more. When there's nothing left to do, you end the turn and the season turns from, say, spring to summer. When you get into conflicts and two armies clash, the game switches to a real-time battle mode in which you control squads broken up into units of about a hundred or so men on a realistically generated battlefield. These real-time battles are the true show-piece of Total War games, and Attila is no different. It is absolutely exhilarating to be a general, moving units across the map like a virtuoso. To lure your enemy into an ill-fated charge, only to ambush their flanks and force a rout really makes you feel like a badass strategist. Unit facing, stance, morale and fatigue all must be monitored to be successful. It's not enough to smash your army against the other. To win battles, especially if you are up against a force with greater numbers, you must play with finesse. In Attila, there's a certain joy to be had playing with the storied cavalry of the Huns; played well, an army of veteran Hunnic horsemen can destroy most anything those silly Romans can put on the field. The improvements in siege warfare made in Total War: Rome II are on display again, along with the ability to use your navy to support the army on the same battlefield. Settlements can now be set on fire using various means -- fire arrows are my favorite incendiary (What's yours? Call me!) -- but in practice this doesn't change your tactics much. In truth, beside some graphical upgrades and a slightly improved AI, the battle system doesn't feel largely different than its predecessor. That's not to say it's bad, just familiar. On the strategic level, there are a few new toys. One of the hallmarks of strategy games is that once you conquer new territory, you can then improve that settlement by building new structures to make the province more valuable. In Attila, some of the starting factions (Huns, Ostrogoths, Visigoths, Vandals and Alans) don't have any provinces to call their own. Instead, their armies are their settlements (did I blow your mind there?), and if you set up camp for a few turns, you can build specific structures there to unlock new units or buff your economy or whatever. The horde is an interesting change to the static strategy of occupying what you conquer -- these nomads don't want to rule, just to plunder and move on. That's even more satisfying now that you can raze whole settlements to the ground after you capture them. The animation of an entire province being burned is appropriately dramatic and supports the theme of desolation over dynasty. Speaking of dynasty, instead of the inter-faction politicking of Rome II, there is the return to a single family tree of characters to control. Your family can be your greatest asset, or your downfall. And, even though some fans might welcome this part of the simulation, it's bothersome to have to keep track of who might backstab you next. There are some randomly generated moments of  storytelling (similar to Crusader Kings II), but in general, it's just distracting busywork. The attempt at random quests would be laughable if they weren't so annoying. No, I don't care about your silly flyting ceremony, man. I've got the Visigoths breathing down my neck! Then there's the unresponsive AI in diplomacy and trade. In theory, you should be able to broker some deals with the factions around your little nation, but they never seem to trust you. Nearly everything proposed -- from non-aggression pacts to trade agreements -- seems to be shut down. It's frustrating, but it's to be expected from playing previous games in the series. In short, Creative Assembly still hasn't been able to crack the nut of making the strategic layer of Total War as wonderfully engaging as the real-time battles are. At this point, instead of mucking about with boring systems, the series should just be about, you know, Total War. That said, the production value of Total War: Attila is top-notch. Entertaining cinematics tailored to the faction you're playing tell the story of the birth and rise of the titular Hun. While the sound designer should have used a different effect than the clanky clash when you click on updates each turn, the music evokes the period well. The map of Europe is a joy to explore, and the amount of fluid animation in the tactical battles is impressive. The animation is one of those elements you forget is so difficult to pull-off. We all remember the janky battle animations of yore, but the flow is never broken in Attila -- at least in the present state of the review code played on a mid-to-high level gaming PC. It's impossible to forget the disappointing glitches many experienced with the release of Rome II. So far, the only thing that's still in evidence in Attila is the interminably long computing time between turns. Even early on in the game and on a recently upgraded PC, you will experience wait times of 40-60 seconds where you're just doing nothing. It's usually acceptable to grab a drink or take a bio break, but when you're pressing end turn multiple times in a row to recruit units, or build siege units while you're getting ready to sack a major city, the endless waiting is the worst. I guess Rome wasn't burned in a day. There's a lot to like in Total War: Attila. It offers a beautiful glimpse into a part of history that doesn't get often explored, at least in strategy games. Pax Romana ends. The classic era fails and the peoples of the world are tumbled into a dark age. A long-sung series like Total War doesn't need to reinvent its formula each time it charges fifty dollars; but, setting even a well-made sequel in the crumbling legacy of the once-mighty may not have been a good choice. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Total War: Attila review photo
Be the barbarian
The horn sounds. Again and again. It's kind of annoying really, these vuvuzela m'fers blowing wind all through my dramatic victory on the fields north of Constantinopolis. Still, it does feel good. I am sacking the center of European civilization after all. I never liked those Romans anyway. Blow those horns, you barbarian bastards!

Total War: Attila photo
Total War: Attila

New Total War trailer less about gameplay, more about Attila


Do you even Hun bro?
Feb 05
// Robert Summa
The newly released Total War: Attila trailer features a whole lot of everything you probably don't want in a trailer. Well, that is if you want to see actual gameplay. I don't know about you, but if I didn't know anything ab...
Total War: Warhammer photo
Total War: Warhammer

Total War: Warhammer announcement leaks early


Strategy franchise's new art book spoils the surprise
Jan 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Yes, Total War: Warhammer is a thing that's happening. No, Sega hasn't officially announced it. The word comes from a book entitled The Art of Total War, which is set to hit shelves next week. Unfortunately for those who may ...
Deals photo
Deals

Total War Attila & The Crew: 25% off Pre-order deals


PC only, duh
Nov 25
// Dealzon
Deals brought to you by the crew at Dealzon. FYI: sales from certain retailers go toward supporting Destructoid. One got a release date confirmed, and the other is finally on schedule to be released after being delayed. ...
Total War photo
Total War

Total War: Attila releases February 17 and so does its first DLC


Pre-order or buy the game at retail for access
Nov 24
// Jordan Devore
We haven't heard much about Total War: Attila since Creative Assembly announced the strategy game back in September but it's coming along. To catch you up to speed: the year is 395 AD, family trees are back, and you can burn ...
New Total War photo
New Total War

Set the world on fire in Total War: Attila


Warning: CGI trailer
Sep 25
// Jordan Devore
I didn't throw out any guesses for what the next Total War would be, but if I had, wow, I would've been way off. Creative Assembly's next installment, Total War: Attila, will follow none other than Attila the Hun when it rel...
Total War photo
Total War

Creative Assembly will unveil the next Total War this month


Is it that time already?
Sep 09
// Jordan Devore
Later this month at EGX London (formerly Eurogamer Expo), Total War studio Creative Assembly will "reveal" the next installment in its popular strategy franchise. The announcement will be a part of a developer session schedul...
Deals photo
Deals

Sega has a new Humble sale and it's super tempting


Featuring the likes of Alpha Protocol, Typing of the Dead, and Binary Domain
Mar 13
// Jordan Devore
Over the next seven days you'll be able to save on a wide array of Sega-published PC games in a Humble Weekly Sale. A nice mix of new and old titles, the deal is broken down into three tiers. You can name your price for a bun...
Total War: Rome II photo
Total War: Rome II

Mod tools for Total War: Rome II are now in beta


I'm hoping someone mods Asterix and Obelix into the game
Jan 16
// Alasdair Duncan
Total War: Rome II was one of the games I'm kicking myself for passing over in 2013; I didn't think I was going to be able to commit to a vast strategy game in a series that has shown me no mercy in the past. However, the new...
Caesar in Gaul photo
Caesar in Gaul

Total War: Rome II is getting an expansion soon


Et tu, Brute?
Dec 02
// Joshua Derocher
Total War: Rome II will be getting an expansion, called Caesar in Gaul. This new campaign will focus around Caesar and the Gallic War, and the campaign will feature seasons with weather effects. New units will be added to the...
SteamOS games photo
SteamOS games

Total War: Rome II coming out for SteamOS early 2014


It'll have Steam Controller support too
Nov 08
// Joshua Derocher
Valve and Creative Assembly are plotting to release Total War: Rome II on SteamOS and Linux early next year. Along with the port to Linux, they will add support for the Steam Controller. Rob Bartholomew, the brand direct...
Total War photo
Total War

Total War: Rome II is getting gory but it'll cost you


Blood & Gore DLC
Oct 30
// Jordan Devore
That man seems to have lost his head. Welp. Tomorrow, Total War: Rome II is getting its Blood & Gore DLC which adds a whole mess of gruesome effects to the game. It's unfortunate that this is a $2.99 download as opposed t...
Total War: Rome II photo
Total War: Rome II

Total War: Rome II rolls out its second major patch


Over 100 more fixes in tow
Sep 23
// Chris Carter
After its first big patch fixed a number of major issues with the game, Total War: Rome II now has a second set of changes that rolled out last week. Over 100 fixes are listed, most notably the changes to unit speeds, and gam...
Rome II patch on the way photo
Rome II patch on the way

First Total War: Rome II patch coming on Friday


It's just a flesh wound
Sep 05
// Joshua Derocher
Less than a week after its release, Total War: Rome II is getting its first patch on Friday. This will be aimed at fixing bugs and crashes, as well as some gameplay balancing tweaks. Patch notes aren't currently available, bu...
Rome II photo
Rome II

Watch Creative Assembly play a Total War: Rome II battle


The Battle of the Nile
Jul 11
// Jordan Devore
In Total War: Rome II's take on the Battle of the Nile, you can either play as the Egyptians or the Romans. The latter is at a distinct disadvantage in terms of positioning and troop numbers, which means, yep, let's go with ...
Sega at SDCC photo
Sega at SDCC

Play Sonic Lost World at San Diego Comic-Con


Plus Total War: Rome II, Castle of Illusion Starring Mickey Mouse, and Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA F
Jul 11
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Sega is returning to San Diego Comic-Con once again with their pop-up arcade to be located just across the halls of the giant nerd convention. Fans will be able to roll up to the arcade and get hands-on with Sonic: Lost World...
Rome II photo
Rome II

Get ready: Total War: Rome II system requirements


Plus a ludicrous panorama
Jun 28
// Jordan Devore
Creative Assembly has put out the system requirements for Total War: Rome II, a game that's been a long time coming and one that will devour many an evening come September. Minimum: OS: XP/ Vista / Windows 7 / Windows 8 P...

Yes, you're going to like Total War: Rome II

Jun 13 // Jordan Devore
Since the only strategy series I'm halfway decent at is Relic's Dawn of War games, I played as the Egyptians without a second thought. With more ships, an advantageous position on top of a hillside, and dudes with freakin' boulders all ready to go, this was a fine choice. The coolest moment in a battle full of cool moments was having my ship literally break one of the Roman vessels in half by ramming into it. Second place goes to when I swapped sides, and boarded an Egyptian boat one man at a time. I had to fight the urge to just sit there and watch this clash unfold while the rest of my on-the-ground troops were doing who knows what. Speaking of which, elephants sure can stomp the heck out of soldiers. Stepping back to Rome II's campaign, Creative Assembly has introduced provinces, a series of smaller regions that when conquered can be given grand edicts. The presenter gave one cash with which to party so that the province would forget that, oh, Rome isn't feeding our people any more. It worked! "Because party." Rome II has also got an internal politics feature that shows the houses within the Roman faction. Each general has ambition and gravitas, giving them political capital to use on actions. Too much capital means that you're power hungry, obviously, and other houses will come after you. In the demo, the Caesar-hating Marcus Tullius Cicero was assassinated. The player could have merely extorted the man instead, but "When in Rome, kill somebody!" I really liked the enthusiastic dude giving the walkthrough. Another addition I liked the sound of was the relations meter, which gives a history log of actions that affect other factions so you aren't left guessing. Now, in Rome II, AI won't attack you for seemingly no reason. With this log, you'll know what they liked and disliked; in the case of Egypt, war atrocities committed against Macedon were received favorably. But putting Roman forces on Egyptian land, as it turns out, didn't go over so well. Hence the aforementioned battle. Lastly, traditions for legions sounded terrific. Your army gains experience as a whole, and leveling up lets you award a legion with specialized abilities. If and when the army gets destroyed completely, its banner can be picked back up by new recruits and the tradition lives on. I can confirm what most of us were thinking: Total War: Rome II should be great. It's certainly been a long time coming. Now, we continue waiting ... until September 3, 2013. F**k! That's too far away!
Total War photo
The battles are indeed awesome
A better-looking Rome: Total War would have been enough for some, myself included -- have you seen how crazy some of the battles look? "Epic" is not a word that frequently leaves my mouth (or fingers, in this case) but it's a...

Sega @ E3 photo
Sega @ E3

Sega will have Sonic Lost World, Castle of Illusion at E3


Quality, not quantity
Jun 07
// Jordan Devore
Sega's bringing five announced titles to E3 2013 and the big one is undoubtedly Sonic Lost World. It's especially weird for me to say that having played few if any modern Sonic titles outside of the wonderful All-Stars Racing...
Total War: Rome II photo
Total War: Rome II

Rome II's campaign will be all about Cleopatra and togas


Toga, toga, toga!
Jun 06
// Joshua Derocher
The latest trailer for Total War: Rome II shows off what the campaign will be about, and it gives us a good look at the campaign map. The story will revolve around Cleopatra's struggles with Rome and all of the political fun...
Rome II photo
Rome II

Total War: Rome II drops in September


Calendar marked
May 09
// Jordan Devore
September 3, 2013. Commit that date to memory -- it's when Total War: Rome II releases globally. Creative Assembly is offering DLC, the Greek States Culture Pack, as incentive for pre-ordering the game. This includes Epirus,...
Total War: Rome II video photo
Total War: Rome II video

Ten minutes of Romans getting slaughtered in Rome II


How do we fight against such hate?
Apr 24
// Fraser Brown
The Romans had quite a wee bit of trouble pacifying the Germanic tribes of Northern Europe, and now you can sit back and watch some of that trouble on top of a substantial amount of bloodshed, fire, and fleeing Italians in T...
Amazon: Total War photo
Amazon: Total War

Amazon: Total War mod extends Rome map and adds new units


War elephants are my new best friend
Apr 04
// Joshua Derocher
A new trailer just came out for Amazon: Total War, an overhaul mod for Rome: Total War that adds a new campaign map that expands the game into Eurasia and India, a quest system, and tons of new units. The new units include A...
Total War photo
Total War

Creative Assembly announces free-to-play Total War: Arena


New spin-off series
Mar 28
// Jordan Devore
Announced at a Game Developers Conference talk by lead designer James Russel, Creative Assembly will be trying its hand at free-to-play gaming with Total War: Arena. Going in a slightly different direction, this new title is ...
Total War II factions photo
Total War II factions

Total War Rome II: Crushing it with Egypt's war-elephants


They also have scythed war-chariots, so mind your legs
Mar 22
// Fraser Brown
The Romans are pretty groovy, but they were a bit boring in comparison to many of their neighbors. Now the Hellenic nations, they knew how to party. The latest Total War: Rome II nation getting shown off is Ptolemaic Egypt, a...
Total War fan remembered photo
Total War fan remembered

Total War fan remembered in Rome II


Creative Assembly are awesome people
Mar 18
// Joshua Derocher
James was a big fan of the Total War series who recently died because of cancer. As a memorial to his struggle with this terrible disease, he has become a character in Rome II. James was 24-years-old when he became one of the...

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