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WayForward photo
WayForward

WayForward might be teasing a new Switchforce game


School edition?
Aug 21
// Chris Carter
Despite any shortcomings WayForward may have, they're pretty on point with Shantae and the Switchforce series. For the latter franchise we've seen heroine Patricia Wagon in the shoes of a policewoman and a fire...
Mario Maker level photo
Mario Maker level

This Mario Maker level plays like a Metroid game


Metroid U
Aug 20
// Jordan Devore
Between Metal Gear Solid V and Super Mario Maker, my schedule for September is Chinese-buffet full. Both games are going be huge time sinks. They're also tons of fun to watch pre-release. Take this level created by&...

Poncho is a mind-melting retro journey through post-robopocalypse

Aug 20 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]307084:60068:0[/embed] Poncho (PC [previewed], PS4, PS Vita, Wii U)Developer: Delve InteractivePublisher: Rising Star GamesRelease Date: September 24, 2015MSRP: $14.99 After the apocalypse, humanity has been wiped out by an unknown scourge, and all that is left are machines. With mother nature having retaken the earth, the machines developed their own society and culture in the ruins of the old world. But one day, a poncho-wearing robot longs to discover his origins, and seeks out his creator. Using perspective-warping abilities and his own platforming skills, the resourceful little robot will travel through the landscape and encounter other machines trying to find purpose in the new world. Over the course of his adventure, he'll not only discover the meaning his own creation, but also the truth behind mankind's destruction. In recent years, retro-throwback games such as Fez have become common. What these titles share is an increased focus on subversion and playing with genre conventions, all the while crafting a compelling story that goes beyond what many would expect from the genre they're paying homage to. Poncho is no different. With the ability to travel between different planes of the level -- from the foreground, background, and middleground -- the poncho-wearing robot will have to tackle challenging puzzles and action set-pieces. The developers cite classic platformers such as Super Mario World and Sonic the Hedgehog, which had richly detailed backgrounds, as inspiration. I was surprised by how quickly Poncho ramped in difficulty. Initially, it's a very atmospheric game that focuses on storytelling, but once you're let loose into the various stages, things take quite a turn. While there are no enemies or bosses to battle, the challenges come from figuring out how to navigate the multi-layered levels with the perspectives-jumping abilities. With platforms, switches, and other obstacles that call for quick jumps between the different areas of the stages, there's tricky twitch-based gameplay to the platforming and some genuine three-dimensional thinking to the puzzles. It's trippy while still playing on the 2D plane.  With its release approaching, I got in some quality time from the current build of the game. As you acquire new abilities and skills from schematics, you'll be able to travel back to past stages and explore new areas. These abilities, such as the robot stomp, open a number of new avenues of exploration. This mechanic did a lot to make me understand the true scope of Poncho. It's very much a throwback platformer with modern puzzle gameplay dynamics. There were several moments where I felt I was stuck, but once I figured things out, I was left immensely satisfied.  If you're itching for a puzzle-platformer that plays with the genre's tropes and conventions, then keep an eye out for this little title. While on the surface it looks like a rather humble platforming jaunt through a post-apocylyptic world filled with robots, Poncho quickly goes into mindfuck territory, and it'll raise questions you'll be dying to get answers to.
Poncho preview photo
Out on September 24
Last year, we got a sneak peek at a rather peculiar puzzle-platformer named Poncho. Launching on Kickstarter and debuting at EGX for attendees, it showed a lot of promise in exploring the earth after humans went extinct. Unfo...

Gunman Clive Wii U photo
Gunman Clive Wii U

Gunman Clive HD Collection for Wii U slated for September release


For $3.99
Aug 20
// Chris Carter
We now have some more concrete details for the Gunman Clive HD Collection, which is a pairing of the first two games in the series, which were originally on 3DS. According to the developer Bertil Horberg, it's set for a Septe...
Freedom Planet photo
Freedom Planet

Freedom Planet on Wii U delayed indefinitely


'We're coming to Wii U no matter what'
Aug 19
// Chris Carter
Every few weeks or so I think to  myself, "is Freedom Planet coming out on Wii U yet?" We missed the review of the original, so I wanted to cover the console edition whenever it hit, and I'm getting pretty anxious. ...
amiibo skins photo
amiibo skins

Sonic, Splatoon, Pit amiibo costumes surface in Super Mario Maker


amiibo skins
Aug 19
// Steven Hansen
[Update: more pictures are available in the gallery below, like Waluigi.] It's no surprise that the sprawling Super Mario Maker supports Nintendo's amiibo toys -- we saw Wii Fit Trainer show up in-game a few months ago. All t...
Blubber Busters photo
Blubber Busters

Save space whales from disease in this pretty platformer


Blubber Busters
Aug 18
// Steven Hansen
With a name like Blubber Busters I was expecting something akin to that video where some knuckleheads try and dispose of a beached whale with dynamite, sending gore and viscera all over looker-ons (not to be confused with th...
American McGee photo
American McGee

American McGee encourages petition for Alice series' rights


Despite EA's disinterest
Aug 18
// Zack Furniss
American McGee's Alice series holds a special place in many a gamer's (queen of) hearts for its grim take on Lewis Carroll's classic tale. Despite a lackluster sequel, there are still fans holding out hope for a third ga...

Super Mario Maker is more fun than I initially thought it would be

Aug 18 // Chris Carter
Super Mario Maker starts in the best way possible -- a miniature creation tutorial featuring the first Super Mario Bros. After jumping across an impossible-to-make gap, you'll have the option to "finish the course," and bring Mario to the safety of the goal flag. Objects are located at the top, and it's very easy to use the stylus to create platforms, Question Mark Blocks, enemies, and hazards. Putting wings on enemies, piranha plants inside pipes, and items inside of blocks is also as easy as dragging it on top of said item. You can also tap or drag to clone the last-used item, which is useful for dropping tons of blocks. There's a lot of personality present, especially with the auto-tuned voice that notes item placement, cutely shouting out things like "block! block block! block block block block!" to the tune of the classic Mario theme. Maker even has its own tutorial character named "Mary O." who functions as a Power Line Expert of sorts, complete with a headset. I love little touches like this. The way amiibo support works is by adding characters to a roster with a GamePad tap, which will allow players to change into new cast members when touching a Mystery Mushroom. Each character has a special emote with the up d-pad button (for example, Pac-Man will raise a piece of fruit) -- most of the ones I've seen so far also have their own sound effects, and if you're hit, you'll transform back into Mario. Here's a full list of compatible amiibo.  Changing your "theme" (such as above or underground in the first Mario game, or even a new series entirely) is as easy as pressing a button, and only takes a few seconds. It's awesome seeing a stage change from the retro style to the "New" visuals instantly. It's also important to note that more tools only open up "over a series of days, as you continue to create in the game," and only 12 are available right away -- Nintendo notes that this is so you aren't overwhelmed but I don't really buy into it (hence my lingering issue). Expect thoughts on how this scenario plays out in the coming weeks. In terms of modes, you'll start off in the editing portion, but you can also access a challenge mode of sorts that limits your lives, and "Course World," which is a full online hub that allows you to play, star, download, and comment on levels. I love how Nintendo has this mode laid out, as you can clearly see the entire level by way of an icon in the hub menu, giving you an idea of whether or not the stage is up your alley before you even play it. You can also sort by rating and filter "up and coming" levels if you wish, and each map only takes roughly five seconds to load. There's tons of levels available right now for reviewers, so I'll be able to provide some thoughts on how the hub works at a later date. I don't want to spoil too many secrets, so expect our review in early September ahead of the September 11 launch of Super Mario Maker.
Super Mario Maker photo
First hands-on with the retail edition
Although I haven't been super excited for Super Mario Maker based on the initial pitch, we've slowly been drip-fed more and more information over the past month or so, and some of it looks intriguing. Now, I've had the chance to play the game myself, and left pretty satisfied outside of one lingering issue.

Stories: The Hidden Path photo
Stories: The Hidden Path

Developer of Tiny Brains reveals Stories: The Hidden Path


Floating islands? I'm in
Aug 17
// Chris Carter
Tiny Brains was a delightful little puzzle game, and showed us that developer Spearhead Games had chops. Now they're moving onto Stories: The Hidden Path exclusively for PS4, which looks fantastic on paper. And "paper" ...
Super Mario photo
Super Mario

Super Mario's Question Block has come a long way


I remember my first encounter
Aug 17
// Chris Carter
One of my favorite gaming experiences is playing something completely blind. That's just what I did for my first ever Super Mario playthrough on NES. While I played with my parents at my side, they didn't really know a ...
Super Mario Poi photo
Super Mario Poi

Poi looks like all the best 3D Mario games combined into one


Now on Kickstarter
Aug 15
// Jed Whitaker
[Update: Added some gameplay videos below] We have written about Poi prior to now, but somehow it flew under my radar. Poi looks like all the best parts of Super Mario 64, Super Mario Sunshine, Super Mario Galaxy&n...

Review: Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey

Aug 14 // Jed Whitaker
Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey (PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Grandé GamesPublisher: Grandé GamesRelease Date: August 11, 2015 (PS4), August 14, 2015 (Xbox One)MSRP: $13.99 Think of the most basic indie platformer you've ever played with minimal graphics and okay at best platforming mechanics, because that is what Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey is, only worse.  Commander Cherry has to get from one side of the ten available levels to the other, using snapshots of your body taken with the Xbox One Kinect or the Playstation Eye as platforms. When posing for pictures you'll have to position yourself so the edges of your body touch red circles causing them to light up, thus making them collectible for Commander Cherry. These yellow dots must be collected to allow advancement to the next part of the level and granting you a rating of yo, yoga, or yogawesome depending on how well you performed, then rinse and repeat for what felt like a billion times. Here's the thing about capturing your body in crazy poses: in theory it sounds great, but in practice the functionality blows. The Kinect was picking up like half my arms, half my face, and half my legs. On top of that, the detection wasn't that great, often times leaving wide areas of the room behind me in the picture, instead of cropping me out. So don't be fooled by Commander Cherry's original trailer, it certainly doesn't work as well as I was led to believe it was; foolish me. [embed]304686:59976:0[/embed] As far as the actual platforming goes it could be better. Early on you're asked to press a button that shows you all what all the controls are, only you can't do two of the functions yet: double jump and laser. You can only double jump if you have a power-up that turns your weak mustache into a long wizard-like beard, but the game doesn't tell you that as the control screen just says "Hold A to double jump" which isn't even how you double jump once you have the ability! The laser is granted to you in later levels allowing you to cut through your snapshots of yourself, which helps a great deal and should have been available from the start. Speaking of available from the start, double jump should have been as well. The platforming isn't exactly smooth, and most of the time I only found myself able to make it through sections when I had the power-up. The double jump power-up is lost upon falling to your death or hitting the weird eyeball grass and oranges that shoot flames, much like the super mushroom power-up in Super Mario Bros. The big difference between this and Super Mario Bros. is the added double jump ability; getting hit as Mario makes you smaller and harder to hit versus in Commander Cherry it just causes you to lose functionality and makes the game harder. Because of this I started to purposefully kill myself three times in a row when I lost the double jump ability, as it causes a power-up to spawn for you. Nothing says "this might not be a great idea" like someone playing your game and killing themselves deliberately to make your game even remotely possible let alone enjoyable. I'm clearly not in shape, at all -- though Seaman once told me round is indeed a shape -- but I didn't have much trouble posing to complete the platforming puzzles. Poses start with just making basic platforms to guide your character across, but eventually add other mechanics, like avoiding touching grass-like eyeballs, blocking firebreath from oranges, and bodies that move when you have Commander Cherry jump on them. The problem is it gets tedious when sometimes you're asked to make up to six poses for one section while holding the controller in your hand and contorting your body in all different positions. It just wasn't fun, and eventually I had to take a break as my knees, and back started to ache a bit. Later on I figured out I could just play while sitting in my chair closer to the camera, and totally cheesed my way through the final levels with no shame.  All the levels look pretty similar, just bland textureless polygons, and what music there was was pretty forgettable, just like the rest of the game. With only ten levels you'd think Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey was over far too soon, but it was quite the opposite; I couldn't wait for this yoga-like Hell to be over. Knowing the game was made by only two people makes me feel a bit like a yogasshole by saying this game is yogawful, but this is one cherry pit I couldn't wait to spit out. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Review: Commander Cherry photo
Yogawful
"A game that captures pictures of you when you pose to build levels for your character to platform on? This is gonna be a blast," I thought naively as I excitedly volunteered to review Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey, "Finally something I can use my Kinect for!" Note to self: Never, ever, ever volunteer to review a Kinect game again, no matter how cool it might look.

Ty the Tasmanian Tiger photo
Ty the Tasmanian Tiger

Ty the Tasmanian Tiger 4 releasing on Steam September 18, first three games are also coming to PC


Well ain't that bonza, mate?
Aug 14
// Joe Parlock
Wow, Ty the Tasmanian Tiger is something I haven’t thought about in 10 years. I always thought it was a weird attempt to piggyback on the success Spyro and Crash Bandicoot had during the  generation before. Th...
Spelunky record photo
Spelunky record

This Spelunky run through hell is astounding


Also record breaking
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
The new world record for clearing Spelunky, including hell, is 3:44:411. Holy shit. Despite knowing this run by D Tea would end successfully, I still got nervous watching it all unfold. What can I say? Rapidly navigating randomized areas with a teleporter while shopkeepers run wild puts me on edge. Even at a slow pace, there's just so many ways to screw up in this game.
Woah Dave! Cross-Buy photo
Woah Dave! Cross-Buy

Woah Dave! is out next week on Wii U, Cross-Buy with 3DS


Out on August 20
Aug 13
// Chris Carter
I didn't really dig Woah Dave!, but a lot of people did, and those folks will be able to enjoy it on Wii U next week. As announced by developer Choice Provisions, it will be Cross-Buy with the 3DS, and if you already own...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Super Mario Maker's level components will be drip-fed


Tools, sounds, and effects unlock
Aug 12
// Darren Nakamura
Every time I think I know what to expect out of Super Mario Maker, a new video shows up with a little more information. The video below was just released and I'm having trouble keeping the hype in check. Here's what's new to ...
Runbow photo
Runbow

Runbow's character list includes Gunvolt and Mutant Mudds cameos


The game launches August 27
Aug 11
// Chris Carter
Nintendo Life has revealed more of the growing cast of characters that's joining Runbow, and some of them are pretty surprising. Most notably there's Gunvolt from Azure Striker Gunvolt, as well as Teslamancer, Clone, ARID, Xe...
Vin Diesel photo
Vin Diesel

Team Meat no longer opposed to a Super Meat Boy sequel


Vin Diesel
Aug 08
// Steven Hansen
Remember back when Vin Diesel wouldn't do sequels and we got xXx: State of the Union starring Ice Cube and the worst Fast and Furious movie? But then Riddick happened and, obviously, Diesel returned to the Fast and Furious fr...
Shovel Knight photo
Shovel Knight

Check out this Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows info blowout


This game still has a lot of DLC left
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
Nintendo UK caught up with Yacht Club Games, and chatted a bit about what to expect in the new Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows DLC coming up. As a note, although they state that it will be coming to "Nintendo platforms...
Ori expansion photo
Ori expansion

Ori and the Blind Forest is getting an expansion


For Xbox One and Windows 10
Aug 06
// Jordan Devore
Ori and the Blind Forest is one of my favorite games on Xbox One. It looks, sounds, and plays magnificently. I'm surprised and delighted it even got made, and that goes double for its commercial success. The game was "already...
LEGO Marvel photo
LEGO Marvel

LEGO Marvel's Avengers pushed back to January 2016


Block quotes
Aug 05
// Steven Hansen
LEGO Marvel's Avengers will miss its fall 2015 release and instead come to North America on January 26 and Europe on January 29. Some real missed holiday sales opportunity there, looks like, especially with it coming to every...
Unravel photo
Unravel

Unravel shows off live gameplay at gamescom


Make Martin Sahlin the King of Games
Aug 05
// Joe Parlock
The true star of E3 is back, now at gamescom. Nervously taking to stage once more, Martin Sahlin and Yarny showed off some live gameplay of Unravel while giving a heartfelt speech about what presenting at E3 really meant to ...
Mirror's Edge Catalyst photo
Mirror's Edge Catalyst

Sprint over here and watch the first Mirror's Edge Catalyst gameplay trailer


Daaaaamn this looks good
Aug 05
// Laura Kate Dale
Finally, Mirror's Edge Catalyst has gameplay footage available for you all to watch. Thank you gamescom. So, what did we learn from this new footage? Well, we learned that Catalyst looks a lot like the original Mirror's Edge, with combat discouraged in favour of running and being a rebellious badass. So, I'm reassured that this should be the Mirror's Edge game I am hoping for. Fantastic news.
Hue photo
Hue

Hue uses color to solve its puzzle platforming


ROY G BIV
Jul 31
// Darren Nakamura
Making objects disappear and reappear at depending on visibility has been done before, but Hue multiplies that idea by a factor of four. Instead of it being a simple light/dark dichotomy, backgrounds in Hue can be one of eigh...

Review: The Swindle

Jul 31 // Zack Furniss
The Swindle (PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Vita, Wii U, Xbox One)Developer: Size Five GamesPublisher: Curve DigitalRelease Date: July 28, 2015 (PC, PS3, PS4, Vita) / July 31 (Xbox One) / TBD (Wii U)MSRP: $14.99 I'll be honest, this review didn't come out on release day because I couldn't beat the fucking game in time. The Swindle starts off simply enough: the robotic police force that defends all of that sweet future funding projects a light in front of them indicating their line of sight. If you take a second to observe most obstacles and enemies, chances are you'll understand how they'll react in any given situation. That's the beauty of Size Five Games' newest creation: through its hand-drawn art and deft understanding of visual cues, a glance at your surroundings is usually enough to convey all of the information regardless of your location. With a general lack of tutorials, it's appreciated that there was a strong knowledge of mise-en-scène (ha! I've justified taking that one directing class now) involved in The Swindle's creation. A successful robbery goes as follows: from a side-scrolling perspective, your scoundrel will arrive at a procedurally-generated location ripe for the plucking. With a combination of climbing, sneaking, and watching, you just might be able to walk away with a considerable sum of money. Small vaults/chests/containers are strewn about, but aren't worth much. Computers (which are hacked through deliciously tense QTEs) are where you'll want to focus your efforts, as they offer the best payday. If you're spotted, you run the risk of dying and losing your character, though your purchased abilities are universal. The police will send increasingly deadly forces at you, but you can still get away if you reach your escape pod without dying. For the first 40 days or so, I felt like I was building a slow, subtle mastery over my surroundings. Though I started by robbing the poor to work my way up, the ramshackle security systems were enough to keep me vigilant. The intricacies of wall-climbing became more familiar to me, and various upgrades to my thieves expanded the possible approaches available at each newly-generated building. I watched many of these swindlers embrace sweet death via bullets, failed hacking attempts on explosives, and oh-so-many plunges off of tiled roofs. Each time, a new one rose with a new outfit and name: Lafeyette Weedbruiser lasted six successful heists before a wheelchair-clad robot shot her down from a magnificent double-jump. I eventually earned enough money to move onto the warehouse districts and the mansions. Each area was progressively more difficult but offered more lucrative lucre. I bought bombs, money-accruing bugs, and the ability to hack doors and security systems, feeling as though the Devil's Basilisk would be mine with days to spare. It wasn't until I purchased the right to try to pilfer from the casinos and banks that I hit an iron wall of challenge. Instead of skulking into buildings with multiple access points and hacking easily-reached computers for big bucks, I was relegated to picking up chump change and scrambling back to my escape pod before the tenacious security bots spotted me during one of my many slip-ups. The titular swindle is actually the final stage, where you attempt to steal the AI device. You need to be prepared for the big event by having the right tools and upgraded thieves, but you also need to pay for entry. Saving up £400,000 is already hard enough; however, failure requires you to pay the whole amount for each successive attempt. Since you'll be spending your hard-earned money on necessary upgrades like teleportation, triple-jumps, and being able to stop in the middle of a wall slide (seriously, buy this), that buy-in price makes an already difficult game feel ludicrously unfair. There are ways to buy extra days towards the end, but the price goes up each time. That's the game over screen, which I saw at the end of multiple attempts at all 100 days. I'm not one to balk at a challenge, but the finite lives combined with the money requirement of the last level feel like an artificial attempt to gate willing players away from the ending. I have no doubt that somebody is on Twitch at this very moment, controlling The Swindle with Donkey Konga drums ghosting through the final stage, but the vast majority of players will mostly find the latter half of the game frustrating. I think it's telling that most of the coverage I've read has only shown screenshots of the first few stages.  There's also the weird bloom effect that permeates some of your jaunt through London. While it makes sense to have your vision obscured when the alarms are blaring and the lights are flashing red, occasionally the screen is bloomed beyond belief and you can't discern the minutiae on the screen. I've committed almost-perfect crimes, hacking security systems and clearing out guards, only to land on an explosive I could barely see. Get used to seeing starbursts of paper money explode from your fresh corpses for the slightest of transgressions. The collision on spike pits also is a bit wonky, and I've died a fair few times just for standing close to one. Depending on the kind of player you are, you might just start finding exploits to accelerate your progress. I'm not all that ashamed to admit that I took advantage of bugs, which seem to go against the whole risk/reward theme of The Swindle. If you get close to a computer, you can place a bug that will siphon cash to your account at a rate of £/second. This goes directly to your account, so you can avoid having to run back to the escape pod to keep whatever you earn. The thrill of sneaking off with a sack full of cash is somewhat diminished when you can place a bunch of bugs and wait by the exit, but I found myself relying on this method in order to actually reach the Devil's Basilisk. Since hacking is accomplished via directional QTEs, you can just spin the stick in a circle without punishment (unless it's a mine, which will explode upon an incorrect input). I only did this once out of curiosity, but it feels like an unnoticed exploit. Hacking is my favorite part of the game, so I couldn't cheat myself out of that experience without feeling like a sad sack. For the record, I played on a gamepad, which was much more comfortable than the keyboard layout. The Swindle is nowhere near an entirely negative experience. It's a festival of moments, of anecdotes filled with failures and smiles. I found myself holding my breath as I hacked a computer with just enough time to dodge three heavy guards coming my way, jumped over two electricity traps, clung to a wall to let a patrol pass, and bombed myself a new escape route. These pockets of perfection kept me hooked, and made me boot up The Swindle again and again in order to preserve this world of rogues. That, and my dedication to you guys. Now, the Devil's Basilisk is for all of us to share. You're goddamned welcome. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
The Swindle photo
Steal shit, get hit
A band of thieves in Steampunk Victorian London has been tasked with preventing Scotland Yard's creation of the ultimate surveillance device: The Devil's Basilisk. If they fail to swindle said device in 100 days (read: lives)...

Unravel photo
Unravel

Adorable yarn adventure Unravel releasing in early 2016


I want him to live in my pocket
Jul 31
// Laura Kate Dale
Without a doubt, the star of E3 this year was Yarny, the adorable woolen hero of EA's upcoming faux indie release Unravel. He's just so gosh damn adorable, as is his nervously cute creator who we met at E3. For those of you j...
Roll Playing Game photo
Roll Playing Game

Roll Playing Game gets the ball rolling this fall


And other ball-related puns
Jul 30
// Darren Nakamura
We might just be in a new renaissance of "roll the ball to the goal" games right now. Super Impossible Road showed us the benefits of breaking the rules. Polyball took it to a trippy otherworld. Now we have word about Roll Pl...
Yooka-Laylee photo
Yooka-Laylee

Team17 is publishing Yooka-Laylee


Considering physical release too
Jul 30
// Laura Kate Dale
Yooka-Laylee, the Banjo-Kazooie spiritual successor that did incredibly well on Kickstarter a few months back, is apparently getting published by Team17. Best known for the Worms series, it has also been publishing indie titl...
MANOS: Director's Cut photo
MANOS: Director's Cut

MANOS: Director's Cut is a game adaptation of a 50-year-old film


I bet this game had a bigger budget
Jul 30
// Joe Parlock
Do you remember the hit 1966 film Manos: The Hands of Fate? No? The movie was made because of a bet by Harold P. Warren, a guy who sold fertiliser and had no prior film-making experience, on a budget of only $19,000. Unbeliev...

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