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PlayStation Plus photo
PlayStation Plus

Sony is hiking PS Plus subscription prices in the UK and Europe


Subscription costs rise Sept. 1
Aug 11
// Kyle MacGregor
Sony is preparing to raise PlayStation Plus subscription prices in the UK and Europe. Currently, a one month membership runs £5.49, whereas three months go for £11.99. The company hasn't yet announced what the new...
Curses 'N Chaos photo
Curses 'N Chaos

Curses 'N Chaos coming out August 18


Tribute Games' next joint
Aug 10
// Zack Furniss
Last year at PAX East, Jonathan Holmes had a chance to interview Tribute Games (makers of Mercenary Kings, which Patrick liked a bunch) about their newest creation, Curses 'N Chaos. It's a two-button couch/online co-op s...
Criminal Girls 2 photo
Criminal Girls 2

Criminal Girls 2 gets a real trailer, don't watch it at work


Still on Vita
Aug 10
// Chris Carter
NIS has just put up a new gameplay trailer for Criminal Girls 2, and as I noted above, you probably shouldn't watch it at work. NIS promises that it'll be a tougher game in general with an expanded battle system, and it'll l...
Odin Sphere Leifthrasir photo
Odin Sphere Leifthrasir

Good lord, Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is pretty as hell


Or at least as pretty as Valhalla
Aug 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Odin Sphere was pretty. But this, this is better. Oh man, it's so much better. Oh, in case you haven't heard, Vanillaware is remastering its 2007 PlayStation 2 classic as Odin Sphere Leifthrasir for Sony platforms. The u...
ATLUS photo
ATLUS

These Persona 4: Dancing All Night remixes are hot!


But I still prefer the originals
Aug 09
// Kyle MacGregor
I'm sure most Atlus fans would agree one of the Persona series' greatest strengths is its music. The studio's in-house composer Shogi Meguro and his crew do brilliant work, which makes the idea of an entire game dedicated to...

Review: Spider: Rite of the Shrouded Moon

Aug 08 // Ben Davis
Spider: Rite of the Shrouded Moon (PC [reviewed], PS4, Vita, iOS, Android)Developer: Tiger StylePublisher: Tiger StyleRelease Date: August 6, 2015 (PC, iOS) / TBA (PS4, Vita, Android)MSRP: $12.99 Spider is primarily about eating insects and getting high scores. You play as the titular character in a large, seemingly abandoned estate, and come equipped with all of the skills a real spider would have. It can cling to almost any surface, move around very quickly, jump incredible distances, and spin webs to trap prey. Playing as a speedy, acrobatic hunter feels really great, and the controls are very responsive and precise. But on top of the slick web-slinging gameplay, there's also an underlying puzzle game hidden in the recesses of the estate for players who want to delve a bit deeper. The core gameplay is simple enough to learn the basics very quickly. Basically, jump from one surface to another while spinning a web to start building, and try to create geometric shapes which will be filled in automatically once completed. These webs will trap passing insects, which can then be eaten for points and more silk to spin more webs. Eating multiple insects without leaving the web will increase a combo meter, but the combo will reset to zero once the spider touches any other surface. [embed]297461:59879:0[/embed] Gameplay leaves plenty of room to develop new skills and strategies to maximize your score. Combos remain as long as the spider is touching a web, so you can try building multiple webs to jump between to keep the combo going. More points are earned by eating smaller insects first and saving the larger and rarer ones until the combo meter has built up a bit, so figuring out which insects to catch and eat in which order can drastically alter your score. Different insects require different strategies to eat them. Most have to be caught in a web, but some will need to be led into the web somehow and some can only be caught in strong webs. These strong insects might destroy webs that are too weak, releasing any other captured insects in the process. Other insects can only be killed by being tackled, such as hornets and ants. These have a separate combo meter which runs out in ten seconds unless the spider tackles another insect to keep it going. Just jump into them to eat them. No webs necessary! But be careful, because some of them can fight back. Spider also has an interesting time and weather mechanic. The game detects your location and mimics the current time and weather in-game, between four different scenarios (clear day, rainy day, clear night, and rainy night). You can choose to opt out of the location services as well, in which case it just uses the developer's location. It also tracks the current phase of the moon if it's a clear night. The time, weather, and moon phases all affect gameplay in different ways. Certain insects only come out when it's daytime or while it's raining, and some areas can only be accessed during certain weather conditions. Sometimes, the level will feel completely different between night and day. For example, one level in the barn is filled with a normal variety of flying insects during the day, but at night it becomes infested with hornet nests, totally changing the way you play it. My only complaint is that I felt some of the levels could have used more obvious differences between the various time and weather scenarios, but for the most part there was a good variety. Then there are the moon phases, and this is where the underlying puzzle game comes in. While roaming the estate as a spider, you'll come across secret areas and clues pertaining to certain mysteries. Many of these clues can only be found and solved if special requirements are met, such as playing during a new moon or at night while it's raining, although some of them can also be completed whenever. Solving mysteries will unlock more areas to play, and the game cannot be truly beaten until all clues are found and the final mystery is solved. While time traveling and altering weather mechanics is an option for those less patient players, Spider is really meant to be played slowly over a period of time. Try playing at different times of the day to find new stuff. Or if it starts to rain one day, then try to find some time to jump into the game and see what all has changed with the gloomy weather. Once you start finding clues, you can begin to synchronize your gaming schedule with the phases of the moon and plan out certain nights to return to the game to check on something. Eventually, as the month goes on, you'll start to unravel the mysteries of the estate. Or, if you don't care about all that, there's still the incredibly fun web-slinging, insect-catching action to focus on, which should be more than enough to keep you engaged. I'm sure some players will be more involved with achieving high scores and climbing up the leaderboards than trying to solve riddles and look for clues. Either way you choose to play, it's still a great game. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
Spider review photo
Strong web
I will take any opportunity to play as an animal in a video game. Let me control a dolphin, a wolf, a shark, or even a tiny little mosquito and I'm happy. As you surely already guessed, Rite of the Shrouded Moon puts the...

Review: Galak-Z: The Dimensional

Aug 05 // Chris Carter
Galak-Z: The Dimensional (PC, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: 17-BitPublisher: 17-BitRelease Date: August 4, 2015 (PS4) / TBA (PC)MSRP: $19.99 The way Galak-Z presents itself is by way of "seasons," which are supposed to be set up in a way that mirrors a television show of sorts. Players must complete five missions per season without dying, otherwise they'll be forced to start over from the beginning of that season. It's a way to justify the roguelike elements of the game (notably permadeath) and provide players with some respite for failure. While the idea actually works from a narrative standpoint, I found this style to be a bit more frustrating than it should be. Rogue Legacy handled progression brilliantly, allowing players to slowly accrue upgrades and "lock" maps into place when they wished. Similarly, Spelunky's shortcuts felt organic, like you were exploring a giant labyrinthine maze that was seemingly connected. Here, seasons feel isolated and disconnected -- you're essentially just completing randomly generated levels one after another. This is easier to swallow because of the endearing anime style of the game. It's a love letter to classic franchises like Gundam, but it manages to pack in a ton of 17-bit's signature look, from the decals plastered on the ships to the delightful VCR-styled menu screens. I also love the minimalist approach to storytelling, as each level may provide you with unique tidbits on the game's world, which are remixed, so to speak, after death. Having said that, I think the voice acting is dreadful, and not in a "so bad it's good way." Thankfully there isn't a whole lot of it. In terms of gameplay, this isn't a standard twin-stick shooter -- it's much deeper than that. After a quick tutorial, it's fairly easy to get the hang of the forward and reverse thrusters, the latter of which allow you to moonwalk (moonboost?) backwards to continue engagement. Pressing both of them allows you to brake, which provides pinpoint movement, as well as the ability to thrust cancel whenever you feel like it. Oh, and you can also press square to "juke," which has a little effect of your ship coming out of the screen and dodging bullets. It's really cool. Check out the full control scheme here. [embed]297236:59841:0[/embed] Sound plays a factor in the game as well, as a blue ring around your ship displays how far enemy units can hear you. Yep, your goal is going to actually be avoiding combat as often as you can, because again, death is a big deal in Galak-Z, and it sort of plays into the Last Starfighter vibe that the story is going for. It's also good then that shields can withstand environmental impacts for the most part and regenerate after a few seconds, so you won't have too many frustrating deaths. While permadeath is hard-hitting, you can earn temporary upgrades that will help you avoid your demise, exchange "Crash Coins" for instant upgrades, and locate blueprints, which grant the in-game shop permanent fixtures for future playthroughs. Note that while that blueprints are stocked for every session, you will still have to buy them with scrap (currency you'll find in the world), so you truly are restarting with nothing to your name most of the time. That right there is probably going to scare a lot of people away. While I generally don't mind a learning curve, there is some tedium involved -- more-so than most roguelikes. While many games don't have clear "objectives," and would rather see you explore at your own pace, the chopped-up level scheme doesn't always gel in terms of pacing. For some missions, I was able to fly right into a really unique area like a lava cave, blow up some bugs, and escape with a jump point relatively close to the objective. For others, I had to fly through a long network of caverns, find a boring box, blow it up, and then fly back for upwards of five minutes just to complete that stage. But for every randomly generated disappointment, there's an array of fun moments. Since multiple factions will attack each other in-game, it's a joy to pit them against one another, and slowly reap the benefits from afar with your missiles and all of the wonderful toys you've acquired through your current season. I don't want to spoil the transforming mech bit too much, but suffice to say it adds yet another layer on top of everything, and is just as satisfying as it sounds. Getting through a season and learning all of the tricks involved over time provides a clear sense of accomplishment, and you'll need to put in some work to reap those benefits. I wish Galak-Z: The Dimensional wasn't so fragmented, because the core experience is a treat for roguelike and space combat fans alike. Even 15 hours through I was still seeing new items and upgrades, which is a testament to its lasting power, warts and all -- I just need to take breaks from the tedium every so often. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
Galak-Z review photo
Amuro Blu-ray
There aren't enough mech games out there. I mean sure, I grew up with Mechwarrior, G-Nome, Armored Core, and Heavy Gear, among countless others over the years, but it's still not enough. It's never enough. While Galak-Z does have some issues, it does manage to keep the dream mostly alive.

LEGO Marvel photo
LEGO Marvel

LEGO Marvel's Avengers pushed back to January 2016


Block quotes
Aug 05
// Steven Hansen
LEGO Marvel's Avengers will miss its fall 2015 release and instead come to North America on January 26 and Europe on January 29. Some real missed holiday sales opportunity there, looks like, especially with it coming to every...
PSN summer sale photo
PSN summer sale

That's more like it, PlayStation Store summer sale


Week two has a wider selection
Aug 04
// Jordan Devore
Well, shit. I forgot to nab what I was going to during the first week of the PlayStation Store's summer sale (Apotheon and Roundabout). Thankfully, today brings overall better deals. PlayStation Vita owners in particular will want to take a look at the full list below. Danganronpa and Danganronpa 2 are $20 each (or $16 each if you're a PlayStation Plus subscriber).
Vita photo
Vita

PS Now subscriptions now on Vita starting today


If you're into that thing
Aug 04
// Chris Carter
If you're into Sony's PS Now subscription service, you can now stream games on the Vita as of today. In addition, God of War III, Dynasty Warriors 8, MX Vs. ATV Supercross, Bomberman Ultra, and The Last Guy have hit the serv...
Yomawari photo
Yomawari

Yomawari from NIS is still creepy, still cute


I'm digging the music too
Aug 04
// Chris Carter
A month ago we just had screens to go by, but Yomawari is shaping up nicely if this new trailer from NIS is any indication. Backed by beautiful music, we get to see a bit of gameplay here, which involves a girl searching for her sister and dog in a city. It'll drop on October 29 in Japan on Vita (!).
tri-Ace photo
tri-Ace

Spike Chunsoft and tri-Ace's Exist Archive looks even better in motion


I'm interested
Aug 03
// Chris Carter
Exist Archive: The Other Side of the Sky, the newest project from tri-Ace and Spike Chunsoft, looks pretty great. Now, compliments of for latter part of the collaboration, we have a gameplay trailer that shows us a bit more ...
Exist Archive photo
Exist Archive

Tri-Ace and Spike Chunsoft unveil their new RPG


Introducing Exist Archive
Aug 02
// Kyle MacGregor
Oh hey, I didn't see you there. I was just reading about Exist Archive: The Other Side of the Sky, a new role-playing game from Star Ocean studio Tri-Ace and Spike Chunsoft of Danganronpa fame. Revealed in the latest iss...
Hue photo
Hue

Hue uses color to solve its puzzle platforming


ROY G BIV
Jul 31
// Darren Nakamura
Making objects disappear and reappear at depending on visibility has been done before, but Hue multiplies that idea by a factor of four. Instead of it being a simple light/dark dichotomy, backgrounds in Hue can be one of eigh...
Spider versed photo
Spider versed

You're a spider in Spider and real-life weather changes the game


PlayStation 4, Vita, PC, and more
Jul 31
// Steven Hansen
I was going to get into my usual spiel about earning a subtitle, but Spider: Rite of the Shrouded Moon is actually a sequel to 2009's Spider: The Secret of Bryce Manor. So 2009's Spider gets a posthumous talking to for colon...
Dancing ALL Night photo
Dancing ALL Night

Persona 4: Dancing All Night trailer rocks faces with Kung-Fu dance


Chie busts out her steak powers
Jul 30
// Brett Makedonski
Chie insists that saving people in danger is her thing. I'd contend that dancing is her thing. She sure does a lot of dancing and not a lot of saving people in this trailer. Well, unless handing out unsolicited motivational ...
Race the Sun photo
Race the Sun

Race the Sun is fantastic, fun, and free today on PC


Can't beat that price
Jul 30
// Brett Makedonski
They say that going solar-powered is a cheap and efficient use of renewable energy. Solar-powered endless runner Race the Sun is the most cost-effective it'll ever be, but for today only. Like the game, it's over when t...
Iconoclasts photo
Iconoclasts

Iconoclasts finally gets a release announcement: Steam and Sony systems in 2016


Also drops the 'the' from its name
Jul 29
// Darren Nakamura
We have had our eyes on The Iconoclasts for a while now. It started development in 2010, and we have covered whispers of updates sporadically since then, including a rad mecha-worm boss fight using rail transport last year. G...
August PlayStation Plus photo
August PlayStation Plus

Lara Croft leads a light August in PlayStation Plus freebies


Also God of War
Jul 29
// Steven Hansen
Look, PlayStation Plus' July free downloads gave us -- well, you, I don't have PS+ -- Rocket League. You aren't going to touch Rocket League. August is a bit slight, though. Maybe it will finally convince people on a wide sca...
Severed delay photo
Severed delay

DrinkBox's Severed is being delayed past summer


A few new screenshots to show off
Jul 29
// Darren Nakamura
Guacamelee! was rad and DrinkBox Studios' next project Severed has a lot of the same stuff going for it, despite existing in an entirely different genre. It has that same sharp cartoon art style and it doesn't shy away from s...
PSN deals photo
PSN deals

Add to that backlog with the PlayStation Store summer sale


First-week deals are live
Jul 28
// Jordan Devore
It sure feels like summer out there. Upper 90s this week? What're you up to, Pacific Northwest? There's no way I'm staying inside all day; plenty of time for that when the skies turn gray again. The PlayStation Store summer s...
Senran Kagura photo
Senran Kagura

Senran Kagura Estival Versus coming to Europe Early 2016


Booooooooooooooooooobs
Jul 28
// Laura Kate Dale
Boooooooooooooooobs are coming to Europe. Most of you who read Destructoid will have probably at some point come across the Senran Kagura video game series at some point in your life. Why do people know about it? Because it's...
OlliOlli 2 photo
OlliOlli 2

OlliOlli 2 [skateboard trick]s its way to PC this summer


We can't nail when it'll land
Jul 27
// Brett Makedonski
Up until this point, OlliOlli 2: Welcome to Olliwood has only shown off its sick tricks on PlayStation platforms. Impressive as they may be, developer Roll7 will soon prove the game has more up its sleeve than just PS4 a...

Review: Lost Dimension

Jul 27 // Kyle MacGregor
Lost Dimension (PS3, PS Vita [reviewed], PS TV compatible)Developer: LancarsePublisher: Atlus USA (NA), NIS America (EU)Released: July 28, 2015 (NA), August 28, 2015 (EU)MSRP: $39.99 The story begins with a man who calls himself "The End" authoring a string of deadly terror attacks and threatening to destroy the planet in 13 days unless someone can stop him. To do just that, the United Nations dispatches S.E.A.L.E.D., an elite team of teenage warriors with psychic powers. But before the final showdown, the kids must climb the villain's mysterious spire, where he awaits their arrival. The task is easier said than done, though, as the group soon discovers. During the ascent the team is locked in a room, where they learn there is a traitor in their midst whom they will need to "erase" before moving on to the next level. The task falls on central protagonist Sho Kasugai to use his visions and deductive skills to root out the traitors. When they're not pointing fingers at one another, the squad of psychics will need to work together to defeat an army of enigmatic robots that stand between them and their main objective. While the ensuing battles have been compared to those of Valkyria Chronicles, the resemblance isn't overly deep. Lost Dimension is indeed a tactical role-playing game with a similar aesthetic, but the combat here is entirely turn-based and has enough distinctive features to make it feel unique.  All of the characters have unique psychic abilities, ranging from offensive powers like telekinesis and pyrokinesis to defensive powers like healing and buffs. Using these abilities is tied to a pair of gauges, one of which is a sanity meter. In addition to managing what is essentially a mana bar, players will need to be mindful of the sanity meter, as depleting it can turn the tide of battle. Should a character run out of sanity, they will go berserk. In this state, players lose control over the character, who no longer differentiate friend from foe. It sounds bad at first, but berserk characters are extremely powerful, and utilizing them effectively is an essential strategy. Another great tactic at players' disposal in Lost Dimension is deferring, which, at the cost of a little sanity, can allow allied units to have multiple turns. This is great for taking advantage of enemy weaknesses with a powerful attacker or moving your forces across the battlefield quickly to close distance or retreat to a more defensible position. Since nearby units will assist their buddies in battle, stacking assists is another important part of the equation, netting you extra attacks for every ally in range. Of course, enemies can pull off this maneuver just as well, which can be pretty devastating. Missions are usually quick affairs, lasting around 10 minutes or so on average, which was ideal for playing the game on Vita. After they're finished, Sho will have a vision where he'll see brief glimpses into what his teammates are thinking -- which might help players identify traitors. There's another ability that should help you do this as well, which allows you to go into someone's subconscious mind and tell for sure if they're the traitor or not. Thing is, you can only use this ability three times per floor, so it's best to narrow down suspects before firing your silver bullets. Since the traitors are randomized, each experience with the game will be somewhat unique, ensuring someone's first run through the game will be different than the second. But it might be a tough sell for most to invest a couple more dozen hours in the game after seeing the credits roll. When a character is erased, they become Materia, which allows other characters to use the abilities they learned before their untimely demise. It's little things like this, and the whole tension surrounding judgement and betrayal that made Lost Dimension an enjoyable experience for me. Knowing I made a blunder early on and would have to watch one of my favorite characters betray me was something I dreaded throughout the journey. It was a huge source of dissonance, enjoying my interactions with someone that I knew was playing me and would ultimately make the final showdown with The End all the more difficult. Lost Dimension isn't particularly exceptional at anything it does, but I still really enjoyed the overall experience. It's a genuinely satisfying and memorable tactical RPG that I won't soon forget. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]  
Review: Lost Dimension photo
Keep your friends close, then kill them
It wasn't long before I realized my adventure in Lost Dimension wasn't going to end terribly well. My comrades and I were turning on one another, agreeing to sacrifice a teammate at the behest of our sworn enemy. None of...

Odin Sphere Leifthrasir photo
Odin Sphere Leifthrasir

Atlus localizing Odin Sphere HD remake in 2016


Vague, but I'll take it
Jul 24
// Kyle MacGregor
Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir is coming to the Americas sometime next year, Atlus confirmed today. The high-definition remake of Vanillaware's gorgeous PlayStation 2 role-playing game was unveiled earlier this week. On top of...

How the hell did Galak-Z hide a Gundam for three years?

Jul 24 // Steven Hansen
Let's recap for a second if you haven't been following along. Galak-Z is broken into five seasons each with five episodes. The fifth season will be added in for free post launch. This is one diversion from the typical roguelike set up, in that when you die, you don't start all the way at the beginning of the game, but rather at the beginning of whichever "season" you're on. "One of [Kazdal's] pet peeves with roguelikes" is that playing very beginning segments over and over can get boring, so this blends that death-based need to replay with earned progression. More typically, levels are randomly generated, and you get different fractions of story and dialogue every time. This way you won't hear the same repeated bits death after death, but slowly glean more information until you finally get through the season. The space shooting half we already knew about is not just a twin-stick shooter, either. The ship maps thrusters (and a boost) to the triggers. There's also a backwards thruster so you can shoot and flee, a dodge thruster, and a a barrel roll (square) that juts the ship "toward" you like it's coming out of the screen (and over incoming bullets on the 2D plane). You have your standard weapon and an Itano Circus missile salvo (limited, but you can buy more if you find the shop during levels). [embed]296589:59676:0[/embed] Ok, so the not-Gundam? You can morph the ship into the robot at any time with a smooth, Transformers-like animation and change up the playstyle completely. It has a beam sword, which can be charged for a stronger, wider attack, and a shield that has parry capabilities. Perhaps most fun, though, is the extending claw arm that can grab dangerous space junk and throw it at enemies, or grab enemies themselves, bringing them in close so you can start wailing on them with punches. Keeping the mech locked up this long is impressive. The feature was locked off in the many public shows Galak-Z has been demoed at and no one slipped up about it. Kazdal tells me there were plans for a third, stealth-focused character, initially, but that it made for too many mental hoops in dealing with all the other things that could be happening at any given moment. Galak-Z is smooth, feels great to play, and the mech is a welcomed addition, adding one more layer to the game. There are warring factions you can sometimes pit against each other, environmental hazards to be aware of (and sometimes use to your advantage -- thanks alien trapdoor spider who saved my ass!), and instant shifts between ranged and close-quarters combat. It's tough, gorgeous, encourages exploration (beyond mission goals, there are blueprints for new gear and other upgrades to find), and a ton of fun.
HANDS ON: Galak-Z  photo
Spelunky by way of Macross...and Gundam
We've covered the "Spelunky by way of Macross" space shooting roguelike for a couple of years now and the follow-up from Skulls of the Shogun developer 17-bit is almost here, coming to PS4 August 4 and PC a few months down th...

Resident Evil Vita photo
Resident Evil Vita

Resident Evil Revelations 2 hits PS Vita Aug. 18


Digital-only package deal runs $39.99
Jul 24
// Kyle MacGregor
Months after bringing Resident Evil Revelations 2 to Windows PC and consoles, Capcom is finally delivering the PlayStation Vita version on August 18, Sony announced via the PlayStation Blog. The portable edition will be a dig...
ATLUS photo
ATLUS

Persona 4: Dancing All Night gets a release date


Taking the stage September 29
Jul 24
// Kyle MacGregor
Persona 4: Dancing All Night launches in North America on September 29, Atlus has confirmed. The rhythm game has been out in Japan since late June and is planned for an autumn release in Europe, where NIS America is handling ...
Net High photo
Net High

The main character of Net High still totally looks like Gurren Lagann's Kamina


Watch the intro
Jul 23
// Chris Carter
Net High is coming on November 26 in Japan exclusively for the Vita, and you can take a look at the intro above to get an idea of what to expect. It's a really kooky game overall, as it involves gathering the most Twitt...
Dragon Quest Builders photo
Dragon Quest Builders

Don't write off Dragon Quest Builders just yet


Interest rising
Jul 22
// Jordan Devore
That first image of Dragon Quest Builders (PS3, PS4, PS Vita) didn't do much for me. "Huh? Dragon Quest through the lens of Minecraft? Uhh, okay." *closes tab* These latest screenshots are more substantial. The "Camp" bar in ...

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