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Review: Short Peace: Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day

Oct 13 // Kyle MacGregor
Short Peace: Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day (PS3)Developer: Crispy's, Grasshopper ManufacturePublisher: Bandai NamcoReleased: September 30, 2014MSRP: $39.99 Ranko Tsukigime is just a typical high school girl, you know, apart from the fact she moonlights as an assassin. There's also the tiny detail of her living in an elaborate series of shipping containers strewn about an automated parking garage. Oh, and she's plotting to avenge her late mother by killing her dear old dad. And that's really just the part of the story that makes sense. The narrative has an intriguing premise, but quickly devolves into an overblown pastiche of Japanese pop culture, one less interested in telling a coherent tale than paying homage to a wide variety of contemporary media. It punctuates gameplay segments with cutscenes that constantly shift in both animation style and tone, coalescing into a disconcerting mess that serves to impart confusion more so than anything. However, even in its most absurd moments, Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day is grounded in a pretty straightforward platforming experience. Literally. It's all about running and jumping and sliding. The game impels you to hurtle toward the finish line, lest risk seeing our eponymous heroine get killed by the enigmatic forces that pursue her. [embed]282079:55938:0[/embed] Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day is essentially a game of tag, and the objective is not to get caught. It can be a challenge, though, as you will need to traverse a variety of obstacle courses where a few small missteps can spell death. There's an ever-present stalker snipping at Ranko's heels just waiting for you to slip up so it can close the distance and pounce on her. Luckily, Ranko is equipped with a gun to help keep her attackers at bay. A single shot will give you some breathing room, momentarily stunning the malevolent spirits or giant Pomeranian (yes, really) in the rear-view mirror long enough to build some momentum. Ammunition is limited, though, and the only way to replenish it is by slashing lesser enemies to ribbons. Eliminating these potential speed bumps also has the added bonus of creating eye-catching explosions of color. The developers attempt to shake up the experience by scattering collectibles throughout the levels, inviting players to risk death for a chance to unlock character art and new costumes. There's also a few boss fights to buoy the standard levels, including a a shoot-'em-up duel with a dragon and an retro-inspired fight against an army luchadores.  You'll see everything Ranko Tsukugime's Longest Day has to offer within the space of an hour, making the game a poor value proposition. Even considering its arcade-like nature and the fact it comes tethered with the Short Peace films, it's a hard sell. It's tough to envision many folks getting their money's worth or recommend this over picking up the movies on Blu-ray. Ranko Tsukugime's Longest Day is a vibrant, scatterbrained thing that seems far more intent on creating a spectacle than a compelling story or gameplay experience. It's bizarre and abstract, even by Grasshopper Manufacture standards, and still winds up feeling lackluster. It doesn't have many glaring faults, but there just aren't a lot of reasons to fall in love with the game either.
Short Peace game reviewed photo
Colorfully drab
The Short Peace project was born out a desire to unite some of Japan's most talented artists and tell stories about the country's past, present, and a possible future. The result is a lovely bouquet of action, romance, and so...

Suda 51 photo
Suda 51

Short Peace omnibus hits the Americas next week

Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day finally arrives Tuesday!
Sep 27
// Kyle MacGregor
Short Peace arrives in the Americas on September 30, Bandai Namco has announced. The anthology features four animated shorts headlined by Akira creator Katsuhiro Otomo, and Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day, a side-scrolling action game from Suda 51 and Tokyo Jungle studio Crispy's. It will be available on PlayStation 3 exclusively as a downloadable package.
OlliOlli 2! photo
OlliOlli 2!

OlliOlli 2 announced for PS4 and Vita, coming in 2015

Sicky sicky gnar, bro bro!
Sep 25
// Kyle MacGregor
OlliOlli 2: Welcome to Olliwood is coming to PS4 and Vita, Roll7 announced today. The follow-up to this year's stellar skating game is rolling with a new look, multiplayer, a deeper combo system, and a more powerful level editor. Look out for it in 2015. OlliOlli2: Welcome to Olliwood Coming to PS4, Vita in 2015 [PlayStation Blog]
TMNT: Danger of the Ooze photo
TMNT: Danger of the Ooze

Activision announces sidescroller Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Danger of the Ooze

Donatello has a gap in his teeth now I guess
Sep 04
// Darren Nakamura
If you are like me, you have not really followed the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in a couple decades. The last thing I really remember was 1991's The Secret of the Ooze and Turtles in Time on the Super NES. Sure, I have hear...
Flappy Bird Family photo
Flappy Bird Family

Flappy Bird returns as a multiplayer console game

...on Amazon Fire TV of all things
Aug 01
// Kyle MacGregor
Flappy Bird has returned as Flappy Bird Family for the Amazon Fire TV platform. The endless tapper has seen some improvements over the original iOS release, including local multiplayer and more obstacles. It is available...
Kero Blaster photo
Kero Blaster

Cave Story creator's Kero Blaster leaps onto PC, iOS

Feeling froggy?
May 11
// Kyle MacGregor
Hop hop hooray! Studio Pixel's Kero Blaster is out now for Windows PC and iOS devices. The side-scrolling platformer follows the trials and tribulations of a bipedal frog tasked with subduing a legion of strange creatures di...
You have my attention
Remember the glory days of beat 'em ups? Well French studio Le Cartel does. The four man team banded together and created Mother Russia Bleeds, with the aim of capturing the golden age of beat 'em ups like Streets of Rage. T...

BloodRayne out now on PC photo
BloodRayne out now on PC

BloodRayne: Betrayal takes a bite out of Steam today

The dhampir femme fatale returns with an enhanced PC release
Apr 30
// Kyle MacGregor
Majesco is looking to lure in unsuspecting victims today, as BloodRayne: Betrayal sinks its teeth into the PC market with a Steam release. The polarizing WayForward side-scroller initially landed on PlayStation 3 an...
Monochroma photo

Monochroma's cinematic trailer gets dystopian with an evil corporation

Ain't no sunshine
Apr 28
// Brett Makedonski
This new trailer for Nowhere Studios' Monochroma presents an interesting juxtaposition between how the corporation in the game sees itself, and the effect that it has on society. Everything's peachy, upbeat, and thrivin...
Suda 51 photo
Suda 51

Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day out now in Europe

Enjoy the sexy launch trailer!
Apr 20
// Kyle MacGregor
Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day arrived in Europe over the weekend. Developed by Tokyo Jungle studio Crispy's and Grasshopper Manufacture, the PlayStation 3 title serves as the final installment to anime legend Katsuhiro ...

Monochroma will remind you of Limbo, and that's an amazing thing

Mar 21 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]272308:53083:0[/embed] Monochroma chronicles the journey of a pair of brothers in the 1950's as they traverse from the outskirts of a city and into a metropolis. The little brother injures his leg at the very beginning, and the older brother has to carry him throughout the game. He can put him down in areas where there's light to solve puzzles, but always goes back for him. If it sounds like the story's a bit sparse, there's good reason for that. Monochroma is told entirely through gameplay, not with any dialogue or cutscenes. Nowhere Studios wants to ensure that the player stays engaged in the game to understand the narrative. As such, it's unclear what exactly Monochroma is about, but Tezateser mentioned that it's a social commentary. The heart of Monochroma lies within the puzzles that litter the way. While there are a share of complicated ones, the four-chapter six-hour game is structured in such a way that difficulty doesn't ramp up. Instead, each chapter will feature a few particularly challenging sections, followed by ones that are easier to solve. It has a sort of rolling effect that's supposed to keep any stretch of the game from being too frustrating. One notable aspect of the platforming is that movements have that sort of clunky, unintuitive feel about them -- again, a lot like Limbo. As such, there are times when you aren't sure if you have to do a better job of jumping further, or if you don't quite have the solution to a puzzle. Most times it's the latter, but it takes a bit more experimenting than it necessarily should. Despite this, Monochroma is a real joy to play. I only got to spend a half hour or so with it, but I was already itching for more when I had to put it down. Fortunately, I won't have to wait long; Nowhere Studios says Monochroma is coming out next month. I can't wait to again immerse myself in the aesthetics and atmosphere of the world that they've created.
Monochroma photo
With some dabs of red
With all the cool tech demos and innovative ideas on display at GDC Play, it's a bit surprising that a 2D side-scrolling puzzle platformer is one of the most worthwhile things to check out. But hey, good games are good games,...


CounterSpy coming to the PlayStation 4

Share progress across all platforms
Mar 13
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Some of you were pretty down with CounterSpy when it was revealed last year for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita (along with iOS and Android releases). Well good news, kids! It's coming to the PlayStation 4 as well. Ev...
Doujin Games photo
Doujin Games

Mech shooter Gigantic Army now available on Steam

A surprisngly satisfying six dollar side-scrolling shoot-'em-up
Mar 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Doujin shooter Gigantic Army is out now on Steam for a measly $5.99. You should check out our review and buy it maybe. That is, if you like fun things. You do like fun things, don't you? I mean, seriously, what els...

Review: Gunslugs

Feb 27 // Ian Bonds
Gunslugs (PS Vita [reviewed], iOS, Android)Developer: Abstraction GamesPublisher: Orange PixelReleased: February 18, 2014 (Vita) / January 17, 2013 (iOS) / September 2, 2013 (Android)MSRP: $2.49 (Vita), $1.99 (iOS), $1.49 (Android) The first thing most will notice about the game is the look: a decidedly retro aesthetic is evident with its pixelated graphics, super-deformed characters, and minimalist backgrounds. I must admit the first time I saw this title, I wasn't impressed with the graphics. It looked like Contra and Metal Slug had an ugly baby. However, the sloppy schlock of it all grew on me, and it's mostly thanks to the soundtrack and control. Gavin Harrison's chirpy chiptune soundtrack is a delicious throwback to games gone by, and his pulsing tunes really set the mood for the frenetic shooting. And boy is there a lot of it. Your basic M.O. is to run to the right side of the screen and shoot everything. Enemies, crates, giants walkers, helicopters. EVERYTHING. As you shoot, enemies and crates drop ammo pick-ups, and different weapons, such as flamethrowers, egg guns (?), and dual-wielding pistols (which have you shooting in front of and behind you. Wow, what a change!). Sadly, once these weapons run out, you switch back to your standard pistol. It would have been nice for the option to switch weapons on the fly, but honestly, it's a minor quibble at best. [embed]270672:52638:0[/embed] All of this would be nothing if the game wasn't fun and easy to control, and thankfully, the minimalist approach does wonders for the gameplay. Jumps are precise, you need only to hold down the fire button to shoot, and movement is quick and fluid. As soon as you drop into the action -- literally, via parachute into every stage -- you're being shot at. As you mow down baddies you must also take down beacons, as they summon more troops. Eliminate all the beacons and get to the end of the stage where a helicopter takes you to the next level. Every three stages ends with a giant boss fight, and then you're off to a new locale. There's a surprising amount of variety in Gunslugs, and this is mostly due to the game's random level generator. The layout of each stage is randomly configured, so If you die in level 2-1, the next time you play it, nothing is where it was before. This may go against the grain of memorizing patterns like in the shooters of yore, but that actually brings a freshness to the genre, as well as allowing for a unique experience each time you play. That said, the randomness to the level design can sometimes be too random, as boxes and landmines may sometime pop-up in impossible to avoid areas, or power-ups (bought with coins dropped by foes) may not be able to be bought when the item shop generates at the beginning of the stage. There are several optional objectives to clear beyond taking out the beacons and the bosses, offered up three at a time, such as blowing up three enemies at once, playing as a certain unlockable character, or driving a tank (another Metal Slug comparison) over five enemies in a row. These objectives carry over through multiple playthroughs, so if you've completed a few and die, you can pick up where you left off, objective-wise. And die you will. While it's not a one-hit kill situation like Contra, your life bar can get depleted fairly quickly with all the chaos and explosions happening around you. Once it's gone, you're dead. One life to live. Continues can be bought but are hard to come by due to the random nature of levels. Ammo too is a precious commodity, and once that bar is empty you'll have no way to battle -- though thankfully ammo drops aren't as rare as continues. While there is a story, the real draw to the game is getting the high score and unlocking the goofy characters. Even though they don't really offer anything beyond a cosmetic change, the character names really got a chuckle out of me, with such action-movie cliches as Willis Kiyay and Bad Ass Barracuda rocking the super-deformed look. There's even a few minigames peppered throughout that pay homage to older titles that aren't even shooters, such as Super Mario Land and Donkey Kong, used to help refill your health and ammo bars, as well as offering a brief reprieve from all the bullet-hell. Gunslugs is a great tribute to the old school, while still maintaining a fresh outlook on the genre. While its random level generation isn't perfect, the control and chaos at play here is a fun distraction for an afternoon. You'll shoot a lot, you'll die a lot, and you'll always be moving right, but you'll always be having fun too.
Gunslugs review photo
Run 'N' Gun 'N' Gun 'N' Run
Sidescrolling run-and-gun games are, arguably, a classic that never seem to go out of style. Games like Contra and Gunstar Heroes, with their multiple weapon types, hundreds of attacking enemies, and billions of bullets whizz...


Battle Princess of Arcadias collides with PSN in 2014

It's up to you to defeat the monsters invading your once peaceful kingdom!
Feb 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Battle Princess of Arcadias and its splashy art are bound for North America and Europe later this year, thanks to the fine folks at NIS America. The Odin Sphere-esque action role-playing game will launch on PlayStation 3...

Review: Gigantic Army

Feb 12 // Kyle MacGregor
Gigantic Army (PC)Developer: Astro PortPublisher: Nyu MediaRelease: February 5, 2014MSRP: $5.99 Gigantic Army is a throwback to the mecha shooters of the 16-bit era. A heartfelt tribute to the likes of Cybernator and Metal Warriors, it certainly wears its heart on its sleeve, paying homage to the classics by crafting a faithful pastiche that wouldn't have looked out of place sharing shelf space with the genre's paradigms twenty years ago. Much of what makes this action-heavy side-scroller so delightful is the GMR-34 Saladin itself. A manned combat robot packed to the gills with heavy artillery, it walks a fine line between handling well and seeming like a lumbering war machine. Simultaneously weighty and motile, the leaden suit of armor just feels exactly how you'd want a massive legged vehicle to feel. The arsenal you take into battle is up to you. Prior to charging into battle, players must select a primary and heavy armament. There are three of each, making for nine potential combinations to support a variety of play styles and skill sets. The Saladin also possesses a devastating melee weapon, should any unfriendly natives ever get too close for comfort. There's also a valuable shield ability and a set of vernier jet engines, which allow you to soar into wild blue yonder for a brief time. Well, it would if the sky wasn't always such a rancid shade of green. [embed]270222:52543:0[/embed] Apart from the anomalous platforming section where the focus is circumventing a minefield, the experience largely focuses on trudging across the game's six levels and laying waste to anything and everything along the way. Common enemies don't pose much of a threat and can be quickly dispatched or avoided. However, the real focus is traversing these obstacle courses whilst taking as little damage as possible. You'll need to save that previous health and heavy munitions for the treacherous minibosses and colossal foes that await at each stage's close. You can't be too cautious though. Just as dangerous as the enemy forces is the clock. A timer constantly ticks away, encouraging players to press ahead, lest risk a fiery death. Should time run out prior to the completion of a level, any remaining health reserves quickly evaporate and then, well, you suddenly explode for some reason. After meeting my maker once in such a fashion, the dwindling clock weighed on me greatly. The feeling of being caught between a clock and a hard place lends the game a tense of tension, wherein players are forced along a tightrope. One must remain even-keeled, but with a touch of recklessness. It's a balancing act, avoiding oncoming fire and returning the favor whilst being mindful of how much time remains and how that should impact your strategy. There's a nice sense of risk and reward to it all. Gigantic Army generally handles pretty well, boasting inputs that can be customized at your leisure. Though, I should note that I encountered some issues pulling off the dash move reliably with a gamepad and special special weapons seemed to go off at random on occasion -- minor gripes that didn't have a great impact an otherwise phenomenal experience. At just six levels long, the duration is fairly short. Experienced players should be able to clear the campaign in about half an hour. That said, you likely won't be doing that on your first attempt and much of the enjoyment comes from replaying the title and testing your mettle against increasingly more challenging difficulty settings. Personally, I've gone back through it again and again because the game is such a joy. The story is the real weak link here. Told through scrolling text diaries reminiscent of those in Konami's 1993 shooter Cybernator, the narrative breaks up the action with banal exposition that isn't interesting or engaging int he slightest. It robs from an otherwise sterling product, as words flit down the screen amid dead silence. That's the worst part. The music just stops and you get to look at a journal and some cigarettes laying on a desk. The music isn't all that great, mind you, but it's better than absolutely nothing. Another weak spot in an otherwise stellar package, the soundtrack merely serves to fill the dead air between explosions -- there's nothing terribly memorable about it. It does the job, but it's certainly nothing you would want to listen to on its own.  In the end, Gigantic Army is a breezy retro-style shooter that STG enthusiasts would do well to check out. The tiny doujin team at Astro Port have created something special, hearkening back to the games of yesteryear with a well-crafted dose of nostalgia. Considering the modest asking price and the overall quality of the package, there's no reason to be gun-shy over this mecha shmup. Go on, pull the trigger.
Gigantic Army reviewed! photo
A well-oiled machine
It's the early 21st century and humanity is embroiled in a bitter war with an alien race hellbent on stemming mankind's advance into outer space. You are a mech pilot. You pilot a war machine that's enormous and powerful. Ali...

Doujin Games photo
Doujin Games

Indie mech shooter Gigantic Army descends on PC today

'Side-scrolling, mech-shooting bad assery is back!!'
Feb 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Gigantic Army begins its assault on Windows PC today, courtesy of publisher Nyu Media and Japanese indie studio Astro Port. The mech-flavored side-scrolling shooter takes inspiration from 16-bit titles like Metal Wa...
Suda 51 photo
Suda 51

Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day heads west this spring

Feb 01
// Kyle MacGregor
Amazing news, everyone! Namco Bandai has announced plans to localize Ranko Tsukigime's Longest Day for PlayStation 3 in the Americas, Europe, and Australasia this spring. The side-scroller is the fifth and final installment ...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin shooter Gigantic Army assaults PC in February

Check out the mech-shooting action in new trailer
Jan 22
// Kyle MacGregor
Side-scrolling mech shooter Gigantic Army is set to make its attack run on Windows PC early next month, doujinsoft publisher Nyu Media has announced. Developed by Astro Port, the Japanese indie studio behind the likes of&nbs...

Review: Max: The Curse of Brotherhood

Dec 29 // Wesley Ruscher
Max: The Curse of Brotherhood (Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Press PlayPublisher: Microsoft StudiosReleased: December 20, 2013 (Xbox One) / 2014 (Xbox 360)MSRP: $14.99 For Max, it’s quite clear that nothing annoys him more than his nerdy little brother. After coming home from school one day, our titular hero finds his sibling playing in his room and quickly getting on his nerves. Fed up, Max turns to the Internet and stumbles upon a spell that, after reading aloud, opens up a portal in his room where a giant monster’s hand reaches through and snatches away his little nuisance. Though relieved for a moment, Max quickly comes to the realization that the impending ramification from his parents outweigh the benefits of being an only child again. So without hesitation, Max jumps into the portal in pursuit, which leads to a fantastical new world. As he comes to, Max sees his brother off in the horizon being taken away by the horrifically large creature that grabbed him, and thus Max’s journey begins. [embed]268141:52041:0[/embed] This all takes place within the first few minutes of Max: The Curse of Brotherhood. A game that wastes no time throwing players into a world of wonder that’s full of puzzles to unravel and suspense to be had. As the adventure begins, you traverse the whimsical landscape akin to any 2D platformer of yesteryear. Max moves at an adequate pace, and can jump and climb basic obstacles with ease. The first five minutes or so are designated as an introduction to Max’s control and the overall responsiveness to the physics behind his movements. But you won’t pay too much attention to all this as it is all cleverly hidden as you move through the game’s beautiful environments. For the most part, Max’s controls are typical for the genre aside from using his nifty magic marker -- which is assigned to the right analog stick and each trigger depending on whether one is drawing or erasing. Typically, having to draw shapes in the midst of action with anything but a touch/stylus based interface would be considered cumbersome, but Max: The Curse of Brotherhood excellently balances its action and puzzle sequences. And when the two do collide, it is usually met with some Matrix-style slowdown that reduces the stress of having to make just the right shape in the nick of time. The game takes a minimalistic approach towards showing players how to use each of Max’s skills, while also teaching how everything isn't as innocent as it seems at first glance. For example, as you make your way through the beginning area, you most likely will fall prey to a tumbling rock. It’s somewhat of an unfair death -- as only those familiar with the stage are going to know it’s coming --  but  it teaches a valuable lesson without bogging down the gameplay with tedious tutorials. The game is full of these moments, but thanks to the way it nurtures throughout, you’ll often be prepared for them and always feel heavily rewarded when you make it through unscathed. But even if you fail, the game is more than generous with its checkpoints, reducing unnecessary retreading. As you start to earn Max’s main skills -- which additionally serve as the game’s main draw -- each new ability is presented in a manner that slowly lets players become accustomed to their intricacies. Armed with a special magic marker, Max will eventually gain the ability to create pedestals from the earth, vines to swing from, conform roots as platforms, and create currents of water to propel himself to new heights. As you learn to use each power, what starts off merely as tools to assist Max in his platforming escapade, eventually become useful aides in finding every hidden secret placed throughout the game. The ability to make branches into platforms eventually evolves into creating movable platforms, battering rams, and even weights in order to solve some fairly obtuse puzzles. Eventually, each skill begins to accentuate other skills adding even more depth to the platforming and puzzle solving. While ultimately the puzzles may fall on the simple side of things, they never ruin the pace of the action, and more importantly, they make you feel accomplished upon completion. In the end I couldn't have been more pleasantly surprised with Max: The Curse of Brotherhood. It’s a game full of wonder and magical moments, that while light on actual narrative, still delivers a world that is hard to forget. The visuals are Pixar-esque charming and the combination of cerebral puzzles with thrilling action offers up a bite-sized experience that is a welcome addition to the Xbox One’s library. If you’re looking for a change a pace, I couldn't think of a more fitting way to finish off this gaming year.
Max reviewed! photo
Magically hits the mark
As the eldest of three, there have been more than a few occasions in my life where I wished my siblings would just disappear. Whether it was from them breaking my things; disrupting my privacy; or as I grew older, the embar...

ATLUS photo

Dragon's Crown shipments soar past 800,000 copies

Atlus vaunts successful figures for contentious PS3 and Vita brawler
Dec 03
// Kyle MacGregor
Atlus has announced Dragon's Crown shipments and digital sales have climbed north of the 800,000 mark since Vanallaware's PlayStation 3 and Vita brawler ventured out into the wild this summer. The controversial...
Senran Kagura launch date photo
Senran Kagura launch date

Senran Kagura Burst hits Nintendo 3DS on November 14

XSEED announces provocative side-scroller for release next week
Nov 08
// Kyle MacGregor
Senran Kagura Burst is hacking and slashing its way to North America on November 14, XSEED Games has announced. The "buxom ninja brawler" will be available exclusively via the Nintendo 3DS eShop for $29.99.  The story f...
Super Time Force photo
Super Time Force

Get educated in latest Super Time Force video

Learn to unload a fecal storm of hot violence
Nov 02
// Wesley Ruscher
Capybara Games' Super Time Force has been slated to hit Xbox Live Arcade for what feels like just about forever now. It's no wonder that wait has been long too. Since I first gazed upon its pixelated carnage and awesome...
Senran Kagura photo
Senran Kagura

XSEED targeting November launch for Senran Kagura on 3DS

Nothing set in stone just yet
Oct 21
// Kyle MacGregor
Senran Kagura Burst will descend upon the Nintendo 3DS eShop in November or sometime thereabouts, XSEED has revealed. The publisher hasn't quite nailed down a definite launch date just yet, but is still on targeting an a...
PS2 Classics photo
PS2 Classics

Retro shooter Heavenly Guardian blasts PSN this week

Pocky & Rocky successor joins PS2 Classics
Oct 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Heavenly Guardian joins the myriad of PlayStation 2 Classics available on PlayStation Network this week. A scrolling shooter initially released in 2008 for PS2 and Nintendo Wii, the title is something of a spiritual successor...
Grasshopper Manufacture photo
Grasshopper Manufacture

Ranko Tsukigimeís Longest Day hits PS3 in Japanuary

Ring in the New Year with a new Grasshopper game
Sep 19
// Kyle MacGregor
Grasshopper Manufacture's next project is leaping to PlayStation 3 on January 16, 2014 in Japan. The fifth and final chapter of legendary Akira creator Katsuhiro Otomo's Short Peace anthology, Ranko Tsukigime’s Lon...
Suda51 x Katsuhiro Otomo photo
Suda51 x Katsuhiro Otomo

Ranko Tsukigimeís Longest Day's short debut trailer

Collaboration between Suda 51 and Akira-creator Katsuhiro Otomo gets a trailer I don't understand, but enjoy
Jul 16
// Steven Hansen
I guess when the man who created the seminal Akira, Katsuhiro Otomo, says, "I'd like to throw my weight behind a videogame," only good things can happen. As reported last week, Ranko Tsukigime’s Longest Day will serve ...

Obscure now called Final Exam, still looks fun

Name changed of that other Obscure game
Jul 11
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Remember Obscure? It was that fun looking four-player side-scrolling beat-em-up/shooter. Well it's undergone a name change, and you can now refer to it as Final Exam. The name was changed largely due to how fans kept thinking...
Suda51 x Katsuhiro Otomo photo
Suda51 x Katsuhiro Otomo

Suda51 teams with Akira creator on new PS3 game

Jul 10
// Steven Hansen
Grasshopper's Suda51 (Killer7, Killer is Dead) is working with Namco Bandai on PS3 side-scroller Ranko Tsukigime’s Longest Day, according to Siliconera. Ranko Tsukigime’s Longest Day will serve as the concluding p...
Code of Princess photo
Code of Princess

Code of Princess developer wants sequel on PS4, Xbox One

Guardian Heroes successor 'sold beyond our expectations' in North America
Jun 21
// Kyle MacGregor
A sequel to Code of Princess might be in the cards, Agatsuma Entertainment producer Yasuo Makajima let slip when speaking with Siliconera. Despite lackluster sales in Japan, the beautifully crafted side-sc...

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