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Hotline Miami photo
Hotline Miami

The Hotline Miami Story covers the making of this trippy series


Cocaine Cowboys and Neon Lights
May 07
// Alessandro Fillari
I still remember how the original Hotline Miami suddenly came out of nowhere and left an incredible impression on those who took a chance on it. It was such an unusual title. Its bright, vivid visuals, along with the overhea...

Review: Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities

May 07 // Jed Whitaker
Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities (Android, iOS [reviewed on an iPhone 6 Plus], Playstation Vita, Wii U)Developer: Psychose Interactive Inc.Publisher: Psychose Interactive Inc.Released: April 23, 2015 (iOS) / TBA 2015 (Android, PlayStation Vita, Wii U)MSRP: $4.99 Rose Hawkins wakes up after being shot in the face, only remembering that she was searching for a missing girl named Eden. She doesn't recall who shot her, how she is alive, or where she is.  Upon exiting the room Rose is greeted by a hallway formed in red curtains, the kind you'd find at any theater. An antique dictation device is waiting for her, and a message plays automatically from a woman named Noah who has been waiting for her. Noah knows Rose by name, and promises her more information on Eden if she can free her nurse friend from the asylum she is about to enter. Rose comes face to face with Noah in a throne surrounded by mannequins one last time before entering the asylum, Noah still talks through audio dictation for some reason. This is the kind of tone you can expect from Forgotten Memories. [embed]291661:58457:0[/embed] Like any psychological survival horror game, the story is deep, twisted and leaves a lot of questions unanswered. Most of the lore you'll come across in case files, notes, and a couple of cutscenes. Forgotten Memories is very old school in this regard, but still manages to have an engaging story worth searching for. Old school is a  word that can be used to describe most parts of the experience, for better or for worse. I almost didn't finish the game due to how difficult the game is, just because the developers felt the need to shove in old school mechanics for old school sake. Saving the game requires tracking down a computer and using a floppy disk, an item that is extremely limited in the game. While classic survival horror games used this save game mechanic, most notably the original Resident Evil series, it sucks for a game on mobile, especially when the game is brutally difficult. Forgotten Memories' app store description originally warned prospective buyers to only purchase the game if you are a hardcore gamer due to the level of challenge involved. They weren't joking -- I almost didn't finish it to how quickly and often I'd die. Luckily I must not have been the only one as the developer quickly released an update that included an easy mode. It provides players with unlimited saves, more ammo, easier enemies and more medkit pickups, among other tweaks. Even with this easy mode I found myself in situations with a sliver of health, no medkits and some distance between myself and the nearest save point.  Touchscreen controls were a mistake, plain and simple, and hopefully they don't carry over to the Vita and Wii U versions of the game. The left side of the screen controls character movement, while the right side controls the camera and aiming. The first place touched on the left side of the screen acts as a center axis, and Rose will move in the direction of your fingers position in reference to said axis. Camera and aiming control seems inconsistent on how much movement there is, often times leading to needing multiple swipes just turn around. On the right side of the screen are also icons that allow you to run or go into an aiming mode with your flashlight or weapon. With a weapon drawn tapping anywhere on the screen will cause Rose to attack. The pipe, the only melee weapon I found in my playthroughs, can be used three times consecutively to perform a powerful combo attack that pushes enemies backwards. Since this piece of junk is your main weapon, combat boils down to letting enemies get close enough to attack, performing the combo, rinse repeat. It leaves a lot to be desired. Shitty controls aside, Forgotten Memories nails the survival horror atmosphere unlike any game I've played in years. Haunting violins can be heard as you search for clues and keys, pounding drums mixed with noise play during combat, and the intro music is haunting, a mainstay of the Silent Hill series. I found my heart beating in my chest with my breath held as I ran past enemies to escape rooms. Hearing distorted singing coming from a shadow-like child that is just down the hallway where you need to go is fucking horrifying. While it is indeed a horrifying affair, it ends all too abruptly at just under an hour and a half on my first playthrough.  Having been in development for years, Forgotten Memories feels like it was purposely cut short to allow for sequels or download content. That being said, the pacing is tight and there is no filler whatsoever, but it still feels like the first chapter of a longer game. Aside from the brevity, awful controls, and dull combat, the game is easily recommendable for those looking for that Silent Hill feel. Though only the desperate should pick up the mobile version, or those that have a compatible controller, otherwise wait for the console and PC releases sometime this year. While the graphics are some of the best I've seen on mobile, they can only be better elsewhere. Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities is about the best you can do for survival horror currently, if you can stomach the control scheme. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Forgotten Memories review photo
Horror-ible controls
Survival horror has always been one of my favorite genres, with Silent Hill being the absolute king. When I heard about a game inspired by and with voice actors from Silent Hill 2, arguably the best in the series, I was ...

Tecmo Koei photo
Tecmo Koei

Koei's Ar Nosurge resonates on PS Vita this July


Gust is at it again
May 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Gust's Ar nosurge Plus: Ode to an Unborn Star is on its way to PlayStation Vita this July. The role-playing game originally debuted on PlayStation 3 late last year, but as anyone familiar with the developer might expect,...
Mega Man photo
Mega Man

The Misadventures of Tron Bonne out now on PSN


Rare PS1 gem now widely available
May 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Good news, everyone! Just as we anticipated, The Misadventures of Tron Bonne is indeed coming to PlayStation Network. In fact, it's already arrived! Instead of spending a small fortune on a PS1 copy, you can now get the Mega Man Legends spinoff on PS3, Vita, or PSP just $6. The Misadventures of Tron Bonne [PlayStation Store -- Thanks, Patrick]
Binding of Isaac: Rebirth photo
Binding of Isaac: Rebirth

Edmund McMillen wants to improve The Lost in The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth


Plus some new Afterbirth content
May 05
// Ben Davis
In this week's update for The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth, Edmund McMillen publicly acknowledged the existence of the super secret character, The Lost, and announced that he'd like to alter the character in a way that would bal...
Planet  X photo
Planet X

SoundShapes vet back for PS4/Vita/PC ryhthm defense Loud on Planet X


Tegan and Sara and Metric!
May 05
// Steven Hansen
A bunch of Canadian hepcats, including talent from the lovely SoundShapes, have teamed with a bunch of indie bands (one of 'ems called "Fucked Up"!) for a Plants vs. Zombies tinged rhythm game, Loud on Planet X. It's already...
Guacamelee photo
Guacamelee

Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with a few of the craziest references in Guacamelee


You might recognize a certain green robot
May 05
// Chris Carter
What better way to celebrate Cinco de Mayo than remembering Guacamelee, one of my favorite platformers in recent memory. Alongside of solid Metroidvania action, DrinkBox Studios created a memorable world that will stay with y...
Kodoku photo
Kodoku

PS4, Vita horror game Kodoku still looks as creepy as ever


New trailer
May 05
// Chris Carter
Every time I see an update for Kodoku, I want to partially look away. Not because it looks bad, mind, it's just filled with incredibly creepy imagery. For months we've been looking at stills in a mostly visual novel-like sen...

Review: Cosmophony

May 05 // Darren Nakamura
Cosmophony (Android, iPhone, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 [reviewed], PlayStation Vita, Wii U)Developer: Bento StudioPublisher: Bento StudioReleased: May 5, 2015 (PlayStation systems)MSRP: $4.99 The setup is about as simple as it gets. Fly/glide/hover/whatever down a seven-lane tube. Avoid smashing into obstacles. Optionally shoot black triangle "enemies." That's about it. There are a couple of different measure for success. Getting through a level without dying is enough to unlock the next level. Doing that while destroying every black triangle along the way is worth a full rating. Each level can be played in Practice Mode or Normal Mode. Aesthetically, Practice Mode takes out the color and some visual effects, but the big difference is that it allows the use of checkpoints and gives the ability to fast-forward or rewind to replay tricky sections. Normal Mode is the real deal: make it through a level from start to finish; any mistake means restarting from the beginning. [embed]291451:58420:0[/embed] Cosmophony's unique hook is that it functions as a rhythm game, but the reliance on rhythm is hidden at first. In the early levels, there is a lot of room for error. Firing a shot at nothing carries no penalty and timing is irrelevant as long as moves are made before crashing. Often I would take out enemies before they were even on screen by spamming the fire button knowing which lane they would be in. That changes by the third level. There is still a little bit of leeway allowed for certain decisions. There is space to overshoot, moving three lanes left instead of two. However, after playing and replaying the same sections a few times, it dawned on me that every button press corresponds to a musical element. It's not just the shooting, but also the movement. Once that became clear, I was able to reach the zen state of concentration where my fingers were doing what they were supposed to be doing before my conscious brain could tell them. So few games hit that sweet spot, where the sound and light and difficulty all come together to create an intense mental experience. Level three of Cosmophony does that for me. Sadly, that falls apart for me at the fourth level. The difficulty ramps up consistently across the levels, but it goes too far to be enjoyable. Where previous levels allowed room for minor error and contained lighter sections for the player to refocus, it turns into a relentless exercise in rote memorization and execution. I was no longer finding my happy place where time slows down; I was only finding frustration. Cosmophony is like a firework. As it's flying up and sending out sparks, interest builds. Once it detonates it's an awesome show of color and sound. After that it's over and everybody goes home. It's short and intense, but it stops being interesting once it oversteps the line between fun and frustrating. I played it and enjoyed it until it felt unfair, and now I probably won't ever touch it again. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Cosmophony review photo
The difficulty sure ain't phony
I had been lulled into a false sense of security. I finished the tutorial and the first level of Cosmophony with a perfect rating in about 15 minutes. "Four more levels of this?" I thought. "Child's play." Cut to an hour and ...

Yumi on Vita photo
Yumi on Vita

Sayonara Umihara Kawase+ is a great Vita port that comes with the original SNES game


And a few more stages
May 04
// Chris Carter
Roughly a year ago, Yumi's Odd Odyssey, a localization of the latest game in the Umihara Kawase series, hit the 3DS. Like its predecessors it involved the simple premise of guiding a young girl across a series of pi...
Deception IV photo
Deception IV

Deception IV: The Nightmare Princess confirmed for North America


In July as 'The Nightmare Princess'
Apr 30
// Chris Carter
Deception IV was an amazing return to form on the PS3 and Vita for the Deception series, and thankfully, the good times are rolling with the Another Princess expansion. It was originally announced for the PS3, ...
Skullgirls photo
Skullgirls

Skullgirls 2nd Encore bringing HOT 2D FIGHTING to PS4 and Vita


The gorilla fate is yearning!
Apr 30
// Joe Parlock
I love Skullgirls. It’s probably the most fun I’ve had with a fighting game since Soul Calibur 2, and I fuckin’ love fighting games. Now Lab Zero and Autumn Games have announced some pretty major updates to ...
Class of Heroes 3 photo
Class of Heroes 3

The PSP is still alive and kicking with Class of Heroes 3


Back to school, back to school, to prove to dad...
Apr 29
// Kyle MacGregor
The PlayStation Portable may be several centuries old at this point, but people are still making games for it -- or at least localizing stuff that came out in Japan several years ago. Such is the case with Class of Heroes 3, ...
Hotline Miami 2 music photo
Hotline Miami 2 music

Download this free track off the Hotline Miami 2 OST


'The Way Home' by Magic Sword
Apr 29
// Jordan Devore
I've stopped playing Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number, but the soundtrack hasn't gone anywhere -- well, not all of it. I said I'd play the songs on repeat until I grew sick of them and, yep, that has mostly happened. But these t...
sexy sexy sexy photo
sexy sexy sexy

Romance Frankenstein, Van Helsing in this Vita game


Talk about toxic relationships
Apr 29
// Kyle MacGregor
Your skin is poisonous. It rots and/or melts anything you touch. You haven't seen your pops in two years and live alone in a derelict mansion near London. Then, one day, Royal Guards try to capture you for some reason, and ma...
PS Plus for May photo
PS Plus for May

Yep, I'm digging May's PlayStation Plus lineup


Hohokum is my jam
Apr 29
// Jordan Devore
Depending on who you ask, this game lineup is great. Or, you know, it completely sucks. Every month it's the same story for PlayStation Plus and Internet commenters. Here's what subscribers can download for free beginning Tue...
Danganronpa photo
Danganronpa

Western Danganronpa sales reach 200,000 for both games


Nice work, NIS
Apr 29
// Chris Carter
Good news Danganronpa fans -- NIS has announced that both Trigger Happy Havoc and Goodbye Despair have sold over 200,000 units in North America. For a niche visual novel that's only available on the PS Vita, that's prett...
PSN Sale photo
PSN Sale

PSN Golden Week sale discounts all the Japanese games


Mother of God
Apr 28
// Kyle MacGregor
Over in Japan, it's Golden Week, a national celebration spanning four holidays that doubles as the country's biggest travel and shopping season of the year. What does that mean for us? Sales! Yes, thanks to Sony, we can get i...

Review: Hyperdevotion Noire: Goddess Black Heart

Apr 28 // Kyle MacGregor
Hyperdevotion Noire: Goddess Black Heart (PlayStation Vita)Developer: Sting, Compile HeartPublisher: Idea Factory InternationalReleased: February 24, 2015 (NA) February 27, 2015 (EU)MSRP: $39.99  Why was I so hopeful for Hyperdimension Neptunia? Well, the concept of a game that parodies the console wars is almost too good to give up on. The series follows a group of anthropomorphized gaming consoles, each the ruler of her own kingdom, all vying for dominance in what's effectively a grand popularity contest. It's a cute idea, at the very least, with the potential for so much more. I hoped it would be a clever satire, something introspective and comedic that poked fun at the industry in an interesting or meaningful way. Instead, I discovered one jejune RPG after the next, a middling collection of games that lean all too heavily on fan service as crutch. What I wanted this series to be and what it is are two very different things. I probably should have realized that before now, but well, here we are. The latest entry in the franchise, Hyperdevotion Noire: Goddess Black Heart, may be a spin-off, but it hews closely to its source material -- albeit with one notable exception. This is a strategy role-playing game, rather than a more traditional one. However, aside from the difference in combat, those familiar with Compile Heart's previous efforts will know exactly what to expect out of this one. But let's talk about what makes this entry unique. The action takes place on grid-based battlefields. There, players act as the general of a small army, moving units to support allies and assault foes. In addition to the SP gauge, used for special attacks, there's an LP meter, which fuels even more powerful moves and allows the central protagonists to transform into their more powerful goddess forms. LP is an interesting resource, as it's gained by performing special attacks while flanked by friendly units. This will result in a kissing animation, which doubles as a power-up.  This system is a key component of a successful strategy on the battlefield, but it isn't without risk. As you might expect, clustering into tightly-packed ranks makes units more susceptible to area-of-effect attacks, meaning it could as easily pave the way to victory as it could to your undoing. The level design at work here is interesting and varied, constantly shaking things up with a range of traps, puzzles, and obstacles. The objectives are similarly diverse, though I'm not sure the assortment makes the combat terribly compelling. Despite minimal repetition, the pace of play here feels inordinately slow. Battles often feel overly long and drawn out, especially when a protracted series of turns are dedicated entirely to positioning. There are a lot of lulls in the action that mar an otherwise competent tactical experience. The story doesn't help in that regard, with a hackneyed plot and shallow, tropey characters that talk forever about nothing at all. There's some mild referential humor to be found, but it's mostly about the fan service. It has plenty of pantsu and giant, jiggling breasts, which is made all the more creepy by the new chibi art direction. The entire cast look like abominable hypersexualized infants. Speaking of said characters, most of the ones you'll be taking into battle over the course of the game are based on popular Japanese videogame franchises. This was actually one of my favorite parts of the experience, as taking personifications of the Street Fighter, Yakuza, and Dragon Quest (I could go on and on) series into the field was a real joy. Their special attacks (like the Metal Gear-inspired Lid's cardboard box stealth attack) are particularly charming, and serve as nice nods to players who are familiar with the source material. It's just a pity that these characters are often relegated to a support role, as the familiar faces are far more useful on the battlefield. Since Noire, Blanc, Neptune, and Vert can all transform into their extremely mighty goddess forms, it pays to deploy them over your favorites. While transformed, the goddesses are able to fly, making them immune to traps and elements of the landscape that limit conventional troopers. It's a lamentable design choice, impelling players to use the same, stale heroines rather than the revolving door of refreshing newcomers.  There are other questionable choices that hamper the experience, like: lengthy enemy turns, the constant influx of tutorial messages that are more busy than informative, a loading period at the beginning of each fight where the game makes you watch combatants materialize out of thin air, one-hit kills, and a bizarre movement mechanic that doesn't allow you to move units exactly where you'd like them to go -- even if that space is in range. There are just dozens of little annoyances peppered throughout the experience that require the player to be very patient and forgiving. It's unfortunate because there's a decent strategy RPG at Goddess Black Heart's core, but the game just can't seem to get out of its own way. Hyperdimension Neptunia fans may well enjoy this one, but I can't count myself among them. The series has an alluring premise, but it just doesn't push the idea far enough for me. The cloying characters and banal story are just so incredibly vapid, and the respectable strategic gameplay just isn't enough to compensate for the myriad of drawbacks and stumbling blocks. Sorry Noire, but it's time we go our separate ways. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Hyperdevotion Review photo
It's not you, it's me
Falling in love with potential can be dangerous. A mistake people make far too often when forging new relationships is placing undue expectations on others. People grow and change, but it's impossible to know how or when that...

Nuclear Throne photo
Nuclear Throne

Nuclear Throne nets one million in revenue while in Early Access


Y.V. knows what's up
Apr 28
// Ben Davis
Nuclear Throne, the indie game where you run and gun as a colorful cast of mutant creatures in a radioactive wasteland, has reached one million dollars in revenue, Vlambeer's Rami Ismail announced yesterday. That's an impress...
Man meat photo
Man meat

I'm not happy with the Persona 4: Dancing All Night swimsuit DLC


You know better than this, Atlus
Apr 28
// Steven Hansen
The first run of Persona 4: Dancing All Night in Japan will come with the "Woman’s Swimsuit Set." Not surprisingly, it is comprised of costumes for four of the rhythm game's characters; Chie, Yukiko, Rise, and Naoto. Th...
Shovel Knight photo
Shovel Knight

Learn the real names of the enemies in Shovel Knight


Know your Blorbs from your Beetos
Apr 27
// Jordan Devore
Clearing Super Mario World for the first time and discovering that the fiery, big-eyed dinosaurs who leap out of the lava are named Blargg was quite the revelation. Come again? Blargg? I can't remember what I called the enemy...
ATLUS photo
ATLUS

Atlus censoring upcoming RPG for western audiences


Dungeon Travelers 2 avoids AO rating
Apr 24
// Kyle MacGregor
While publishing our initial report on Dungeon Travelers 2, a PlayStation Vita role-playing game based on an erotic visual novel, I wondered what sort of concessions Atlus would have to make to localize such a game for wester...
Persona 4: DAN photo
Persona 4: DAN

Naoto comes out of her shell in her Persona 4: Dancing All Night trailer


The detective prince of dance
Apr 24
// Alissa McAloon
Naoto's character trailer for Persona 4: Dancing All Night shows a sexier side of everyone's second favorite Persona 4 girl. The trailer shows off her new-found dancing skills, but more importantly it gives us anot...

Review: MonsterBag

Apr 22 // Steven Hansen
MonsterBag (PlayStation Vita)Developers: IguanaBeePublisher: IguanaBeeReleased: April 7, 2015MSRP: $9.99 Suitably impressed with the trailer's art style, I was still a bit sure how the game actually worked until I played it. Levels are set up with a line of folks to jump between. Reaching Nia, always at the end, is the goal. Tapping left or right flits you across bystanders one at a time, but some are a bit more attentive, requiring you to pause and wait until they aren't looking your way. A series of unfortunate events en route to some kind of alien apocalypse in a narrative escalation reminiscent of Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack means you never quite reach Nia, even when you get to the end of levels. Complicating things beyond increasing sets of hungry eyes per level are certain puzzle elements that make use of V's telekinesis. Various items in the stages can be tapped on if you're in range and then thrown at the NPCs. This starts off innocently enough by fulfilling the character's desire as indicated by little thought bubbles. The angry old man who won't let you pass becomes amicable if you chuck something at the guitarist, causing the latter to throw his axe to the old man, who then shreds and chills out. Soon, though, you're sending spears through people, exposing their internal organs as further items with which to progress. Or beheading scientists to pass retina scans. Levels have a flow of, "get to the first accessible item without being caught, use it on an NPC, then get to whatever item that might've opened up." Only once did I find myself screwing up the combination that I had to restart a level, reaching an impasse without any interactable elements left. [embed]290782:58276:0[/embed] The difficulty, then, comes as more and more enemies are out to get you, which slows your progress as you have to wait for them to avert their gaze to get to one side of the level and often have to then make it back to the start. It can get a bit grating on wider levels, especially when enemies' -- in particular, the later alien monster things -- patterns sync up and you find yourself waiting longer and longer for smaller openings. Getting seen means instant death and regression to a checkpoint, which I occasionally wished were more frequent. Spicing up the puzzling elements are sections where speed is a necessity and those were the most frustrating, not helped by some additional, finicky uses of the Vita touch screen to rotate bits and pull levers. Requiring speed when the distance between two points of character-cover is so heavily watched meant I tried to force more openings with barely-desynced enemy vision patterns, which led to a lot of frustrating deaths. Later levels also introduce more abstract, more complex button-pushing puzzle elements that feel thematically distant and get away from the charming, cobbled together cause-and-effect puzzles that I enjoyed, like tossing lemonade on a thirsty girl or throwing an alien's flaming head to melt down a bigger alien. MonsterBag is a nice bit of light puzzles and charming slapstick, at least until the narrative drives it towards something more serious and mechanical that ups complexity and challenge, but almost feels like a different, less personable game. That backpack is one of the cutest characters in recent memory, though, thanks to its infectious grin and happy hiss, murderous tendencies be damned. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
MonsterBag review photo
Cartoon violence
Animaniacs was all trios and duos (and one solo sexy rat thing) playing off each other for comedy and I couldn't help but think of the Buttons and Mindy skits while playing MonsterBag. Mindy would toddle off into harm's way, ...

Shovel Knight photo
Shovel Knight

Get Shovel Knight on the PSN if you haven't already


Though it may not be worth a double-dip
Apr 22
// Chris Carter
Shovel Knight has arrived this week on the PSN, bringing Cross-Buy and Cross-Save promotions to the PS3, PS4, and Vita platforms. I had a chance to test out all three, and although the justification for buying it again is very slim, it's no doubt the best version yet.

Here's how to unlock Kratos in Shovel Knight, and a look at the full boss battle

Apr 21 // Chris Carter
The unlock:  [embed]290778:58265:0[/embed] Basically, you'll need to access the Hall of Champions first on the world map -- you can get there in roughly 30 minutes, and it essentially marks the mid-way point in the game. Go up the first ladder, and head all the way to the right. Blow through the false wall, go to the end of the corridor, and use your downward strike. The scroll to unlock Kratos is in that room. The fight: [embed]290778:58266:0[/embed] The phrase "epic" gets thrown around entirely too often these days, but this is one badass boss. I may have beaten him on my first attempt, but I had a decent loadout and he put up one hell of a fight. I wouldn't exactly call it a system selling encounter, but it was really fun. He also gives you a special item that you can see at the end of the video. The reward: [embed]290778:58267:0[/embed] If you take the item back to the blacksmith in the second town, he'll forge it into a special armor called the Armor of Chaos. It's a brand new set of armor that allows you to use Kratos' Blades of Chaos in-game.
Kratos in Shovel Knight photo
Progression spoilers
You've seen the teasers for Kratos' reveal for the PSN version of Shovel Knight -- no surprises there. But how you actually unlock him is another beast entirely, so beware of spoilers ahead for a rather cryptic meth...

Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Playism is localizing doujin games for PS4, Vita


Astebreed, Croixleur Sigma, and more coming west in 2015
Apr 21
// Kyle MacGregor
Good news for fans of Japanese indie games: Playism is bringing its wares to consoles.  We've known this was happening for a while, but now it's official. The company has announced plans to localize a number of Japanese ...
Elan Vita photo
Elan Vita
I was real into OlliOlli 2 last month. Skate was a surprise, that I could actually still enjoy a skateboarding game in the post Pro Skater world and OlliOlli 2, Roll7's demade 2D skater, served as a second surprise. The emba...







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