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Phoenix Wright

Video game movies to watch this weekend instead of Pixels

Jul 23 // Jed Whitaker
Ace Attorney (Gyakuten Saiban) [embed]296492:59644:0[/embed] Whether or not you're a fan of the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney games, the movie based on the series is pretty decent. All the characters look and act like their game counterparts and even with the subtitles the movie still nails the games' humor. Sadly the film has never officially been released for sale in the US, but if you have a way to watch it I highly recommend it. Sweet Home [embed]296492:59645:0[/embed] Sweet Home had a Famicom game by the same name, which Resident Evil was planned as a spiritual sequel to. It might not be the best horror film but it is certainly worth a watch. Those who go in thinking the movie will be a Resident Evil movie will be disappointed, as this is more a haunted mansion story than a zombie story. The Sweet Home game influenced a lot of survival horror games and could be painted as the original survival horror game. The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters [embed]296492:59646:0[/embed] This documentary follows Steve Wiebe as he attempts to take the world record high score in Donkey Kong from (at the time) current champion Billy Mitchell. While that alone may not sound exciting, the real life characters in the movie make it something special. The film plays more like a drama than a documentary, so much in fact that a scripted film adaptation has been said to be in the works. The documentary was also parodied in a South Park episode where Randy Marsh attempts to take a larger shit than U2 frontman Bono Vox. It's one of my favorite movies ever and highly recommended. Dead Rising: Watchtower [embed]296492:59647:0[/embed] When the free-to-watch Dead Rising: Watchtower was announced I wasn't too excited, and upon release I went into it with low expectations. Turns out it is a rather competent zombie film and has enough fan service to make Dead Rising fans happy. Frank West may not be the lead character but he makes many appearances throughout the film as part of a news program, dickish charm intact.  Animal Crossing (Dōbutsu no Mori) [embed]296492:59648:0[/embed] Does anime count? Well I'm saying it does and you should watch the Animal Crossing anime film that was released in Japanese theaters. The anime follows the same plot as the games; a new girl moves to town, is an indentured servant to Tom Nook, and befriends and helps the other animals in town. Animal Crossing's anime adaptation was never officially released outside of Japan but a fan dubbed version is out there somewhere. The Lawnmower Man [embed]296492:59649:0[/embed] What list of video game-related movies would be complete without The Lawnmower Man, a movie that is more relevant now than when it came out as it deals with virtual reality headsets. A dumb dumb lawnmower man in town is approached by a scientist to be his human guinea pig in an experiment using drugs and a VR headset, and this somehow turns him into a genius with magical powers... I remember watching the movie when it came out and being amazed at the cutting edge special effects, though today they look extremely dated. Strangely enough the effects were made by Angel Studios, which later became Rockstar San Diego and went on to make Red Dead Redemption, L.A. Noire, and Grand Theft Auto V.  Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World [embed]296492:59651:0[/embed] Whether or not you've read the graphic novel series you should give the Michael Cera-led Scott Pilgrim vs. the World a shot, as it may be the best video game movie out there. The film is basically oozing with references to video games from band names, to Zelda music, to epic fight scenes that would feel at home in any beat 'em up. Speaking of which, if you haven't already, give the game a try because it is just as good as the film and plays very similarly to one of the greatest beat 'em ups of all time, River City Ransom. -- These are some of the best video game-related movies I've seen and surprisingly I don't see them getting the credit they deserve. Also don't let me stop you from watching Pixels, by all means tell Hollywood you want more garbage Adam Sandler films if you so wish. I know I'll probably be watching Pixels sometime this weekend because clearly I'm a masochist, and I'm part of the problem. 
#StopSandler photo
Think of the children
This week the critically lampooned Pixels movie opens in theaters nationwide in the United States, and if you'd rather spend your time and money on movies that don't blow consider these other video game-related films. Don't worry though, this list won't just be the movies you've all seen before, because I'm so much cooler than that.

Canine/10 photo
Canine/10

Phoenix woof: Capcom cuts trailer for fake The Great Dog Attorney


Canine/10
Mar 31
// Steven Hansen
While the new Ace Attorney--The Great Ace Attorney coming July 9 to 3DS in Japan--looks great and all what with Phoenix Wright's ancestor palling around around with Sherlock Holmes and Watson in Meiji era Japan and the Briti...

Review: Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy

Dec 27 // Brittany Vincent
Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy (Nintendo 3DS)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomReleased: December 9, 2014MSRP: $29.99 Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney had the right blend of Japanese humor and adventure aspects to break into the Western market. Hardcore gamers weren't the only audience to fall in love with Phoenix Wright though. The DS was in part responsible for the now multi-billion-dollar casual gaming industry and the Ace Attorney himself gained fans from all walks of life. The series has only continued to grow in scope and fanbase, and a new sequel is said to be in the works for the Nintendo 3DS. The English version that debuted the character of Phoenix Wright, which released on the Nintendo DS, is actually a port. The original version of the game was released on the Game Boy Advance and has since been ported to Windows, iOS, Wii, and recently the first three in the original Phoenix Wright Trilogy were ported to Nintendo 3DS. Going into reviewing the 3DS trilogy, I was initially concerned that the series wouldn’t stand the test of time, but I was pleasantly surprised. [embed]285044:56734:0[/embed] The first game is by far the simplest of the series. It follows the titular Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright during his first cases straight out of law school, and focuses on his relationships with his law firm boss' sister Maya Fey and childhood friend turned rival Miles Edgeworth. The story still holds up solidly throughout the game's main four cases (and one bonus case), but compared to the later entries in the series, the cases are played in a fairly straightforward manner, with cross-examinations, introduction of evidence, and objections being fairly obvious and non-branching. It’s still an absolute blast to play through, especially if you’ve never experienced it before, but like I felt in 2005, I wish there had been multiple ways to get a verdict. The fifth case is a bit more exotic though, as it’s the bonus case made specifically for the Nintendo DS and as such uses the touch screen and microphone for dusting for prints, or spraying luminol. The second game, Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney: Justice For All, is probably my favorite of the three and is where the series really came together to define the formula that would take Ace Attorney from merely good to excellent. The game takes place roughly a year after the first and all the familiar faces return. It offers four cases to solve, involving amnesia, mediums, circuses, kidnappings, and dirty, dirty, murder. It features the best pace and variety of the three games, and the cases don’t go by too fast or too slow, remaining challenging without being frustrating. It introduces the Psyche-Lock system, in which Phoenix can use the correct evidence to “unlock a witness's heart” and allow questioning that they would otherwise clam up at. Unfortunately though, this game’s cases received none of the DS treatment the bonus mission did in the first game, so after completing it, this game can feel like a step back, even with the addition of Psyche-Locks. Unfortunately, the finale of the trilogy, Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney: Trials and Tribulations, is for me the weakest in the series as far as gameplay is concerned, lacking the originality of the first, or the innovation of the second. It feels like more of the same, but that's not necessarily a bad thing, as the story is still quite strong in its own way. Trials and Tribulations serves as a prequel focusing on Mia Fey, Phoenix’s first boss, and on the events directly after Justice For All. However, this game can be quite frustrating because of its expansion of a concept introduced in the second. At times Phoenix can get an answer so wrong that the Judge instantly gives you a game over. In the second title this was fairly rare, and easy to recover from, but in Trials and Tribulations the frequency has increased quite a bit, and for a game that is at its core fairly linear, making a player repeat 15 or twenty minutes of dialogue is a sure way to get them to turn off their 3DS. While the games are still excellent, there’s not really anything new added for their 3DS release. These are basically a port of the iOS version, with a simple yet adequate 3D layer tacked on. What you see is what you’ll get. There are no new bonus cases or ways to play -- just regular old Phoenix Wright un, deux, and trois. It is somewhat disappointing that these games aren’t a true remaster, but at ten dollars a game, it could be a lot worse. I typically do my handheld gaming on my 3DS, so it’s nice to have a copy of the three games that’s sharp, easy on the eyes, and digital. If you’ve never played Phoenix Wright, or if you’ve only played one or two of the original trilogy, this collection is a great way to finally rectify that. However, if you’ve picked them up for the DS, or the Wii, or iOS (or Windows for our Japanese friends), you may want to pass unless you're looking for a convenient way to experience the games. With no new features aside from the rudimentary 3D, this collection is meant to satisfy those who haven’t come to love the unique and colorful world of Phoenix Wright. If you know someone who hasn’t been so fortuitous, take one of those shiny new gift cards you just got and get them a copy. You’ll be doing them a favor. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Phoenix Wright review photo
This old lawyer hasn't lost his appeal
The visual novel has been ubiquitous in Japan since the early ‘90s, but in the West they've never truly caught on. Whether it was the U.S.’s love for its own home-grown adventure games like Sierra’s King&rs...


Ace Attorney photo
Ace Attorney

Phoenix Wright was almost named 'Roger'


Revealing interview with one of the original Ace Attorney translators
Dec 14
// Jonathan Holmes
The Ace Attorney series has gradually built itself a small but loyal following outside of Japan. One of the reasons for that is how the games offer an experience that you can't get anywhere else in gaming. Their popularity ha...
Phoenix Wright: Ace Atty photo
Phoenix Wright: Ace Atty

Hold it! You need to pick up Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy


No objections here
Dec 10
// Brittany Vincent
I was in high school when I first got my hands on the original Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney. As a visual novel addict, it sated my thirst for something new and exciting in the handheld space, and even inspired a brief stint w...
Phoenix Wright photo
Phoenix Wright

I have no objections to the fact that Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy is out in December


December 9th
Oct 10
// Chris Carter
I'm really loving the idea of bringing back the Phoenix Wright trilogy on new systems. iOS was a great way for people to experience the series for the first time, and now, you can get a little more traditional with the 3...

Review: Professor Layton vs Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney

Aug 30 // Patrick Hancock
Professor Layton vs Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney (3DS)Developer: Capcom, Level-5Publisher: NintendoRelease Date: August 29, 2014MSRP:  $29.99 The story revolves around the main characters from each game: Professor Layton, Apprentice Luke, Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright, and Spiritual Medium Maya Fey. It doesn't take long for these characters to meet up in a town called Labyrinthia, a town on no map and completely run by one person: the Storyteller. It's also a town that seems to be caught in the past: knights keep order and there's no modern technology to speak of. The Storyteller is exactly that: the one who pens the "story" for the town of Labyrinthia. However, the town has been having some major issues with magic-using witches in the past years, and everything seems to be coming to a head just as the four protagonists enter the scene.  The characters of Labyrinthia deserve a very special mention. There are numerous characters that easily steal the spotlight during the courtroom scenes, which is largely due to the fantastic writing. The game's tone ranges from incredibly serious to downright hysterical while hitting every note in between. Characters come to life, scenes nail the correct tones, and the unpredictable story itself all come from the brilliant writing throughout.  Gameplay is divided into two distinct sections: puzzle solving while navigating the town and court cases. The former will be familiar to anyone who has played a Professor Layton game in the past, and the latter familiar to Ace Attorney players. The major issue here is that they almost never blend together. Instead they act like oil and water, with each section being completely separate from the other. It is important to note, however, that despite this lack of congruence, the game does not feel disjointed, largely due to the character interactions between the two sets of protagonists. There is a moment towards the end of the game where the two gameplay types cease to act like oil and water and instead act like peanut butter and chocolate. Needless to say, this moment is nothing short of pure gameplay bliss and one of the most memorable moments of the entire game.  The Layton-inspired puzzles are various logic puzzles. For players unfamiliar with the games, these puzzles often require a decent amount of brainpower and/or trial and error to solve correctly, and the objective of each puzzle is different. The difficulty of these puzzles is widely inconsistent, as some of the final puzzles are laughably simple.  Some puzzles are required to progress, while others are included simply for players who want to try more puzzles. The context for these "extra" puzzles is always absurd, in an endearing way. Meeting someone on the street and having them challenge the player to a puzzle just because is absolutely ridiculous and perfect. The story puzzles are always given context and make a remarkable amount of sense within that context, making them feel very real. [embed]280424:55505:0[/embed] As for the Ace Attorney-inspired court cases, players will listen to witnesses tell their testimony, and then have a chance to point out any inconsistencies or contradictions they can find. Players can "Press" the witness, which involves Phoenix Wright asking for more clarification on a specific statement. Players can also Present information to the court, which will bring up a key piece of evidence to hopefully point out a flaw in a witness' testimony.  This time around, there can be more than one person on the witness stand at a time. This allows for a slightly different mechanic of asking two witnesses about the same topic. While pressing a witness, another witness may make a sound if they hear something funky. At that point, the player can move to that witness and ask why they had a reaction to what was said. It's a decent mechanic that lends itself to a little bit of repetition, since the original witness' testimony will be cut short when moving to another witness, and to hear the entire testimony players will have to press the original witness again. Hint Coins can be found while exploring the town and can be utilized in both the Layton-style puzzles and the Ace Attorney-esque courtroom scenes. During the logic puzzles, Hint Coins will slowly reveal more of the solution, until finally telling the player "alright fine here's the answer," essentially. In the courtroom, Hint Coins can be used when a player has no clue what to do next. The game will then let the player know who to Press or Present to, and when presenting, Hint Coins will remove certain incorrect options from the evidence to narrow it down for the player. The game's visual style and technical capabilities are wonderful. The town of Labyrinthia truly does feel alive with vibrant characters while maintaining a sense of a seedy underbelly and something very sinister lurking around. There are some moments in the game where the framerate becomes noticeably terrible. This is often when there are many animated characters on the screen, and happens whether the 3D slider is on or off. Speaking of which, the stereoscopic 3D presentation is great and is easily the best way to experience the game. The music and sound effects from each game make an appearance, but much of the music is new to go with the "Middle Ages" theme of the town of Labyrinthia. Professor Layton vs Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney is two great tastes that taste great together, even if they don't congeal together until the finale. But wow, what a finale it is! The framerate issues are very unfortunate and the new Ace Attorney mechanics can make the game a bit repetitive, but with over 20 hours of well-written content, this is a game who will please fans of either series, and will delight anyone who is a fan of both series. This game is also a great entry point for either series, since it offers a glimpse into both without heavily favoring one or the other.
Layton vs Wright review photo
Gentlemanly and Objectiony
You got chocolate in my peanut butter! You got peanut butter in my chocolate!  Reese's Peanut Butter Cups are great. Personally, my favorite part is the edge, as long as you still get a little bit of peanut butter along ...

Capcom photo
Capcom

Ace Attorney Trilogy packs a fresh translation


Plus remastered music and new visuals
Aug 22
// Jordan Devore
When Capcom re-releases the Phoenix Wright trilogy on 3DS this winter, the upgrades won't be purely visual -- the localization has been touched up, too. Writing about Ace Attorney Trilogy in a blog post, localization director...
Dual Destinies photo
Dual Destinies

Ace Attorney: Dual Destinies is available on iOS now


The whole game is $14.99
Aug 15
// Chris Carter
Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies is out this week on iOS, and it's basically a port of the 3DS game with an enhanced graphical filter. You can nab the first case for free, buy each case piecemeal for $4.99, or bu...
123, let's jam photo
123, let's jam

Original Phoenix Wright trilogy coming to 3DS this winter


For not Japan; it already came to 3DS in Japan
Jun 16
// Steven Hansen
Ace Attorney 123: Wright Selection came out in Japan. It's coming to the 3DS eShop elsewhere this winter. Wright Selection includes Ace Attorney, Justice for All, and Trials and Tribulations, all gussied u...
Prof. Layton vs. Phoenix  photo
Prof. Layton vs. Phoenix

Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney is finally getting a Western release


It's about time.
Jun 10
// Brittany Vincent
Thank you, based Level-5! After announcing Fantasy Life, Nintendo revealed that we've also got this gem of a game to look forward to from the Yokai Watch developer (and Capcom too, of course.) We've been clamoring for it for...
Phoenix Wright photo
Phoenix Wright

Do you have an objection to this Phoenix Wright video?


Overruled
May 07
// Brett Makedonski
Ace Attorney may have a tenuous grasp on the intricacies of various legal systems, but this brentalfloss video nails all the subtleties of the series. But, the one thing that Phoenix Wright gets right time and time again is that you just need to yell "OBJECTION!" a lot. That's the key to good lawyerin'.
Music photo
Music

Jake Kaufman's game music mashup series Fusion Challenge rocks


I'm already a fan
May 06
// Jordan Devore
Jake "virt" Kaufman is taking genre mashup suggestions for his cool new game music series, Fusion Challenge. (Or he was, before hundreds of people threw down ideas.) He does a terrific, humorous job describing how it's all g...
 photo

New Ace Attorney trailer translation goes heavy on the America


*eagle cry*
Apr 29
// Dale North
We were wondering if we'd ever hear about that new Ace Attorney 3DS , Grand Turnabout Trial - The Adventures of Naruhodou Ryuunosuke, on our side of the world. Given that it was just announced, we weren't expecting...
 photo

New Ace Attorney trailer is packed with Meiji Japan style


How are they going to un-Japan this one?
Apr 24
// Dale North
When we told you about the announcement of a new Ace Attorney 3DS game, Grand Turnabout Trial - The Adventures of Naruhodou Ryuunosuke, I mentioned that I thought it would be pretty difficult for Nintendo's localization...
 photo

New Ace Attorney 3DS game takes place in Japan's Meiji period


Hmm
Apr 22
// Dale North
Famitsu's latest issue tells us that a new Ace Attorney 3DS game is on its way. Phoenix Wright's ancestor is the star, it looks like. That makes sense, as the game takes place during Japan's Meiji era (September 1868 through ...
Ace Attorney 123 photo
Ace Attorney 123

No objections to Ace Attorney 123's updated graphics


HOLD IT! close to your eyes and look at the difference
Mar 25
// Darren Nakamura
Capcom has announced that Ace Attorney 123: Wright Selection will be releasing for the 3DS on April 17 in Japan. Japanese site 4Gamer.net has taken the liberty to compare the original Game Boy Advance screens (left), the upda...
Capcom photo
Capcom

Monster Hunter 4, Dead Rising 3 did well for Capcom


Lost Planet 3, not so much
Feb 07
// Jordan Devore
Capcom has reported its earnings for the nine months of fiscal year ending March 31, 2014 and the usual suspects are all represented. Monster Hunter 4 did extremely well for the company, selling four million units; Resident E...
Phoenix Wright trilogy photo
Phoenix Wright trilogy

Wright on: GBA Phoenix Wright trilogy coming to 3DS


In 3D! And only in Japan, for now. But with English!
Jan 22
// Steven Hansen
Capcom is bundling the first three Ace Attorney games for 3DS, according to Famitsu, picked up by Siliconera. Ace Attorney 123: Wright Selection will include Ace Attorney, Justice for All, and Trials and Tribulations, all gu...
Capcom photo
Capcom

Capcom hints at new Ace Attorney and more for 2014


Company to reaffirm its place in the fighting scene as well
Dec 29
// Wesley Ruscher
Taking part in a massive group interview, over at 4gamer, a few of Capcom's lead developers have shed some light on what' in stow for the Japanese company in the new year. While many of the announcements were merely teases of...
Capcom photo
Producer ponders revival for Final Fight and Dungeons & Dragons
With the arrival of the new generation, Capcom is looking to try new strategies for how to better satisfy its audience. And while Deep Down is an interesting experiment, a producer at Capcom has some other ideas in mind -- an...

Phoenix Wright photo
Phoenix Wright

Ace Attorney 5 Orca-defending DLC coming next week


*sqwueek*... Fweeeeeeet!
Nov 14
// Jonathan Holmes
Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney -Dual Destinies- is an incredible game filled with drama, comedy, murder, mayhem, and most of all, lawyers. So many lovable lawyers. Soon it will have a mustached pirate orca as well. In this spec...
Ace Attorney photo
Ace Attorney

It's not too late for this Ace Attorney 5 launch trailer


Athena Sykes for Mayor of Metro City
Oct 26
// Jonathan Holmes
Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney -- Dual Destinies is out and it's fantastic. Along with Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-, it's the best transition from sprite based graphics to polygons that I've seen yet. All the body language, exaggera...

Review: Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies

Oct 24 // Aerox
Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies (3DS [eShop Only; 4432 blocks])Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomTo be released: October 24, 2013MSRP: $29.99 Dual Destinies takes place after the events of Apollo Justice, in a time that the game refers to (over, and over, and over) as the "Dark Age of the Law." Shortly after Phoenix's disbarment in the early events of Apollo Justice for unintentionally producing false evidence thanks to Kristoph, Simon Blackquill, a rising star of the prosecutor's office, was indicted and found guilty of murder. Because of his talents, he's still allowed to try cases while incarcerated, and is your main opponent in this installment of the series.  With two of the best attorneys on both sides of the aisle disgraced, the public loses faith in the system. Attorneys begin resorting to underhanded tactics to win cases -- if Phoenix Wright was fabricating evidence to save his clients, why shouldn't they? If defense attorneys are going to fabricate evidence, the prosecution needs to find a way to secure convictions. If the prosecution is convicting by any means necessary, defense attorneys have to fabricate evidence to defend the innocent. It becomes a vicious cycle, and gets to the point the top legal academy in the country begins training it students to win at all costs, teaching that the ends always justify the means. It's our own legal system taken to the extreme -- while nothing in American jurisprudence is as blatant or overt as what occurs in Phoenix Wright, we're reminded that we still live in a country where local prosecutors are often politicians looking to move up, and defense attorneys are paid to defend their client at all costs. It's in a similar environment Dual Destinies takes place -- Apollo, Phoenix, and new attorney Athena Cykes try cases, defend clients, and try to put an end to the Dark Age of the Law while sticking to their morals. The structure of the game will be familiar to any who have played any of the previous installments. After a short, courtroom-only introductory case, the rest of the cases play out similarly -- an anime cutscene introduces the murder, Phoenix, Apollo, and/or Athena show up on scene to investigate, and then present their findings in a courtroom sequence. For longer cases, an additional investigation/courtroom sequence or two are added, but the general structure remains the same. Investigative portions play out like they always have: you move from area to area, interrogating witnesses and presenting evidence to them, gathering ammunition for court. Certain areas, usually the actual scenes of the crime, allow you to search the whole room in a point-and-click style sequence reminiscent of classic adventure games. After you've thoroughly searched the required areas and spoken to all of the necessary witnesses, the game moves to the courtroom phase. There aren't many changes to the courtroom action either, where gameplay primarily consists of the cross-examination of witnesses. As you discover contradictions in witness testimony, you present evidence to blow their statements out of the water or, when you don't have evidence, bluff your way through the examination by selecting the appropriate responses from small dialogue prompts. It's simple, it's basic, and it works, just like it has in the four previous installments. The one significant new addition to witness examination comes from Athena Cykes, who can use her robot, Widget, and her skills in analytical psychology to read the emotions of a witness as they testify. During these sequences, you listen to a witnesses testimony while monitoring their four basic emotions -- joy, anger, sadness, and surprise, and look to find where their emotions (or lack thereof) don't match the testimony they're giving. Back on the investigative side, Apollo Justice's bracelet, which allows you to observe a witness in slow motion to look for physical tells that show they're lying. Phoenix's Magatama and the Psyche-Lock system also make a relatively brief return.  On the whole, Dual Destinies is an extremely strong addition to the series, and my favorite Ace Attorney game so far. The cohesive themes and narrative tie the game's cases together more strongly than any previous title, and I think the final case just barely beats the Case 5 of Trials and Tribulations in terms of drama and surprise. New prosecutor Simon Blackquill is a solid addition to the series, although I don't think he can stand up to Godot or Edgeworth. The real standout is Athena. Initially introduced as an assistant attorney, Athena's background and her story soon become the core focus of Dual Destinies. While the Ace Attorney series frequently slips into stereotypes and caricature, particularly with witnesses, Athena makes for a unique character who's history, motivations, behavior, and eventual story arc may be the most well rounded of any characters in the franchise. Unfortunately, Dual Destinies still occasionally suffers from the same problem all of the previous games have had -- there are times when you piece together the mystery several steps ahead of the game, and get bogged down trying to figure out what you need to do next because you can't leap straight to your conclusion. You can't present the decisive piece of evidence you know will break the witness too early, because the game's script demands that you do otherwise. Similarly, events in the investigative phase often won't trigger until one very specific piece of evidence has been shown to a certain witness, and the game isn't always clear that this needs to happen for you to move forward. However, these incidents are relatively rare, particularly compared to the previous games, and don't cause significant trouble beyond brief annoyances. Finally, those who might have gotten excited upon hearing the game had received the series' first ever M rating from the ESRB should temper their enthusiasm. Just like every other game in the Ace Attorney series, every case in Dual Destinies involves murder, but there's nothing I'd consider overly graphic. My guess is either that the ESRB is simply inconsistent in its ratings, or the M comes from the stories of two separate witnesses who for whatever reason concerned someone at the ESRB: one witness is revealed to be a different gender than initially presented (their parents forced them to live as the opposite gender and the game leaves it at that), and another character hints at a same-sex attraction. Both issues are given cursory examination, and then the cases move forward. In any event, aside from the murder present in every game in the series, there's nothing here that's inappropriate for teenagers under 17. However, even though it's not a new, gritty, ultra-violent courtroom drama, Dual Destinies delivers exactly what I wanted from a new Ace Attorney game. Interesting new cases, great new characters, lots of twists and surprises, and what is ultimately an excellent work of interactive fiction. Topped off with beautiful 3D animations, an unsurprisingly excellent soundtrack, and some great anime sequences that highlight major moments in each case, Dual Destinies is not to be missed.
Ace Attorney review photo
Court is back in session
Previous entries in the Ace Attorney series never examined the legal system beyond surface commentary. Apollo Justice came close when it examined the idea and consequences of a jurist system (something Jap...

Ace Attorney 5 photo
Ace Attorney 5

Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies demo on eShop today


I have no objections
Oct 01
// Tony Ponce
Getting ready for Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies on October 24? Pump yourself with a demo on the 3DS eShop today. Get your finger pointing on as soon as you can.
Phoenix Wright photo
Phoenix Wright

Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies hits the eShop in October


Turnabout Return and costume DLC confirmed
Sep 17
// Jordan Devore
I now think of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies as the game where Phoenix Wright defends an orca charged with murder which is, to be fair, at least a funny thing to be remembered for. (Shame that case is DLC.) Ca...
Layton vs. Ace Attorney photo
OBJECTION!
[Update: European release also confirmed.] Late last year, Japan got an amazing crossover in Professor Layton vs. Ace Attorney -- leaving everyone else in the dark as to when it would be announced worldwide. But due to today...

Capcom photo
Capcom

Not all DLC heading West in Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies


The quiz didn't pass the test
Aug 03
// Wesley Ruscher
Western Ace Attorney fans have much to be excited for when the fifth entry in series invades the Nintendo 3DS eShop with Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies and its subsequent DLC titled "Turnabout Return" late...
 photo

You must defend this whale that's been accused of MURDER


One of the first major DLCs for Ace Attorney: Dual Destinies
Jul 26
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The first details of the Ace Attorney: Dual Destinies downloadable content plans have been revealed, in Japan at least. The Special Chapter: Turnabout Return DLC is the one I'm looking forward to as it will bridge the gap bet...
 photo

The new Ace Attorney game has been rated M


Also here's some new videos
Jul 17
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Well this is random. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies has been rated M for mature by the ESRB. Past games have always been rated T for teen, and the reasoning behind this change isn't all that clear. Sure, the g...

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