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Skate

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EA CEO: Skateboarding game rage has 'run its course'


Dec 03
// Nick Chester
Tony Hawk and Shaun White frown as Electronic Arts' John Riccitiello talks. The CEO has told Kotaku that he feels the skateboarding game phenomenon may have "run its course as the representative example" in the broader "actio...
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Skate 3 heads off to Hawaii


Jul 03
// Matthew Razak
Skate 3 is a skateboarding game, and really the only way to make a skateboarding game better is more skateboarding. Thus the new Danny Way "Hawaiian Dream" DLC for the game should theoretically make it better because it's gi...
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Play as Dead Space's Isaac Clarke in Skate 3


May 19
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Even the hero of Dead Space needs to have some fun every now and again. That's right! Isaac Clarke is a playable character in Skate 3. Just enter the code "DEADSPACETOO" in order to play as Isaac and to get a special board to...
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You're probably playing Skate 3 right now (and I totally recommend it), but if you're looking to play on the go, consider Skate It for the iPhone and iPod touch. The game was released on the App Store this week, and will run ...


Review: Skate 3

May 11 // Nick Chester
Skate 3 (PlayStation 3 [reviewed], Xbox 360)Developer: EA Black BoxPublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: May 11, 2010MSRP: $59.99 Fans of the series should know from the jump that the basics of the Skate formula haven’t changed much, with the exception of a few new tricks, including darkslides and underflips. The game’s "Flickit" control scheme remains intact, with all of the most basic skate moves mapped to the controller’s right analog stick. The idea is to simulate how a real skater would move his or her body weight and feet on a board -- you pull back on the stick to lean weight backwards, and then flick up and forward to “kick up” and perform an ollie, for instance. Combinations of flick directions and button presses result in a variety of moves, all of which --much like real skating -- require skill and timing, all of which comes with practice.Admittedly, my experience with the previous Skate titles indicated that I didn’t have the skill, timing, or the patience to invest in practice. I had always found that the controls were unforgiving, spending more time shredding my virtual elbows and knees than actually, well... shredding. Instead of making me feel like a skateboarding badass, the game’s always made me feel more like a straight up jack-ass. So I steered clear of Skate 3’s new “Hardcore” difficulty, a mode with the “physics tweaked for more realistic skating.”Instead, I embraced the new “Easy” difficulty mode, obviously included for players like me -- it’s harder to bail, easier to pick up speed, and far more forgiving when it comes to pulling off tricks. The result was a game that, for someone of my skill level, was far more satisfying and less frustrating across the board. If you've found yourself having trouble with previous games (and not having fun because of it), you’ll want to switch this option on immediately. But make no mistake, just because it’s called “easy,” that doesn’t mean the game plays itself -- you’ll still be required to focus on accurate flicks and movements. But if you're anything like me, it’ll mean you’ll find yourself tossing down the controller fewer times in any given gameplay session. Both new difficultly modes mean that more players can appreciate the experience and dig into the meat of Skate 3, which is great news, because there’s a hell of a lot of great content here. From downhill races to playing “H.O.R.S.E.”-style games against the pros to setting up the perfect camera angle for the ultimate magazine cover shot, there’s plenty to do and see. EA has also added a new layer to the title with its “team” play, which allows you to create your own skate team, the goal to promote your brand, sell more boards, and build a legacy. This can be done both online and off -- as you progress through the offline game, you’ll add new skaters to your crew, and even be given the opportunity to add your friend’s customs skater. Online, teams can be formed with other players, and you’ll compete against rivals in team challenges; you can even earn board sales (the game’s career progression “currency”) by having other players download your team’s graphics and other custom content.And custom content is really where Skate 3 shines. EA has provided a massive toolbox for creating and sharing elaborate skate parks using the title’s new skate.Park feature. It all feels a bit like LittleBigPlanet, with the game giving you a bare canvas to drop in all manner of objects, allowing you to create some truly unique playgrounds. Playing the game prior to launch, I was already able to sample some incredible and creative environments; I expect time and care is going to yield surprising results once the tools are in the hands of consumers. But for all of Skate 3’s tweaks and additions, it doesn’t feel like EA nailed the game’s career mode. It’s possible to freely skate the world, finding plenty of one-off skating challenges and opportunties, but it’s likely you’ll be hitting the game’s menu to fast hop from one trial to the next. They don’t get particularly creative either; there are a handful of the challenges simply asking you to “do a trick,” which could be anything from a simple ollie to a grind. Of course, how much fun there is to have is up to the player in Skate 3. In reality, a skateboard by itself isn’t all that exciting; it’s really just a piece of wood with some wheels on it. You could simply push it around with your foot while sitting on a couch, which no doubt would get old quick. Or you could get off your ass and find some crazy places to trick on. Or take it to the next level and build something for yourself. With Skate 3's tools, the posibilities are potentially endless. It would have been silly for EA to completely overhaul the already-solid Skate engine for this third installment, so it’s really no surprise that the game does share quite a few similarities with its predecessors. But there’s no mistake that Skate 3 simply isn’t a rehash of what’s coming before. The create and share features offer up so much potential that EA may have presented a problem for itself. There’s really no need for a new Skate game next year... you’re going to be playing this one for a long, long time. Score: 8.5 -- Great (8s are impressive efforts with a few noticeable problems holding them back. Won't astound everyone, but is worth your time and cash.)  
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While Activision was busy driving its Tony Hawk Pro Skater franchise into the ground, Electronic Arts quietly snuck in with its own title and stole the old pro’s crown. Skate was everything the Tony Hawk series was n...

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Skate 3 share features require activation code


May 11
// Nick Chester
Skate 3 is out today, so the chances of you finding a used copy at your local shop are slim. But if you're holding out to save a few bucks on a second-hand copy, you might want to reconsider. One of the key features of Skate ...
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Games on Demand: Prince of Persia, Skate 2, Brothers in Arms


May 04
// Nick Chester
Gamers are so demanding, so three new games have hit Xbox 360 "Games on Demand" this week -- Prince of Persia, Skate 2, and Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway. Prince of Persia and Skate 2 will run you $19.99, and now's the per...
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Absorb this Skate 3 TV ad into your brain


May 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
EA has released the Skate 3 TV ad and it barely shows the game off! A majority of the commercial is of people going bat sh*t crazy as others are skateboarding on the ramp. The commercial ends with a few seconds of actual Ska...
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Skate 3 co-op reminds us what skating is all about


Apr 28
// Conrad Zimmerman
This new trailer for Skate 3 that EA sent out to us is really good. It's an example of what cooperative play could be like for you and your friends. What's so effective about it is how it captures the essence of what it's li...
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Download the Skate 3 demo from XBL and PSN starting today


Apr 15
// Jordan Devore
Reminder time: as of today, the demo for Skate 3 is available via PlayStation Network and Xbox LIVE. It's got single-player for those of you -- much like me -- who passed on the last game, multiplayer for people wanting to me...
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New screens of Skate 3 emerge


Apr 08
// Conrad Zimmerman
When I was eleven or twelve, I was always on a skateboard. I wasn't one of those kids who was really attempting to learn how to ollie and kickflip, though I'll admit to an occasional fantasy that I might someday. No, it was a...
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Skate 3 demo hits Xbox LIVE, PSN next week


Apr 06
// Nick Chester
Electronic Arts has re-confirmed that a demo for Skate 3 will hit Xbox LIVE Marketplace and PlayStation Network on April 15. The demo will feature a small piece of the game's "University District," inside the game's new open...
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Skate 3 demo coming to tempt you in two weeks


Mar 29
// Conrad Zimmerman
Did you know there was a booth for Skate 3 at PAX East? I didn't, but with its looming May 11th release date, it was a pretty safe assumption that there would be. At this very special Skate 3 booth, much like many of the boot...
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Skate 3 grinds towards shelves May 11


Mar 17
// Nick Chester
Forcing me to write a stupid skate trick-related headline, Electronic Arts has revealed that Skate 3 will hit North American shelves on May 11. The rest of the world will have to hang tight, as it'll release worldwide on May...
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Skaters allowed in Skate 3's university setting


Feb 25
// Brad Nicholson
Grinding on books is hard work. In fact, some skaters would argue that it's "totally impossible, bro" -- something about the "ledges" being too thin. But you can rock out on a library's front yard. Or in the case of Skate 3,...
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Here's some new Skate 3 info for your eyes to consume


Feb 17
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Destructoid got to check out Skate 3 last week but seeing as how we brought you a pretty detailed preview already, I'll just touch on a couple of things that weren't covered. Other than the new focus on team play online or o...
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Skate 3 devs explain what 'Port Carverton' is all about


Jan 30
// Brad Nicholson
I haven't the slightest idea what a "grind-to-pump-to-tranny" is, but I'm guessing it's an important thing that skaters do. It's at least something Black Box Studios thought about when constructing Skate 3's "Port Carverton,...
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Brave and Skate hit Xbox 360 Games on Demand


Jan 19
// Nick Chester
Two old games have hit Xbox 360 "Games on Demand" today -- Brave and Electronic Art's "Tony Hawk killer," Skate. Brave will run you $29.99, and is relatively new in "Games on Demand" years -- it shipped to stores last August....
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Pre-order Skate 3 for Black Box Distribution Skate Park


Jan 18
// Samit Sarkar
Activision’s Tony Hawk franchise was already in decline by the time the original Skate came out back in 2007, but EA Black Box’s analog stick control scheme and focus on realism accelerated Tony Hawk’s desc...
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Skate 3 trailer has got the eyes of a panther


Nov 06
// Ben Perlee
Hopefully, by now you've had a chance to check out my preview on Skate 3. Looks to be a fairly solid entry into the series, one fans are surely going to get a kick out of come next May. Anyway, here's the trailer for the gam...

Teaming up and throwing down with Skate 3

Nov 06 // Ben Perlee
Skate 3 (Xbox 360, PS3)Developer: Black BoxPublisher: EATo be released: May 2010 Quite noticeably, one of the major changes made to the Skate franchise has to be the interactions with other skaters. Skate and Skate 2 were really about establishing who the player was as a skater, but in Skate 3, it is all about establishing yourself as a member or leader of a crew. After all, the new slogan for the game is “Team up. Throw down”, and you'll be working together with friends to really create user created content such as graphics, skate parks and videos to become an all-around skate mogul. Even better, work as a team and create awesome stuff others download, and you'll receive in-game prizes yourself. There is strong motivation to not play Skate 3 solo. The team-based motif continues with the new multiplayer modes. Every gameplay mode has been updated to keep multiplayer in mind. Deathrace has been changed to a team race around the skate parks, and the combined time and score is what is going to confirm a win. It's fun, but fairly standard. Make sure you have a full team for this one. Freeskate Activities, a mode where you could skate around doing random activities around the world, has been boosted to include that third team member. Contest mode now has a slew of skaters trying to trick off of one or two specific trick boxes and rails. It is chaotic to say the least. However, it was the new game modes that EA really wanted to show off. First lined up was Domination, which plays like a control point mode in an RTS or FPS. Throughout an area are specific objects to trick off, and you and your team of three must make high scores to protect the control points from the other team. Yeah, it's kinda like Graffiti mode of ye olde Tony Hawk, but Domination seems to be a little tighter due to the specific trick objects. The 1UP was actually my favorite new mode. A team based variant on HORSE, each team is given 20 seconds to do as many tricks as possible and rack up the highest score. If any member bails once during those 20 seconds, it's over for that team, and the next crew goes up. Lose and you'll get a letter, and earn an 1-U-P and you'll be done. Ultimately, for people looking to play multiplayer, there are a whole lot more options than in previous Skate games, so you'll definitely want to check this portion out. Anyone concerned that Skate 3 is going to change things too much with the gameplay have nothing to worry about. While three new trick types have been added, such as underflips and darkslides, for example, the basic control stick-based trick system remains the same. Thankfully, certain issues have been tightened up, such as the off the board controls.  Detractors of the high difficulty of the Skate franchise will be pleased to hear about Skate.School, a new tutorial area for new players. Even better, there's actually difficulty settings for gamers, so if you are new to the game and want to play with your buddy who is a pro, you'll be able to keep up, albeit handicapped. Experienced players will be able to make gameplay more difficult as well, should they find normal Skate gameplay too easy. Thankfully, even at this pre-alpha stage, that actual gameplay is as solid as you're going to want it to be. From here on out, EA Black Box just has to make sure that the world they create and the new things they do with it live up to standards. And the world of Skate 3 is quite a bit different than New San Vanelona, the anti-skateboarding city of Skate 2. Instead, we have the skaters paradise of Port Carverton, a sunny metropolis inspired by Venice Beach, Stanford University, and other fresh locations. It is broken up into three areas, University, Downtown, and Industrial, and while the locations were very early code, it is obvious the direction Black Box is hoping to take is a brighter and cheerier skating environment. While the original Skate was touted as a straight-laced skating sim, Skate 2 injected a little quirkiness that some loved and some hated. Let's be real, any plot or goofy challenges only serve to do crazy stuff on a digital skateboard, and damnit, if Skate 3 wants you to literally jump over the shark sculpture, then jump the damn shark sculpture. Skate 3 doesn't seem to be taking itself terribly serious, and when you get down to it, begs the question on whether it should. There is plenty to keep an eye out for in Skate 3. The new multiplayer focus and team-based mechanics are the logical direction Skate should take, and the overall improvement on certain features, such as basic walking, is an obvious acknowledgment that Black Box is paying attention to the needs of their fans. With a May 2010 release date, and the basics already in place, Black Box would be ashamed if Skate 3 were not the best Skate yet. And really, when they are the only traditional controller-based skateboarding game on the market, they had better make sure their game rocks.
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It's funny looking back on the old battle between skateboarding videogames. Ever since the original Tony Hawk, plenty of skateboarding games have come and gone, and other than the eternal old bird itself, not many of them hav...

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To no real surprise, Electronic Arts has announced that Black Box-developed Skate 3 will ship for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in May of 2010. This time the game has a focus on cooperative play, the game's tag-line "Team Up. T...

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World in shock at mention of upcoming Skate sequel


Jul 05
// Nick Chester
No surprises here, but it looks like Electronic Arts is working on -- or at least thinking about -- a new game in the Skate franchise. One of the dudes over at skateboarding Web site Epicly Strife dropped some info on the new...
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Skate 2 'Maloof Money Cup Pack' available on July 9


Jun 30
// Nick Chester
Today, Electronic Arts announced that on July 9, you’ll be able to download the “Maloof Money Cup Pack” for Skate 2. I’ll admit, I don’t know what the hell the Maloof Money Cup is, but according ...
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Skate 2 patch available today, fixes a lot of stuff


Mar 23
// Brad Nicholson
A beefy (and kickin’ rad) patch is now available for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 versions of EA Black Box’s Skate 2. The list of fixes, tweaks, and improvements is so large I had to include it post-jump. Below ...

Destructoid review: Skate 2

Jan 26 // 8BitBrian
Skate 2 (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 [Reviewed])Developed by EA Black BoxPublished by Electronic ArtsReleased on January 20, 2009What happens when Mongo Corporation comes in and practically takes over the town? Why, they have their security guards put metal caps on everything skateable in the city, and body-check anyone on a skateboard. So, you've served your hard time in jail for what I presume was either killing someone while skating or just rocking those tricks too damn hard. So now that you're out of prison, it's time to get your cred back. Like Dyson mentioned, the game allows you to remove yourself from the board, pulling off new sorts of tricks, and if you want to, you can simply run around the world. Of course, I don't recommend doing this unless you absolutely have to. When your character gets off the board, he begins to control like some nightmare conjured up from the darkest pits of survival horror. It makes Silent Hill feel like it's Metal Gear Solid.Allowing you to get off of your skateboard and interact with the environment, though, is a fantastic touch that opens up quite a bit of opportunity. Now, you can move about bits and pieces of scenery to create opportunities for combos or reach some highly-desirable spots that were inaccessible without the aid of a ramp or something to jump up onto.Now, looking at this from my experience with Tony Hawk titles, my first sitting with the game was utterly shameful. Getting used to the controls takes a decent amount of time, especially if you're accustomed to the button-mashing that was Tony Hawk. That's not to say that the controls aren't logical -- they make a ton of sense, but it's just not what I'm used to playing. So, after mounting that hurdle, I found myself dealing with another one: the environment.As I've found, Skate 2 is not particularly easy. Unless you spend plenty of time practicing and learning all of the engine's tricks, you're going to suffer. Sometimes I wouldn't be able to land tricks because of poor timing. I'll admit, that's my fault. But too often I would run into the camera changing position to such an angle that it was impossible to see what I had lined up, a person suddenly walking in the way of my trick, or just landing at the wrong angle and being thrown from my board.Beyond this, I would run into problems with the physics of the game, resulting in some rather odd results. For example, I moved two dumpsters right next to each other in order to make it easier to jump over them both for a challenge. When the two dumpsters touched, they shot into the air as though some invisible mine was triggered, and it came down on my head. How that happened, I'd love to know. Despite those problems, running around the city is as easy as the city is gorgeous. It's rather well designed and is a rather accurate recreation of a city. They didn't skimp on any of the minor details, which can sometimes be a problem. Even the most minor of sudden elevations of terrain stop you from moving, and if you don't realize that you can't just skate over them, it'll send you flying.But, for all the minor problems in the environment, it does give you a ton of stuff to interact with and explore. The city is rather expansive, and getting around it can take quite a while if you want to just skate through. Within Skate 2 are a bunch of miniature challenges that you can try if you're not too interested in tricks, like managing to crash into a person at 25 mph and the like.One of the things that I must ask is: who the hell speaks like the characters in this game do? "Man, you can't believe how buttery I made you look!" The dialogue is filled with stereotypical skater talk, to the point where it's so bad that it's funny. Combined with that, Black Box still needs to work on its facial structures -- many of the characters have rather awkwardly shaped faces. Skate 2 is going to require a serious investment of time on your part if you want to get into it. I'll be honest with that. But once you do, the game provides a rather intuitive and fun experience that's worth the work you put into it. The camera is one of the most immediate problems that needs to be fixed, but Black Box has done a good job with the title, and if they can keep making substantial improvements with each title in the series, then they'll be the undisputed frontrunners for the new generation of skating titles. Score: 7 -- Good (7s are solid games that definitely have an audience. Might lack replay value, could be too short or there are some hard-to-ignore faults, but the experience is fun.)
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Back in August, Dyson gave us a hands-on preview of Skate 2 that summed up the new additions to the series fairly well, and so I invite you to sit down by the campfire, and let me tell you in grand detail how the game pans ou...

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Skate 2 ships tomorrow, so check out this commercial


Jan 20
// Samit Sarkar
We’ve all been waiting for Skate 2 for a long time. Ever since the original skate. revolutionized skateboarding videogames back in 2007, gamers have been looking forward to a bigger, better, and more badass sequel. Oh...
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Here are some new Skate 2 screens, but where's my meat?


Jan 14
// Nick Chester
Electronic Arts has sent us some new Skate 2 screens, no doubt getting us amped up for the game's January 21 release. We get new screenshots. Stephen Totilo at MTV Multiplayer, on the other hand, the dude gets steaks. Yes, EA...
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Skate 2 connects to the Internet, EA release video feature to prove it (Update)


Jan 06
// Nick Chester
Who would have guessed it, but you can take Skate 2 online. Yup! It supports the Internet!In this latest video feature, the folks behind Skate 2 talk a bit about the game's online component, which looks to be greatly improved...
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Skate 2 demo coming, insert horrible skate trick pun here


Jan 02
// Nick Chester
EA Black Box's Skate 2 hits the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 sooner rather than later -- January 21 to be exact. It looks like a demo for the game is coming even sooner, at least on the Xbox LIVE Marketplace. According to ...

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