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Sonic

Sonic the Hedgehog photo
Sonic the Hedgehog

Sega and Sony are producing a Sonic movie, coming in 2018


Woaaaaah my head's spinning!
Feb 10
// Joe Parlock
What do you imagine a decent Sonic the Hedgehog film would look like? Fully animated, being able to properly utilise the many colourful and fantastic locations the games are known for? Maybe even a feature-length version of t...
Sonic photo
Sonic

The Sonic Twitter is hinting at something pretty huge


Might actually be Sonic Adventure 3
Feb 10
// Joe Parlock
The Sonic the Hedgehog Twitter account is teasing something. If it isn’t just memes (which we’ve all come to expect from the Sonic Twitter), then it’s something potentially huge.
NPR photo
NPR

NPR's Morning Edition had an Easter egg for us today


What do you think when you hear hedgehog
Jan 26
// Darren Nakamura
Growing up, NPR had an image of being mostly for stuffy old white people. Imagine my chagrin when I found myself listening to it regularly. I had become stuffy and old! Except, every now and then I catch hints of somebody beh...
Michael Jackson photo
Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson's involvement in Sonic 3 & Knuckles has been detailed


We finally know after 23 years...
Jan 26
// Joe Parlock
For years now, it’s been rumoured that Michael Jackson at least partially wrote the soundtrack for Sonic 3 & Knuckles. Many of the songs in the game sound remarkably similar to some of Jackson’s: just compare ...

Sega photo
Sega

Surprise! That Sega 'classic' announcement hype was Sega 3D Classics Collection


CJ called it
Jan 21
// Chris Carter
Remember when Sega said a new announcement was coming today, and that classic gaming fans should be excited? Well, I don't think you're going to be very excited. Sega has confirmed that it is indeed the Sega 3D Classics Colle...
Release date photo
Release date

Mario & Sonic at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games gets release date


Aww hell yeah!
Jan 11
// Steven Hansen
My boys Mario and Sonic are back together again for yet another Olympic games game -- this time in Rio de Janeiro. For the fifth entry in the Mario & Sonic Do Sports For Some Reason series, the roster of playable charact...
Big the Cat photo
Big the Cat

Sega teases plans for Sonic's 25th anniversary with Big the Cat


Get ready for a Big surprise
Jan 08
// Ben Davis
An image of the guys from Game Grumps holding a Big the Cat doll appeared on the official Sonic the Hedgehog Twitter and Facebook pages today, along with the message, “We've got some pretty exciting stuff planned for th...

Review: Freedom Planet

Jan 03 // Jed Whitaker
Freedom Planet (PC [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: GalaxyTrail Publisher: GalaxyTrail MSRP: $14.99Released: July 21, 2014 (PC), October 1, 2015 (Wii U) Having started out as a Sonic the Hedgehog fan game, Freedom Planet unsurprisingly looks, sounds, and plays similarly to the beloved original Sega Genesis trilogy with a hint of some of the newer Sonic games. However, instead of rolling or jumping onto enemies to kill them, the two main protagonists, Lilac and Carol, have a dedicated attack button that makes them punch and kick. Simply touching an enemy doesn't inflict damage; instead, they have to be attacking, which can be both a good and a bad thing; good because you'll almost never get slowed down, and bad for a similar reason, as levels end far too quickly. There are three characters on offer and each play differently. The main character is Lilac, a furry dragon who has a punch attack, a kick, a double jump that causes her to whirlwind enemies, and a mid-air dash that works similarly to the one from the classic Rocket Knight Adventures, which is by all means a good thing. The level design doesn't encourage the use of the mid-air dash very often, a shame since it's a unique move, but the times you do need it feel solid and thought out. The mid-air dash can also be used similarly to Sonic's spin dash to be able to instantly get a boost of speed from a dead stop. The other character available in the story-based adventure mode is Carol the wildcat. Carol still has the same kicks and punches as Lilac, but attempting to double jump with her will have her gliding through the air. Instead of being able to dash, Carol has a rapid-fire kick that inflicts a lot of damage in a short period of time. She can also wall jump, which allows reaching parts of levels that may not be accessible to Lilac. The biggest difference between Carol and Lilac, however, is that she can pick up gas cans littered across levels to spawn a motorcycle. Yes, you read that right, a motorcycle. When on her motorcycle, Carol zips around quickly, and can still punch and kick, while double jumping makes her spin attacking enemies multiple times per second. Best of all her motorcycle can drive up walls, which is as useful as it is comical.  [embed]330156:61704:0[/embed] Adventure mode is the story-driven mode that includes plenty of cutscenes with fully voiced lines, but it is also probably my least favorite mode. The story isn't all that interesting or original -- an evil villain with an army of robots steals a powerful stone -- but mostly because the other bits of the story are hard to follow and make little sense. On top of that, the voice acting is inconsistent both in terms of quality and fidelity; some lines sound like they were recorded on a professional setup and others almost sound like a Skype call recording. Even worse some of the cutscenes barely add anything of value to the story or development of characters, like a drawn-out slumber party scene between the protagonists in their clubhouse that would have felt more at home in a fan fiction story about the character's lives than in the actual game. Also, when playing as Carol, players will miss out on bits of the story, which makes for an even more confusing and disjointed experience, as the narrative was clearly written with Lilac in mind. While I appreciate the time and effort that went into the adventure mode, I think classic mode (which removes the tedious voice acting and cutscenes) makes for an all-around better experience. Classic mode also features a third playable character, Milla, who is apparently a basset hound. Personally, I don't see the resemblance, but I'll take the developer's word for it. Milla plays quite differently from our other heroes. Her attack button can be used to strike quickly with a single press causing a short green burst that works like a melee, or a long press spawns a shield. Milla's special attack spawns a green cube above her head that can be used as a long range laser beam or tossed as a short range projectile. When being used as a beam this attack propels Milla in the opposite direction; thus, it can be used to help navigate through the levels, along with her flapping ears that lift her up in the air for a short time when double jumping.  The level design feels familiar, as you're zipping from left to right, going up and down hills and around loops, while occasionally being forced to platform. However, levels do take their own spin (pun intended) on Sonic's formula; water levels allow swimming in any direction for instance, while other environments have buttons to physically press to advance. That said, no specific stage stands out, perhaps, as I mentioned before, because you breeze through them all so quickly. Each character has an exclusive level built around their unique abilities, but unfortunately, these aren't taken advantage of elsewhere. That said, if I had to rank these levels alongside the 16-bit Sonic games, I'd put them right between the second and third games for Sega Genesis, they are nowhere near as creative as anything seen in Sonic 3 & Knuckles, but aren't as straightforward as Sonic the Hedgehog 2. Overall, Freedom Planet's adventure mode takes around two and a half hours to complete, which is a good amount of time for a retro-themed platformer. The only problem with this is I found myself spending most of my time battling bosses in later levels. Early bosses are fun and require little effort, while late game bosses are brutal and demand some skill. This is easily one of the worst parts of the whole experience. There are lots of cheap shots, and one hit kills. Many games by first-time developers have a tendency to be a bit more challenging to the average player, perhaps because the developers build a game for themselves.  While Freedom Planet isn't a perfect experience, it is still a very enjoyable and easily one of the best Sonic the Hedgehog-esque games I've played in years. If you were looking for something to scratch that 16-bit Sonic itch this might be it. Just don't say I didn't warn you about the questionable story, voice acting, and late game bosses. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
Review: Freedom Planet photo
Sonic the Furhog
Here at Destructoid, we don't often review games originally released well over a year ago, but we are making a special exception for Freedom Planet. With a sequel just announced, I discovered we never reviewed the original, one of the best Sonic the Hedgehog-esque games I've played in years. Yiff out in the night with your fellow furries and prepare to go fast.

Sonic the Hedgehog photo
Sonic the Hedgehog

Crush 40 let slip a 25th anniversary Sonic game is in the works


I tried to think of a Live and Learn pun
Jan 03
// Joe Parlock
Jeez, it’s already been almost five years since the great Sonic Generations was released to celebrate the Blue Blur’s 20th anniversary. With the series’ 25th birthday rapidly approaching later this year, peo...
Mario & Sonic photo
Mario & Sonic

Mario & Sonic at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games amiibo functionality detailed


Costumes, basically
Dec 29
// Chris Carter
I still can't believe that Mario & Sonic at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games exists. If you would have told my younger self that both characters would be teaming up for not one, but multiple games, including Super Smash B...
Mario in Sonic mod photo
Mario in Sonic mod

Mario goes fast in this impressive Sonic Generations mod


Playable Luigi, Mario bosses, too
Nov 02
// Steven Hansen
TRUST ME AND WE WILL ESCAPE FROM THE CITYYY. One time, City Escape lyrics prompted me to unbundle my disconnected GameCube, set it up, play City Escape, and then put it all away, but the most interesting part of that story i...

I wanted to be The Wizard

Oct 31 // Nic Rowen
Anyone else remember the movie The Wizard? You know, that piece of shameless Nintendo product placement released to the public under the guise of entertainment? The film where we learned to “love the glove?” Well I do. Frankly, it was a real piece of shit of a movie, but I saw at an impressionable time and it will always hold a small special place in my heart. The Wizard was a weird movie. It was a cynical exercise in co-marketing that waffled between cheesy narm and uncomfortable self-seriousness. It told the story of a traumatized autistic child but also featured a pubescent Fred Savage uncomfortably flirting with some poor 13-year-old girl.  At the time though, the only message I took away from The Wizard was about being wicked sick at video games. About being so unbelievably good that people would stand up and cheer when they saw you stomp on a goomba, that they would lose their shit when you set a record lap in Radmobile. That the solution to fixing everything wrong with your life was as simple as finding the the warp whistle. I was in love with the idea. I was never a cool kid, never popular. Even in the context of our lame-ass church youth group, I was pretty low on the old totem pole. But with this game competition I knew I’d been given a golden opportunity. I was good at games, way better than anyone else I knew. While the details about the competition were a little sketchy, the one thing they were sure of was that it would culminate with a big screen performance projected on the theater screen in the camp’s main auditorium (just like the end of The Wizard!) and the winning group would receive a brand new Sega Genesis console. This was my chance stand out and impress everyone. To win a prize for our group and be a big shot. To show them who I really was. And for better or worse, I did. I remember being so thrilled the morning of the competition. The tournament had a weird structure. There would be some preliminary games played during the afternoon to whittle down the herd a bit (which for the life of me I can’t remember) and for the main event that evening to determine a winner, we’d be playing Sonic the mother fucking Hedgehog. The fools were playing right into my hands. It was like it was meant to be. Sonic was practically my best friend. I was a fucking EXPERT at Sonic. In fact, I’d already won a small competition at a local video store years ago (a story I blogged about back in the day) playing Sonic. A little piece of trivia I decided to slyly keep to myself that whole afternoon, only sharing it with a few members of my group. I let them know that so long as we made it to the finals we were good. A few years before this, I pretty much spent a summer of my young life playing Sonic 1. It was the only game we had for the Genesis at the time and rentals for the system were scarce in my area, so I just ended up replaying it over and over again. My obsessive knowledge of the Green Hill Zone had served me before, and it looked like it was set to pay off again.   That evening we slowly filled the auditorium/theater room. The councilors, bless them, had done a really great job of making it a cool event for the kids. They’d wired up a system to play on a small monitor at the back of the room while the action was projected across a surprisingly professional movie screen for the spectators. They were even handing out bags of popcorn. As an uber-geeky 11-year-old who practically worshiped games, seeing the Sonic title screen displayed 30 feet wide and hearing the familiar music piped through a theater sound system was practically a religious experience (I mean, probably not the one the councilors intended, but still). They'd rigged up some kind of scoring mechanism that rewarded both time and points. Each group would pick someone to play for them and it was up to that kid to set as high a score as possible. Truth be told, I ignored them shortly into the whole explanation because I knew that in Sonic, time and points were the same thing. The person who finished the level the fastest and cleanest would always outscore everyone else, regardless of how many robots they popped or rings they collected. In fact, it seemed almost misleading to even separate the ideas (not that I was going to tell the other kids that). We were slated to be the third group up to bat. The way the competition was set up one member of each youth group would represent their little tribe for this final confrontation, and of course I was the designated hitter. I'd talked up my Sonic skills and knew I was the one to do it, but I'd be lying if I didn't admit to a little last minute doubt, some panic. I mean, it had already been a few years since I was really into Sonic, what if I was rusty? What if I choked? This whole thing could backfire. As soon as I saw the first two teams take their turn, I knew how mistaken such doubts were. Please know that I’m not trying to brag when I tell you how badly I beat the other kids. I’m not trying to hold up my skill at Sonic when I was 11 years old as some kind of point of pride. It is just the plain fact that I annihilated the other kids as soon as it was my turn. In whatever block of time they gave each of us to rack up points, I made it all the way to Robotnik, killed him, and started on the next zone before they told me to stop. None of the other kids made it that far -- some of them didn’t even clear the first stage. The worst part about it? I wasn’t even all that happy with my performance. I knew that if I had practiced I could have done A LOT better (#humblebrag before it was cool). You have to understand, the other kids were not “gamers” like I was. They were there to play around, see the hedgehog jump over the spikes and collect a few rings. For them, the definition of being good at the game was “not dying too much”. At the height of my Sonic obsession, I was measuring success by milliseconds. It was straight up rhino versus baby stuff. Shockingly, most of the kids weren’t exactly stoked by my performance. Instead of the cheers I expected, there was a decidedly uncomfortable atmosphere. A few scattered (begrudging) applause here and there amidst a whole lot of murmuring. Even the kids from my own youth group were kind of quiet. They were excited to win of course, but they took the temperature of the room and knew it probably wasn’t the best time to bust out in jumping jacks. I saw a couple of the adults running the event talking to each other. I got the distinct impression they were talking about me, like this was a problem. Like they thought I cheated somehow -- if not in actuality, at least in the spirit of the competition. I was a little 11-year-old ball of indignity, utterly galled at the injustice of it. Nobody thought it was cheating earlier in the day during the Shirts and Skins basketball match (FYI, I was a Shirt by insistence) when the kids that played youth league basketball scored easy rebound after easy rebound on me. Why should they have? The basketball kids put in the work, practiced, and were (way) better at basketball than me. But when I got a chance to take them on in the one weird arena where I excelled, suddenly it was somehow a trick? They were acting like I conned them when really I was just incredibly over-specialized at a game they were unlucky enough to turn into a competition (and yeah, I could have probably stood to branch out a bit more with my hobbies, but shut up). In the end, our group was declared the winner. I mean, what were they going to do, say my turn didn’t count? Much to my disappointment, there was no parade. The competition just kind of petered out as the last few groups took their (pathetic) turns and shuffled off. Our youth minister took the stupid prize Sega and I never saw it again. Either he kept it for himself, or decided that video games weren’t appropriate for a religious environment, or maybe the whole boondoggle just left him with a sour taste. After that, I was pretty sure I was doomed. I had my big chance and somehow blown it by being too good (which I thought was the whole freaking point of a competition, but what do I know). I started to wonder if there was anyone out there who loved games the way I did. This was 1994, way before I would even learn what the Internet was. The only other real game enthusiast I knew was my brother. It was the heyday of Jack Thompson and the popular idea that Mortal Kombat was turning kids into crazed serial killers. Magazines like EGM and Nintendo Power let you know you weren't completely alone, but it all felt so far away and removed from real life. It was a weirdly lonely time to love games. The deflated balloon of my misguided childhood dream is why I can’t get mad at modern YouTube stars who make 4 million a year screaming at the screen while they play games, no matter how much I don’t personally like the content. It’s why I don’t sneer at eSports, even when they struggle with growing pains and identity crises. It’s why I try to book days off every year in the summer to watch EVO. For as silly as it can be, I love the growth of games as a spectator event. The now-reality that people really will gather to watch talented players being wicked sick at games, to cheer them on and lose their shit with every big play and comeback. The fulfillment of The Wizard’s promise, delivered 25 years late, but finally arrived. If an 11-year-old were to stumble on The Wizard today, he or she could take it the same way I did, but they wouldn't be so wrong. The idea of a video game tournament people give a shit about isn't some Hollywood fantasy anymore, it's a daily reality. Now, The Wizard (however dated and cheesy) would play like any other movie about garage bands making it big, or underdog athletes with a lot of heart triumphing against the odds. Hollywood schmaltz of course, but the same kind that inspires some kids to pick up a guitar, or start running extra laps before school. The kind of schmaltz that sets some kids on an arc that will take them beyond dabbling in a hobby or pastime and take it further, to see if they can turn their passion into a profession. I was too early to be The Wizard, but there is a whole generation of apprentices out there just waiting for their shot.
The Wizard photo
Games as a spectator sport
When I was a kid in the ancient days of the early ‘90s I was part of a church youth group. Obviously this was before I morphed into a surly, foul-mouthed teen (and then an even more profane adult). Every year the youth ...

More empty Sonic optimism photo
More empty Sonic optimism

SEGA sez: New Sonic to be 'inspired by how it played in its heyday'


That smoke'll make you choke!
Oct 29
// Steven Hansen
Earlier this year, SEGA issued a bold apology. The company apologized for accidentally naming its Halloween character "Boob" instead of "Boo." Even earlier in the year, SEGA made another apology for how shit Sonic games have ...
Sonic Wii VC photo
Sonic Wii VC

Sonic games are being removed from the Wii Virtual Console


Bummer
Oct 29
// Chris Carter
The digital revolution has its conveniences. For instance, I tend to jump into FPS games randomly, playing a few rounds before moving on to the next one. Being able to do this instantly is great, and I don't necessarily need ...
Sonic Adventure photo
Sonic Adventure

Do you prefer Sonic Adventure 1 or 2?


I want to know
Oct 27
// Chris Carter
It looks like I sparked a discussion yesterday in my recent article on Sonic Adventure 2's twisted backstory. I drew a line in the sand between the first Sonic Adventure and the sequel, and a debate started up, comparing...
Sonic Adventure 2 photo
Sonic Adventure 2

Learn the twisted backstory behind Sonic Adventure 2


Haha, Shadow
Oct 26
// Chris Carter
Sonic Adventure 2 is a pretty strange game. I remember playing it for the first time with my cousin, plugging away at multiplayer for 10 hours straight. For that reason, I've always had a soft spot for the Adventure&nbs...
Sonic's 'Boob' photo
Sonic's 'Boob'

Sega apologizes for Sonic Runners 'Boob' boner


Typo of the Year
Oct 24
// Kyle MacGregor
Someone at Sega made a helluva typo, accidentally naming a character in Sonic Runners' seasonal Halloween stage "Boob" instead of "Boo," which prompted this apology: "In the current 'Halloween Special Stage' event, the charac...
@midnight photo
@midnight

We were on Comedy Central last night for the best reason


Vital Peen-formation
Oct 22
// Brett Makedonski
Well, this is something that happened. Your favorite robot was on @midnight with Chris Hardwick last night. As our former video wizard Bill Zoeker tweeted "If Destructoid were going to be shown on television, this w...
Sonic Boom photo
Sonic Boom

Sonic Boom Season 2 is coming, you can't stop it


He's the fastest thing alive
Oct 12
// Chris Carter
As far as Sonic cartoons go, the Sonic Boom show actually isn't bad -- hell, it's way more entertaining than the games themselves. For those of you who do enjoy it, you're going to get more of it, as distributor LER has ...
Sonic Dash 2 photo
Sonic Dash 2

Sonic Boom rides again in Sonic Dash 2, out this week


Hmmmm
Oct 09
// Chris Carter
Not to be confused with the microtransaction-stuffed Sonic Runners, Sonic Dash was actually a decent little Temple Runner clone released in 2013. Now it's seeing its second release in the form of Sonic Dash 2: Soni...
More Sonic on PC photo
More Sonic on PC

Sonic Lost World heads to PC next month


Other 'past Sega titles' to follow
Oct 06
// Jordan Devore
Sega is bringing Sonic Lost World to PC on November 2, 2015. It's priced at $29.99 and the NiGHTS-infused Nightmare Zone, a stage available as DLC for the Wii U version, is included. In his 2013 review for Destructoid, Jim St...
Clickhole photo
Clickhole

Hilarious Clickhole video parodies remedial Anita Sarkeesian videos


Sonic the 'beautiful blue-haired woman'
Sep 25
// Chris Carter
In an era where every single game has to be inclusive, lest the pitchforks come out, Clickhole has provided a breath of hilarious fresh air. In a clear effort to parody Anita Sarkeesian (right down to the voice and delivery)...
Sonic photo
Sonic

Rare Sonic arcade game coming to a PC near you


Waku Waku Sonic Patrol Car
Sep 20
// Kyle MacGregor
Back in 1991, when Sega was helping Energizer and Duracell achieve record profits, probably, the company released Waku Waku Sonic Patrol Car, a Japanese arcade game targeted at children. In the years since release, when ...
Sonic Boom delay photo
Sonic Boom delay

New Sonic Boom delayed over quality concerns


Slow down, Sonic
Sep 15
// Kyle MacGregor
Sega has hit the brakes on Sonic Boom: Fire & Ice, postponing the Nintendo 3DS exclusive's launch date to give developer Sanzaru Games additional time to polish and improve the experience. The publisher says "it&rsqu...
Sonic Worlds photo
Sonic Worlds

Fangame Sonic Worlds is looking really impressive with its latest release


Metal Harbor and the Chao Garden added
Sep 09
// Joe Parlock
I’ve always been a huge fan of the Sonic games. Sonic the Hedgehog was the first game I ever played, and ever since then I’ve liked pretty much every one of them I’ve played (I maintain Sonic R and...
Sonic on Piggy Island photo
Sonic on Piggy Island

Sonic's next adventure takes him to Piggy Island


NOT some messed up erotic fan-fic
Sep 02
// Steven Hansen
Something has happened to Sonic. It's been happening for years. Sonic is a weird porn figure, the subject of countless adolescent Deviantart drawings and erotic fan-fics by kids still figuring themselves out. Also, us, when w...
Sonic photo
Sonic

Sonic Dreams Collection: Mascots, legacy, and audience perception


What happened to you, Sonic?
Aug 22
// Laura Kate Dale
Most of the critical discussion on Sonic Dreams Collection up until this point has been largely focused on it as an unexpectedly odd curio, and with good reason. An unusual mix of Sonic fan fiction crossed with Don't Hug Me I...
amiibo skins photo
amiibo skins

Sonic, Splatoon, Pit amiibo costumes surface in Super Mario Maker


amiibo skins
Aug 19
// Steven Hansen
[Update: more pictures are available in the gallery below, like Waluigi.] It's no surprise that the sprawling Super Mario Maker supports Nintendo's amiibo toys -- we saw Wii Fit Trainer show up in-game a few months ago. All t...
Sonic Classic Collection  photo
Sonic Classic Collection

Crazy Taxi 4 pitch revealed by former SEGA employee


And cut content from Sonic DS collection
Aug 18
// Chris Carter
Released back in 2010 for the Nintendo DS, the Sonic Classic Collection was a let down. It only contained a select few games (and removed multiplayer options), whereas other collections like Sonic Mega Collection ha...
Sonic Dreams Collection photo
Sonic Dreams Collection

I want to get sucked deep inside your dreams Sonic


Yeah, work that camera Shadow
Aug 13
// Laura Kate Dale
I just played Sonic Dreams Collection. I'm not sure if my life will ever be the same again after today. I'm so sorry for everyone already affected. Sonic Dreams Collection is presented to the world as a series of forgotten Dr...

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