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Pokemon

Pokken Tournament photo
Pokken Tournament

Three new Pokemon confirmed for Pokken Tournament


Still no sign of Vanilluxe
Jan 13
// Joe Parlock
Last week we reported that Nintendo and Bandai Namco were teasing a new Pokémon being announced for Pokkén Tournament on January 15. Before that announcement, Serebii.net spotted Japanese magazine CoroCoro ...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Pokemon gets a special 3DS bundle for its 20th anniversary


With both Red and Blue
Jan 12
// Brett Makedonski
February 27 marks the 20-year anniversary of the release of Pokémon Red and Blue in Japan. In those 20 years, the lovable game about pocket monsters has grown into a marketing mammoth. Like an earlier An...
Pokken Tournament photo
Pokken Tournament

A new Pokken Tournament character is being teased, and will be announced next week


Who's that Pokemon?!
Jan 08
// Joe Parlock
Nintendo and Bandai Namco have teased that they will be announcing a new playable character for Pokkén Tournament on January 15. Apparently, the Pokémon will have the character ラ (“ra”) in it...
PS4 hack photo
PS4 hack

Pokemon on PlayStation? With hacks, anything is possible!


PlayStation 4 hacked, what next?
Jan 04
// Steven Hansen
Hacking group "Fail0verflow" -- the same group that hacked the PS3 five years ago -- has taken advantage of an exploit in the PlayStation 4 to start messing about under its knickers, which is to say I myself know little abou...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Don't worry, those classic Pokemon 3DS releases will take up practically no space


11MB
Dec 28
// Chris Carter
While Japan might be getting a badass 2DS set with all of the original Pokemon releases, the west is still on track to acquire Red, Yellow, and Blue sometime early next year. Thankfully, Serebii has uncovered that the Vi...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Nintendo 2DS finally coming to Japan bundled with the original Pokemon games


Celebrating Pokemon's 20th anniversary
Dec 26
// Kyle MacGregor
Two years after its western release, the Nintendo 2DS is finally coming to Japan. The handheld will be available in four semi-transparent colors (red, green, blue, and yellow), all of which come matched with one of the origin...
Pokken photo
Pokken

The official Pokken Tournament controller is coming west


Rad
Dec 25
// Chris Carter
[Update: Amazon has more pictures of the controller up, including the western packaging, which you can view in the gallery below.] Well, this is a nice thing to wake up to. For its Japanese release, Bandai Namco is providing ...
Pikachu photo
Pikachu

Kick off Christmas Eve with a picture of a meatless Pikachu


Build-A-Monstrosity
Dec 24
// Chris Carter
Although Build-A-Bear noted that Pikachu would arrive in "late December," (or possibly not in time for Christmas), local stores are now stocked with him this week. It's $28 for the full rat, and you get a trading card with it...
Pokken photo
Pokken

Japan is getting a special Pokken Tournament controller for Wii U


Uhhhh
Dec 15
// Chris Carter
When I played Pokken Tournament over in Japan, the first thing I noticed was the controller. It has a distinctive look and feel to it, and although it's not the most comfortable thing in the world, it works. To celebrate...
New Pokemon photo
New Pokemon

This new Pokemon is a fire and water type


#721, Volcanion
Dec 14
// Jordan Devore
We got our first glimpse of Volcanion so long ago, via a leak, that today's official announcement from Nintendo initially felt brand new to me. The latest Mythical Pokémon is a fire/water type -- the first of its kind ...

Experience Points .28: Pokemon Red/Blue

Dec 12 // Ben Davis
The Big Six Every trainer has their own method of choosing a team in Pokémon. Some players choose only the most powerful Pokémon, such as legendaries and whatnot. Others choose Pokémon based on stats and abilities, in order to maximize their fighting potential. Some people might even just go with whoever they find first, without swapping them out for something different. Or maybe they want to try using only certain types, such as having an all Water team like Misty. I always chose to use my favorite Pokémon, regardless of strength or stats. Sometimes I'd even keep them from evolving, because I simply preferred how they look unevolved. Cubone was always a staple in my teams, since he's my favorite one. Marowak is cool too, but he loses some of Cubone's charm in my opinion, so I never let my Cubones evolve. Other common choices for my Red and Blue teams included Haunter, Scyther, Cloyster, Weepinbell, Omastar, and Mr. Mime (it's true, I like Mr. Mime!), among others. I never used legendaries, and I usually dropped my starter Pokémon at the earliest opportunity. I'm probably kind of weird in that regard. My teams may not have been the most powerful, but they got me through the main games easily enough, and I loved seeing them all in the Hall of Fame. Battling other players was another story, however. I was terrible at fighting my friends' Pokémon. I even entered a tournament once, and lost in the first round. But at least I went down with a team I cared about! Bringing the legends down a peg I may not use legendary Pokémon on my teams, but I do enjoy hunting them down and catching them... only to let them sit in the PC forever, remaining completely useless to the world now that they're in my possession. You thought you were hot shit, Mewtwo? Think again! Ahem... as I was saying, coming across a legendary Pokémon in the wild was always thrilling. Finding Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos just chilling in their respective locations got me really excited, and I knew I'd be in for a difficult fight. It's almost impossible to catch them until they're at the very last sliver of health and also asleep, and trying to get them to that state without killing them or being killed by them in the process can be quite tense. And then I'd just start chucking Pokéballs at them. Like hundreds of Pokéballs, because I never wanted to use my one Master Ball. Sometimes I'd go through my entire stock of Ultra Balls, Great Balls, and regular balls before finally capturing a legendary Pokémon. I always thought it was funny when I'd catch one in a regular Pokéball, because then they don't even get to enjoy the luxury of living inside of a nicer ball. They're doomed to live in the cheapest home, stuck in the PC forever, like they deserve. I'm such a jerk. All Pokémon go to Heaven My favorite Pokémon actually gets his own little storyline in Red and Blue, so of course it was one of my favorite moments in the game. In Lavender Town, the player comes across the Pokémon Tower, which is essentially a seven-story graveyard for deceased Pokémon where trainers come to pay their respects. It's also home to wild ghost Pokémon, as well as wandering Cubones. While exploring the town and the tower, the player will hear about a Cubone whose mother was killed by Team Rocket while she was trying to protect her child. A man named Mr. Fuji apparently went to the tower to stop Team Rocket and help the Cubone, but hasn't been seen since. Towards the top of the tower, the player will suddenly be stopped among the gravestones with a creepy warning: “Be gone... intruders...” A battle with a ghost ensues, which turns out to be Marowak, the Cubone's deceased mother. She cannot be captured, even with a Master Ball (she's DEAD, you heartless trainer!), but defeating her in battle will ease her spirit and allow her to pass on to the afterlife. Afterwards, Mr. Fuji can be found at the top of the tower, and he's happy to hear that Marowak's spirit has been calmed. I always assumed that the Cubone in question was whichever Cubone I ended up catching, since I made it my mission to catch one as soon as possible. That way he would have friends to cheer him up and help him cope with his mother's passing. Poor little guy... Did I mention how much I like shorts? One of my favorite things about the Pokémon games are all the weird comments that the random trainers make whenever they're encountered. They usually manage to bring up something completely unexpected and off topic, giving the player unnecessary information about their lives without being asked. We just met, and you're bragging to me about how cool your boyfriend is? He sounds great, but maybe introduce yourself first before diving right into your personal life. The most memorable line comes from a Youngster outside of Pewter City. He walks up to the player and the first thing he thinks to say is, “Hi! I like shorts! They're comfy and easy to wear!” …Ummm, that's cool, I guess. It's always a good idea to start a conversation with a stranger by talking about your pants, right? This kid is so fired up about shorts, it's like we're suddenly in some kind of clothing commercial. And now I can't stop staring at this kid's pants... maybe it was really a clever distraction strategy all along! In the zone I was always a big fan of the Safari Zone. It had lots of cool Pokémon to catch and I didn't even have to fight them. Just throw down some bait and toss some Safari Balls and hope for the best! I spent a ton of time there trying to catch all the rare Pokémon the park had to offer, like Scyther, Pinsir, Tauros, Chansey, Kangaskhan, and Dratini, and picking out the best hunting spots to find each of them. I always made it a point to catch Scyther before I left (or Pinsir, depending on the game), since he was one of my favorites. Plus, chucking rocks at Pokémon felt pretty good sometimes. Especially if they were being obnoxious and refused to be captured. Don't want to be my Pokémon, Tauros? Maybe some rocks to the face will change your mind! Sometimes I threw rocks at them just because they were appearing too often and annoying me, like all those Nidorans when all I wanted was a Scyther. Too bad there aren't any Zubats in the Safari Zone. It sure would feel nice to throw some rocks at those guys! The truck Pokémon Red and Blue were rife with rumors of secret things players could find. While not actually a part of the game per se, some of the rumors still have significant value when I think about the time I spent with the game as a naive youngster. I remember trying desperately to access Bill's “secret garden,” a hidden area located behind Bill's house which supposedly housed many rare wild Pokémon. It was somewhat believable because there appeared to be a path leading offscreen right behind his house, even though there was no visible way to access it. I also remember trying to pull of a specific sequence of events in order to discover a leaked Pokémon named “Pikablu,” which actually turned out to be Marill. Both of these rumors were false, of course. But the biggest rumor of all involved the truck near the S.S. Anne where Mew was supposedly hiding. This rumor was particularly convincing because of how tricky it was to access the area, and because of how weird it was that the truck even existed in the first place. In order to find the truck, players have to faint on the S.S. Anne after obtaining HM01 from the captain by losing a battle before leaving the ship. This will bypass the short cutscene of the ship leaving port, meaning players could go back at any time to visit the ship again. Later, return to the S.S. Anne after teaching a Pokémon to use Surf, and surf off the boardwalk right before entering the ship. The player will be able to freely surf around the harbor, which contains nothing except for one very conspicuous truck, which strangely doesn't appear anywhere else in the game. According to the rumor, the truck could be pushed aside by having a Pokémon use Strength, similar to moving a boulder. And in the space where the truck used to be, it was possible to encounter the legendary Mew, which at the time was impossible to obtain without going to an official Pokémon event. The rumor was false, but that didn't stop me from trying everything I could possibly think of to move that truck. It had to be there for a reason, right? Why would there be some random truck in a hard-to-reach area for no reason at all? There must be something! Unfortunately, the only thing to ever come out of that truck was severe disappointment. Glitch in the system However, there were some rumors that actually turned out to be true. I heard talk of a secret Pokémon named Missingno, who could be found under special circumstances by surfing along the coast of Cinnabar Island. So of course, I had to check it out for myself! Missingno did, in fact, exist. After completing a sequence of events involving the old man in Viridian City and surfing along the coast of Cinnabar, I finally encountered the fabled creature... which turned out to be a weird mess of random pixels. It was a glitch. The glitch Pokémon, whose name is short for “Missing Number,” could actually be caught, raised, and used in battle. It could even be used for item duplication, meaning it was possible to get infinite Rare Candies by simply encountering Missingno. But being a glitch, it also corrupted some of the game data, so finding and catching one was rather risky. I still did it anyway just to see what would happen, and while it did interfere with some stuff, like scrambling sprites and messing with the Hall of Fame data, nothing particularly bad seemed to happen. Maybe I just got lucky. Regardless, Missingno is still one of the coolest video game glitches ever. Past Experience Points Level 1: .01 - .20 .21: Katamari Damacy.22: Tomb Raider.23: Mother 3.24: Deadly Premonition.25: Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars.26: Dark Souls.27: GoldenEye 007
Pokemon Red/Blue photo
Welcome to the world of Pokemon!
Experience Points is a series in which I highlight some of the most memorable things about a particular game. These can include anything from a specific scene or moment, a character, a weapon or item, a level or location, a p...

save data photo
save data

How does save data loss affect your enjoyment of a game?


Loss.jpg
Dec 11
// Myles Cox
Ever since the invention of save games, losing your progress has always been a major issue. Way back then, it wasn't as much of a problem, simply because it was inevitable -- the battery in your cartridge is dead. Easy fix: r...
Lizard ppl are the NWO photo
Lizard ppl are the NWO

Sceptile confirmed for Pokken Tournament


Farfetch'd!!!
Dec 09
// Jed Whitaker
The grassy lizard Pokémon Sceptile has been confirmed for the upcoming Pokken Tournament via the Japanese trailer above. As someone who played Pokémon competitively for a while, this game makes no sen...
Machoke photo
Machoke

Have a video of hundreds of flexing Machoke


Pokemon? More like Pokemanly, right?
Dec 04
// Joe Parlock
I don’t know what The Pokémon Company and Japanese fan club Pokémon Daisuki Club are doing, but I love it. Recently they launched the Kairiky Gym website, a site devoted giving us all the information...

Review: Pokemon Picross

Dec 03 // Darren Nakamura
Pokémon Picross (3DS)Developer: Jupiter CorporationPublisher: NintendoReleased: December 3, 2015MSRP: "Free to start" (but actually $30) "Picross" is the term Nintendo uses for the logic puzzles more commonly called "nonograms." The puzzles have an elegance to them; they are built upon just a few simple rules, but those rules result in a network of tips and tricks for finding the solutions. The solutions themselves are typically more interesting than a sudoku, kakuro, or ken ken. Rather than ending up with a grid filled with numbers, a well-built picross puzzle creates an image, adding an extra reward at the end. Not only is there the intrinsic satisfaction of having found the solution, there's the bonus of having created a monochromatic, pixelated piece of art. Pokémon Picross capitalizes on that reward at the end even further. Not only does it offer the usual puzzle goodness, but completing a puzzle also nets the player a Pokémon. It doesn't matter how many times and in how many forms I've caught 'em all, the drive to catch 'em all here is just as strong. [embed]323769:61340:0[/embed] The Pokémon confer special abilities to use in puzzles. Some automatically reveal a section of the puzzle. Some provide real-time hints or fix mistakes. Some manipulate the timer, slowing it through a run or stopping it entirely for a short period of time. For the picross purist, it feels strange using these abilities at first. Indeed, it's entirely possible to go into a puzzle without setting any Pokémon in the team. For a while I did just that, playing classic picross; it was just my wits versus the puzzle challenge. However, another addition threw that off for me soon enough. Most levels include bonus missions past completing the picture. Some of the missions are simple: use a certain type of Pokémon or activate a certain ability. Those vary from puzzle to puzzle, but every level has a timed challenge. While many are easy enough to surmount unassisted, some would be downright impossible without abilities. One time, I went up against a 15x15 grid asking me to finish it in less than a minute. I set up my team carefully, bombed a huge chunk out immediately, activated a time freeze, and highlighted important clues. I finished with the timer reading only four seconds, and it felt awesome. A potential downside to the mission structure is that it requires backtracking in order to fully complete everything. Some missions will pop up that ask for a certain Pokémon that hasn't been encountered yet. On the one hand, it adds replay value for completionists, but on the other, solving the same puzzle multiple times isn't as fun as taking on new puzzles. One of the reasons to go back and complete missions is another cool addition to Pokémon Picross. Some challenges will award a mural piece. These are small 10x10 puzzle grids, but they come together in an 8x8 mural, creating a much higher resolution image over a much longer period. I haven't finished a mural yet, but I'm looking forward to seeing it come together. The last big tweak is the inclusion of mega rows and columns. These only appear in a separate path, which mirrors the main path exactly. These add a new mechanic to the nonograms, with numbers that span two rows or columns describing an amorphous chunk of pixels rather than a neat line. For picross enthusiasts, this is a huge change. After doing hundreds (thousands?) of these puzzles, the process can become rote. Even with ever-changing target images, certain number patterns can emerge and a general algorithm can be followed. The mega rows throw a wrench into that, forcing the player to actively reason through it and use more advanced logic than usual. I welcome the new mechanic, but I can imagine purists shunning it. By far, the biggest psychological hurdle players will have to surmount with Pokémon Picross is its pricing presentation. It is advertised as "free to start," which some might interpret as free-to-play. Indeed, there is an energy mechanic and a separate currency (Picrites) that can be purchased with real money. It looks and acts like a free-to-play game at first glance. It is (probably) technically possible to play it in its entirety without spending a dime. Picrites are required to unlock new sets of stages, and after exhausting the available missions, Picrites can be earned indefinitely through the daily challenges. However, Picrite income is dwarfed by spending. Early on, a single daily challenge awards about five Picrites and level sets can easily cost in the hundreds. One single Mega Pokémon level costs 500 Picrites, which would take ages to grind out. Thankfully, Pokémon Picross does what I wish most free-to-play games did. After spending enough money -- about $30 -- on Picrites, the currency supply becomes infinite. With those infinite Picrites, players can make the energy bar infinite as well. Essentially, putting enough money in turns it from a free-to-play into a standard-style retail game. There's no more waiting for a timer or being gouged by microtransactions, just playing. To look at the pricing scheme another way, you can download the Pokémon Picross demo for free, but the full game costs $30. With that in mind, I have no qualms about recommending Pokémon Picross for those willing to pay full price. I got a code to download it a few days early, dipped my toes into the microtransactions, then soon decided it was worth purchasing the infinite Picrites with my own money. The only difference between this and Picross DS is the $30 I paid for this came after I already knew I liked it instead of before. Picross with Pokémon. That's all this needed to be, and that's what this appears to be at a glance, but further inspection reveals much more. The murals provide long-term motivation. The missions provide short-term reward. The mega rows encourage nonstandard nonogram logic over rote processes. Aside from the strangely disguised pricing scheme, the new additions to Pokémon Picross exceed expectations. [This review is based on a retail build of the game essentially purchased by the reviewer.]
Pokemon Picross review photo
Gotta swatch 'em all!
I thought I knew exactly what to expect with Pokémon Picross. Picross, but with pictures of Pokémon. Sold. That's all I need. Give it to me now. I even joked with our reviews director Chris that I could probably...

Pikachu photo
Pikachu

You can get a Pikachu wearing Charizard's skin at Build-a-Bear soon


Pre-orders are up
Dec 03
// Chris Carter
Soon, Pikachu will be upon us, creeping up in every mall, beckoning you to go and build him. Yes, that Build-a-Bear promotion will be coming to stores this month, and you can pre-order a ticket now to create him for $28. If y...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Reminder: You can pick up the Hoopa Pokemon now at McDonalds


Through December 23
Dec 03
// Chris Carter
Haha, this is such a strange promotion -- McDonalds. As a reminder, you can pick up Hoopa at "participating" McDonalds restaurants from now until December 23, 2015. Thankfully, in addition to the typical Ruby and Sapphire&nbs...
Pokemon Rumble World photo
Pokemon Rumble World

Pokemon Rumble World's microtransaction-free version coming to Europe


Free-to-play free
Dec 03
// Chris Carter
I actually enjoyed Pokemon Rumble World in spite of its free-to-play scheme, as it offered up plenty of ways to play regardless of the timers involved. But for those of you who absolutely positively got to kill every microtra...
Pantsless Pokemon photo
Pantsless Pokemon

Machoke and Machamp don't have pants on, actually


Nor lil dicks!
Dec 01
// Steven Hansen
I feel clowned upon. Damn near 20 years later and you want to tell me that Machoke and Machamp don't wear body-building speedos? That those perfectly placed black trunks are, according to Pokémon canon, just markings s...
Pokken Tournament photo
Pokken Tournament

A new fighter is coming to Pokken Tournament soon


Revealed on December 10
Dec 01
// Chris Carter
Pokken Tournament currently hosts 11 characters (counting Pikachu Libre and Shadow Mewtwo), and it looks like one more will be revealed on December 10, as per the official Twitter account. I'd wager that the new character wou...

Review: Pokemon Super Mystery Dungeon

Nov 27 // Ben Davis
Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon (3DS)Developer: Spike ChunsoftPublisher: NintendoMSRP: $39.99Released: November 20, 2015 To start things off in Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon, the player will take a short personality test. The test determines which of the 20 starter Pokémon they will become; it also chooses their partner. However, the results can be overruled if the player is unhappy with their chosen 'mon. The game picked Mudkip for me, with Torchic as my parter, so I just went with it. The story of Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon revolves around a human who has been turned into a Pokémon and has lost their memory. The Pokéhuman wakes up in confusion to find that they're being attacked by a group of Beheeyem, but they're quickly led to safety by a kind Nuzleaf with a southern accent who shows them the ropes and brings them into town. Once in town, the player will make some new friends, meet up with their destined partner, and begin going on expeditions into mystery dungeons. From here, the main storyline will begin to reveal itself in bits and pieces. There are whispers of Pokémon around the world mysteriously being turned to stone, the Beheeyem are still following the player, and their memory of being a human refuses to return to them. Eventually, everything will start to fall into place and a grand adventure of world-ending proportions will unfold. But before all of that happens, there are dungeons to explore. These make up the core gameplay, of course. Mystery dungeons are made up of randomly generated grid-based floors filled with enemy Pokémon, items, and traps. Enemies only move when the player moves, so sometimes it's best to take things one step at a time so as to avoid suddenly becoming overwhelmed with foes. [embed]322769:61271:0[/embed] To attack, just hold down the left bumper to open up a menu of four possible moves, then select an action. It's also possible to combo moves with other team members by tapping the right bumper, which activates an "Alliance" to hit an enemy with multiple moves at once. Strategy is key to winning battles. Sometimes the best course of action is to waste a turn so that the enemy might move closer, opening up the possibility to land the first strike. Or, maybe it would be safer to switch positions with another teammate so they can take a blow and allow others to heal. Perhaps a liberal use of items will get the player out of a jam. A lot of planning and foresight is necessary in order to survive most confrontations, so simply spamming attacks is not going to cut it for the most part. Moving around dungeons will slowly heal injured Pokémon, but it will also decrease a hunger gauge as well, and if hunger reaches zero then the Pokémon's health will slowly begin to deplete. On top of that, there are status effects to worry about, such as poison or burns, which will stop Pokémon from regenerating health and will hurt them. Other effects, like confusion, can mess with a Pokémon's movement or ability to act. This can prove to be very annoying and potentially dangerous, so it's always a good idea to have the proper items available. Actually, a big part of mystery dungeon navigation involves managing items effectively. Only a certain amount can be held at once, but items will be scattered about all over the place and will quickly fill up the bag. It's a good idea to figure out which are the most important and plan accordingly. Some of the more important ones are oran berries and reviver seeds which are necessary for healing, elixirs which replenish the PP of moves, apples which stave off hunger, and wands and orbs that keep enemies at bay or help with dungeon navigation. There are also "Looplets" which act as the sole source of accessory. These can be upgraded with "Emeras" or gems which provide a wide array of different effects to help with combat and navigation (some may even cause a Mega Evolution!), but the Emeras will disappear upon exiting a dungeon. If the player fails a dungeon, they will lose all the items and money currently being held, unless they opt to wait for a rescue mission. These can be arranged on Pelipper Island, where the player can request help from other players via passwords, QR codes, local wireless, or IR connection. Alternatively, the player can simply return to their old save in order to retain items and money, but of course progress might be lost. Helper Pokémon can also be sent out from Pelipper Island for streetpass purposes, although I haven't encountered any yet. While story dungeons will force the player to use specific teams of Pokémon, normal dungeons will allow the player to choose any three Pokémon they wish to use. More Pokémon can be recruited by completing expeditions or simply chatting with folks around town, so the pool of possible allies will continue to grow larger and larger. All 720 Pokémon are available to be recruited, including legendaries, gender variations, all forms of Unown, and more. Using Pokémon in dungeons will allow them to level up and and learn new moves. I don't believe they can evolve, but since their evolutions can also be recruited, it doesn't really matter too much. Normal expeditions are where Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon really shines, but unfortunately they are few and far between until the main story has been completed. Free play finally opens up in the epilogue, but players are looking at about 20+ hours of gameplay and cutscenes before that happens. Aside from that, my only real complaints are the lack of skippable cutscenes and the fact that some story missions don't provide much opportunity for preparation. Even though it often allows the player to choose the items they want to take along and check out the shops beforehand, I still occasionally found myself woefully unprepared for story missions and ended up getting stuck with lousy equipment. The game also tends to save before long cutscenes right before boss fights, so I was forced to rewatch the same scenes over and over again whenever I died. The one before the final boss was particularly frustrating; it was so long! I'd have to say my favorite part of Super Mystery Dungeon is the way the Pokémon are portrayed. In most games and in the anime, the Pokémon simply say their own names and their personalities, if they have one at all, can only be implied. The main cast of characters in Super Mystery Dungeon consists of a good mix of Pokémon from each generation, and they're all given their own voice, each with different quirks, opinions, personalities, and sometimes even accents. It's really fun to learn about these guys in a new light. Some that I liked before I ended up hating this time around (like Pancham and Shelmet, those jerks!), while others that I may have ignored in previous games quickly became some of my favorites (like Espurr!). The cutscenes may have been long and the story may have been a little over-the-top, but I'd say it was worth it in the end just to get to know some of the Pokémon a bit better. Having never played any of the previous entries in the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series, I can't really compare it to the earlier games. However, for my first foray into Pokémon roguelikes, I had a great time! The difficulty seemed to ramp up considerably in some places, but between items, Emeras, and the random elements, I was generally able to figure out a strategy that worked well enough for me to just barely make it through. But if that doesn't work for some players, there are always the rescue missions to fall back on in case of an emergency. If you're like me and you haven't tried a Mystery Dungeon game yet, this one comes highly recommended. I'm fairly confident fans of the series will not be disappointed either. On its own, Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon is a quirky, light-hearted spin-off with well-developed dungeon crawling gameplay that provides a satisfying level of difficulty and gives the player plenty of room to develop their own strategies, all the while offering tons of customization options with a huge roster of potential allies and moves. It's a solid entry in the Pokémon franchise. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
Super Mystery Dungeon photo
Like Magic(karp)
The Pokémon Mystery Dungeon spin-off series transports the colorful cast of pocket monsters from the role-playing games into the challenging world of a roguelike dungeon crawler. Super Mystery Dungeon retains the charm...

Pokemon Picross photo
Pokemon Picross

Pokemon Picross will launch on December 3


In the west
Nov 26
// Chris Carter
Pokémon Picross was kind of announced out of nowhere on a recent Nintendo Direct, and it didn't have a set date outside of "December." Thanks to a recent site listing though, we now know that it will hit on December 3 ...
Holiday toys photo
Holiday toys

Christmas Pikachu and other holiday Pokemon merch


From the Pokemon Center
Nov 21
// Steven Hansen
From the people that brought you Intern Pikachu, the Pokémon Center is doing a holiday line of Pokémon products. Deck the halls with Pokéballs of holly. Rudolph the red-nosed Deerling. Uh. Man, I really h...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Amazon is listing Pokemon Generation 1 on 3DS at $9.99 each


A premium for Pokemon
Nov 17
// Chris Carter
Well, I guess this would make sense, but it's probably not ideal for a lot of you who were expecting to scoop up the upcoming releases of Pokemon Red, Blue, and Yellow all at once. Up at Amazon, there's a $9.99 pre-order...
amiibo photo
amiibo

PSA: Mewtwo and Animal Crossing amiibo go on sale on Amazon in 15 minutes


Mewtwo, Mabel, Tom Nook, and a 3-pack
Nov 13
// Brett Makedonski
Friends, Romans, amiibo-hunters: lend me your ears. The day is upon us for another amiibo release. It's a little bit of Smash Bros. and a lot of Animal Crossing. Mostly cute (like last time) with just a dash of badass. Mewtwo...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Pokken Tournament strikes Wii U spring 2016


Japanese debut slated for March 18
Nov 12
// Kyle MacGregor
The Wii U version of The Pokémon Company and Bandai Namco's fighter Pokkén Tournament will debut in Japan on March 18 and sometime in the spring across Europe and North America. An amiibo card for Shadow Mewtwo will be included with first-run copies of the game worldwide. Nintendo says the creature can also be unlocked sans card "after you fulfill certain conditions."
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Pokemon Red, Blue and Yellow are coming to 3DS


Wireless trading and battling
Nov 12
// Laura Kate Dale
I am so bleeding pumped right now, you can't even believe it. Pokemon Red, Blue, and Yellow and coming to the 3DS eShop in Europe and North America on February 27, 2016. Yes, that's right, they're really finally coming. Link ...
Pokemon Picross photo
Pokemon Picross

'Free to start' Pokemon Picross is coming in December


Got your puzzles, got your Pokemon
Nov 12
// Joe Parlock
In the first Nintendo Direct in a long time, Nintendo has announced that the popular puzzle series Picross will be getting a Pokémon-themed makeover in early December, with the release of Pokémon Picross digital...
Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Bone-up on how Pokemon relates to real life history


A lot of alien influences
Nov 09
// Chris Carter
Another Did You Know Gaming is out, and it celebrates the real life influences that are found in Pokemon. I think my favorite bit is how Sableye is basically an eyewitness account by a Kentucky family who thought they were v...
Mewtwo photo
Mewtwo

Mewtwo amiibo up for pre-order now at Best Buy


Last time it went away pretty quickly
Nov 08
// Chris Carter
If you're still into collecting amiibo, Mewtwo is up now at Best Buy's site for the standard price of $12.99 in the US. Although the amiibo shortage seems to have mostly let up, there are still a number of figures that sell o...

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