Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Summer of Arcade


Weekend Playlist: Summer Jams

Fun in the sun
Jul 19
Summer is officially in full swing and most of you are probably sitting inside and playing Destiny. I dont blame you though, if I had a PS4 I would be doing the same exact thing. For those of you who maybe want to pretend you are outside enjoying the nice weather, I have created this playlist of happy summertime jams.   

Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons also coming to PS3, PC

Spread the brotherly love
Aug 08
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons just came out for Xbox Live Arcade to little marketing and fanfare this past week. We're here to remind you that's it pretty great though, and something worth adding to your XBLA collection. Or, ...

Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons Achievement Guide

Aug 07 // Brett Makedonski
Take a Break Kids usually play close to home. As it states in the description, this Achievement will pop outside the brothers' house which is in the Prologue. At the very beginning of the game, as you're carting the father to the doctor, stop immediately before the bridge and instead travel south on some stone steps. Run along the beach until you find a pile of rocks in front of the water. Interact with them as the little brother to begin skipping stones which will unlock the first Achievement. Wishing Well For your wish to come true, you need something to throw. At the start of Chapter 1, you can see a well off to the right and a girl playing with her ball in the distance. Go take her ball and throw it down that well, you giant jerkface. I can't believe you emotionally scarred that sweet, little girl for a measly 20 Gamerscore. Black Sheep It's a long walk. In Chapter 1, you'll come across a wheel that needs to be run on in order to lower a bridge. Run on it with the little brother, and send the big brother across to pick up a sheep. Carry that sheep back across and to the lower left where the bunnies are playing. Drop him in the coal, which will turn him black and unlock the Achievement. Bunny Buddies Are bunnies colorblind? Also in Chapter 1, at the exact same location as the Black Sheep Achievement, there's a white rabbit hopping among a group of black rabbits. Drop the white one in the coal to knock out this Achievement. Falling Star Patience is a virtue. As soon as you reach the cemetery near the beginning of Chapter 3, there will be a statue off to the right-hand side. Interact with it with the little brother for approximately six seconds. A star will go shooting across the sky, and the Achievement will unlock. A Sad Tune  Give something back which was believed to be lost. This one's pretty morbid. At the beginning of Chapter 4, the path forks. Off to the right side, there's a guy who's, well, he's not having a very good time. Climb up the tree with the older brother, and let him down. Then, venture around the right side of the tree and work your way around the ledge. Grab the music box and give it to him. He's probably still bummed out, but you did everything you could. Windpipe  Find the right tone. In Chapter 4, after raising the platform that the inventor's stranded on, there's a giant organ-type device in the upper-left part of his home. Turn the crank with the little brother and push the other part with the big brother until you hit the right tone. Love Birds  A caged heart cannot love. This is a two-parter. In Chapter 1, right before the wheel that leads to the sheep, there's a bird cage that needs to be opened. Do that, and free the bird. Then, in Chapter 4, immediately before the hang-glider, there's a telescope that's impossible to miss. Look in the telescope, and zoom in on the lower-right. There will be two birds chilling out on a branch, and the Achievement will pop. Call of the Giants  First take a deep breath. In Chapter 5, right before using the giant crossbow, go down the path to the right. Waiting there is a giant horn. The little brother is ineffectual, but the big brother has what it takes to make some noise. Behind the Curtain On your feet you could never get here. At the start of Chapter 6, you'll hop in a canoe. At the end of the first straightaway, there'll be a "unique" waterfall off to the right. Go through it to earn this Achievement. Turtle Soup Life, Drop, Slide, Plop! During Chapter 6, you'll come to an ice cavern which is home to a crying mama turtle. Off to the right are her babies, which have all found themselves in some sort of predicament. Pull one to the top of the giant slide and send him to his mother. There's another waiting to be slid down at the top of the slide. For the final turtle, the big brother will have to boost the little brother up. Once he's down, reunite him with his family. Whale Song Rest and smile, sing for a while. In Chapter 6, immediately after climbing out of the ice cave that houses the family of turtles, you'll come across a two-man saw. Run past it, climb up a ledge, and a bench will be waiting. Take a seat on the bench, and the whales below will put on a show for you.
Brothers tips photo
O Brothers, where art thou Gamerscore?
Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons is an anomaly when it comes to Achievements. Not a single one will be unlocked through normal gameplay. However, every last one takes only seconds to get and isn't dependent on anything othe...

Review: Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons

Aug 07 // Brett Makedonski
Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons (Xbox Live Arcade [reviewed], PlayStation Network, PC)Developer: Starbreeze StudiosPublisher: 505 GamesReleased: August 7, 2013 (XBLA), TBA (PSN, PC) MSRP: 1200 Microsoft Points, $14.99 Brothers follows, well, two brothers as they embark on a quest to cure their ailing father. Despite speaking in a language of gibberish, it's easy to pick up on each's character traits. The blue one is older, stronger, respectful, and more emotionally mature. The red one is younger, mischievous, and nimble. As expected, they play off one another, and the game does a good job depicting them as incomplete parts to a cohesive whole unit. The most easily recognizable theme of Brothers is the bond between siblings, and Starbreeze turned this into the core mechanic of the game. The left analog stick controls the movement of the blue brother, the right analog stick controls the movement of the red brother, and the respective triggers function as each's action button. The pared-down control scheme offers a level of simplicity that's rarely seen in videogames, which would be nice if it worked fluidly. Unfortunately, the dueling-stick approach never becomes consistently comfortable. It isn't bad when the brothers are moving side-by side, but it's difficult to replicate when they're further apart. Throughout the three to four hour game, moments of Zen-like unity occasionally occur, which are quickly erased when the camera swings around and you've unwittingly made one brother run into a wall. [embed]258764:49747:0[/embed] Surprisingly, the control issues aren't game-breaking. In fact, they're relatively easy to look past. They constantly walk the line between "kind of irksome" and "frustrating", but never really cross it. It's completely due to Brothers' structure that this is the case. A more challenging game might not get a pass, but Brothers makes it evident that it's not here to challenge you. Rather, Brothers almost always moves along at a relaxed pace. You'd be hard-pressed to qualify its puzzles as such, because nearly all of them have an immediately obvious solution that's easy to perform and difficult to screw up. It's less about skill, and more about carrying out the requisite actions to further the adventure. It's possible to die, but if it happens, you likely won't make the same mistake twice. There's a bit in chapter four where the brothers are tethered together by a rope and need to climb around the outside of a structure. As one brother hangs on, the other pendulums laterally to the next hold. It's an uncomplicated section, and most will instantly identify the required strategy. However, when it comes to implementation, it's tough to not feel a sort of guilty cleverness if you move through the area too fast, almost as if you're somehow outsmarting the game.  That's how Brothers lures you in -- with its accessibility. It provides comfort with its simple puzzles, radiantly beautiful backdrops, and charming musical score. It's truly immersive, especially in the first hour or so (I'm convinced that a heads-up display would provide no greater disservice to a game than to this one). Then, things go off the rails. For a game that sets the tone with such serenity and a lackadaisical carefree attitude, Brothers turns dark and it does so quickly. I don't wish to spoil a single instance, but Brothers certainly crescendos throughout the entire experience, as it all becomes progressively more bleak and somber. Everything from narrative points to set pieces to isolated incidents that you weren't even necessarily supposed to find, they all ooze a positively depressing aura that seemed impossible from the outset. All of this is made considerably more notable by the fact that Brothers is a love story, or, maybe more accurately, a collection of love stories. Regardless of how melancholy things may get, there's always a love-induced spirit overshadowing everything, for better and for worse. Whether it's a pair of cave trolls reunited, a man absolutely wrecked by the death of his family, or even a couple of birds that have been uncaged and found one another again, Brothers never lets the player forget that love is the primary motif for this tale. That's precisely what makes Brothers - A Tale of Two Sons so endearing -- the undeniable contrast created by the highs and lows that come with the entire experience being driven by love. It's so strong that it even dwarfs the game's core mechanical flaws, making them feel trivial when they should sully the whole affair. It's a powerful venture that isn't necessarily about where you began or where you end up; it's about everything that happened in between. 
Brothers review photo
Family bonding
It all starts innocently enough with a pair of brothers making their way through town. Sure, there's a task at hand, but urgency isn't an issue. It should be, but it isn't. Soaking in the warm glow of the sun and playing with...


Xbox Summer of Arcade release schedule detailed

August is hot
Jul 08
// Dale North
The Xbox Summer of Arcade is warming up and we have the full release details for you here. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, Flashback, Brothers -- A Tale of Two Sons, and Charlie Murder are all coming this Au...

The DTOID Show: "Girlfriend" mode, Dust, & XCOM

Aug 13
// Max Scoville
Today on The Destructoid Show, we bring you the hottest, slimiest journalistic filth to come out of the gaming industry. For starters, Borderlands 2 caused a bit of a ruckus this morning by ruffling the feathers of everyone ...

Tony Hawk HD hits the over 100k mark in its first week

Jul 28
// Brett Zeidler
Only in its first week of sales up to this point, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater HD has already sold a total of 120,000 downloads. Apparently, its day-to-day sales have also managed to stay consistent since last Wednesday. It's worth...

The DTOID Show: Summer of Arcade, Saints Row, & The WiiU

Jun 20
// Max Scoville
Oh hey everybody! The Destructoid Show is here again, to lean in really close to your ear and make wet slurping noises. And by that, I mean to give you news about video games. For starters, Microsoft unveiled the Surface tab...

Microsoft talks Summer of Arcade 2012 prices and dates

Jun 19
// Jordan Devore
While the line-up for this year's Summer of Arcade had previously been announced, we weren't quite so sure when the games would release and for how much. Microsoft's Larry Hryb has the scoop: July 18: Tony Hawk's Pro Skater ...

E3: XBLA Summer of Arcade 2012 revealed?

Jun 04
// Chad Concelmo
During the live stream of E3 on GameTrailers just now, Phil Spencer revealed the names of all the XBLA games that will compose the annual Summer of Arcade. Those games are: Hybrid (from 5th Cell) Deadlight Wreckateer (Kinect exclusive) Tony Hawk's Pro Skater HD Dust: An Elysian Tale Excited? I know I am. Deadlight looks ridiculously amazing.

New DLC coming to Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet

Sep 07
// Brett Zeidler
Do you just wish you had more Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet? Well, do I have news for you. "Shadow Hunters" is new DLC that will be hitting the Xbox Live Marketplace next week and it expands on the Lantern Run multiplayer mo...

Review: Toy Soldiers: Cold War

Aug 15 // Maurice Tan
Toy Soldiers: Cold War (Xbox Live Arcade)Developer: Signal StudiosPublisher: Microsoft StudiosMSRP: 1200 Microsoft Points Fans of the original will have no trouble getting back into the flow with Toy Soldiers: Cold War, because at its heart it's more or less the same game. You still protect your Toy Box from incoming waves of baddies, place turrets on small circular build sites and larger artillery or anti-air on the larger square build sites, and take direct control of turrets and vehicles to score multipliers and battle more effectively. The new 1980s Cold War setting feels like a perfect fit for a Toy Soldiers game. It makes the game a lot more colorful, and everything from the logo to the 80s music gives off that campy yet nostalgic feeling of the bygone era. As a result of the more modern era of warfare -- but not too modern -- the old Barbed Wire is gone from the build menu. In its place is the new Anti-Tank turret, while the Mortar seems to have been tweaked to primarily act as an anti-infantry weapon. Turrets now dramatically change as you upgrade them, rather than just becoming more powerful iterations that act the same. The Machine Gun turret turns into a chain gun that never overheats, but also allows you to lob grenades. The Anti-Tank turret upgrades to a T.O.W. missile launcher that you can manually steer into tanks or even aircraft. Likewise, artillery and anti-air receive MIRV or lock-on upgrades. If you at any point mess up a wave, this time around you can rewind to any wave you have passed and start from there instead of starting from scratch. Arguably the biggest change to the Toy Soldiers formula comes from the aspect of direct turret control, something that became less important in Toy Soldiers' later missions as the balance between hands-on action and battlefield oversight was skewed against the action approach. Take control of a turret and kill 20 enemies in a row without losing your multiplier in Cold War, and you fill up a meter to receive a "Turbocharge" that lets you shoot without reloading for a short period of time. Get a 40-enemy killstreak, and you'll receive a "Barrage" that is specific to the turret you use. Barrages are special abilities that act as game changers. you can use at any time. Getting 40 kills with a Machine Gun turret nets you the Commando Barrage, which makes a Rambo figure drop down onto the playing field -- cardboard and plastic packaging and all -- and puts you in control of an invincible fighting machine who can shoot unlimited RPGs everywhere. Other Barrages include temporary control of an AC-130 gunship, an artillery strike, a tactical nuke, and more. You can also receive a random Barrage by manually shooting an enemy special unit indicated by a red star, although if one of your turrets kills it before you get the chance to, you won't earn that Barrage. The system of rewarding your multipliers with Turbocharge and Barrages makes it a lot more fun to get into the pilot seat, and you'll often feel like not wanting to switch back to the overhead view to build, repair, and upgrade your turrets. It wouldn't be a Toy Soldiers game if there weren't some vehicles to take control of, and Cold War's don't disappoint. You can get to the choppa and take control of different types of gunships that focus on fire-and-forget missile salvos or lock-on missiles, or use tanks and APCs that can level entire waves of units. By taking control of the F-14 Tomcat to drop napalm on waves of infantry, you even get rewarded with very appropriate Top Gun-esque music! This may sound like the vehicles are overpowered, and apart from the long reloading times for missiles, they really are. For balance's sake, each vehicle has a battery charge that slowly runs out. While exiting an aircraft makes it explode and fall to the ground, you can safely exit any tank and then re-enter it within a few seconds, provided it still has juice. This also means that you can leave a tank on its battery charge pad and never move, essentially turning it into a powerful turret that only works when you control it. The aerial unit focus is mostly on helicopters this time around, so gone are the times where you tried your utmost to control a biplane in Toy Soldiers, only to fly through or over most enemy planes before one of them hit your Toy Box. Plus, the helicopters are more fun to shoot down -- especially right before they drop infantry to the ground. While planes do make an occassional appearance, they are few and far between, and it's for the better that they don't take central stage. Gameplay-wise, all these changes help to make Toy Soldiers: Cold War feel a lot tighter and more varied, and Signal Studios has succeeded in this regard. That's why it's a shame that, unlike the original, this campaign only comprises 11 missions with no new game+ option. Re-use of assets be damned, it would've been a lot of fun to be able to play as the Soviets. You can play the campaign levels on different difficulties, tackle challenges (e.g. kill 100 infantrymen using a Machine Gun turret), unlock level-specific "decorations" for completing side objectives, or try to get gold and platinum medals for completing a level in the healthiest, fastest, and most cost-effective way possible. A major downside of the campaign is that you only get access to the highest level of upgrades after the first half of the game gently eases you into the design, making the campaign too short and too easy for veterans of the original -- provided you're not playing it on Hard. There are six mini games that allow you to get a feel for the main game as well as challenge your friends' high scores. Whenever you have a few minutes to kill, you can enter a turret-control shooting range, guide a rocket through a path for as long as possible, or go wild with a very satisfying turkey shoot in an AC-130. A Survival mode tests your might on three different maps, with three modifiers to boot. Classic Survival is just your typical Survival mode, while Lockdown makes you purchase increasingly expensive build sites before you can build turrets on them. Finally, there is the Hardcore modifier, which doesn't let you repair any turrets and doesn't offer any replacement vehicles should they explode. Competitive multiplayer can be played on three maps, either locally with vertical split screen or online over Xbox Live, and it's through multiplayer that you can finally get to play as the Soviets. Split screen limits your field-of-view and takes some getting used to, but it works well enough. You can see what your friend is doing, though, so it's less strategic because of it. Not that making your friend shit his pants, when he can clearly see your super unit marauding its way towards his base, doesn't have its charm. Far from it! The core gameplay in multiplayer is similar to the campaign, with both players automatically spawning waves of enemies and using money to build turrets, but you can also buy single-use vehicles or specific offensive waves with the money you accumulate. One level offers periodic control over a special forces Commando unit (Rambo) for the U.S. and an Ivan unit (Drago from Rocky IV) for the Soviet side, which are not only great fun to use but also act as the only units capable of capturing a strategically important central build site for artillery. At the time of writing, I was unable to get into any online multiplayer games, as not many people are playing it yet. However, the addition of offensive waves changed the dynamic well enough in local multiplayer to make it worth going back to once the online population has grown. Besides the competitive multiplayer aspects, the Survival and campaign missions can be played cooperatively to give you yet another reason to play through the existing content. Every single level, whether in the Survival mode, mini games, or the campaign, also displays leaderboard stats where it's impossible to ignore. Add to that all the medals, decorations, and challenges that you can aim for in the campaign, as well as option to replay things with a co-op buddy or fight him in competitive multiplayer, and Toy Soldiers: Cold War certainly presents a very well-rounded and big package of content that goes beyond what other games in this price-range tend to offer. The caveat is that you will only get the most out of it if you are someone who always tries to improve his scores in a tower defense game, or if you have friends to play with or to keep the competition going. Outside of the mini games, the levels can be quite lenghty -- especially the survival ones -- so you do need to have a pretty hardcore interest in the genre to really invest hours and hours into it. However, if you're more of a casual XBLA enthusiast who plays through a game's campaign and never looks at it again (e.g. you played through all the Defense Grid missions maybe once on easy or normal), then you might be a bit disappointed in the shorter, though more polished and varied, campaign. The Survival mode should keep you busy for a while to make up for it, but probably not for more than a few tries. Toy Soldiers: Cold War could have been a lazy reskin of the original, but Signal Studios has done an admirable job making the game better and more accessible all around. While it may be lacking in raw content for some players, it more than makes up for it with layers of cooperative and competitive elements that make it one of the best strategy games on Xbox Live Arcade.

The original Toy Soldiers was one of the first games with the now-standard 1200 Microsoft Points price tag, and to date it's still one of the select few games that was actually worth its price. With its "take control" twist o...


New Destructoid Episode: Insanely Twisted Diablo EVO2K

Aug 01
// Max Scoville
Hey guys, today we're giving a wrap up of EVO2K news, including Capcom's next plans for the 3DS, and two new characters for Street Fighter X Tekken. There's suddenly a bunch of crazy news about Diablo III, like the addition ...

Review: Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet

Aug 01 // Jim Sterling
Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet (Xbox 360)Developer: Shadow Planet ProductionsPublisher: Microsoft Game StudiosReleased: August 3, 2011MSRP: 1200 Microsoft Points Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet is all about tackling a planet full of insanely twisted shadows as a plucky little UFO with controls that mimic a traditional arcade shooter. This shooter sensibility, however, is married to exploratory gameplay that has been quite rightly compared to the likes of Metroid and latter-day Castlevania. There is a single world map and players must gain access to new equipment in order to unlock new areas and explore the entire world.  Over the course of the game, Insanely Twisted's "B-movie" flavored spacecraft will uncover such power-ups as a grasping claw to grab at objects, a circular saw that can burrow tunnels through rubble, and a magnet that picks up otherwise inaccessible items. Just like with all "Metroidvania" games, there is a rewarding satisfaction in gaining a new item and backtracking to find previously unreachable areas. These areas usually contain extra upgrades, such as higher damage tolerance or a stronger projectile for the ship's ray gun. Concept art and fragments of visual backstory scenes are also dotted around the game. Insanely Twisted puts a significant focus on puzzle solving, as most areas inflict some sort of brainteaser on the player. Such puzzles include remotely controlling rockets through a maze in order to hit switches or using crystals to deflect laser beams into blocks of ice. The further the game goes, the more involved the puzzles get, although none of them are taxing enough to ever keep the moderately intelligent completely stumped.  This preference for puzzling over combat is carried over into the game's best moments -- the boss battles. At the end of each map area, an oversized creature will make its appearance. These bosses are fought with logic rather than violence, and usually require the use of whatever new upgrade was found in the area. Again, these battles aren't too challenging, but the logic required to beat them is often so clever that it can be forgiven.  For those with a desire to fight, there is most definitely some combat, although it is by far the weakest aspect of the gameplay. While a number of upgrades can be used in battle, the defacto weapon is a rather weak energy projectile that, even when upgraded, is so weak and unwieldy that it barely hits anything. This is made doubly irritating by the fact that the enemies are almost always erratic in their movements and like to come at the player with sudden bursts of movement. Due to an overabundance of health items and frequent spawn points, no battle is really difficult -- but almost every one feels like an unwanted hassle due to the speed and unpredictability of enemies and the UFO's inefficient arsenal of weaponry.  Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet has all the basics in place for a decent game -- it's got a neat exploratory aspect to it, the puzzles are simple but satisfying, and there are some really cool bosses. However, the game never goes beyond those basics and doesn't seem to strive for anything above simple decency. Despite the Metroidvania comparisons, there isn't much exploration as each area is quite linear and there are only a few opportunities to backtrack and find new secrets -- opportunities which dwindle rapidly over the course of the game, as if the level designers just gave up.  The main problem with the game is that it never goes far enough in any one direction to truly make an impression. It's not deep enough to be a worthy Metroidvania, it's not mentally taxing enough to be a puzzle game, and it's not balanced or intense enough to be a shooter. It makes half-hearted attempts to spread in all three directions, and does nothing to excel in any one of them. It's worth noting that the game is also very short, and can be easily completed in an afternoon with time to spare. It took me two moderate play sessions to complete the game with 95% of the map explored.  Despite the odd flashes of brilliant design, I can't say I found anything truly compelling in the experience, due to the shallow nature of the experience and its languid pace. For a game that doesn't last very long, a lot of time is wasted on the egregious backtracking and sluggish UFO movement, and in spite of the exploration aspect of the game, maps are designed in a rather straightforward, linear fashion, with shortcuts in limited supply.  So much of the game feels simply like one is going through the motions rather than getting engrossed in the gameplay. Its lack of complexity, poor pacing, and tedious map design leads to a game that is solid overall, but undeniably tepid throughout.  As well as the main game, there's a little extra longevity in the "Lantern Run" mode. Up to four players have use the grabbing upgrade to race through a level as quickly as possible, while being chased by tentacles. It's a decent little co-op mode, but nothing worth keeping players invested for too long. It has to be said that the game gets credit for a wonderful visual aesthetic, which presents much of its scenery and many opponents as silhouettes with splashes of strong, bold colors to keep things interesting. It's an appealing style that sometimes threatens to make the game look more fascinating than it actually is. Each area of the map has its own distinct color scheme, with a bright background offsetting the dark shadows of the foreground. It shares many aesthetic traits with Patapon, and it makes for a visual treat on the big screen.  Sadly, great visuals do not a great game make. Nor does gameplay that spends most of its timing striving only for a passing grade. Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet scores points for its moments of genuine cleverness and tight, logical design, but the majority of the experience is a lukewarm and superficial one. It tries to merge three types of gameplay together, and while the intention is admirable, the effort made is far from total. It would have been better for Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet to pick one specialty and go the distance, rather than attempt to run in multiple directions at once and make very little ground at all. 

If games were rated on name value alone, then Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet could be a game of the year contender. It's the kind of name guaranteed to get attention, and one that promises a unique, interesting, entertaining ...


This not just your average shadow planet we're talking about here. Nay, it's an Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet. We were joined by Joe Olson of Fuelcell Games and artist Michel Gangé to talk about their new game, comin...


New Destructoid Episode: Battlefield 3 & Summer of Arcade

Jul 27
// Max Scoville
Hello, my darlings. It's your old pal Max with some more internet videos for you to watch instead of doing your homework. Our robot overlord Mr. Destructoid has social-engineered his way into the Ms. 'Splosion Man Pinball FX...

New Destructoid Episode: Metro Dorito Aliens Having Sex

Jul 15
// Max Scoville
Hey kid, wanna see a dead body? Oh. Well. You wanna see some really cool video game news... In the back of my van? Uh. Anyway. The guy from Crytek says the PS Vita is gonna fail, and the guy from Naughty Dog says the Wii U i...

New Destructoid Episode: Hacks, PAX, Mercs, and Freedom!

Jun 27
// Max Scoville
Hey dudes, whacky awesome exciting news today. First, hacker group LulzSec gave one last hurrah before saying the voyage of their LulzBoat had come to an end. Or something, I don't even know. Second, the United States Suprem...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...