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Tatsunoko vs Capcom

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Tatsunoko vs. Capcom is going out of print


Grab it. Grab it nao!
Nov 08
// Chris Carter
Pesky licensing deals! Capcom's Christian Svensson has announced that the deal between them and Tatsunoko has "lapsed," which basically means that they can't print the Wii's Tatsunoko vs. Capcom anymore, or sell it digitally....
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Sundays with Sagat: Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom Vs. Birdie


Aug 18
// Jonathan Holmes
This is my least favorite Birdie episode. In fact, it might be my least favorite episode of Sundays with Sagat altogether. So why am I posting it? Well, thus far, quite a few of my least favorite episodes from this series ha...
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EVO 2010 recap: The guys who won beat the guys who lost


Jul 12
// Jonathan Holmes
Our own Samit Sarkar was really having a good time with EVO 2010. It's the one time this year that the often downtrodden sports fan can raise his head up high and say to his videogame-loving, sports-hating brothers and sister...
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New Capcom art collection coming from Udon


Jul 10
// Jonathan Holmes
Capcom may not be the titan of 2D artwork that they were in the 90's and 00's, but the legacy of their past illustration focus lives on at Udon. The studio is responsible for the most (and arguably the best) hand-drawn Capcom...

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Capcom talks the Vs series: Past, present, and future


Apr 27
// Jonathan Holmes
Poor Seth Killian, In this week's Bit Transmission podcast (to be posted tomorrow), I mercilessly pummeled the guy with Marvel Vs Capcom 3 questions. I wanted to know everything about the game; how the game would play, how ma...

Peripherally Speaking: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom FightStick

Feb 16 // Jonathan Holmes
Tatsunoko vs. Capcom FightStickCompany: Mad CatzMSRP: $79.99 Have you played Tatsunoko vs. Capcom yet? If so, you'll know that unlike the Street Fighter series, you really only need four buttons (light, medium, heavy, and assist) to play the game on expert levels. The Classic Controller is pretty much all you need for that. Having attacks mapped to shoulder buttons makes pulling off master combos in Street Fighter IV with the standard PS3/360 controllers feel unwieldy to many. That's not a problem for Tatsunoko vs. Capcom. It also puts into question the need for a stick that gives equal access to all buttons. I didn't find most button-only combos any easier to pull off with the FightStick. That brings us to the "stick" part of the Tatsunoko vs. Capcom FightStick. It's really nice, much easier to manage than the pads on the Classic Controller or the GameCube controller. "Shoryuken" motions are particularly more likely to come out. I've been playing Street Fighter games for almost 20 years, and I still have trouble pulling off a "Z-motion" move every once in a while. Not with the FightStick. I've been tossing out zombies in shopping carts with the greatest of ease, something necessary for anyone who wants to play competitively with Frank West. [embed]163256:27473[/embed] I tried the stick out with a few more games, including Super Smash Bros. (the original), Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Samurai Shodown Collection, and Guilty Gear XX Accent Core. I wasn't surprised by how much easier Samurai Shodown and Guilty Gear were to play, but I didn't expect Smash Bros. to be this much easier. Taking the analog control out of the equation made double tapping much easier. I also had an easier time throwing and blocking, with those buttons now having equal access. The stick is also surprisingly effective in making non-fighting games easier to play. The Wii-only sequel to NiGHTS was fun, but a little bit irritating to play with the notch-y analog sticks on the classic controller and the nunchuck. The game is a lot smoother with the FightStick, though you do lose the ability to do more subtle movements. It feels more like an arcade game, which may not mean much for people born after 1990, but it definitely works for me. Aesthetically, the stick itself looks nice, if not a tad overgrown. This thing is huge, much larger than most of the old-school sticks I have in my possession. The art on the stick's face is sharp, and doesn't look like it will fade or smudge from excessive use and or sweat damage. The rest of the stick stays true to the Wii's "blue and white" color theme. Everything here is blue or white. The stick even has glowing blue lights that signify which buttons are "Turbo" activated. It's purely a looks-only thing, but it's still pretty cool. Speaking of "Turbo," that's the main thing about this stick that gives me a distinctive NES Advantage vibe. In addition to being able to switch the stick's functionality to left analog stick, right analog stick, or control pad at any time, you can also power-up any of the game's buttons to "turbo mode" at any time. This works great for games like Super Punch-Out!!, where high-speed button mashing can be the difference between success and failure. The Wii Virtual Console is definitely where I'll be using the Tatsunoko vs. Capcom FightStick the most, both for the turbo buttons, and the stick itself. Final Fight 3, the deepest (and most underrated) game in the series, makes good use of both Street Fighter-style controller moves and rapid-fire attacks. I had a hell of a time pulling off Guy's super (which calls for a reverse hadouken motion after a grab) with the Classic Controller, but I can throw it out no problem with the Fightstick. [embed]163256:27478[/embed] The proof that this stick is the real deal is the way it makes Fighting Street (the TurboGrafx-CD port of the original Street Fighter) actually playable. Out of all the Street Fighter games, Fighting Street is undeniably the most unforgiving when it comes to special move inputs. If you don't do your hadouken or shoryuken motion at the exact right speed while pressing the button at the exact right time, you're screwed. It's nearly impossible to pull this off with a control pad, but with a stick, it can happen with enough practice. There is no way you're getting to Sagat without a hadouken, and there's no way you're getting a hadouken out without a stick. I haven't tried to mod the stick yet, but I did open it up to take a look. It's definitely harder to access the buttons from the inside than it is with Hori's Wii-compatible fight stick. Hopefully I won't need to replace any of the buttons anytime soon. They definitely feel better than the buttons on the Hori stick, though they are a bit noisy. If you play your fighters in a common area of your home, you may get some complaints from those you share a space with. Hit these buttons hard, and you're going to get some pretty loud clicking. As a fan of older games and fighting games, the Tatsunoko vs. Capcom FightStick is a perfect fit. Like I said, I'll be utilizing it with Virtual Console games more than with fighters, but that's only if the Wii's selection of 2D fighting games remains as limited as it is now. At $80, you better be sure that you're going to get a lot of use out of this thing. It obviously wouldn't be worth the money for someone who doesn't play stick-friendly games more than a few hours a week. Still, it's worth mentioning that this stick isn't just for fighting game fans. Anyone with an appreciation for that old arcade feel, something that's all but dead in modern gaming, will get some fun out of this controller.
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Over the years, the prestige surrounding "arcade stick" controllers has ballooned into something epic. Back in the days of the NES Advantage, stick controllers were made to help ease old-school gaming fans, who weren't as com...

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A better look at the stuff cut fromTatsunoko Vs Capcom


Jan 29
// Jonathan Holmes
A while back, we got an obscured look at this image from Capcom's "Secret File" promotional mini-magazine focusing on Tatsunoko Vs Capcom. It showed blurry images of Ace Attorney's Phoenix Wright and Capcom Fighting Jam's Ing...
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Capcom's talks Tatsunoko Vs Capcom, shiny faces


Jan 26
// Jonathan Holmes
I really wish this video could have been compressed into a podcast, because it's really better to listen to than to watch. Still, there is some good content here for anyone who's still trying to wrap their head around what Ta...
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Me against the pros: A Tatsunoko Vs Capcom video


Jan 26
// Jonathan Holmes
I understand that you might be sick of hearing about Tatsunoko vs. Capcom by now, and for that, I'm sorry. Then again, you can just ignore this video if you're that upset about all this event coverage, right? I shouldn't fee...
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Here's what the people think of Tatsunoko Vs Capcom


Jan 26
// Jonathan Holmes
If you read (or scrolled down to the end of) the Dtoid review of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom, then you already know what I think of the game. But hey, I'm a (sort of) gaming journalist, right? My life, and my relationship with vide...
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In my recent chat with Ryota Niitsuma, the producer behind Tatsunoko Vs Capcom, I was shocked by how sincerely and repeatedly the guy spoke well of Nintendo, and how interested he was in borrowing from them. When I asked what...

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A lot of publishers have been having trouble figuring out how to make more money off their Wii games. We've heard from some folks at Capcom say that "hardcore" gamers have moved on from the Wii, or that there was never an con...

Review: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars

Jan 25 // Jonathan Holmes
Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars (Wii)Developer: Eighting Co. and Capcom Publisher: CapcomReleased: January 26, 2010MSRP: $49.99 Okay, about that Tatsunoko question: Tatsunoko is the name of a Japanese animation company that's been around for the better part of fifty years. A few of their creations have gone on to star in big-budget live-action films (like Yatterman and Casshern), while others have managed to even grab some crossover success in the United States (like Gatchaman/G-Force). Over the past two years (since the release of the Japanese version of the game), I've learned just how much Tatsunoko means to certain high-ranking staff at Capcom Japan. A lot of armchair critics have been quick to claim that Tatsunoko vs. Capcom has little chance of selling in the US due to its weird name and cast of partially unfamiliar characters. What I've come to find out is that Capcom USA and Capcom Japan are well aware of this, but they made the game anyway. Why? Well, the answer's simple: they wanted to make a videogame for themselves and for like-minded fans. Tatsunoko vs. Capcom is truly a labor of love, and it shows. The game is packed to the gills with fan service, characters from both the Capcom side and the Tatsunoko side that were thought to be dead to the world, and a general feeling of exuberance that can only be the result of a creative team whose inspiration has thrown their imagination into overdrive. "Imagination" is the key word with Tatsunoko vs. Capcom. The game is brimming with ideas, both in terms of visuals and gameplay. If you can imagine a combo or fighting technique, it's probably possible. The only thing limiting you is your own creativity and technical skill. Unlike in Street Fighter IV, the characters in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom don't generally fit into the typical Capcom types (charge character, 360-throw character, shotokan, etc.). These are characters the likes of which have never been seen in a fighting game, and may never be seen again, ranging from a giant 25-foot robot to a five-foot-tall, super-deformed superhero who can control time. For a fighting game fan, a game like Tatsunoko vs. Capcom represents truly undiscovered country. Thought the basic combat system fits firmly into Capcom's superhero rave line of fighters, there are a few major changes worth mentioning. Like Capcom's other tag-team fighters, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom allows you to pick two fighters at the start of a match. You can call out the second character for assist attacks, or tag them into the primary combat roll, allowing their partner to replenish some health from the side-lines. The Baroque combo system changes that a bit. Instead of replenishing the red part of your health meter by tagging a character out, you can also sacrifice it to power a Baroque combo. Trading health for offensive power is a risky maneuver, but it can yield huge rewards. There is nothing like being on the verge of defeat and using your red health to power a 114-hit Viewtiful combo, bringing much shame and sorrow to the competition. While the Baroque combos are sure to please fighting game enthusiasts looking to learn ever more complicated fighting techniques, the game's simplified controls work to appease the other side of the market: gamers who like fighting games in theory, but can't actually play them in practice. Using an arcade stick, GameCube controler, or Wii Classic Controller makes Tatsunoko vs. Capcom play like a slightly stripped-down version of Marvel vs. Capcom 2 that employs three buttons instead of four. If you use the Wii Remote or Wii-Remote-and-Nunchuk control schemes, the game plays much more like Smash Bros., with one button for all regular attacks, and one for all special attacks. This effectively opens the game up to everyone who ever wished they could effectively play a traditional 2D fighing game, but terminally sucks at quarter-circle-forward-and-fierce-punch controls. Now even the least dexterous among us can know the joys of chaining a hadouken into a shin-shoryuken. The game's cast also smacks of Smash Bros. influence. While previous Capcom vs. titles have featured a broad range of characters as well, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom has by far the most varied (and insane) roster of players utilized in a 2D fighter. On the Capcom side, newcomers Frank West (Dead Rising) and Zero (Mega Man X) join Ryu (Street Fighter), Chun-Li (Street Fighter II), Alex (Street Fighter III), Batsu (Rival Schools), Morrigan (Darkstalkers), Mega Man Volnutt (Mega Man Legends), Roll (Mega Man: Powered Up!), Kajin No Soki (Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams), Viewtiful Joe (Viewtiful Joe), PTX-40A (Lost Planet), and the Cabel-esque Saki (Quiz Nanairo Dreams) to form the most eclectic cast the publisher has ever put together. There's an equal amount of Tatsunoko-based characters, the majority of whom will be unfamiliar to most American players, but they definitely still hold their own in providing a wide range of new and interesting fighting styles for the player. I don't care if you're a 5-year-old girl or a 40-year-old man, you will find teams on Tatsunoko vs. Capcom's roster that you can relate to and enjoy playing with. Also included in the package is an unlockable side-game, "Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Shooters." This is a game that anyone, even those completely phobic of the fighting genre, can pick up right away and enjoy. It's a 4-player cooperative shmup set in the Lost Planet universe, starring Ryu and PTX-40 from Capcom, and Ken the Eagle and Tekkaman Blade for Tatsunoko. Just like the main game, Ultimate All-Shooters is fun alone, and it can become incredibly addictive in multiplayer, especially for fans of Lost Planet. Though you'll be playing the game as a team, you also play for points, and are ranked at the end of each mach based on score. Multiple paths, bosses, and special moves round out what could easily have been its own full-fledged downloadable release. Speaking of online, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom features online play, and thus far, I've had no real issues with it. Out of the hour or so I've spent playing others who presumably are reviewing the game for their respective game sites/magazines, I've not had slowdown, and only a few instances of frame-skipping lag. It's been a generally better experience than the time I've had with BlazBlue and Street Fighter IV on the PS3, despite the fact that there's no online chat. Random battles are quick to load, and after fighting a stranger, you can add them to your rival roster and fight them at any time. The all-too-familiar friend code system is in effect for other planned matches, but just like using a cell phone, it doesn't bother me to have to enter a number into my Wii every once in a while to connect with people. Probably the two coolest things about the game's online system are its ranking and matchmaking features. As you play, the game detects your play style and will pin you with a fire (offensive), ice (defensive), or lightning (evasive) badge, letting other players know what they're likely up against. You'll also only be put up against players of similar skill and experience, so as you get better at the game, you'll be permitted to take on players who are more skilled. Perhaps best of all, the game also keeps track of every time you disconnect early from a match. Disconnect enough times, and the game will only match you with other players with a tendency for cowardly disconnects. As much as the Wii's online system can be overly protective, being saved from fighting sore losers who disconnect before a loss is something I fully stand behind. What I've described so far should sound like a near-perfect fighting game experience, and it is. Still, I'd be remiss if I didn't point out the game's flaws, a few of which carry over from the Japanese build of the game, and a few of which are new to this Western localization. While the game holds up Capcom's long tradition of providing amazing animation, the game's cel-shaded character models are a bit of a mixed bag. Some of them, like Zero, PTX-40A, Gold Lightan, and Karas look amazing; a few others, like Morrigan and Frank West, look a little janky up close. For the most part you won't notice, as once the camera pulls back and everyone starts moving, every character in the game looks great. It's only during pre-fight introduction screens and close ups that you'll sometimes see Doronjo's overly blocky boobs or Frank West's broken armpits.  As a fan of the Japanese verison of the game, I also noticed a few things are missing. One character from the Tatsunoko side, a fat genie whose name escapes me, didn't make the cut for this Western release. Honestly, I don't miss him. He had a cool fighting style -- one that involved a weird mix of throws, ranged attacks, and dropping random objects from the sky -- but thankfully, Frank West can do all that and more. Dropping zombies from the sky is better than a fat genie in every way, so I can't really complain, but it would have been nice to have them both. Also worth noting is that due to licensing issues, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom doesn't have the character-specific soundtrack of the original game. In the Japanese build, tagging out to Viewtiful Joe would cue the Viewtful Joe stage one theme, Ryu would cue his theme from Street Fighter II, etc. Instead, each stage now has its own specific theme, and while they are all good (especially the one that sounds like Dead Rising's mall music), they don't offer the same nostalgic flair as the character-specific tunes. They also cut the game's fully animated endings and swapped them out with static illustrations by the team at Udon Comics. These endings are even more filled with even random Capcom references than the ones that were cut. Seeing the cast of Haunting Ground in Joe the Condor's ending totally blew my mind. The additions and subtractions continue. Twenty-one of the character-specific side-games were also cut from the Japanese build. In a way, Cacpom more than made up for that by taking PTX-40A's game and turning it into Ultimate All-Shooters, but I can't help but miss the motion-controlled hadoken throwing game and Yatterman's bizarre robot-dog-launching Olympic event. If you've never played them before, you won't know what you're missing, but it's still worth noting that the game isn't quite as much fun without them. On the whole, though, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars is a better game than its Japanese counterpart, with more characters, improved balance, and online play. Due to the slightly uneven graphics and the occasional downgrade from the original version of the title, I can't say it's a perfect game, but it's damn close. Unlike Street Fighter IV, which only has six new characters and a few minor gameplay additions, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom feels, looks, and plays almost totally new. It's the most interesting and exciting fighting game to hit the market in years, so if you're at all curious about the game, I'd suggest you buy it immediately. Score: 9.0 -- Superb (9s are a hallmark of excellence. There may be flaws, but they are negligible and won't cause massive damage to what is a supreme title.)
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When I tell one of my fighting game-playing friends that Capcom's releasing a new fighting game called Tatsunoko vs. Capcom, the first thing they ask is, "What's a Tatsunoko?", frequently with an incredulous tone of budding d...

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Video interview: Capcom's Ryota Niitsuma


Jan 25
// Jonathan Holmes
Here's the first video in a God-knows-how-many video series from last Saturday's Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars launch event. This one focuses on Capcom big-wig Ryota Niitsuma. He's a very serious man, but I manage...
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In a recent interview with Ryota Niitsuma, the producer of Tatsunoko Vs Capcom, I learned that Phoenix Wright (Ace Attorney) and Ingrid (Capcom Fighting Evolution) still may weasel their way into Tatsunoko Vs Capcom. Accordin...

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Samurai Pizza Cats, Speed Racer almost in Tatsunoko vs. Capcom


Jan 22
// Joseph Leray
In the same online chat in which Tatsunoko vs. Capcom producer Ryota Niitsuma spilled the beans about the potential for another Versus game being announced later this year, he spoke out about some of the franchises that didn...
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Depending on sales, a new Capcom Vs. might be possible


Jan 21
// Joseph Leray
If there's one thing fighting fans love to do, it's telling Capcom how to run their business. Personally, I think R. Mika should make a Super Street Fighter IV comeback, but that's neither here nor there. What is both here an...
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Good news/Bad news: Tatsunoko Vs Capcom NYC event update


Jan 17
// Jonathan Holmes
How about the bad news first? I was wrong and community member The Average Guy was right; Capcom and Nintendo wont be selling Tatsunoko Vs Capcom at the launch party on Jan 23rd at the Nintendo World Store in NYC. I guess tha...
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US Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom TV spot is all sorts of awesome


Jan 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Nowadays, ads for videogames aren't really fun. Sony's latest ad attack on TV is pretty good, but the rest of what's out there is just so serious. Enter Capcom with their ad for Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom. The promo features Mega ...
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Tatsunoko Vs Capcom launch event set for Jan 23rd!!


Jan 13
// Jonathan Holmes
This rules for three reasons -- 1) I get to play Tatsunoko Vs Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars three days earlier than planned, 2) I don't have to worry about immediately dividing my attention between Tatsunoko Vs Capcom and No Mor...
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Shmupping with Tatsunoko Vs Capcom just got shmuppier


Jan 12
// Jonathan Holmes
The excellent side-game starring Lost Planet's PTX-40A included on the disc is one of the reasons I gave the Japanese build of Tatsunoko Vs Capcom a 9.0. It's a 4-player shmup with three levels, three bosses, and multiple pow...
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CES 2010: Tatsunoko vs Capcom: Frank hits the mall


Jan 11
// Dale North
You guys already know that Dead Rising's Frank West in Capcom's upcoming Wii brawler, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars. No news on that. I just wanted to let you know that I gave him a spin, and he's great fun to play...
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CES 2010: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom FightStick close-up


Jan 08
// Dale North
The Capcom fighting title Tatsunoko vs. Capcom is almost perfect on the Wii as is, if you ask me. The only thing missing is a good controller.  Mad Catz brought along the Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Arcade FightStick along to ...
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Tatsunoko FightSticks to ship alongside game this January


Jan 05
// Brad Nicholson
Wii remotes and Nunchucks aren’t ideal devices to play games with, no less games within the fighting genre. So, we weren’t that surprised this afternoon when Mad Catz revealed that its line of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom...
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New sexy character revealed in Tatsunoko Vs Capcom


Jan 05
// Jonathan Holmes
It had been rumored for a while, but now it's confirmed; the ironically named female fighter Yatterman 2, is playable in this month's Tatsunoko Vs Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars. Gamespot got the exclusive on their On the Spot vi...
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Amazon has Tatsunoko vs. Capcom cheap, gives $10 bonus


Jan 04
// Dale North
Tatsunoko VS Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars. You know you're going to buy it. I have the Japanese version, and I'm still buying this. I think Amazon is the way to go if you haven't pre-ordered this fighter already. Their price of...
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Check out the official box art for Tatsunoko Vs Capcom


Oct 27
// Topher Cantler
There it is, folks, in the gallery below. The final, official box art for Tatsunoko Vs Capcom. Is it everything you'd hoped it would be? Works for me, I'd say. It's got Frank West on it, after all.Either way, now you know wha...
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Play Super Street Fighter IV in New York this Thursday


Oct 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Capcom is throwing another Fight Club event this Thursday in New York and it's going to be extra special this time around. First, they're going to have Super Street Fighter IV for people to get their hands-on and this demo wi...
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Tatsunoko Vs Capcom screens up in your face, mofos


Oct 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
As you found out earlier this week, Zero and Joe the Condor have joined Tatsunoko Vs Capcom. I don't know a thing about Joe the Condor, but I'm super excited to play as Zero. I prefer Zero over Mega Man any day though, mostly...

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