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Racing games

Gold wheel photo
Gold wheel

Ride in style with this blinged-out Mario Kart 8 wheel


Link's sponsored by the Big Tymers
Jun 30
// Brett Makedonski
Somewhere along the way, Link traded Epona for a sleek sportbike. It's unconventional, but probably necessary in the high-octane world of Mario Kart 8. I mean, Epona is literally one horsepower. That doesn't quite cut it. Lin...
Driveclub photo
Driveclub

Driveclub PS Plus Edition is out tomorrow, but...


Just the offline mode at first
Jun 24
// Jordan Devore
The Driveclub PS Plus Edition saga is nearing its end. After months of delays, the trial version for PlayStation Plus subscribers released on the store yesterday only to be pulled. It was "premature," according to Evolution S...
Forza photo
Forza

There's a blue Forza Xbox One coming


VRRROOOOOMMMMMMMM
Jun 24
// Laura Kate Dale
If you've been waiting to buy an Xbox One but were tuned off by the lack of VROOOOOOMMMM and SCHREEEEEEE engine noises made by the console, then I have some exciting news for you. A new Xbox One bundle has been announced and ...
Project CARS 2 photo
Project CARS 2

What is this, a race? Project CARS 2 announced


Slightly Mad promises continued support
Jun 22
// Jordan Devore
It was only last month that I read Brett's review of Project CARS, and now Slightly Mad Studios is out there talking up a sequel for PC, PS4, Xbox One, and SteamOS. Only thing that's missing is a call for pre-orders but, worr...

Need For Speed is back with double spoilers and customization galore

Jun 21 // Jed Whitaker
While the cosmetic customization in the build I played was deep, it was nowhere near as in depth as the beloved Need for Speed: Underground. The car tuning was fantastic and simple enough for a none car guy like myself to understand. There is a slider that allows you to make cars control more like modern games in the series (drift handling), or more like classic games in the series (grip handling). You can also manually adjust features of cars to make them control as you see fit.  Hundreds of events are scattered around a large open world, and players just need to pull up and hit a button to start the event. Other players can fill out the roster as competing racers. Completing the events advances one of five stories based on different types of driving: speed, style, customization, hanging with your crew, and messing with the cops. It is still unclear how exactly these stories will be advanced, but story is rarely important in racing games. Need for Speed is looking like it really could be the definitive game in the series. Get your hype engines revving. 
Need For Speed preview photo
Definitive version of NFS
The upcoming Need for Speed doesn't have a subtitle because it wants to be the definitive game in the series, according to Craig Sullivan of Ghost Games. The developers have cherry picked the best parts of the previous subtit...

Forza 6 photo
Forza 6

Forza 6 reps American muscle for Xbox One


Leak details confirmed
Jun 15
// Steven Hansen
Microsoft Euro-trashed the pop fun of Forza Horizon with a somber, American muscle-y showing of Forza 6 at its press conference, confirming all the details that leaked last week: "over 450 cars, 1080p60 visuals, 3D puddle effects, night racing, 26 'world-famous' locales, 2-player split screen, 24-player races, and the return of the Drivatar AI system." It releases September 15.
Runbow photo
Runbow

Runbow for Wii U is freaking weird and I kind of love it


Do a chicken dance as a red muscle-man
Jun 15
// Chris Carter
When I first heard of Runbow, I didn't know what to make of it. It's a nine player "runner," a subgenre that's become way too over-saturated with the dawn of the mobile market. But after actually playing it, I can definitely ...

Review: The Next Penelope

Jun 10 // Chris Carter
The Next Penelope (PC [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: Aurelien RegardPublisher: Plug In DigitalMSRP: $12.99Release Date: May 29, 2015 (PC) / TBA (Wii U) It's the year 3044, in Ithaca. Odysseus has been away at sea for 10 years, and his kingdom is now under attack by Poseidon, father of the Cyclopes race. As a result, it's up to Odysseus' wife Penelope to find him. If you couldn't tell by the year marker, all of this is set to the tone of a futuristic epic -- spaceships are prevalent throughout Penelope's universe, and Poseidon is basically a member of an alien race. A lot of people probably won't even pay attention to the ties to Homer's Odyssey, but it works for the most part. All of this setup brings us to the main event -- racing. Yep, somehow, someway, this is a classic top-down racer reminiscent of the Micro Machines games or Blizzard's Rock'n'Roll Racing. As such, the visuals are retro-centric, and I have to say, they look excellent. Everything from the animated anime-like portraits during cutscenes and the colorful, flashy in-game graphics are painstakingly detailed. The controls take no time at all to learn, as they mostly consist of just altering your direction by way of the arrow keys or the gamepad's triggers, but they'll take quite a while to master. Acceleration is automatic, but weapons and power-ups can be enacted by pressing a specific button (in the case of a keyboard, the up arrow). These range from things like boosts to bullets, which you'll often need to blow away enemies or blast through hazards like boulders. They're fun to use, but since the general gameplay is so fast, they don't have as big of an impact as they should. [embed]293674:58914:0[/embed] Power-ups also bring another classic racing mechanic into play -- energy zones from F-Zero. While micromanaging your abilities, staying on track, and fighting off foes, you'll also have to occasionally steer yourself into the way of energy areas to sap up more power-up meter. It's fast, frantic, and fun, especially since individual stages are roughly a minute or two long. What's amazing to me is that The Next Penelope hosts a four-hour campaign. Heck, with its old-school flair it didn't even really need to go this extra mile, but it did. The campaign is even further augmented by a full galaxy map, the power to choose what stats to level-up (including upgrades to steering, defensive capabilities, and more outwards camera zoom). Boss battles on top of all this madness make things even more interesting, turning the game into a full-on shooter. It's crazy how much variety there is. The four-person multiplayer mode also has a mini-story involving Penelope's suitors, who are battling each other for glory. It's not a fully-fledged campaign or anything, but it's a neat little way to justify its inclusion. The gist is that all four racers, CPU or player-controlled, are attempting to blow each other up while they struggle to stay on one screen. If you're left behind, you're dead, and the last ship standing takes it all. It's a good old-fashioned slugfest across nine maps, and given the way it works, all four players can feasibly share the same keyboard. It's important to note that no online play of any kind is supported. The Next Penelope is a blast to play on PC, and will probably be a massive hit at parties when it arrives on Wii U later this year. It's a shame more old-school racers aren't around, but with games like this and 90s Arcade Racer, the scene is seeing a revival that brings a huge smile to my face. [This review is based on a retail build provided by the publisher.]
Next Penelope review photo
My, how mortals take the gods to task
If I told you that I wanted to mix Greek mythology with the racing and shoot-'em-up genres, you'd probably call me crazy. But that's just what developer Aurelien Regard did with his one-man show The Next Penelope, and for the...

Forza 6 photo
Forza 6

It looks like Forza 6 details were just leaked


By way of Xbox Japan
Jun 07
// Chris Carter
Ah Microsoft. What will you have left to unveil at E3 after all of your reveals are leaked beforehand? Throw another one up on the pile, as Forza Motorsport 6 has been leaked by way of Xbox.jp. The site is down now, but it wi...
Project CARS photo
Project CARS

Project CARS races past 1M sales


PS4 is leading platform
Jun 05
// Brett Makedonski
If video game sales were racing speeds, Slightly Mad Studios would be pleased with the lap times of Project CARS. After just a month since release, the hardcore-simulation racer has sped past one million sales. Not shabby at ...
Fast Racing NEO photo
Fast Racing NEO

FAST Racing NEO is a Wii U exclusive that's looking great


60fps
Jun 03
// Chris Carter
Fast Racing NEO from developer Shin'en is only in its alpha form, but it's looking fantastic. It's set to debut exclusively on the Wii U eShop at some point, and we can now get a taste of what to expect by way of a serie...
Mario Kart photo
Mario Kart

Hacked Mario Kart 7 puts 200cc to shame


Also totally breaks the game
Jun 02
// Jordan Devore
Go ahead and skip to 2:40 in the video. That's about when the chaos begins. This demonstration from YouTube user mariohack&glitch shows how stupidly fast Mario Kart 7 can get when you tamper with the settings using, in t...
Synth photo
Synth

We could use more racing games like Power Drive 2000


Synth
May 28
// Steven Hansen
Racing games have flattened. There are still kart racers and there are still realistic racers (with mild middle ground for realistic-looking arcade racers, like Forza Horizon) and that's it. Why? Where are the horse racers a...
DiRT Rally photo
DiRT Rally

You can fly off Pikes Peak in DiRT Rally


Ignore the signs
May 26
// Jordan Devore
The new DiRT game is coming together piece by piece, and today's morsel has me reminiscing about a certain scenic climb in Colorado. Today's update for DiRT Rally is a big one, and centers on Pikes Peak (both its "full fat m...
Project CARS photo
Project CARS

Project CARS boss: 'We're running at about 23FPS on Wii U'


Yikes
May 25
// Chris Carter
I enjoyed what I've played of Project CARS. It's geared towards simulation enthusiasts, but it's clear that the development team put a lot of heart into it. It's currently out for the PC, PS4, and Xbox One, but it's...
90's Arcade Racer photo
90's Arcade Racer

Remember 90's Arcade Racer? It's looking pretty good


So blue
May 18
// Chris Carter
90s Arcade Racer feels like a relic of the past. It's actually a brand new project that was Kickstarted in 2013, but I very rarely hear anything about it, and often forget it exists. Thankfully a new update was given las...
Project CARS review photo
Project CARS review

Where is our Project CARS review?


Dragging a bit
May 06
// Brett Makedonski
Project CARS is at the starting line raring to go, but before the green flag waves, some people would like to offer their analyses. We won't be one of them. The game's review embargo just lifted, but we'll be laggin...
Need speed photo
Need speed

New Need for Speed coming 2015, Titanfall and Plants vs Zombies 2016


Who needs to be surprised this E3?
May 05
// Steven Hansen
Electronic Arts is adding to its holiday lineup (sports, Battlefront) with a new Need for Speed, according to EA financials. The company decided to chill on yearly Need for Speeds after going from developers Black Box to Crit...
Project Cars photo
Project Cars

Project Cars trailer can't seem to move at the right speed


But it looks gorgeous, nevertheless
May 04
// Brett Makedonski
I haven't yet had a chance to play Project Cars, but I have a fair amount of experience in the racing genre. Usually these games depict fast cars going reasonably fast. This trailer wavers a bit before finally nailing that. ...

Review: Project CARS

May 01 // Brett Makedonski
Project CARS (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developers: Slightly Mad StudiosPublisher: Bandai NamcoReleased: May 6, 2015 (PC), May 12 (PS4, Xbox One)Price: $59.99 Even though Project CARS is difficult, it's all rather appropriate. I've never raced cars before, but I imagine it to be an unrelentingly tough gig. There are a dozen or so drivers that are all after the same checkered flag. Slightly Mad has done a fantastic job crafting a racing experience that reflects real-life competition. Whereas other games often feel like races take place around the player, Project CARS feels like the player is one small part of the race. However, in the heat of the moment, one could be forgiven if they don't agree with that. Project CARS' AI can be so aggressive at times that it seems as if the game is trying to pound the player into submission. Opponents will veer across the track to block progress, and they'll occasionally send you skidding into the gravel trap. Sure, it's an accurate portrayal of racing, but, man, that comes as no consolation at all when it dooms the entire race. The AI isn't the only opponent in Project CARS; you're a constant threat to cause your own downfall. In the rare event that you break free from the pack, the most minute of miscalculated turns will send you straight to the back. One tire overstepping the bounds of the track will often send the car skidding off into a pile of tires, relegating you to an unimpressive finish. Also, this title doesn't play the rubberbanding game, so once the leaders have created separation, you're likely to stay off the podium. Again, frustrating, but that's what you signed up for when you booted up Project CARS. [embed]291507:58427:0[/embed] All that annoyance isn't aided by the fact that Project CARS starts the career with the lowest levels of kart racing, which just so happen to be the most uncontrollable vehicles in the game. It's almost like a trial by fire of sorts, a challenge from Slightly Mad that if you can command these unwieldy beasts, you're good enough to play this game. I was handily defeated so consistently during these races that I wondered if tweaking vehicle settings was an absolute necessity to success. That's where Project CARS' commitment to being for hardcore simulation fans became actively detrimental. Before each race, the menu will implore the player to make alterations, but offers little in the way of guidance as to what anything does. Those who know the ins and outs of cars may take great pleasure in adjusting camber angles and changing suspension heights, but the layman will be left wondering if they're actively at a disadvantage. Honestly, they probably are. Regardless of where all those sliders end up, Slightly Mad has some great driving to offer. The cars all have an appropriate weight about them, only seeming floaty when they're the lightest of vehicles. Project CARS also mandates a nice degree of subtlety with the throttle and brake, often requiring barely touching the gas to optimally weave through a set of turns. The most appreciated facet of driving is that most of the 70-some vehicles feel legitimately unique from one another, meaning that each takes some time behind the wheel before you can control it efficiently. That learning curve won't be welcomed by everyone, however. A lot of nuance is needed, and it's difficult to master. This is especially true with a standard gamepad, which is how the majority of people will play Project CARS. These controllers are often too finicky, and will send the car careening further and more slapdash than the player intended. Those with proper racing wheels will surely have an easier time. One aspect of Project CARS that never fails to impress is its aesthetic. Everything is stunningly gorgeous at all times, even when the sun blinds you as you're trying to corner. The scenery might be at its best during the rainfall, which looks fantastic, but adds another degree of difficulty as the slick roads definitely impact driving performance. Unfortunately, it also impacts game performance, as rainy weather acts as a kind of stress test, and it's where the frame rate dipped the most noticeably in the Xbox One version of the game. For a title that touts itself as offering a staggering amount of control, Project CARS is ironically rather shallow. While all cars are unlocked right from the get-go, the player has no say in what they drive throughout the career. Once signed up for a new league in which to compete, the game decides what vehicle the races take place in. Likewise, outside of the standard career progression, there just isn't much more to do in Project CARS. It basically boils down to the obligatory multiplayer, some community events, and some one-player quickmatches. The game doesn't give the player much incentive to keep playing, so that drive has to be internal. If it isn't, you might find yourself putting down Project CARS sooner than you'd think. Actually, Project CARS' career is paced in such a way that it directly conflicts with the desire to keep playing. Every race is preceded by a practice and qualifying round. Each of those lasts a minimum of ten minutes. You can probably afford to skip practice (easy, Allen Iverson), but qualifying is borderline mandatory. Bypassing it, or simulating to the end after a solid lap, means you run the very real risk of starting the race in last place. If that happens, it's unlikely that you'll finish first. The AI is just too good to let you overcome those odds. You were probably damned before you even began. Admittedly, Project CARS isn't for everyone. In fact, it isn't for most people. It's niche, and it's for those who take their racing games seriously. It does most of what it sets out to do, and it does that very well. However, the broad appeal is lacking, as the long learning curve likely outweighs what most are willing to put up with. But, for those who put in the time and manage to take the checkered flag, this title has a supremely rewarding experience that most anyone can feel proud of, regardless of familiarity with cars.
Project CARS review photo
Hard charger
Project CARS is a game that revels in its inaccessibility. It was made specifically for people who have come to expect more from their realistic racing simulators. Developer Slightly Mad took that desire and ran with it....

Mario Kart 8 update photo
Mario Kart 8 update

Mario Kart 8 update unlocks 200cc and Mirror Mode for everyone


The ride never ends
May 01
// Jordan Devore
In a move that will annoy some and please others, Nintendo has issued an update for Mario Kart 8 that unlocks the new, fast-as-hell 200cc class as well as the track-reversing Mirror Mode. Just boot up the game and you'll see ...
Project CARS photo
Project CARS

Here is your Project CARS full car listing


Jay Leno says hi
Apr 30
// Robert Summa
The upcoming racing sim Project CARS has been on the radar for many of those who live and breathe the genre. Slated for release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC on May 8, here is the full car list that we know about so far (65 of which will come with the standard edition).
Mario Kart 8 photo
Mario Kart 8

Firehopping dead in Mario Kart 8


Competitive play at 200CC renders technique ineffective
Apr 28
// Laura Kate Dale
Firehopping has essentially been killed off in competetive Mario Kart 8, thanks to the recent addition of 200cc mode to the game. While adding 200cc mode doesn't patch out the ability to firehop, the alterations that have sur...
DiRT Rally photo
DiRT Rally

Codemasters brings DiRT to Steam Early Access minus the Gymkhana


DiRT Rally
Apr 27
// Jordan Devore
The next entry in Codemasters' DiRT racing series is available now on Steam Early Access and that "scares the absolute crap out of [the studio], but in a good way." It's called DiRT Rally, and if this is the first you're hear...

Nintendo, your work isn't done on Mario Kart 8

Apr 25 // Chris Carter
New crossovers: The sky really is the limit for new franchises. While I initially wanted a full-on "Mario Kart All-Stars" for the next game, I soon realized after playing the Animal Crossing pack that Nintendo could just keep supporting 8, and it would be more than good enough. With a real online infrastructure and a visual style gorgeous enough to withstand the test of time, we don't have to wait years until a new console iteration. Keep the crossovers coming. Samus, Fox McCloud, Kirby (with his Warpstar) -- all of them would fit perfectly into the Mario Kart universe, and I can see some really ingenious tracks down the road due to Nintendo's rich history as a character factory. One request is to just go all-out for the new characters though -- no "half Mario half new" -- just go all-new. Just inject F-Zero into the game already: We've seen the Mute City and Big Blue homages, but really, with F-Zero considered by many to be the definitive racing experience over Mario Kart, that's a huge market ready to be tapped. I'm not even talking about a "Pack" here -- more like a full-on expansion in 2016 featuring cast members from F-Zero, at least 10 tracks from the series, and extra elements like new characters and planets. Use that as a barometer for gauging interest in a new F-Zero game. Miyamoto himself said last year that "the struggle is that I don't really have a good idea for what's new that we could bring to F-Zero that would really turn it into a great game again." I have an idea -- fans already like what you've done with the franchise in Mario Kart 8, so think about expanding on it. A real battle mode: Finally, we come to my one big problem with Mario Kart 8 -- a lack of a real battle mode. No, that sorry excuse of "racing with balloons" doesn't cut it. I want real, tiered arenas that are all-new. Although I loved the core game as a racer, it really loses a lot of its spark due to the fact that so many fans grew up only playing the battle minigame. It cuts down on the replay value for fans as well, as I remember plenty of Mario Kart marathons that would have ended after a few hours if it wasn't for someone suggesting that we play "just a bit more" within the confines of the arena. I'm hopeful for these additions because Nintendo has shown it knows how to to DLC right. For $12 right now, you'll net seven characters (Villager counts as two!), eight vehicles, and 16 tracks. For reference, the game shipped with 32 courses. While I wouldn't trust a lot of publishers with this charge, Nintendo has the opportunity to really make Mario Kart 8 one of the longest-lasting games in the series, as the company has proven that it knows exactly what it's doing.
More Mario Kart 8 photo
More crossovers and a real battle mode
When Nintendo announced its DLC plans for Mario Kart 8, there was a combination of collective groans and cheers across the internet. The latter group was on the right side of history, it seems. When the first DLC Pack dr...

Mario Kart 200cc photo
Mario Kart 200cc

Mario Kart 8's Cheese Land will crush your spirit on 200cc


Brake drifting is our saving grace
Apr 24
// Jordan Devore
Mario Kart 8 feels fresh again and not just because of the fabulous new tracks added in this week's Animal Crossing-themed DLC Pack 2. Nintendo also unleashed the humbling 200cc class in a free update for the game. We saw the...

Review: Mario Kart 8 DLC Pack 2

Apr 23 // Jordan Devore
Mario Kart 8 DLC Pack 2 (Wii U)Developer: NintendoPublisher: NintendoReleased: April 23, 2015MSRP: $7.99 ($11.99 bundled with DLC Pack 1) First up, let's run through exactly what's included in DLC Pack 2: Characters: Villager (male and female), Isabelle, and Dry Bowser Vehicles: Streetle, City Tripper, P-Wing, and Bone Rattler Vehicle Parts: Paper Glider and Leaf Tires Crossing Cup tracks: Baby Park, Cheese Land, Wild Woods, and Animal Crossing Bell Cup tracks: Neo Bowser City, Ribbon Road, Super Bell Subway, and Big Blue Whereas last time we got two characters who looked like retreads of the existing lineup (Tanooki Mario and Cat Peach), here there's Dry Bowser as the lone offender -- but he's so awesome on his badass, metallic, skeletal bike that I'm not even going to complain. Isabelle is a cute addition to the roster and, hey, cute is fine. But the Villager duo is where it's at for my money ($7.99). The boy's patterned pants are the best. Like, I went so far as to jot down a note about them between races. That might sound silly. It is. But for a game packed so full of little flourishes, you've got to appreciate the attention to detail. I particularly dig how Animal Crossing's iconic "Oh shit!" piano sound plays when you fall off course as one of these characters. I don't have much to say about the three other new vehicles, but admittedly I'm not one to dissect stats and stick to certain builds because they are technically superior. Aesthetics matter, too! With that in mind: the Streetle has a chubby beetle-esque frame; the City Tripper reminds me of a Vespa; and the P-Wing has got a cool sort of Speed Racer thing going for it. It wasn't long at all before I returned to old favorites like the Sport Bike, though. [embed]290911:58308:0[/embed] "The tracks," you might be thinking. "Get to the tracks already! That's what we care about." Yes, yes, I agree. No more stalling. (And thanks for the segue!) First up is Baby Park, a short and sweet oval-shaped course modeled after a bustling theme park. During its seven micro laps, you will probably be hit with a bunch of items and hit back just as hard. It's equal parts chaos and joy. Whether in first place or last, everyone's so bunched together that it feels like you're in the middle of the pack, always. I somehow took first place in an online match and it was as if I had cheated death himself. Cheese Land, a desert area with edible-looking rock formations, makes terrific use of the game's depth-of-field effects for its sprawling vistas. This track has come a long way since its debut in Mario Kart: Super Circuit for the Game Boy Advance, that's for sure. Unquestionably pretty, but not necessarily a standout track in my mind. Wild Woods, however, stands out. It might even be the standout. It's this oasis hidden deep within a lush forest and there's a little village of Shy Guys and Toads and they've got a waterslide which you of course get to race across. Someone at Nintendo finally figured out that driving down waterslides in Mario Kart is what rainbows must taste like: magic. Next is Animal Crossing, which closes out the Crossing Cup. It's a relatively simple area that shifts seasons to dramatic and delightful effect. Northern lights glimmer during winter in one playthrough, while cherry blossoms flow in another. Seeing this world and these characters rendered so beautifully has me giddy at the possibility of a new Animal Crossing on Wii U. Just, wow. Neo Bowser City kicks off the Bell Cup with a rain-soaked neon cityscape. It's a nice change of scenery from the usual castles and lava we associate with Bowser, but the layout didn't feel all that unique. Still, I have to commend the designers for coming up with these places that feel seem like tracks in a racing videogame and more like cross sections of living worlds. Hundreds of races later, we might still be picking out fresh details in the environment. Ribbon Road, another upgrade of an old Game Boy Advance track, might be my favorite. It's miniature Mario Kart in a child's bedroom, complete with those wind-up dudes from the end of Super Mario World, swaying jack-in-the-boxes that you'll need to glide around, and a monstrously large movie poster for "Kung-Fu Lakitu" plastered on a wall. It's a pitch-perfect theme and the course itself is continuously exciting to navigate. What a keeper. Super Bell Subway isn't as visually arresting as its predecessors but speeding through an underground subway makes for a good time all the same. This can be one of the more rewarding courses depending on if you're (un)lucky enough to get sandwiched between two trains. Finally, there's Big Blue, a track that translates well from F-Zero (and I'm not just saying that because of the fist-pumping theme song). It's another one of those long, one-lap tracks people either love or loathe. I adore 'em. Between the competing conveyer belts, the waterslide-like pathways and, yes, that amazing song, I thought to myself "So this is what it feels like to truly be alive." Is this all working up toward a future F-Zero game or are DLC cameos in Mario Kart 8 as good as it gets for fans? Ignorance might be bliss. The free new 200cc option isn't a part of DLC Pack 2 (and as such I'm not factoring it into this review), but since it's out on the same day, I figured you'd want to know at least a little about it. As expected, it is exhilarating. Also as expected, it takes some getting used to. I'm not even sure the AI is fully ready for it. The action moves at such a rapid pace that you need to rethink your routes and strategies (and possibly your vehicle of choice) or risk crashing into walls or falling over the edge frequently. Repeat after me: "there is a brake button." The free update also adds more costumes for Mario Kart 8's Mii character which you can unlock by scanning supported amiibo. I saw someone online with a Kirby sitting on their head and that was neat for a second before I got shot to hell with shells. Your results may vary. As with DLC Pack 1, Nintendo has shown what great downloadable content can look like and that it doesn't need to arrive on day one or even month one. While not every new track is memorable, there is a consistent quality here and a few of them represent Mario Kart at its best. It was a treat to see other Nintendo properties dip into the game last year and that novelty hasn't worn off yet. This is the future of the series. It has to be. [This review is based on a final build of the DLC purchased by the reviewer.]
Mario Kart DLC review photo
Animal Crossing is in the house
Nintendo is back with more crossover content for Mario Kart 8 and even as an on-again, off-again fan of the series, today feels reminiscent of waking up on Christmas morning confident that the present you most wanted this yea...

Mario Kart 8 photo
Mario Kart 8

Mario Kart 8's Animal Crossing DLC is out today


Eight tracks, three (four) characters, and four karts
Apr 23
// Chris Carter
Want more Mario Kart 8? Today is your lucky day! DLC Pack 2, otherwise known as the "Animal Crossing DLC" is out on Wii U. This follows-up the first pack from November 2014. 200cc races and eight new Mii costumes will be avai...
F1 2015 photo
F1 2015

F1 2015 feels mostly the same as last year, with incremental improvements


How do you pronounce Cote d'Azur?
Apr 16
// Chris Carter
It's only been a six months since UK-based Codemasters released F1 2014, and the studio is in the process of prepping 2015 for launch in June. It's not hard to see where the inspiration for that rapid iterative model comes fr...
Project Cars photo
Project Cars

Project CARS has a dedicated windshield wiper button


Yes!
Apr 16
// Chris Carter
I'll admit it -- when I first heard about Project CARS, I didn't give it much thought. It doesn't help that the name is fairly ho hum, and it's been ages since developer Slightly Mad Studios worked on Need for Speed...

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