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Ratchet and Clank

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Black Friday: Target has some great deals


Nov 19
// Brett Zeidler
We are now officially less than a week away from the post-Turkey Day madness. If you're set on stopping by either Walmart or Best Buy I can't blame you for that. Here's why you should still give Target a chance though: $139....
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Black Friday: Newer releases on sale for $28 at Walmart


Nov 10
// Brett Zeidler
Well, here we are two weeks away from Black Friday itself. Pretty soon every retailer in existence will once again be vying for your post-Turkey Day attention with unheard of prices on pretty much everything. Walmart has gott...

Insomniac responds to 4/10 All 4 One review with dignity

Oct 20 // Jim Sterling
After the review went live, I came to learn that I had just awarded Insomniac Games the lowest review score in its 17-year, 15-game history. The review is also the lowest-scoring non-port Ratchet & Clank review of all time. It's not a record I'm exactly thrilled about, but there it is. However, rather than get angry or upset, the message I received from Insomniac was one of dignified acceptance.  "It's bound to happen at some point," said the studio during our exchange. "No hard feelings. You backed up [the] score with your thoughts." By no means is this an endorsement of the review by Insomniac. Nobody likes getting slammed by the critics, and Insomniac is certainly not pleased with what I wrote. Did it get upset, demand a rewrite, or complain about the score? I received nothing of the sort. Not from Insomniac, nor from Sony -- a publisher that has always treated me with respect and friendliness, despite the litany of criticisms I've written about the company before (and still stand by, I might add).  Insomniac Games has been one of my favorite developers for a long time. I've long admired the way it respects its workforce and I love its ability to craft truly endearing characters. It's unpleasant taking a dump on someone's hard work at the best of times, but when it's a studio you truly value, it's all the worse. Nothing's worse than souring a relationship with people you like.  Recently, we had Epic Games' Cliff Bleszinski whine about 8/10 reviews for Gears of War 3, claiming to be "upset" by criticisms and implications that Gears of War 2 might have been slightly better. He is another developer I've always liked, but he now refuses to talk to me, ever since I asked him to justify his Gears 3 outrage. When I see that kind of behavior over a positive, very high review score and contrast it with the dignified, adult response from Insomniac, I am astounded. One side is cheapening the entire idea of a review system and encouraging melodramatic fanboy backlash, while the other -- in my opinion -- reacted with the professional responsibility that so many more studios need to adopt.  We have the same problem with gamers themselves. I've received a few hateful messages from people furious over the 8.5/10 score I gave Batman: Arkham City, and there are communities almost obsessed with crying over our critiques. Yet while the members of N4G and GameFAQs go on the attack within seconds of any of our reviews going live, looking to undermine our writing and whip themselves up into a childish frenzy of emotional convulsion, it's cheering to know that people who have a better right to be angry than anybody else can take criticism on the chin and move forward with their lives.  As someone who has received phone calls and emails from all manner of folk upset by my reviews, I can't tell you what it means to me on a personal level to have such polite discourse and understanding from a developer who really had no impetus to be polite at all. If more developers had the grounded grace of Insomniac, this would easily be the best industry in the world.  Insomniac Games' attitude should serve as an example to everybody working in videogames and ought to shame many of those same people.
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Moments before yesterday's review of Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One went live, I received a message from Insomniac Games via Twitter. It said, "We will still love you, though you realize as a dev it's terrifying knowing Jim S...

Review: Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One

Oct 19 // Jim Sterling
Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One (PlayStation3)Developer: Insomniac GamesPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: October 18, 2011 MSRP: $59.99 While previous Ratchet & Clank games have been single-player affairs, All 4 One is designed entirely around four-player co-op. The contrived story sees our heroes and villain trapped together on an alien world, facing a bigger threat than Nefarious himself has ever posed. They need to rescue a world overseen by a mysterious threat, deal with an embarrassing GLaDOS rip-off, and maybe learn a thing or two about friendship along the way. With that paper-thin plot established, things are set for a surprisingly long list of levels in which the four unlikely allies must shoot incessant waves of enemy robots and take part in simple co-op "puzzles" to progress through each stage.  All 4 One shares much more in common with top-down arcade shooters than the third-person action found in past installments. The camera is pulled back and slanted, allowing all four characters to appear at the same time. This is where All 4 One's first big problem lies -- the camera is awful. It creates invisible boundaries during platforming sections, so that what may look like a clear jump will actually cause characters to fall to their deaths if a party member is lagging behind. This issue is doubled thanks to the fixed camera positions, making many platforms appear closer than they are while obscuring a number of death-drops. With nearly every level in the game surrounded by chasms, death by pitfall is farcically common, and it's nearly always the fault of the camera.  The gameplay itself is a rather brainless bit of run n' gun action. Many of the more unique weapons of the Ratchet & Clank series aren't present, and although there are a few interesting guns -- such as one that turns enemies into giant boars -- most of them are fairly common items, such as rocket launchers and electricity cannons. Weapons can be upgraded thrice, although some of them are borderline useless thanks to their short range and inability to target efficiently. The ammo count is also low for each gun, which is a real pain when the game drops players into arenas full of enemies without an ammo pad on which to restock. In one encounter, we had nothing but short-ranged weapons left against an enemy that was out of range. The game does not account for these moments. Outside of shooting, there are various co-op puzzles to conquer, although they're incredibly shallow and repetitive. They mostly consist of using the Vac-U to suck up objects or players and shoot them onto switches or across chasms. The Hookshot also returns, and players will need to latch onto each other as well as onto grapple points to cross wide gaps. Puzzles scale according to how many players are sharing a game -- requiring all four characters in a full game and less for incomplete teams. In single-player, the main character is helped along by a CPU-controlled Clank, who is pretty efficient at completing co-op activities but prone to jumping down holes or standing in front of enemy fire in any other situation.  Although it's a cooperative title, the game includes a light competitive element. Players are graded on how many bolts they discover throughout a level, how many indigenous animals they suck up with their Vac-U, how many enemies they defeat, and how many co-op actions they perform. This makes the action a little more compelling, although bragging rights are the only real reward.  At its best, Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One feels more like a smaller digital game than a full retail one, despite its length. The wide camera and shallow gameplay gives it a vapid arcade atmosphere, and the fact that the gameplay is so messy, throwing endless robots at players and overloading the screen with visual garbage, makes for a title that feels far too loose and sloppy to constitute a full-priced game.  Furthermore, it is very poorly structured. Each chapter is broken into stages, but only certain stages serve as real checkpoints. If you get to the end of a stage and quit, there's always a chance you'll be thrown back a stage and lose up to 20 minutes of progress. This is made worse by the fact that cutscenes are unskippable, as are end-of-stage result screens, meaning you have to sit through the same content over and over again.  Endless repetition seems to be a theme in All 4 One, evidenced by the tiny selection of stock phrases that the characters spout to a nauseating degree. I didn't think anything could make me hate Dr. Nefarious, who stands among my favorite videogame villains, but hearing him say, "A few billion bolts more and I'll have a new space station," for the fiftieth time definitely did it. He even squeezed the line out in the two seconds before the final boss was beaten and the ending cutscene played. I now exclusively associate Nefarious with skin-crawling irritation, and I hate that All 4 One ruined him for me.  The multiplayer has been shoddily implemented as well. There is no true drop-in/drop-out co-op, as the session has to reload the nearest checkpoint whenever somebody joins the game. Sometimes, it shunts the players forward and skips over a section of the game, and other times, it tosses them backwards and forces them to replay a section. Once, I had somebody join just after a lengthy cutscene finished, then the game booted us to a split-second before the unskippable cutscene activated and I had to watch it again. The new player dropped out before the cutscene had finished playing.  While the single-player game is noticeably less action-packed and more slow-paced, it's shockingly preferable to co-op much of the time. Between having to reload for new players and a camera that's unable to cope with four of them at once, the entire game can grind to a halt if just one person doesn't know what he's doing -- there's quite a few of them, considering the squadron of mouth-breathers I kept getting stuck with. If one player is unsure of how to use an item correctly or to help solve a puzzle, nobody can progress. It was not uncommon for me to be joined by somebody who was totally clueless, even after having stuff explained to them, effectively stopping the game. I also saw no way of booting them from the session, while quitting myself always presented the aforementioned risk of losing a chapter's worth of progress. You'll also be pleased to know that All 4 One is rather glitchy. I've had multiple issues with the screen's becoming a single solid color or with Hookshot grapple points' causing characters to freeze. During the very last boss, the creatures I needed to beat to get to the next part of the fight stopped spawning, preventing the boss from appearring at all.  To be fair, the game is competent a lot of the time, but that's as high as it ever climbs -- a level of baseline competence that fails to excite. The only real entertainment comes from the cutscenes, which, while they should have been skippable, are at least genuinely amusing. Otherwise, you're left with a rather bland shooter and even less flavorful, forced co-op action dragged out over the course of eight to ten hours. That's a decent length for a game these days, but only if the game is a lot of fun. For a lukewarm arcade shooter that frequently frustrates with clueless design, it makes for something that long overstays its welcome. Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One should have been about $15, five hours shorter, and released on the PlayStation Network. It's a game that does a disservice to the high pedigree of the Ratchet & Clank series and takes too far a departure from what made such an excellent set of games. It's sad to see these fantastic characters appear in a poorly structured, mediocre game, full of camera issues and silly bugs that add insult to injury. A very substandard outing for Ratchet and Clank, one that might be serviceable at a fraction of the price but which can be safely be ignored during a time when so many better products are vying for a gamers' attention.
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Everybody's jumping on the co-op bandwagon these days. Be it to fill an imaginary checklist that demands that all games need some sort of multiplayer component or simply to justify the inclusion of an online pass, you can't m...

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Check out Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One's opening trailer


Oct 18
// Dale North
Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One hits stores today, and to celebrate this new opening cinematic has been released.  If you haven't heard, this game takes Ratchet and Clank and sticks them in a 4-player co-op adventure, with...
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Ratchet & Clank All 4 One has giant balls of power


Sep 01
// Conrad Zimmerman
Insomniac tossed us this latest trailer for Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One, part of a running series on the weaponry found in the game. And why not? Next to the primary characters, there's nothing more important to the serie...
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Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One gets trailerized for gamescom


Aug 17
// Nick Chester
Of all the games coming out this fall, Insomniac's Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One is near the top of my "gimme that now" list. As a longtime fan of the series, a four-player cooperative adventure has me giddy. Insomniac is p...
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Uncharted, R&C, and Resistance packs coming July 22nd


Jun 24
// Maurice Tan
Sony Europe has confirmed the existence of a series of PS3 hit collections that showed up on Best Buy's website before they were removed, CVG reports. An Uncharted Collection will include both games -- you know which ones -- ...
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Oh, so that's what Ratchet looks like without skin!


Jun 18
// Nick Chester
Insomniac has chosen the winners of its skin design contest for the upcoming Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One and… oh my god, what the hell did they do to Ratchet!?First-place Ratchet winner Alejandro David Gonzalez of T...
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Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One: Date, box art and pre-orders


May 20
// Dale North
Sony has just announced the official release date for Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One: October 18, 2011. You'll also get a first look at the official box art, shown above and in our gallery. If you read my preview you'd know i...

Preview: Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One

Apr 13 // Dale North
Although the core game play from previous Ratchet and Clank titles remains mostly intact, Insomniac had to make several changes to fit this into a group co-op format. Fans of the series will instantly notice the change in presentation. The third-person camera that hovers over the shoulder of Ratchet has been replaced with a wider shot that moves to encompass all four players at once. This has you controlling smaller characters on screen, but they're put into a world that seems more vast, so it works out.  The control set is very similar to previous games -- even the weapon wheel remains -- but the gameplay has been refocused for teamwork, with weapons being a prime example. For example, a vacuum gun can hold an enemy captive for another player to finish off. Many obstacles and enemies in the game require interaction from all players to proceed. Everything from opening gates to fighting bosses requires constant communication. From what I've seen so far Insomniac has done a great job with how they made players work together; the game manages to draw a group of players into it easily.  There's still a level of competition in this game with every man (or Lombax?) for himself when it comes to the collection of bolts. Like other multiplayer co-op games, with the goodies in this game it's still a case of see it, grab it. The player with the most bolts is the one that gets the cool weapons first, leaving other players to watch on in jealousy. It was also revealed that each player will also have a unique weapon that gives their character a sort of character class type contribution to the team.  Insomniac showed us a new stage called Octonok Reef, where the four players started out in a river, on a raft. Each player had its own role, which constantly switched. All players had to man one of four fans on each side of the raft that propelled it down the river. Some had to stop momentarily and kill approaching enemies and others had to remove obstacles or open gates. Eventually they make their way to dry land and enter the Terawatt forest, where they use teamwork to get through closed smaller boss sections that Insomniac called arena battles. Later, the team encounters a massive robot called a Guardian. The part is able to conquer and ride the Guardian, sitting atop its head and using mounted turrets to gun down enemies. As the stage progresses, the team uses its Guardian to battle other attacking Guardians. This stage served as an example of what Insomniac calls "cinematic co-op" -- big set pieces, lots of scene changes.   I managed to play a couple of other stages in four-player teams with other event attendees. I found that right off the bat you're relying on the other three players to move past obstacles or cross wide gaps in bridges. We learned together by jumping across a gap at the same time -- and dying at the same time -- that firing one player across the gap with the vacuum gun was a better choice. Some platforming puzzles made use of one of the neatest co-op devices in All 4 One, a slingshot attachment that automatically latches onto the nearest player. With a press of the triangle button a line shoots and connects to the nearest player. This can be used to pull yourself across a large gap easily. It can also be used to catch up with other players when you're behind. One platforming section involved a very large gap where all four players had to tether to each other, swing, and then tether to another point. Each player had to hold down the triangle button for dear life.  Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One supports stereoscopic 3D. The game looks great with or without 3D, but the 3D demo stage I saw had lots of floating platforms, and the effect seemed to make them stand out against the background scenery nicely. The 3D isn't eye-poppingly pronounced; it's just enough to give the game a little bit of extra visual punch if you happen to have a 3D display in your home. Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One casts the net a bit wider than your standard group co-op game. Insomniac's goal of "cinematic co-op" shows, as there's such a variety of scenery, set pieces, big bosses and challenges to keep players entertained in these stages. The cool dynamic of having players work together while in competition really fits the series and characters. The biggest difference between this and other group co-op games is that there's actually a grand story that the players will move through together. You'd expect no less from a Ratchet and Clank game. We got only a small taste of this story, but it looks like it's going to be a great ride. Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One will come to the PS3 this fall.
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At a press event last night, Insomniac said that making a 4-player cooperative Ratchet and Clank game has been a dream project for them. This is the first group co-op title in the ten-game series for them, so it had the team ...

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The deep, meaningful tale of Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One


Mar 22
// Conrad Zimmerman
I can't think of too many party-oriented games that feature anything resembling a cohesive story. Super Smash Bros. Brawl comes to mind with the Subspace Emissary campaign, but that wasn't really much of a party. I also...
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PlayStation Move Heroes getting bundled with Move


Jan 31
// Nick Chester
Considering you need a Move controller to play the upcoming PlayStation Move Heroes, it makes sense it would be bundled with Sony's motion controller, right? Well it is… at least at Toys R' Us. The retailer has the exc...
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PlayStation Move Heroes out March 22


Jan 14
// Nick Chester
Sony has announced today that PlayStation Move Heroes will be shipping to stores on March 22. Developed by Nihilistic Software, the game sees a team up between some of Sony's biggest names: Jak, Daxter, Sly Cooper, Bentley th...
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Demon's Souls, MAG and more go PS3 'Greatest Hits'


Sep 28
// Nick Chester
Sony has announced that it's added a slew of games to its "Greatest Hits" line-up today, pricing them all at $29.99. The following titles should now be available at retail for your buying pleasure at the discounted "Greatest ...
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At the Sony gamescom press conference today, Insomniac Games pulled the covers of its next title -- Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One. The first title in development at Insomniac's "new-ish" North Carolina studio, the game will...

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Is more Ratchet and Clank coming before Resistance?


Aug 08
// Matthew Razak
Last weekend I told you about the fact that Insomniac would be showing something off at PAX, and assumed that it was a foregone conclusion that that something was Resistance 3. Well, you know what they say about assuming. It ...
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Insomniac will be present at Pax Prime 2010


Jul 27
// Conrad Zimmerman
PAX Prime is almost upon us! We will no doubt soon be beset by information of all the joys one can partake of at the largest gathering of game geeks to be organized by a web comic.  Insomniac Games is going to be there. ...
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Insomniac would back Ratchet & Clank HD remakes


Jul 02
// Nick Chester
God of War. Sly Cooper. Both Sony franchises that have gotten the high definition makeover treatment. With Sony's "Classics HD" branding and its talking heads already saying they'd like to see more, it's not likely to stop t...
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E3 10: Heroes on the Move is a PS Move mascot action game


Jun 15
// Josh Tolentino
So you've got a snazzy new motion controller, and need a game to show it off with. What do you go with. Sports? Exercise? Slapping games? Well, there's all that, and PlayStation Move has them, too, but they could certainly do...
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Support this: 48 hours of Ratchet & Clank for charity


Dec 03
// Jordan Devore
It's truly awe-inspiring to see how many gamers are willing to put their dedication to good use by organizing gaming marathons in the name of Child's Play. And let's not forget the generous people who help out the cause throu...
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Ratchet & Clank: A Crack in Time gets pretty little patch


Dec 03
// Nick Chester
Ratchet and Clank: A Crack in Time is good, but it's not perfect. That is, of course, why Insomniac just released a patch for the title which fixes a bunch of stuff you may or not have known was broken.  The update (1.20...
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Kill some time with Ratchet & Clank 'Race Through Time'


Nov 13
// Nick Chester
If for whatever reason you haven't played Ratchet & Clank: A Crack in Time, there are only two acceptable reasons - you're broke or you don't have a PlayStation 3. "I'm not interested" is not acceptable; the game is good,...
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Ratchet & Clank figures available this holiday


Oct 24
// Nick Chester
I love me some Ratchet & Clank. Could you not tell in my review for the duo's latest exploits, A Crack in Time?So imagine how thrilled I was when I flipped through the instruction manual for my retail copy of the game to ...

Review: Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time

Oct 22 // Nick Chester
Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time (PlayStation 3)Developer: Insomniac GamesPublisher: Sony Computer Entertainment Released: October 27, 2009MSRP: $59.99As the third and final installment of the Future trilogy which started with 2007's Tools of Destruction, A Crack in Time kicks off right where Insomniac's downloadable title Quest for Booty left off. Clank has been kidnapped by the evil Doctor Nefarious in a, uh, nefarious plot that has the evildoer attempting to control time and space. As the wrap-up to an overall story, A Crack in Time does a brilliant job of tying everything together, while at the same time adding more than enough backstory and history to characters that fans like myself have already come to love.More importantly, A Crack in Time's narrative -- and the cut-scenes that help move it along -- represent a triumph for Insomniac. While the developer has always been good at crafting engaging and funny dialogue for the adventurous Lombax and the folks around him, A Crack in Time features some of the best scripted story elements in the series to date. To say Insomniac could hold its weight against animated fun-for-all-ages heavy hitters like Pixar and Disney wouldn't be much of a stretch. Taken as a collection of characters and story, A Crack in Time would be an entertaining and viable feature film; I'd be first in line.But without fun gameplay, A Crack in Time would fall flat. Fortunately, Insomniac's Ratchet and Clank pedigree already provides a solid foundation for the new title. Longtime fans will immediately feel at home with the basic controls, even the game's newer elements borrowing cues from previous titles. A Crack in Time is broken up into three distinct gameplay sections -- action-packed Ratchet levels with light puzzle, the time-bending puzzle Clank levels with light action, and all out galaxy-exploring space gameplay.The Ratchet levels are cut from the same template as the rest of the series, with players exploring various environments with platforming elements and a whole lot of blowing crap up with some of the sickest (and most clever) weapons in gaming. While many familiar tools return from Ratchet's previous exploits, Insomniac has added enough "new" to keep you on your toes, including upgradable "Constructo" weapons that can be customized in both function and look. No surprise, exploring planets and blowing up a wide assortment of curious alien lifeforms is as fulfilling as ever in A Crack in Time. The simple act of breaking boxes and collecting bolts hasn't gotten boring, and is as addictive as it was in 2002 when Insomniac introduced the furry/metal duo to PlayStation 2 gamers.It has to be noted that one of Ratchet's newest gadgets, the Hover Boots, are an absolute blast to use. In fact, once you slap them on your feet a few hours into the game, you'll not want to take them off. A faster form of movement, the boots allow Ratchet to hover and glide quickly across the ground. Environments are equipped with "speed strips" (how convenient) that will give a quick boost, lending itself to race-like sections and sick jumps that are scattered across the game's worlds. It's interesting how such a simple addition can change the way a game feels almost entirely -- the simple act of moving from one side of a world to the other can be absolutely exhilarating. If A Crack in Time proves one thing, it's that every game -- from Double Dragon to Guitar Hero: Rocks the 80s -- could probably benefit from some some of hover-boot implementation.Clank gameplay sections offer an interesting contrast to the more action/shooter Ratchet areas, as well as offering a brilliant and mind-bending gameplay innovation -- the ability to record and replay multiple instances of Clanks in an environment to solve puzzles. While the Clank sections aren't entirely devoid of action (the little guy can swing his Chronoscepter to bash enemies or deflect their attacks), its this new gameplay addition that is the true highlight. While delving into the specifics will probably require more words than I'd care to spend in this review (you can get more details here), here's the short version: you can record multiple instances of Clanks, and play them back in real-time to help you trigger switches and such.One example includes a room with two switches, both of which require pressure to open a single door. The idea would be to record two instances of Clank, one for each switch. On the third recording, you'd move your Clank in real time towards the opened door, as the two recordings provide pressure to the aforementioned switches. That's the simple example, with these puzzles getting more complicated as the game progresses by including enemies, moving platforms, and more. The puzzles required to advance the story are tricky enough to make you scratch your head, but never convoluted enough to have you stomping your feet in frustration. The bonus Clank puzzles, on the other hand, are a whole other ball of wax. Fans of unique platforming puzzles and mind-benders like Portal should be delighted by the challenges.Insomniac also added an all new space exploration element to A Crack in Time, which Ratchet can board his upgradable ship and zip around the galaxy. Not only does this provide a link between missions, but also allows Ratchet to explore the various planets and moons around the galaxy. These spherical worlds allow Insomniac to throw in plenty of non-story driven obstacles, many of which are directly tied into the use of Ratchet's hover-boots. On these worlds (which can be visited in mostly any order you choose), Ratchet can find additional bolts to spend on gear, as well as Zoni that can be used to upgrade his ship.Controlling the ship is pretty basic, moving left and right with the right analog stick, and the buttons used to "pew pew" various enemy ships along the way. While there's nothing particular wrong with the flying sections (they're actually a good bit of fun, and a nice break from the standard action), they can get a bit repetitive. It's a whole lot of "pew pew" and "pow pow" in a vast space that mostly looks the same, which one can only take so much of. There are a few story-related battles that take place during the sections to switch things up a bit, they really take a back-seat to the more traditional style of Ratchet and Clank gameplay.By no means were Tools of Destruction and Quest for Booty slouches in the visuals department, but it must be said that A Crack in Time is easily the best looking of the bunch. Iterations on the in-house Insomniac Engine have allowed for more colorful environments, better animated characters, and slick particle and lighting effects. Insomniac clearly knows what it's doing with the PlayStation 3 and it shows; there are few games that look this crisp, colorful, and alive on any platform.If there's any one particular thing one could ding A Crack in Time on is that it has a feel that's completely consistent with the rest of the series. So much so that one may be able to accuse it of being "more of the same," despite a number of interesting gameplay additions and innovations. Of course, this isn't completely a bad thing -- the quality of the series has been far above average across the board. Complaining that A Crack it Time is a lot like the other Ratchet & Clank games is like complaining that two five-star meals "kind of taste the same."For fans of the series, picking up A Crack in Time was never a question. You've likely already pre-order the game. If you've for some reason found that Ratchet & Clank isn't your cup of tea, it's likely you're suffering from an illness, but take note that A Crack in Time is similar enough that it probably won't change your mind. For those of you who've never embarked on an adventure with the furry-faced hero and his brainy metal friend, you've got a lot of catching up to do, but it'll be worth it -- Ratchet & Clank: A Crack in Time is easily one of the best in the series. Score: 9 -- Superb (9s are a hallmark of excellence. There may be flaws, but they are negligible and won't cause massive damage to what is a supreme title.)
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Insomniac Games' Ratchet and Clank Future: A Crack in Time represents the ninth game in the series, which started back in 2002 on the PlayStation 2. That's nine games in seven years, folks. Wow. Sure, that's not quite Gu...

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Insomniac crazy, opening its doors to you animals


Oct 15
// Nick Chester
If you're in the Burbank, California area, you might want to clear your schedule on October 23. To celebrate the October 27 North American launch of Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time, the folks at Insomniac are...
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Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time goes gold


Oct 09
// Nick Chester
Insomniac Games has announced that Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time is done. Finished. In the can. The game's gone gold! That means it's on its way to the factory where fairies replicated discs and then g...
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How f'ing metal is Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time?


Oct 07
// Nick Chester
All week long, we've been asking developers to tell us (in their own words, and in any way they see fit) just how "metal" their upcoming games are. It is, after all, Rocktober. We started the week with BioWare and D...
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Europe receiving R&C: A Crack in Time Collector's Edition


Oct 07
// Brad Nicholson
A Collector’s Edition version of Ratchet & Clank: A Crack in Time is coming to participating European retailers.Revealed this morning on the official European PlayStation blog, the Collector’s Edition has a fe...
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A Crack in Time too big for one demo, will get two


Oct 02
// Nick Chester
Apparently, Ratchet & Clank: A Crack in Time (one of my "must have" titles this fall) won't just be getting a downloadable demo... it will be getting two! In the latest episode of Insomniac's Full Moon...

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