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Mario Kart 8 DLC Pack 2 photo
Mario Kart 8 DLC Pack 2

Mario Kart 8 gets 8 new tracks: Baby Park, Animal Crossing, and more


F-Zero love, too
Apr 15
// Steven Hansen
Nintendo detailed its DLC Pack 2 for Mario Kart 8 during a recent Nintendo Direct. The 200cc races are coming free for all, but you gotta pay if you want to play (the 8 new tracks). The Animal Crossing: New Leaf track is lov...
Free Forza photo
Free Forza

Friendly reminder: Last day to get the free Forza Horizon Fast & Furious game


Act fast, but not furious
Apr 10
// Brett Makedonski
Two weeks has already come and gone, meaning that today, April 10, is the last day you can pick up the free Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious title for both Xbox One and Xbox 360. Beginning tomorrow, it jumps t...
Mario Kart 8 photo
Mario Kart 8

Mario Kart 8's 200cc class put to the test on Piranha Plant Pipeway


It'll be hard to go back to 150cc
Apr 08
// Jordan Devore
We're about two weeks out from Nintendo adding the speedy new 200cc class to Mario Kart 8. After watching a few of these side-by-side comparison videos between 200cc and 150cc, it already feels like I'm growing accustomed to...
Forza cars photo
Forza cars

Dom! Forza Horizon 2 got a (wolf) pack of cars!


Eight cars, five dollars
Apr 07
// Brett Makedonski
Some of us live a quarter mile at a time. Some of us are always fast and furious, not just when we're Fast and Furious. Some of us have nitrous oxide for blood, and a gas tank for a brain. If speed's your everything, your re...
Mario Kart update photo
Mario Kart update

Mario Kart 8's new 200cc class compared to 150cc


I'm going to stay away from the leaderboards
Apr 02
// Jordan Devore
After Nintendo updates Mario Kart 8 on April 23, there will be a brand new racing class available for free: 200cc. To give us a better sense of how quick it is, here's a side-by-side comparison of 200cc and the game's curren...
Mario Kart photo
Mario Kart

Mario Kart adds 200cc class, DLC Pack 2, and more costumes on April 23


Watch out for Mr. Resetti!
Apr 01
// Jordan Devore
Oh, right, we still have more Mario Kart 8 DLC coming up. It's been so long since I locked in my pre-order that I had totally forgotten! DLC Pack 2 marks the debut of Animal Crossing's Isabelle and Villager as racers, and al...
NBA photo
NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves go old school with Rubio Kart 64


Nobody tell Nintendo
Mar 31
// Robert Summa
Since Nintendo loves content creators so much, let's keep this Mario Kart 64-inspired video by the Minnesota Timberwolves on the down low. Ricky Rubio must love it, though, because it's going to be the only chance he has to actually win something meaningful. [Via Facebook]

Review: Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious

Mar 31 // Steven Hansen
[embed]289632:57948:0[/embed] Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious (Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Playground GamesPublisher: Microsoft StudioReleased: March 27, 2015MSRP: Free until April 10, then $9.99 Steven: I don't got friends... I got family. Want to talk about 2 Forza 2 Furious? Brett: Yeah, we can talk for review. Start with some dialogue, send it, and I'll respond. S: Too late. I'm counting the preceding as "started." Everyone is going to see how the Destructoid sausage gets made. Boring fucking emails. I am so very torn (I'm all out of faith, this is how I feel) on Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious. On one hand, I am playing a free (without Xbox Live, but only until April 10) sampling of Forza Horizon 2 that feels like it contains enough of what Forza Horizon 2 is about -- especially to me, as not a car person. On the other hand, the Fast & Furious partnership that bore this free thing feels too crass, too spurious. It's just not there thematically because this is still Forza Horizon 2 (a very fun car driving game). NOS and racing for pinks feel like set dressing. Ludacris' voice over linking races just feels sort of bland. They couldn't even throw in a "Did you see that?" B: Fantastic Natalie Imbruglia reference aside (I have a whole story about "Left of the Middle" for another day), this feels less Fast & Furious and more like a large-scale demo for Forza Horizon 2. If I can add a third and fourth hand to your two, this might be the best that Forza Horizon 2 ever gets. No boring C and D class races -- just fun cars, and a campaign with a digestible scope. However, the Fast & Furious veneer isn't fooling anyone. The one-minute unskippable movie sizzle reel at the beginning is the strongest the tie-in ever gets. I don't know that anyone expected this to be anything more than fan-service, but it barely qualifies as that. The NOS mechanic is the one alteration made to gameplay, and it doesn't even do anything! It adds a filter to indicate that you're going real fast, but you don't actually gain ground on other cars. Maybe they're all using their NOS at the exact same time I am. If so, it's uncanny how that keeps happening. S: It's probably the weakest boost I've felt in a racer. Seems to slowly up your top speed on straightaways. The digestible scope thing is interesting because for as short as it is in terms of providing you with explicit objectives, the pace felt kind of whack. I already drove a McLaren in one of those skill point challenges before I won one in a race, and even then it was arguably not better than the Nissan GTR I used to win it. Plus, the few more cars you unlock down the line mostly drop from these super cars to A level or whatever, and it's like, why am I going to trade down? If you're a car nut, I guess. Or really want to drive a Jeep Wrangler. Races are engaging at any level, though, whether your top speed is around 90 or 200 mph which is good because the latter half in the race progression doesn't solely scale to super cars and will make you pick out other options in your garage. The skill point challenges, on the other hand, are rather dull or too easy. I drove around haphazardly burning out and running into things and aced most of them without much effort, save for the one that was like 25,000 points, which just took a bit longer. On the other hand, one challenge that was a combination of the two -- race to an end point in under two minutes and score 15 near misses with other cars -- was a nice mix and fit a bit more into the Fast & Furious theme of skilled drivers doing exceptional and cool things with cars. Even if "get close to but don't hit this many cars for no particular reason" is, well, arbitrary. Being able to come in first place consistently despite being a horrible driver that crashes monstrously evokes the opposite feeling, despite helping to keep things light. B: That isn't so much a problem that's inherent to this particular piece of content, so much as it is of Forza Horizon in general. And, if you want to go broader, it's really the case for any racer that doesn't pride itself on being simulation-like, or whatever. I mean, it's easy to forget when the mediums stay in their respective corners, but when you try crossing them over, you realize that in a lot of ways, Forza Horizon 2 basically already was Fast & Furious: The Videogame. That is to say, it's just a lot of fast racing and over-the-top stunts that generally require a suspension of belief. The #synergy between the two franchises is obvious, so the tie-in makes sense on a base level. However, tacking a movie known for being ridiculous on top of a game known for being ridiculous elevates expectations in a way that's near impossible to deliver on. This game falls flat in that sense, because those are heights this never had a chance to soar to. S: That's it. This is fun because Forza Horizon is fun and it is nice that it's free (until April 10), glorified demo that it is, but it makes me yearn for an actual Fast & Furious game with a "Press F to drink a Corona" prompt and a Han lives retcon. [This review is based on a retail build of the game downloaded for free on the Xbox Marketplace.]
Fast & Furious Forza photo
Just a quarter mile
Forza Horizon has long been considered the Fast & Furious of games, so this standalone release makes sense. Unfortunately. it's not much more than a thin, thin Fast & Furious skin over Forza Horizon 2, a bit of a disa...

...I got family photo
...I got family

Quarter mile livestream: Fast & Furious expansion for Forza Horizon


I don't got friends...
Mar 27
// Steven Hansen
Are you's all ready to live(stream) your life a quarter mile at a time?! Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious, a standalone expansion, is available for free on Xbox One and 360 until April 10. If you download it before...
Free Forza expansion photo
Free Forza expansion

That free Fast & Furious expansion for Forza Horizon 2 is out today


You don't need the base game to play
Mar 27
// Jordan Devore
More free stuff to download on Xbox One and Xbox 360 assuming you get around to nabbing Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious before April 10, at which point the standalone expansion becomes $10. As we said previously,...
F1 photo
F1

F1 2015 coming this June, but only on current gen


Yes, this is a good thing
Mar 26
// Robert Summa
Fans of F1 and actual racing can breathe a sigh of relief regarding two facts about the upcoming F1 2015. One, it will be out this June. And two, it's only going to be on current gen consoles and PC -- that's right, no dumbin...
The Crew photo
The Crew

The Crew is getting a two-hour trial, upgradable to the final version


Go hit the hoad
Mar 25
// Chris Carter
Starting this week, both PS4 and Xbox One owners can go grab a free version of Ubisoft's new open-world racer, The Crew. It's a two-hour trial of sorts, and if you want to buy the full game you can continue your progress. Whi...
Driveclub photo
Driveclub

Driveclub developer hit with layoffs; game now considered a service


So no more MotorStorm then?
Mar 19
// Robert Summa
The life of Driveclub has not been easy. From delays to broken promises, what was to be a flagship title for the PlayStation 4 has become somewhat of a joke -- whether actually deserved or not. And even though we can debate i...
Driveclub photo
Driveclub

Driveclub getting Lamborghini DLC


New cars and tour coming this month
Mar 09
// Laura Kate Dale
Later this month Driveclub is going to be getting some new Lamborghini-themed DLC. The Lamborghini DLC pack, which comes with four new cars and a dedicated tour, is due out at some unspecified time later this month alongside...
Quarter mile at a time photo
Quarter mile at a time

Forza Horizon 2 gets free, standalone Fast & Furious expansion


Free for the first two weeks
Feb 25
// Steven Hansen
Get ready to live your life a quarter mile at a time. An Xbox and Universal partnership has borne Forza Horizon 2 Presents Fast & Furious, a standalone expansion.  Not only do you not need to own the base game to pl...

Review: Harold

Feb 20 // Conrad Zimmerman
Harold (PC)Developer: Moon Spider StudioPublisher: Moon Spider StudioReleased: February 12, 2015MSRP: $19.99 The premise of Harold is centered in a school where angels are trained to become guardians of humanity. For their final exam, students are tasked with safely guiding a human as they race through deadly obstacle courses, working to ensure their human not only survives but is at the head of the pack. Players assume the role of Gabe, a top student who has coasted by on natural talent and needs only to place third in the final exam races to earn a coveted scholarship to Archangel Academy. In a cruel twist, Gabe has been matched up with Harold, a determined but physically inept racer. Where other angels are paired with athletes able to nimbly hop around obstacles, Harold will run straight into them and die without intervention, taking Gabe's hopes of higher education with him. Harold himself isn't so much controlled as he is prompted to act. In the vein of an auto-running platformer, he trundles straight along the path until he's compelled to jump by a button press or sent into a brief sprint with the expenditure of the "Puff Power" collected during the race (also used as extra lives for Harold). A sprint extends the length of a jump, but that's the extent of Harold's physical prowess, far from enough to safely navigate a course alone. To succeed, the player must manage Harold and his environment simultaneously to finish each of the game's twelve races. [embed]287901:57417:0[/embed] Each race is presented as a series of screens which Harold crosses from left to right, typically containing one or more objects that can be moved or manipulated for his benefit. There is considerable variety in environmental objects and how they're interacted with, using different applications of the left analog stick. Platforms can be pushed and pulled, quick flicks bash barriers with a wispy battering ram, and gears turn with rotations. Some objects, like wooden bridges and snare traps, won't stop Harold but offer opportunities to propel him forward more quickly. When multiple objects exist, pulling the triggers allows the player to switch between interactive elements. These objects are not only helpful to Harold, they can be a hindrance to the other racers. Every manipulable object has the potential to disrupt other racers and slow them down while additionally rewarding the player with more Puff Power for sprinting and mishaps of their own.  It's an exercise similar to plate spinning. Under the constant pressure of advancement through the course, the player has to remain mindful of Harold's position to time sprints and jumps, while ensuring that the coming challenges are prepared for his arrival. There is barely enough time to recognize what actions need to be taken before those actions must be performed, which makes it exhilarating to play when some confidence has been gained. As the courses become more difficult and introduce more complex configuration of objects, the game even grants the ability to pan ahead one race segment and get greater lead time on establishing the course. This is yet another plate. Moving ahead means leaving Harold to his own devices until the player returns to the prior screen or Harold catches up, further dividing focus. It also means additional opportunities to create interference for opponents ahead of Harold, which quickly becomes as important as keeping him alive if he's going to finish third or better. It would be horrible to leap into one of these races cold. Certainly, learning the intricacies of a course is one of the great pleasures of a racing game, but Harold is so demanding of the player's focus that running a stage without some knowledge of its contents would probably frustrate most players into quickly quitting. Moon Spider has wisely implemented a progression system which prevents this by putting the player through a practice mode on new stages before the race can be attempted. The practice mode presents the segments of the course individually as exercises, making sure the player can get Harold through each segment while also providing indications of optimal paths achievable by collecting the three stars on each screen. After completing a race, an even more difficult "challenge" mode becomes available for the stage in which Harold must navigate the course and collect stars while running at top speed. If Harold dies in this mode, that's the end of the attempt, making the stages extremely hard. Mastering a stage's challenge mode all but guarantees one has the skill to take first place in a replay of the main race, if desired. Harold is a satisfying challenge, but it may be a little too demanding of accuracy at times. I found rotating actions to be particularly difficult to perform evenly and had frequent issues getting back and forth flicks to register correctly. While I, as the player, am perfectly willing to accept the most responsibility for this, it's worth keeping in mind for the easily frustrated, especially as the game offers no means of reassigning controls nor allows for any input method other than a controller. Harold is also a looker of a game. Employing a hand-drawn animation style, it's bright and colorful, with exquisite detail. The visuals are almost wasted on a game where the player barely has a chance to observe their surroundings. Cutscenes before stages are not nearly as impressive from an animation standpoint, but do enjoy well performed narration and Harold's escalating pre-race mishaps are generally funny. Between its charming premise, beautiful graphics, and demanding gameplay, Harold is a winner in the end. Players who appreciate auto-running platform games should find it to be a fresh approach to the concepts found in such titles and a worthy challenge. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Harold review photo
Divine interference
Moon Spider Studio has released its debut title, Harold, an endearing and challenging race game about the most incompetent runner ever to need protection from a guardian angel. With some quick thinking, quicker thumbs, and an opportunistic eye, players guide the titular Harold to victory against all odds. Who doesn't love an underdog?

THUMPER photo
THUMPER

If this is what a 'rhythm violence' game looks like, I'm all about them


Nominated for Excellence in Audio at the Independent Games Festival
Feb 18
// Jordan Devore
While watching this trailer for THUMPER, a self-described rhythm violence game from current Harmonix artist Brian Gibson and former lead programmer Marc Flury, I didn't want to blink. I also let out a confused "what?" follow...
Spectra photo
Spectra

Race through ten Chipzel songs on a laser track in Spectra


Billed as 'F-Zero meets Audiosurf'
Feb 18
// Darren Nakamura
"F-Zero meets Audiosurf" brings some vivid imagery to mind, but after watching the above trailer, I'm not sure I agree with that tagline for the indie racer Spectra. Sure, it's set to some bumpin' Chipzel tracks, but it look...
Driveclub photo
Driveclub

Upcoming Driveclub car will peel your face off


Not quite ludicrous speed though
Feb 12
// Robert Summa
To tease one of the upcoming cars arriving for Driveclub this month, the developers decided to give us a sneak peak via a video showing off the terrifying speed the unnamed four-wheeled machine can do -- at least 242 mph. You got what it takes to hit that kind of speed and not end up a stain on the road? We'll have to see in the coming weeks.  
Ubisoft photo
Ubisoft

The Crew patch fixes months-old lost stats bug, doesn't return lost stats


Ubisoft
Feb 09
// Steven Hansen
Ubisoft's open world racer The Crew launched in December with a bug that the team couldn't fix over the holidays or also the month of January. It was a big bug, too, what with it randomly erasing players' stats.  Wi...
Drift Stage photo
Drift Stage

PS4, Vita ports locked in for rad racer Drift Stage


It's not too late to get in on the Kickstarter
Feb 04
// Jordan Devore
With a few days left on the Kickstarter for Drift Stage, developer Super Systems Softworks has confirmed that PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita ports will eventually happen for its arcade racer. Expect those to land sometime...
Drive!Drive!Drive! photo
Drive!Drive!Drive!

Drive!Drive!Drive! looks insane, sounds wonderful


Different Cloth announces new multi-track racer
Feb 04
// Kyle MacGregor
Derrick the Deathfin and lilt line developer Different Cloth has announced a new project. It's called Drive!Drive!Drive!, like the Ryan Gosling film if you shouted into an echo chamber. It's a driving game where you race multiple tracks simultaneously. I'm loving that music and violet hue. Expect it to end up on "some platforms at some point in the future."
Forza Horizon 2 photo
Forza Horizon 2

Time to get your Stig on


Forza gets Top Gear love
Feb 03
// Robert Summa
If you're a car junkie, then you should be very familiar with Top Gear. Microsoft is hoping that familiarity will lead to DLC sales as the Forza Horizon 2 Top Gear Car Pack has just been made available to Xbox One racers for $5. Have a look at the list of cars available (including a freebie):
RIDE photo
RIDE

Take a ride with RIDE


Or just ride it out
Jan 27
// Robert Summa
As a daily rider, when I first heard a game like RIDE was announced, I got a little excited. Not too excited, but just a little. Sometimes I need a virtual motorcycle fix and that's just not easy to get in a car-dominated ra...
Forza Motorsport 6 photo
Forza Motorsport 6

Microsoft announces Forza 6...with a nice, stationary model of a Ford GT


Forza Motorsport 6
Jan 12
// Steven Hansen
Forget the Euro-dynamism and great soundtrack of Forza Horizon. Microsoft and Turn 10 have announced Forza Motorsport 6, baby!  Look at that well-modeled Ford GT, Forza 6's "cover car." Look at it. Look at it again. Exc...
Hidden Nintendo song photo
Hidden Nintendo song

Hidden 'Totaka's Song' discovered in Mario Kart 8


You sly dog
Jan 12
// Jordan Devore
Composer Kazumi Totaka has been hiding this tune in Nintendo games for over two decades now. While some of us will best recognize "Totaka's Song" from Mario Paint, it has turned up in titles like Link's Awakening, Luigi's Ma...
Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Drift Stage looks and plays like a love letter to classic arcade racing games


I haven't felt this compelled to share a Kickstarter in quite a while
Jan 09
// Jordan Devore
One look at Drift Stage in motion -- a few quick seconds into its main theme song -- and it's love. This is a racing game for PC/Mac with one hell of an art direction currently seeking funding on Kickstarter. The pitch isn't...
Joe Danger photo
Joe Danger

Tearaway is back with a cameo in Joe Danger 2 for PS Vita


Forget Steve from Minecraft, play as Atoi or Iota instead
Jan 07
// Jordan Devore
Before No Man's Sky, there was Joe Danger 2, a lovable side-scrolling racing/platform game about a motorbike-riding daredevil. After appearing on Xbox 360, PC, and PlayStation 3, the game is now primed for its PS Vita debut, ...
More F-Zero, maybe photo
More F-Zero, maybe

Miyamoto thinks F-Zero needs a 'new type of controller interface'


We'd be fine without it, all the same
Jan 06
// Jordan Devore
In a recent appearance on Smosh Games (interview starts at 4:35), Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto touched on a range of topics, including the future of F-Zero and Pikmin. The famed designer gave a concise update on the latter se...

Review: The Crew

Dec 22 // Brittany Vincent
The Crew (Xbox One, Xbox 360, PC, PlayStation 4 [reviewed])Developer: Ivory Tower, Ubisoft ReflectionsPublisher: UbisoftReleased: December 2, 2014MSRP: $59.99 The Crew was arresting ever since I became entangled within its narrative, which is surprisingly gripping for the genre. Its deliciously cheesy and lightweight criminal protagonist’s plight gave me something to shoot for: revenge. Kyuss’ “Demon Cleaner” blared from my television as I burned rubber to tail the dirty FBI agent who murdered Alex Taylor’s brother, years after his being framed. With the law on my side, I was absolutely ready to exact my sweet, sweet revenge by working my way to the top of the gangs who put me away and took my brother from me. Sure, it’s cliched. You’ve heard this story before, namely within the realm of Need for Speed and its ilk, but I didn’t care. I related to it. I probably would have done much of the same given the situation. So I couldn’t have cared less who I was playing as after The Crew motivated me to drive cross-country in-game, winning races, delivering cars, and taking out leaders in the name of justice along the way. [embed]285043:56708:0[/embed] That’s why with all of its shortcomings I was able to genuinely sit back, relax, and enjoy The Crew. Most importantly, I did it without the influence or necessity of other people. And looking back on my time with the game now, like in real life, other people would only have tainted what I was able to accomplish. Let’s get down to brass tacks, though. The bread and butter of any racer is of course car mechanics, and there’s a comfortable mix of arcade-style handling with simulation-styled controls. You can alter the controls to your liking so it feels more familiar and workable, but for the most part the game is quite forgiving, even if you tend to bump into that car in front of you or the signpost on the side of the road. This actually tends to work in your favor, especially during timed events where clipping a guard rail and spinning out in another game could mean the difference between starting the race over entirely and losing a couple of seconds. All of the cars have a very basic “stock” feel to them in the beginning, which you can liken to the very same feeling arcade racers pack. You’ll need to tune them accordingly before they begin to feel more like wieldy vehicles, and this is done by purchasing additional upgrades with points earned throughout the game as you progress. There’s a robust if uninspired system in place to ensure your earnings are tracked in every way they can be, so there are plenty of opportunities for you to earn additional points here and there to make your muscle car or humble sedan roadworthy. But without somewhere to drive, where would we be in a racer? The vast open world of The Crew is its biggest asset, and despite the dozens of missions and races you can drive to from the start of the game, you’ll undoubtedly spend most of your time checking out the U.S. countryside, just like a virtual road trip. You can hit up Manhattan and check out the Rocky Mountains with no loading times between, spending hours upon hours exploring every little nook and cranny the game has to offer. Sprinkled throughout the countryside are a smattering of missions you can complete, ranging from a couple of minutes long to a few hours. You might spend some time speeding through gates for experience. In another area you might be charged with delivering a car as a gift for one of the gang members’ contacts. There’s always something to do, even if a good part of it consists of single-player missions that are best enjoyed alone. That’s where things get a little confusing. Unfortunately, Ubisoft opted for the boneheaded decision to force The Crew players to remain online at all times to play this game. Effectively, that makes it a racing MMORPG, given the fact that experience is earned through said missions and whatnot. That also means other players are sharing the map with you at any given time. Luckily, you aren’t forced to get buddy buddy with others in order to complete missions and progress, though if you want to reach out, you can form your own crews to conquer instances you just can’t best. You can even reach out at any time to complete a mission with a second player, which can get you through some pretty tight spots. If either player wins, both participants receive experience, which makes playing with others a lucrative offer. But what really happens is a flood of notifications declaring that RiffRaff420blAzEiT wants to race against you, or YesImAGirlPlayingAVideoGame wants to complete a mission together. In more congested areas you’ll find that everyone just wants in on the multiplayer experience, which only got worse as the days piled up after release date. Some might find this an alright problem to have, given the fact that online-only games need their players to participate. But as someone who prefers to play solo, period, it was tiring and jarring, especially since I wished only to spin the narrative of my choosing, and that was being a lone wolf on a cross-country journey to avenge my brother. I didn’t want anyone getting in the way. Of course, for the review’s sake, I had to participate in multiplayer events, which worked quite smoothly. It can still be difficult at times to find players for races or assistance (if that’s your kind of thing) but I didn’t have any issues establishing or maintaining a connection once I made the decision to. It’s a helpful addition when and if you choose to take advantage of it, but if all you’re concerned with is a solo career as a driver, you’ll want to turn notifications off and speed through the desert on your lonesome. Unfortunately, sometimes the solo grind can be difficult. Unless you challenge nearly every mission you come across and rack up the experience points, you won’t have reached the best level at which you can best your competition. This will call for an abundance of experience farming, which does tend to give a “homework” sort of feel to the game at some points, but with so many places to explore, you can take it one play session at a time. No need for rushing — you’ve got the whole of the the States to explore. With an insanely large world it had to be assumed there would be at least some sort of hit in visual fidelity as well, and while the game looks competent at least in the current-gen department, it’s not as great-looking as it could have been. The trade-off for minimal load times and such an expansive world more than makes up for it, however, and visually impressive cut scenes prove time was spent on making characters and cars impressive where the effort could be more concentrated. The Crew offers you the entire countryside to explore solo or with friends (or strangers), plenty of cars, customization options, and a narrative that extends a purpose beyond “being the best” to get your motor running. Ubisoft’s familiar structural pitfalls like microtransactions, online-only play, and other trappings hinder rather than enhance, but those things have become par for the course by now. Thankfully, they don’t mar the overall experience, and that was an overtly positive one for me. I don’t need a crew to cruise downtown Chicago or the west coast. I was just fine going it alone. And if you settle in for a few hours and let the game take you, I surmise you will be, too. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
The Crew review photo
Me and my crew, we swaggin' in the room
A great racer to me doesn’t focus on an abundance of customization options or entire garages of cars. It doesn’t even serve up solid multiplayer modes or an interesting soundtrack. It keeps me playing. And let me ...


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