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Q-Games launches a new PS3 music visualizer


Trippy
Aug 12
// Dale North
I love everything that Q-Games makes, even if they aren't really games sometimes. These are musical people, and as one myself I always connect to what they do.  While musical visualizers might not normally be exciting e...
PixelJunk photo
PixelJunk

PixelJunk Monsters headed to Steam with online co-op


Yet another re-release, but ... co-op!
Aug 02
// Jordan Devore
Even though I'd rather get my hands on PixelJunk Inc. than double dip on yet another Q-Games title, PixelJunk Monsters Ultimate is tempting. It's coming to Steam on August 26, 2013 with local and online cooperative play, game...
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PS Plus

PS Plus: Dokuro for free, Max Payne 3 for eight bucks


PixelJunk Monsters also discounted
Jul 30
// Jordan Devore
This week's addition to the PlayStation Plus Instant Game Collection is Dokuro, a PlayStation Vita puzzler-platformer from Game Arts. It's got skeletons and an art style reminiscent of children's books -- and it's regularly ...
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PixelJunk

PS Vita gets PixelJunk Monsters: Ultimate HD on July 30


Release info locked down for revised Monsters
Jul 17
// Jordan Devore
Double Eleven is giving PixelJunk Monsters a fresh coat of paint for PlayStation Vita later this month. PixelJunk Monsters: Ultimate HD will launch on July 30 and July 31 for North American and European PlayStation Network us...
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PixelJunk

PixelJunk Monsters: Ultimate HD announced for Vita


Well, that's my day made
Jun 25
// Jordan Devore
This is the exact news I was hoping I'd get to cover following word of Q Games' collaboration with Double Eleven. The latter studio is indeed porting a beloved PixelJunk title to PlayStation Vita. PixelJunk Monsters: Ult...
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Q Games

Q Games partnering with Limbo Vita dev Double Eleven


What a pleasant pairing
Jun 24
// Jordan Devore
Double Eleven, the team responsible for bringing games like Frozen Synapse, Limbo, and LittleBigPlanet to PlayStation Vita, is teaming up with PixelJunk studio Q Games, reports GamesIndustry International. The ...
PixelJunk Inc. photo
Not necessarily in that order
In case you aren't aware, PixelJunk Inc. looks to be the raddest game ever. Imagine Castlevania, Metal Slug, Pikmin, and a tower defense all rolled into one. Also, soup everywhere. Naturally, when I got the opportunity to ta...

PixelJunk photo
PixelJunk

The PixelJunk series is half price right now


You should own at least one of these
Mar 27
// Jordan Devore
Did hearing about PixelJunk Inc. put you in the mood for some of Q-Games' other titles? From now until April 9 in North America (and April 10 in Europe), the entire line-up of PixelJunk games is half price. On Steam, it's the...
PixelJunk 1-6 photo
PixelJunk 1-6

You've got my full attention, PixelJunk Inc.


A better look at the game formerly known as PixelJunk 1-6
Mar 25
// Jordan Devore
For a while now, Q-Games has been releasing bits and pieces of information on PixelJunk 1-6 with regular development updates on its blog. Today, we've got a trailer and screenshots for this project, which is now being called...
JP indie game event photo
JP indie game event

BitSummit event to boost Japanese independent dev scene


Much-needed initiative
Feb 15
// Dale North
Early next month, BitSummit will kick off with its first ever event in Kyoto, Japan. From what we've heard we think it's going to be a great start to a Japanese indie game uprising. Bring on the tidal wave! Our indie scene he...
Pixeljunk FAQ photo
Pixeljunk FAQ

The meaning of Q-Games' company name is revealed


PixelJunk creator lays it all out in an official FAQ
Feb 07
// Chris Carter
One could assume the biggest question Q-Games (creator of the PixelJunk series) gets is "where the hell is PixelJunk Monsters 2?!" I guess they got sick of having to repeat themselves, as Q-Games tackles that and more in a br...
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Q-Games explains why PixelJunk 1-6 is coming to PC


Developer isn't leaving PSN behind
Nov 07
// Jordan Devore
It's still unclear what exactly PixelJunk 1-6 is, but it sure looks pretty. The game was announced for PC, which didn't sit well with some fans of Q-Games' prior work. "Given our history with Sony I think people are being rat...
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Finally! New PixelJunk game in development for PC


Codenamed PixelJunk 1-6
Nov 02
// Dale North
Q-Games is teasing us with the very first details on the next PixelJunk game, codenamed PixelJunk 1-6. They say it's different from anything else in their catalog as it's being developed specifically for the PC. It is slated ...
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All the PixelJunk games on sale on PSN starting tomorrow


May 07
// Brett Zeidler
Have you yet to complete your PixelJunk collection, but have been waiting for a sale? Well, tomorrow is a good day as any because Q-Games is celebrating PixelJunK's 5th Anniversary by dropping the prices of Racers, Monsters,...

Review: PixelJunk Eden (PC)

Feb 09 // Jordan Devore
PixelJunk Eden (PlayStation Network, Steam [reviewed])Developer: Q-GamesPublisher: Q-GamesReleased: February 2, 2012 MSRP: $9.99Rig: Intel i7-2600k @3.40 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 580 GPU (SLI) The core of PixelJunk Eden remains the same for Steam, so rather than completely reiterate what was covered in our original review years ago, I'll summarize the basics. Thankfully, this is a rather minimalistic game, so there's not much to set up. As a little creature called a "Grimp," you feel compelled to use your acrobatic prowess to launch into floating enemies. This recklessness results in an explosion of much-need pollen that gets absorbed by nearby plants. Once fully pollinated, these plants will sprout the next time you bump into them. In terms of objectives, that's practically it. By helping plants grow, you're able to reach new heights and collect pick-ups called Spectra. There are five in each garden to find and collecting them is necessary for unlocking additional gardens. Levels are spacious and non-linear, so it can be more challenging to reach the Spectra than one might initially think. The biggest change for returning players is the control scheme: it's been redesigned for mouse and keyboard. I tend to prefer the comfort of a gamepad outside of, say, real-time strategy, but Q-Games has done such an excellent job with the controls here that I have a hard time imagining playing Eden any other way. Which is good, because there currently is no gamepad support in this version. Given the amount of precision you need to reach certain areas, the new controls don't immediately feel quite right and take some practice -- but the end result is undeniably good. The pacing is such that you're given plenty of time to become acquainted with the controls as you're eased into Eden with fairly straightforward level design. Zen gaming is the category I'd toss Eden in, but that doesn't mean it's boring. The soundtrack by Baiyon had me eager to fetch my headphones every single time and enter a state of bliss. Ending a session of Eden -- breaking the spell -- feels like stepping back into reality. As you become more skilled, you can't help but try zipping through gardens as quickly and stylishly as possible. This is reinforced by a much-needed addition: quick warps. Narrowly missing a jump and plummeting to the bottom of the stage is frustrating, or rather, it would be. At the press of a button, some energy is shaved off and you're teleported back to your last position. Another welcome change to Eden is that now, you don't have to find all five of a garden's Spectra in one go. Instead, you collect one, get sent back to the level-select screen, and can then jump back in. After getting all five, you're able to freely play through the garden, recollecting every Spectra in a single session if you so choose. This may seem like a minor thing, but it greatly helps to alleviate much of the frustration from levels with wind, gravity flipping, and other annoyances. Finally, the five gardens from the PlayStation Network version's "Encore" expansion are included at no additional cost. If you're anything like me, you won't want Eden to end, so this gesture is greatly appreciated. These levels are as solid as the rest of the game. It's a shame to see a few features -- particularly multiplayer -- get cut from this version of PixelJunk Eden, but the warp ability, new controls, and restructured pacing more than make up for the loss. This Steam edition is a must-download for new and returning players alike.
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At this point, I think there's at least one game in the ongoing PixelJunk series for everyone. For the longest time, PixelJunk Monsters was the obvious go-to choice for me, but I've since flirted with the idea of giving Pixel...

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PixelJunk debuts on Steam with Eden


Jan 27
// Jordan Devore
I was starting to think the PixelJunk series would never end up on Steam. Not so! Q-Games has announced a new version of PixelJunk Eden, due out on February 2. This release includes the five levels from the "Encore" DLC and "...

Preview: PixelJunk 4am

Dec 15 // Samit Sarkar
PixelJunk 4am (PlayStation Move) Developer: Q-Games Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment Release: Spring 2012 PixelJunk 4am is Q-Games’ second collaboration with the Japanese artist Baiyon, who also did the art and music for PixelJunk Eden. The relaxing electronic music in that game, which rose and fell with your actions, suited that experience perfectly. 4am ups the ante somewhat, although the atmosphere is still more “lounge” than “rave.” [Update: Per Q-Games, Baiyon himself calls it “deep.”] While Baiyon’s tracks determine the mood, the PlayStation Move gives you an incredible degree of control over the specific sounds coming into your ears. The foundation consists of four different lines: kick, bass, rhythm, and synth. They’re controlled by the X, square, circle, and triangle buttons, respectively, and the ball on the Move wand changes color to match the track. These “long-play elements” are complemented by four one-off gestures: flicking the Move controller up, down, left, or right plays a particular sound. The result is nothing short of astounding. Holding the Move wand in your hand and waving it around to transform the groove, you feel like a digital shaman taming the spirits of song with a plastic whip. The PlayStation Eye camera and the Move controller combine to give you a three-dimensional performance space. To lay down the base tracks, you hold down the trigger and reach out until you feel the controller vibrate and bring it back into the center before releasing the trigger, unleashing the musical line. You also have effects modulation at your disposal: hold the Move button and move the wand to play with an element, perhaps distorting the sound with a phaser. 4am furthers the DJ experience by letting you mute a particular track -- cut out the bass for a bit -- by double-tapping the face button for that track, or mute everything but a particular track -- just the drums right here -- by holding its face button. The software offers three different visualizers, each with its own ambience and set of sounds. You can switch between them, and because doing so doesn’t stop the music, you can cull your favorite elements from each setting and blend them as you desire. Music is meant to be enjoyed by an audience, and 4am lets you broadcast your DJing live over the PlayStation Network through the app. Q-Games will be putting out a free “viewer,” so you don’t need to buy the software in order to be able to enjoy performances. Just turn on your PS3 and tune in to your favorite DJ to get the party started.
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The music/rhythm genre is full of experiences that a reductive person might call “performance simulators.” In essence, games like Rock Band lay out a track of notes to hit -- whether with your voice or a controlle...

Review: PixelJunk SideScroller

Oct 29 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]214774:41509[/embed] PixelJunk SideScroller (PlayStation Network)Developer: Q-GamesPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: October 25, 2011 MSRP: $9.99 If you beat PixelJunk Shooter 2 and played the unlockable sidescrolling shmup stage, like a tru3 hxcorez dude, then you know SideScroller is a labor of love for Q-Games. SideScroller is more than just an expansion on that idea. It’s the developer’s best game yet. From beginning to end, SideScroller is an immaculately polished, trippy adventure back into the heart of what made a good shooter in the ‘90s. Don’t worry, there are also unlockable difficulty modes and online leaderboards for fans of modern shmups.Like Salamander and Harmful Park, SideScroller gives the player access to a versatile arsenal at all times. The machine gun is self-explanatory. It’s a bit weak, which makes it only useful for the beginning of levels. Then there is the laser and wall gun. The laser is essential for dealing damage fast and the wall guns will help you deal with turrets and other enemies clinging to the walls, above and below. You can level each weapon up to five times (a la Harmful Park), extending their range and power. Finally, there is the charge attack which, as far as I can tell, is completely useless. You hold down the L1 trigger to power-up a charge that sends you spiralling in the direction of your choice. It feels like a half-baked idea that Q-Games never fully developed. We’ll see if high score YouTube videos prove me wrong.The weapon system constantly puts you to the test, as enemies and environments force you to adjust your strategy. Despite the cliché weapon-types, the way Q-Games implemented the system is completely unique and exciting. The challenge grows immensely after the opening stage. (Confusingly, the game has three “stages” that contain four sectors each.) If you don’t know what weapons are good for which environments, you’ll soon find yourself accepting the game’s invitation to play on Casual Mode. Hey, you don’t want that. DO YOU? You want to go to school and have all the kids call you pissy-sissy pants and have sex with your mom? Because that’s what happens when you play on Casual, strangers come to your house and have sex all over your mom. ALL OVER! ON TOP, ON THE SIDE, FROM THE CURTAINS ... I SHOULD KNOW! I'VE BEEN THERE, MAN! I'VE SEEN IT HAPPEN! ALL A SUDDEN YOUR COOL FRIEND BOOZY WITH THE ATV AND KICK-ASS MULLET ISN'T SO COOL ANYMORE. THEN IT'S YOUR SHY FRIEND GABRIEL, THEN IT'S THE ENTIRE FOOTBALL TEAM AND, BEFORE YOU KNOW IT, THE SCHOOL FACULTY! IT'S LIKE A -- As I was saying, Q-Games have done an immaculate job of making every level feel unique through its layouts, mini-bosses, hectic finales, and environmental obstacles. Your ship will weather the elements, although to a lesser extent than the Shooter games. There are no puzzles to be solved here, but lava, gas clouds, and other colorful substances (that I can’t quite identify) make for an ingenious way to restrict the player’s movement. At one point, I cleared a wave of enemies and suddenly found myself searching for safety as a tidal wave of red, boiling death came flowing my way. This game is pretty intense, so feel no shame in punching your pillow, biting your tongue, and letting out a breath of relief as you approach a checkpoint. We all do it. Especially on Hard mode. Along with Casual Mode (...) and Normal Mode, you’ll unlock Hard and Burtal after that. Each difficulty level feels like it was examined in detail, as enemies and environmental hazards are tailored toward each play-level. Even better, Hard mode has an awesome graphics filter that makes the game look like what we thought future Game Boys would look like in 1992. Along with having a less exciting greyscale filter, Brutal mode gives enemies suicide bullets and bullet patterns that flirt with Danmaku.Unlike most shmups, SideScroller doesn’t connect levels together. Each level is played for its own score, so a 1cc isn’t really possible with this game. On the other hand, the combo system and hidden bonuses should keep the dedicated genre-fans returning. Everything in the game, including the bullet patterns, is pretty simple but the game never feels dumbed-down. The weapon system and fluid hazards even out the challenge. However, the checkpoint system may kill it. You basically have infinite continues and you respawn at your last checkpoint. It may be a bit too Call of Duty for shmup-purists, but you’ll be thankful for this in later stages. The visuals in SideScroller are the next best thing to dropping acid at a Daft Punk concert. The scanlines and warped corners of the screen, that replicate a CRT TV, are a loving ode to the '90s, but the actual graphics are jaw-dropping. I thought past Q-Games titles looked like boring Illustrator images made by an ad company, but this game is something entirely different. The way the neon-glow and color palate mix is incredible. I had so much fun getting to the next level just to see how it looked and I was never disappointed. I only wish the game were in 3D, since the game’s scrolling parallax layers naturally pop-out at you due to the colors. The entirety of the final sector, which can only be unlocked via Normal Mode, is one of the most memorable moments of gaming this year. Much like Rez, SideScroller saves the best for last with this epic, mind-bending stage. I’ve never seen graphical glitches so creatively used for tension and visual effect like this before. It’s a brilliant moment when the game’s aesthetic and gameplay come together to make something incredible. I just wish the entire game could have been on this level. Touhou and Cave fans may find issue with SideScroller’s slower-pace and constant checkpoints -- not to mention the levels have individual scores -- but this is a rare shooter that will have appeal to a wide audience. Stoners, hi-score chasers, and shmup veterans will all find something to love in Q-Games' latest. Along with Deathsmiles and Gradius V, SideScroller is one of the few side-scrolling gems of the past decade. So long and thanks for all the bullets, Q-Games.
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No, PixelJunk SideScroller is not old-school. Nor is it retro -- OK, maybe a little. But, more than that, it’s a completely contemporary game full of visuals and ideas that feel fresh and original within videogame&rsq...

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October 25 is PixelJunk SideScroller day in the US


Oct 17
// Jordan Devore
No, it's not PixelJunk Monsters 2, but that doesn't mean PixelJunk SideScroller isn't worth obsessing over. On the Q-Games Twitter feed, we're told this latest PJ title is set for a North American PlayStation Network release ...

Preview: PixelJunk SideScroller

Sep 29 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]212612:41076[/embed] PixelJunk SideScroller (PlayStation Network)Developer: Q-GamesPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentTo be released: TBA 2011 Konami’s late-80s shmup-sidecrollers (Salamander, Gradius) are the most pronounced influences on Q-Games’ latest, but if you dig deeper you may be surprised by what else you’ll find. The first comparison my mind made was one to Harmful Park. I’ve gushed about that game elsewhere on the site, so I won’t go into too much detail on its history. Like the weapon system in Harmful Park, SideScroller gives you unlimited access to four primary weapons which you level-up individually. This is one of my favorite touches in Harmful Park since it opens the doors to strategic play. It also keeps you from feeling the frustration of accidentally touching the laser power-up and losing your current powered weapon -- Man, do I hate that! In SideScroller, you have lasers, a rapid-fire peashooter and bombs that shoot up and down. Just like Harmful Park, you switch between them with the triggers so you always have immediate access to them. Finally there is the charge attack: By holding down the back left-trigger for a couple seconds, you can send your ship spiraling toward enemies, destroying them, at hyperspeed (not sure if this can be powered-up). When SideScroller was shown at E3 earlier this year, the art direction looked surprisingly lazy for the graphical masterminds at PixelJunk. The game was clearly an early-prototype, reusing Shooter 2’s assets. As you can see in these screens, the current build of SideScroller has much more of a Tron/neon-colored vector-graphics look which suits the game really well. Not only do the visuals pop, but the new look help keeps the bullets distinguished from the backdrops. When you are racing to drop some lava on the ground or are making your way through a narrow tunnel amidst gunfire, you’ll appreciate this new change.The same chemical elements of Shooter are at play in SideScroller but it hardly feels like a puzzle. Though, the game finds ways to keep the player thinking and fighting strategically. You’ll frequently come across environmental hazards that can only be destroyed with certain weapons. The same is true of some enemies and bosses, so you’ll have to spread your power-ups across your arsenal if you want to get very far. Once you have played the game through and have the levels memorized, it probably won’t provide much of a challenge. But, it makes for some tense encounters on the first playthrough, especially during bosses when you scramble to find the right weapon. Although I walked away from SideScroller feeling mostly glee, I have a couple reservations that I hope will be addressed before its release. For a PixelJunk game, the music seemed a bit buried in the mix; it wasn’t up front and thumping like it should have been, especially for this type of game. Also, the constant checkpoints diminished some of the challenge that the game is trying to capture. Gradius and Gradius II are insanely difficult so I wouldn’t expect something like that -- supposedly SideScroller was this hard during its early stages -- but constant checkpoints in a shmup just rub me the wrong way. I rather have lives that let me respawn, even if that isn’t how Gradius did it.Along with Sine More and Jamestown, SideScroller is helping bring shmups back to the masses while giving it a new paintjob. As a fan of the genre, I see nothing wrong with that.
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The title of PixelJunk Shooter was a bit misleading. It was much more of an exploration and puzzle game than an actual shooter. It was a great game (along with its sequel), but not exactly what genre fans wanted. Sidecroll...

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PixelJunk Lifelike rebranded as PixelJunk 4am


Sep 14
// Jordan Devore
The game formerly known as PixelJunk Lifelike shall now be referred to as PixelJunk 4am. Man, I don't think I've even been up that late in years. According to Baiyon, who is working on this audio-visual thing for PlayStation...

Review: Star Fox 64 3D

Sep 09 // Jonathan Holmes
Star Fox 64 3D (3DS)Developer: Nintendo and Q-GamesPublisher: NintendoReleased: September 9, 2011MSRP: $39.99 Like Ocarina of Time 3D before it, Star Fox 64 3D stays true to its source material, but boasts vastly improved graphics and tons of new features. I'd argue that Star Fox 64 3D is the better of the two revamps, but that's mostly because Star Fox 64 is source material more suited to the 3DS. The game is basically about violent animal Muppets that are constantly engaged in Star Wars-style air and space battles, carelessly killing each other with wanton abandon. There is a giant disembodied monkey head scientist named Andross who may pose some nebulous threat to the galaxy, but none of that is really talked about after the brief opening narrative exposition. This is basically Crud! Get this Bozo off my tail so I can blast some monkeys and/or monkey-shaped robots out of the sky!: The Game, and it's just as timeless a concept as it sounds.  Star Fox 64 3D is a 3D shmup. Throughout the game, you generally fly along a set path, though there are a few bits where you can chose your own course, or fly around a designated area as you please. The game focuses on tasking the player with alternating between offensive and defensive play maneuvers. Each level has a multiple environmental hazards, requiring a strategic, well-timed use of speed boosts, air-breaks, and flips. Fail at these tricks, and you'll end up smashing into something large and/or explosive. On the offensive side, you need to always be working to destroy enemy ships, objects in the environment -- ranging from Star Destroyers to giant space clams -- and just about everything on screen at all times in order to max out your score, and sometimes find hidden areas and power-ups. More advance players will work to charge up their attacks and fire at specific enemies to set off chain reactions among multiple enemies. The offensive side of Star Fox 64 3D is sort of like the recently released XBLA/PSN title Galaga Legions DX, but in 3D, and with stressed out, bloodthirsty chicken men and androgynous frog people leading the charge into battle.  Like I said in the opening paragraphs, the game looks great and plays well to the 3DS' strengths -- particularly the glasses-free 3D, which is a perfect fit with the game's focus on depth of field. Most objects are still built from a fairly low amount of polygons, but the textures, lighting, and transparency effects do a lot to make the game look impressive. The game also knows how to suddenly change gears and display fairly complex-looking, gigantic, highly detailed polygon models. The player will quickly get accustomed to blowing up simple abstract shapes, only to suddenly get accosted by a "realistic"-looking giant skeleton crab boss, or a wet and weird lava man. It should probably feel jarring to change styles like that so drastically, but it doesn't, largely due the consistently great art direction throughout. It would be totally irresponsible of me to not spend at least one paragraph of this review discussing the game's music. Like the John Williams scores it draws from, the soundtrack of Star Fox 64 3D works wonders at making ridiculously impossible events feel emotionally real. You'll feel genuine responsibility when your giant rabbit buddy tells you he's about to get his ass blown to bits (not his exact words) unless you get those bogeys off his tail. This clearly silly situation is made to feel important, largely because the music supplies the gravitas with no expense spared on drama. This works throughout the more emotional moments, which range from being mocked by a seemingly Deliverance-inspired pig man, witnessing flirtations between a cat lady and a blue bird guy, to even a (spoilers) lifesaving family reunion toward the end of the game. Though these moments feel like half-parody most of the time, they still have some genuine emotional weight, largely because of the musical score. Like most of the 8-Bit Mega Man titles -- and just about every Mario and Zelda game -- Star Fox 64 3D would not be half as fun if it's soundtrack had been replaced with lesser music. I've already spent much more time with the game's sound test mode than I expect Nintendo had intended. Star Fox 64 3D is much shorter and easier than I remembered, which shows that though the game feels timeless, it hasn't aged quite as well as I imagined it would have. Compared to other Nintendo-published 3D shmups like Sin and Punishment 2, Star Fox 64 3D lacks challenge, and is all too brief. There are two levels of difficulty, one based on the original N64 level design, and the other custom tuned for the 3DS. I found both difficult levels to be relatively easy, and was able to beat the game twice in less than three hours. Thankfully, Star Fox 64 3D is a game designed to be played multiple times. It's packed with branching paths that hold many surprises, including a couple of tank-based levels, and even an underwater stage complete with a submarine. I don't think it's possible to see every level in the game without playing it through at least three times. There are tons of unexpected, almost random conditions (saving your friends, defeating bosses in a set amount of time, destroying various environmental hazards, etc.) that determine what path you'll gown down. You won't figure most of them out on your own, requiring a lot of trial and error, or more realistically, some research online. On top of the branching paths themselves, the specifics of each level will change based on what order you play them in. Remember that flirtatious cat lady I told you about before? Well, she won't show up to make time with the blue bird man unless you beat the proceeding stages in the right order. Tiny details like that go a long way to making the supremely silly world of Star Fox 64 3D feel real, and supply the player with the small incentive necessary to boot it up again and again, long after you've seen both of the game's two endings.  One of the new features in the 3DS remake is the ability to control your ship using the 3DS' gyroscopic controls. Unlike in Ocarina of Time, the gyroscopic controls here offer no real advantage to the standard analog nub set up. There is nothing wrong with them, and those who have extremely poor fine motor control may dig the option, but I got nothing out of this unwieldy new mechanic. I did get a lot out of the option to play the game in various languages. Hearing Peppy Hare tell me to do a barrel roll in French is way more fun than it has any right to be. I also really enjoyed the game's multiplayer mode. I didn't expect much from it to start with, but after just one round, I quickly learned that it's more than a tacked-on extra. Even playing against the CPU was a lot of fun. In multiplayer, the game plays a lot like Mario Kart's battle mode, but in space, and with guns. All four players are thrown into an arena, with randomly generated "?" block power-ups spread throughout the field. There are tons of new weapons here, like a cloaking device, a teleporter, a giant vortex laser cotton ball thing, some highly lethal floating space-mines, and more. Playing this mode alone offered quite a challenge. It's much tougher than the game's main campaign. On the other hand, playing this mode with other people is an exercise in playful sadism. Using the 3DS' camera, you can get a good look at your opponents' faces as you blast them out of the sky, or better yet, betray a fragile alliance you might have formed with a buddy by farting a well placed space-mine directly onto their face. It goes without saying that it's a bummer this multiplayer mode isn't online compatible. It's a strange move, especially considering how well online play works with Super Street Fighter IV 3D and Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D, not to mention DS games like Pokemon Black/White and Mario Kart DS. I know Nintendo could have put this game online --but ultimately didn't -- for reasons only they understand. Still, that doesn't diminish how much fun local multiplayer is on its own. Thankfully, you only need one cartridge to boot the game among multiple players; so as long as you have one or two 3DS-owning friends nearby, you'll be all set.  Star Fox 64 3D is a great little package, more than worthy of a purchase for fans of the genre. It lacks the scale and scope of Nintendo's other big N64 remake, but it's arguably a more compelling experience for shmup junkies like myself. The game is constant action with no filler; just constant dog fighting and high-flying arial maneuvers, with a bit of jaw-flapping, Muppet-y fun layered on top. With multiple rewards for achievements and high scores, loads of secrets to unlock, and multiplayer that screams "One more game!", it won't be hard to convince yourself to replay this one again and again.
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The N64 is my least favorite console of all time, but I still feel the need to own one, mostly for Star Fox 64. It's easily one of my favorite games on the console, way ahead of Super Mario 64 and Ocarina of Time. That's part...

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Gorgeous PixelJunk SideScroller screenshots from gamescom


Aug 18
// Jordan Devore
[Update: The original screenshots we ran were, in fact, old. Someone let the Ghoulies run wild in the Sony Computer Entertainment Europe offices again. Q-Games sent over the latest batch of images, so check 'em out.] Having c...
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Q-Games unveils new web-based PixelJunk Monsters


Jul 21
// Jordan Devore
Q-Games' Casual Connect teaser was indeed related to PixelJunk Monsters as many of you had guessed. For the first time, the fantastic series will be available outside of PlayStation Network. This free-to-play, browser-based v...
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Q-Games teases Casual Connect announcement with an image


Jul 13
// Jordan Devore
Dylan Cuthbert of PixelJunk-maker Q-Games has "posted a little sneak preview of something we'll be revealing next week at Casual Connect" on Google+. Social media! His post, which includes the image above, is viewable here. L...
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E3: PixelJunk SideScroller revealed


Jun 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
Curiously absent from Sony's press conference earlier today was the announcement of a new title in Q Games' PixelJunk series. Such a thing does exist and expands the franchise into yet another classic genre of video...
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Q-Games is bringing three titles to E3 2011


May 31
// Jordan Devore
Finally! E3 will be when we figure out just what the heck PixelJunk Lifelike is all about. The teaser sure was weird and all, but that dates back to September. Guess Q-Games founder Dylan Cuthbert wasn't lying when he said we...
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ThinkGeek has a couple of PixelJunk Shooter 2 t-shirts


Mar 03
// Jordan Devore
ThinkGeek has jumped in bed with Q-Games to offer some swanky products based on the studio's games. And really, who can blame them? Chad has certainly flirted with the concept before. To go alongside the release of PixelJunk ...
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March 1 is officially PixelJunk Shooter 2 day


Feb 10
// Jordan Devore
Q-Games president Dylan Cuthbert has taken it to the PlayStation Blog to share exciting news on the PixelJunk front: PixelJunk Shooter 2 has been confirmed for Tuesday, March 1 on PlayStation Network. This looks to be a parti...
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PixelJunk Monsters sequel being considered, no more 2D


Sep 26
// Colette Bennett
Anyone that knows me well knows that I am unnaturally obsessed with PixelJunk Monsters. I still play the game at least two nights a week, and since I have finished the majority of the levels, I just try to get the trophies fr...

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