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Plants vs Zombies

Need speed photo
Need speed

New Need for Speed coming 2015, Titanfall and Plants vs Zombies 2016

Who needs to be surprised this E3?
May 05
// Steven Hansen
Electronic Arts is adding to its holiday lineup (sports, Battlefront) with a new Need for Speed, according to EA financials. The company decided to chill on yearly Need for Speeds after going from developers Black Box to Crit...
EA Xbox One sale photo
EA Xbox One sale

Xbox One sale: $10 Titanfall and Garden Warfare, $36 Dragon Age: Inquisition

I'm tempted
Jan 26
// Jordan Devore
It's much easier to stomach Electronic Arts when you're only paying a fraction of the original price, as is the case with these Xbox One deals via Live. Come on, latecomers. This one's for you: Battlefield 4 - $13.20 Battlef...
EA Access photo
EA Access

If you happen to have EA Access, I highly recommend playing Garden Warfare

One again, it's quite good
Oct 15
// Jordan Devore
I keep forgetting about EA Access. Perhaps you can say the same. It's a $4.99-per-month service for Xbox One that gives unlimited access to select games from you-know-who along with other perks like early demos. One of my fav...
PvZ Garden Warfare DLC photo
PvZ Garden Warfare DLC

Free update for Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare adds tweaked classes, tacos

Do you want to taco 'bout it?
Sep 29
// Darren Nakamura
Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare has already done right by its users by providing good post-launch support via free downloadable content, and it is continuing on that path with tomorrow's Legends of the Lawn update. The DLC...
PopCap boss leaves EA photo
PopCap boss leaves EA

PopCap's last remaining co-founder leaves EA

John Vechey to work for environmental non-profit Grist
Sep 07
// Kyle MacGregor
PopCap boss John Vechey is parting ways with the studio he helped build nearly 15 years ago. In Vechey's farewell address, he reveals plans to "give something back for awhile until [he figures] out what's next." That inv...
#Cheetos photo

Wear the carcass of Chester Cheetah in Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare

Cheetos is really doing this
Aug 19
// Jordan Devore
I was prepared to get mildly annoyed at this Cheetos partnership with Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare, despite the fact that it's not the first time the game has dabbled in brand-sponsored character variants. (There were ...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Garden Warfare's Suburbination update adds another mode and character

Capture and defend control points
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
This week's free new update for Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare adds Suburbination mode, a capture-and-defend game type in the same vein as Battlefield's Conquest and Call of Duty's Domination. Gardens & Graveyards is...
Garden Warfare photo
Garden Warfare

Play Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare in bed with Remote Play

1080p, 60 frames per second on PS4
Jul 29
// Jordan Devore
I played a ton of Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare on Xbox 360, and now I'm getting into it again on PC. Still super fun and arguably one of the best shooters of the past few years. On August 19, the game comes to PlayStat...
PvZ photo

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare is getting another free DLC

I still can't believe this is published by EA
Jun 30
// Chris Carter
I'm really glad that Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare is still chugging along with free DLC. It's a truly great shooter that was pretty risky for a developer like PopCap, but since EA keeps greenlighting new content i...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

PC players will get this new Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare map first

Jewel Junction
Jun 20
// Jordan Devore
Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare comes to PC on Tuesday and if you ignored everything Chris and I said about the Xbox One and Xbox 360 versions of the multiplayer shooter, hear this: it's really good. This video showcases ...
K'nex photo

K'Nex drops their Plants vs. Zombies line this week

Based on PvZ 2
Jun 18
// Chris Carter
Plants vs. Zombies has come a long way from a humble indie PC game, to a series that's owned by EA with multiple games. K'Nex is getting in on the action as well, and has announced their newest playsets, complete with pl...
News that's good to the last drop
There's a hot drizzle of news leading up to E3, and Max is here to suck it down and spit it back at you! A sequel to Homefront is actually happening, for some reason. Ed Boon officiates the new MK as Mortal Kombat X (as in E...

Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Pick up Plants vs. Zombies for free on Origin

Zombie ga yatte kita!
May 08
// Brittany Vincent
If you're looking for a reason to see the bright side about using Origin, you can pick up Plants vs. Zombies: Game of the Year Edition there currently for the low, low price of free. I realize that doesn't exactly make up for...

EA looking to stream games direct to Comcast customers

Get titles like Madden and Fifa from your cable provider
May 02
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Electronic Arts could soon be offering their games directly to Comcast subscribers, according to a report from Reuters. The two companies have been in talks, and after two years of testing it seems the deal is close to an agr...
Garden Warfare photo
Garden Warfare

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare microtransactions incoming

And that's okay, actually
Apr 28
// Jordan Devore
This week, PopCap will add microtransactions to Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare. We knew the day would come and, you know what? It's not a big deal. For those of you not playing this wacky third-person shooter (you're miss...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare adds free Zomboss Down DLC

Dibs on Sun Pharaoh
Apr 15
// Jordan Devore
I'm not sure which alternate dimension Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare came from or how it got here but PopCap's wacky third-person shooter has been a pleasant surprise. Against all odds, the game keeps on giving: another...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Plants vs. Zombies 2's 'Far Future' update hits today

New characters on both sides
Mar 26
// Jordan Devore
PopCap is releasing an update for Plants vs. Zombies 2 on iOS and Android today which adds a bunch of futuristic-looking plants and zombies as well as a new world map. Yes, there are lasers. EA has run through a few of the ad...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare's DLC is off to a great start

EA is giving out free DLC without microtransactions?
Mar 19
// Chris Carter
I really enjoyed Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare, which was a pleasant surprise amidst a sea of "me too" shooters. I enjoyed it so much in fact that I still play it, and I find myself spending more time with it l...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

PvZ: Garden Warfare is getting substantial new DLC and it's free

A new mode, map, and ability upgrades
Mar 17
// Jordan Devore
I've been pleasantly surprised by the way Electronic Arts and PopCap have handled Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare. First, the game itself is loads of fun -- the foundation is solid. But more than that, they don't have paid...
PvZ: Garden Warfare photo
PvZ: Garden Warfare

Impressions: Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare (Xbox 360)

A downgrade, but still absolutely worth playing
Mar 08
// Jordan Devore
It's as if we slipped into some alternate dimension. The long-awaited Plants vs. Zombies 2 went straight to mobile, passing over PC fans, and while it wasn't bad -- not at all -- I sure lost interest. Instead, it's PopCap's t...

Very Quick Tips: Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare

Feb 25 // Chris Carter
General tips: Always follow the challenges for each class, or at the very least, keep them in the back of your mind. They're key to unlocking new abilities at the start, or helpful modififcations as time goes on. Even after you earn your core three powers, they're still worth doing. In terms of choosing what card packs to open, the 10,000 coin packs are a safe bet. Not only do they deliver a number of backups from the 1,000 pack, but they generally help you work towards new characters, and with the right skills, you can buy a 10,000 pack every three games or so. If you want a "safe" choice to start, I recommend the Pea Shooter or the Soldier Zombie. They're very easy to learn because all of their abilities are basically "shoot stuff." Both of them also have the ability to leap high into the air, allowing you to escape tough battles or get a vantage point. If you're hunkering down with the Pea Shooter's gatling gun ability, keep in mind that you can cancel it with a quick tap of the "B" button. You'll want to cancel it more often than not, because players will instantly recognize the sound and unleash heavy hitting artillery in your direction. You have the ability to switch classes mid-match, and depending on your team's composition, you may want to do this. For example, online players will often think the Chomper plant is overpowered because of it's one-hit stealth kill, and mass them. The problem with this strategy is that zombies can easily counter it by going to high ground, and picking off Chompers one by one. Take the initiative by changing to a ranged class, like a Cactus, and taking out the snipers -- shifting the meta-game entirely. Likewise, don't forget that you can change your character to the "Boss Mode" feature, which allows you to heal teammates or drop bombs from the sky. Use it once per match but don't stay in it too long -- ground support is much more tide-turning. The Chomper is probably one of the most unique classes in any modern shooter, and as such, it's hard to use. Always try to stick to moving in-between cover as you're a sitting duck at a range, and don't be afraid to use your digging power even if you aren't being shot. Stealth is key for any Chomper's success, but you will need backup -- so don't go into an area swarming with enemies at every turn. Scientists are very similar to the Chomper in that they need to get close to deal major damage. Stay mostly out of sight and teleport past open spaces to confuse your opponents, or use it to close a gap. Since your healing power is an AOE, stick to groups of at least two or three teammates. Don't be afraid of choosing the Flower -- even though it's technically a healing class, it can still deal a respectable amount of damage. Also, feel free to use your RB plant power to heal yourself from time to time -- you don't always need to use it for your team. Use your mines and tall-nuts often as a Cactus. I've noticed that a lot of players online will only use them sparingly when enemies are close, but they will respawn in time even if you just lay them down anywhere. You can't really "waste" them.
Garden Warfare tips photo
Plant the seeds of victory
Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare is a pretty unconventional shooter -- and that's partially why I liked it. Instead of your typical cookie-cutter classes there are choices like killer potted plants and teleporting scientist zombies, so things can get a little complicated once you're learning the ropes. Here are some quick tips to help you get acclimated to the world of Garden Warfare.

Review: Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare

Feb 25 // Chris Carter
Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare (PC, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: PopCap GamesPublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: February 25, 2014 (Xbox 360, Xbox One) / TBA (PC)MSRP: $39.99 (Xbox One) / $29.99 (Xbox 360) Garden Warfare at its core is an unconventional shooter similar to Team Fortress 2. There are classes that fulfill specific roles, skirmishes mostly involving two teams, and of course -- there are hats. Garden Warfare looks great with its use of the Frostbite 3 engine, as every single character model has an alarming amount of detail, as do the wonderfully crafted maps. It's weird to see the Plants vs. Zombies cast come to life in full 3D, but I think it's worked out for the best. Typical Call of Duty-style progression schemes are generally eschewed for a more interesting method of earning new skins and abilities -- opening random card packs. Immediately when I heard "EA" and "random packs" alarm bells went off in my head, but thankfully, there are no microtransactions involved. All of the packs are bought by way of coins, which are earned entirely in-game and are performance based. Depending on how well you do, you can generally buy a mid-tier pack every two to three games. Cards can yield partial unlocks of new characters (which generally need a few pieces to open up), hats, other costume pieces, and consumables to use in both co-op and competitive modes. It can be a relatively slow burn sometimes -- especially if you're on the losing end of a few games and have nothing to show for it -- but if you just sit down and play the game for a while, you'll see the rewards start to pile up. One of the most brilliant aspects of Garden Warfare though is how easy it is to pick up and play. All you need to do is aim and fire like any other third-person shooter, and learn the three special abilities of each class. Most of them are self-explanatory: the Soldier Zombie can rocket-jump and fire off heavy artillery, the Sunflower can heal allies and drop healing hubs, and the Cactus is basically a sniper with a few tools at his disposal. As simple as it sounds, there's lots of tactical nuance here. To be blunt, it's much more than I expected, and once I played a ton of online multiplayer against other human opponents, the game really opened its wings. As expected, class diversity is the key to success, and PopCap went through great lengths to balance them. Although it's good to have a number of standard Peashooters on hand for any plant team, having at least one or two Sunflowers to heal, a few Cactus classes to snipe, and a number of Chompers is also a good idea. With all of the classes on the board at once, things get hectic and you'll constantly be clashing with different counters and other players. For example, Chompers are formidable units with a lot of health, and they can also employ a special one-hit kill stealth move if they chomp zombies from behind. But their Achilles heel is that they're extremely slow and basically can't jump worth beans, so taking to high ground and always watching your back is a perfect counter. When you're skittishly looking around for Chompers, a Peashooter could easily toss a bean grenade your way, a Cactus could hit you from above with a flying drone, or you could walk right into a potato mine. It's that sort of orchestrated insanity that happens nearly every spawn, and in the game's 12-on-12 online modes, it can get extremely chaotic -- in a good way. The maps are one of the best parts of the game, and they're not only the perfect size, but fun to look at and play in. They're just as playful as you'd expect from the Plants vs. Zombies series, ranging from a giant pirate ship theme park, to a shopping center, to a giant suburban sprawl with its own giant playground. There's tons of detail here, from hundreds of breakable objects to graffiti that states "plants R stoopid" -- to the point where I found myself roaming around arenas just to find Easter eggs. They remind me of some of the best Twisted Metal or Tony Hawk levels in that there's a certain amount of diversity to their design and a practicality to it, which is quite the accomplishment. Sadly, there's only a scant few for use in two of the three game modes (five to be exact), and even though a few offer day and night cycles, you can't help but shake the feeling of deja vu after a while -- even if the maps are so well done. So what are the three modes you can play? Well, Garden Ops is basically co-op base defense for four players -- in other words, it's literally plants versus zombies 3D. Waves of zombies will come your way with various modifiers to mix things up each session, and multiple difficulty modes help keep replay value high. In the end it eventually suffers the same fate as many other horde modes in that it becomes predictable to a fault, slowly shuffling you into the other two gametypes. This is also the only mode you can play by yourself -- so if you're planning on not playing online, you may get bored really quickly. Be warned, this is a multiplayer affair at heart, and the meat of the game most definitely lies with the other core game modes. Team Vanquish (team deathmatch) and Gardens and Graveyards (Garden Ops with two teams) both support 24 players, which helps bring out some of that consistent chaos I was talking about earlier. I've been playing shooters all my life, but to see two armies of plants and zombies go at it is something else. Every single class looks and feels utterly different, and constantly picking your battles with certain players doesn't really get old. Although Vanquish is fun all on its own, Garden and Graveyards can often yield some of the crazier matches. Here, Plants are on the defense, with Zombies slowly acquiring base after base until they reach the end goal, where an all-out war happens. If the Zombies make it all the way to the last point they have to fulfill a unique objective, like destroying a giant boss plant or invading a mansion with its own security measures. Since there's no AI element to this it feels fresh every time, and almost every match I've played was filled with intense moments that had me on the edge of my seat. If you're not keen on any upgrades or customization options, "Classic" matchmaking choices are there to keep things on a completely level playing field. In terms of platform differences, the Xbox One version sports improved visuals over the 360, and it has a split-screen mode as well as SmartGlass support. Sadly, split-screen is limited to a pared-down Garden Ops mode that's only playable offline, and player two can't earn coins or achievements. While it is nice that some sort of concession was made to even allow split-screen in the first place, it's a shame that the second player can't earn their own rewards or play online in general. With those options, Warfare would be a force to be reckoned with in terms of local play. With a few more tweaks, Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare would be a must-buy for pretty much any shooter fan out there. But even with its blemishes, I was incredibly surprised by the amount of depth the game has to offer on top of all of its charm. Hopefully EA will ease off the microtransactions in the future and even more content will pile in, because with the right moves and support, Garden Warfare will be something special for quite some time.
Garden Warfare review photo
Plants rule, zombies drool
Plants vs. Zombies has been on one wild ride since PopCap was acquired by Electronic Arts. What started off as a grassroots (hah) series with humble beginnings on the PC has become an exclusive-heavy franchise -- with Pl...

PVZ no microtransactions photo
PVZ no microtransactions

PvZ: Garden Warfare won't launch with microtransactions

Feb 21
// Chris Carter
As soon as I booted up Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare (published by Electronic Arts) for the first time, I saw that there was a currency system. But before I could groan, I found that there was no way to purchas...
Garden Warfare photo
Garden Warfare

Learn botanical battle basics from Garden Warfare video

Why can't plants and zombies just be friends?
Feb 21
// Brett Makedonski
When you're engaged in war with the likes of plantlife or the animated undead, you can't just rush into the fray. Only a fool would do that. No, you have to study your enemy, and more importantly, know thyself. This gameplay...
Plants vs Zombies photo
Plants vs Zombies

Garden Warfare live-action trailer has a porpoise

I know dolphins and porpoises are different, but work with me here
Feb 14
// Brett Makedonski
Every time I think that Plants vs Zombies: Garden Warfare can't possibly do anything else to leave me speechless, it goes and does just that. Maybe I should've dropped the expectation of any semblance of rationale the v...

Preview: Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare

Jan 28 // Alessandro Fillari
Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare (Xbox 360, Xbox One [previewed], PC, PS4)Developer: PopCap GamesPublisher: Electronic ArtsRelease Date: February 25, 2014 (Xbox 360, Xbox One) TBA (other platforms)If you need a narrative to help make sense of all this, here it is: plants have attained sentience and combat effectiveness, the dead have risen from their graves, and both sides must battle each other for dominance. Oh, and a crazy human gardener with a speech impediment is helping the plants. That's pretty much all the story you need, and it fits perfectly along with the other entries in the series.Taking cues from modern shooters, Plants Vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare is a third-person action game that utilizes a class and group based dynamic across several battlefields. Each side must work together to overcome the opposing players, and knowing your army's strengths and the enemy's weaknesses is the key to victory. Let's be clear, even though this is now a shooter, strategy and coordination is the name of the game. While you can manage to take out some enemies all by your lonesome, you can easily be overwhelmed by the opposition if you don't use your arsenal of support plants and work with your team. Much like the previous games, picking and setting vital plants is necessary for success.The game's primary mode is the multiplayer, which is also the only way to play as the zombies. Players take on the role of either the Plants or Zombies and have to battle it out for dominance. Consisting of 12 on 12 skirmishes across 10 different maps, players will engage in game-types such as Gardens and Graveyards, where they can capture enemy points, and Team Vanquish, a take on the classic Team Deathmatch. Along with the core character types are different variations of them. For instance, players can unlock fire and ice versions of the Cactus, which can do long-range status effect damage on the zombie force. In addition to these variations, players can unlock perks and skills that add new abilities and buffs for their classes. This not only helps to add more much flavor to the game, but gives more options for players and how they use their favorite class.In addition to the robust multiplayer mode, players can also engage in the Garden Ops mode. Playing as the plants, Garden Ops is this PvZ's spin on the horde mode game type. Players can team with up to three others online or locally to defend key points from AI controlled zombies across several maps. With a smaller group of players on your side, placement of the support plants is even more vital than in the competitive multiplayer mode. Scattered across the field are plant pots, which can be used to summon support forces from your current arsenal of plants. Placement of the support units is key, as the zombies can easily overwhelm players. Many of the favorites return, such as the Wall-nut, Potato Mines, Gatling Peashooter, Fume-Shroom, Bonk Choy.In keeping with previous entries of the series, Garden Warfare has a deep focus on maintaining your arsenal of plants, and after each battle players must keep their limited stock of characters in healthy supply. Players will gradually acquire coins from taking out enemies and completing dynamic match objectives, which can then be spent in the game's sticker shop.All this may sound odd, but stay with me on this one; stickers are collectable items that can be used to upgrade your characters and customize their appearance. In the shop, you can buy unique packs of character cards and sticker pieces ranging in price, and you will randomly receive a set to strengthen your reinforcements. Similar to packs of baseball cards, the content of each pack is unknown to the holder. Moreover, when you collect enough sticker pieces of the same type, you will unlock a new variant of that particular character.The packs range in price, some focusing on cards or stickers, so players can spend coins only on what they need at the moment. If you only wan to refill support placements, then you can purchase the basic packs. Though if you're feeling lucky, you can take your chances on the premium packs that drop rare stickers and cards for a high price. It's clear that Garden Warfare wishes to expand upon the characterization of each plant types, and this allows for players to customize their plant and zombie armies as they see fit. Character customization is deep and robust, and it shows how the devs at PopCap Games went to great lengths to flesh out the characters of the series. There are many unique variants of each class, and honestly you'd be surprised just how many different ways you can make the Sunflower character plant look. Many of which include hats, facepaint, and other quirky accessories.The developers at PopCap Games have shown some extra attention to the Xbox One release of the game, including making split-screen play an Xbox One exclusive feature. I can imagine this will disappoint many fans, as it should, because playing local co-op and coordinating with my partner was a lot of fun. It's definitely a missed opportunity to not include this with the other versions. Another exclusive feature for the Xbox One is Boss Mode, where another player can use a tablet device and sync with SmartGlass to offer support for players during the Garden Ops gametype. While on the tablet, you'll be playing as the returning character Crazy Dave, who will be able to offer support for players in battle. You get an overhead view of the map, similar to classic PvZ, and you can assist by dropping health pickups, place radar plants on the lookout for nearby zombies, revive downed players, and you can even call-in devastating air strikes.After spending about an hour playing the Garden Ops game type locally, I came away impressed with Garden Warfare. In many ways, it feels like a fully-realized and expanded version of a Plants vs Zombies game. While many fans may turn their nose up at the focus on shooting, if they give it a chance they'll likely see that the quirky humor and strategic gameplay that they've known and loved are still here. While it's very disappointing to see that the split-screen mode is only for the Xbox One release, I can still see much to like. In many ways, it felt like PopCap took some serious notes from Valve's Team Fortress 2, as Garden Warfare is brimming with style and humor. On the surface, it looks to be a major shift into a new direction, but when you get down to it, it is very much in line with the series' focus on strategy and character. And that's all I needed to know.
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Botany vs Necromancy
How weird was it seeing that reveal trailer for Plant vs Zombies: Garden Warfare at last year's E3? Plants vs Zombies was known for its focus on strategy and quirky humor, so it was a pretty surprising move for the developers...

Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Here's 30 more seconds of PvZ: Garden Warfare

Jan 21
// Harry Monogenis
PopCap's released a new video for its upcoming third-person shooter take on the much loved tower-defense franchise, Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare. It's short, and really only exists to let everyone know that they can no...

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare pushed back one week

Now releasing February 25
Jan 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
Electronic Arts has moved back the scheduled release of Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare, the third-person base shooter take on the beloved franchise. Previously scheduled for February 18, the game will now release one wee...
PvZ photo

Plants vs. Zombies 2 celebrates Feastivus this week

Dec 23
// Jordan Devore
Ever since getting partway through its final world, I've been ignoring Plants vs. Zombies 2 -- but Plants vs. Zombies 2 has not been ignoring me. Those push notifications haven't compelled me to return yet, though PopCap's p...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

New gameplay for Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare

Call in 'zombomb' strikes as you battle to control territory
Dec 17
// Alessandro Fillari
The reveal of Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare took a lot of people by surprise at this past E3. The series is known for its strategy and quirky elements, and seeing it as a real-time shooter threw a number of fans through...

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