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Ninja Gaiden

Ninja Gaiden smartglass photo
Ninja Gaiden smartglass

Ninja Gaiden 3 on 360 will feature Smartglass integration


Syncronize YouTube videos
Mar 01
// Chris Carter
Tecmo Koei has confirmed that in addition to the new content that was added to the Wii U version of Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge, the Xbox 360 version of the game will be getting Smartglass support. Basically, this version of...
Ninja Gaiden Vita photo
Ninja Gaiden Vita

Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus launches today with new trailer


Izuna Drop into the Vita version
Feb 26
// Chris Carter
Koei-Tecmo keeps on riding that Ninja Gaiden I and II gravy train with the release of Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 on the Vita -- a game that's an enhanced portable port of a release from 2009, which was a port of the Ninja Gaiden s...
New releases photo
New releases

New releases: Brutal Legend makes PCs metal


Plus Dynasty Warriors 7: Empires, Etrian Odyssey IV, and Star Wars Pinball
Feb 25
// Fraser Brown
Monday has once again snuck up on us like an unfortunate rash you got from a really good weekend. Don't worry, there's cream for that! And much like a soothing medicinal balm, the new releases of the week are here to cure wh...
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus photo
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus

Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus on Vita: New screens, details


Don't be a Hero
Feb 12
// Dale North
The sequel to Vita the Ninja Gaiden franchise launch title is coming later this month. Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus drops February 26, complete witha new cast, new features, boss battles and more. Tecmo Koei dumped a bunch of ne...
Razor's Edge photo
Razor's Edge

Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge confirmed for PS3 and 360


Dismemberment is back on Xbox 360 and PS3
Feb 06
// Jordan Devore
The recent retailer listing for Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge on PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 was correct, unsurprisingly. Tecmo Koei has confirmed these ports as legitimate and announced a planned retail and digital-distributio...
Razor's Edge on PS3 / 360 photo
Razor's Edge on PS3 / 360

Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge outed for PS3 / 360


Well, that was fast
Feb 05
// Tony Ponce
Not even three months since Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge landed, we already have evidence that PS3 and 360 ports of the enhanced Wii U port are on the way. Japanese retailer Rakuten has let slip that Razor's Edge will drop fo...
Ninja Gaiden 2 Vita photo
Ninja Gaiden 2 Vita

Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus summed up in latest trailer


Videogames can be pretty ridiculous, sometimes
Jan 30
// Jordan Devore
It's back! The trailer for Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus Chris posted about the other week is now available in English. Funny enough, before remembering why this footage looked so familiar, I remarked to myself that Team Ninja j...
PlayStation Plus Update photo
PlayStation Plus Update

Ninja Gaiden, Section 8, Madden dropping on PS Plus


Get it? Section 8 is dropping? Oh, never mind...
Jan 28
// Kyle MacGregor
Sony is currently offering a 15 month PlayStation Plus subscription for the price of 12. But that's an investment for the forward-thinking man. What have they done for us lately? Well, that 13 for '13 sale was pretty nea...
Ni no Kuni photo
Ni no Kuni

New releases: Ni no Kuni arrives at last


Plus The Cave, ShootMania Storm, and more
Jan 21
// Fraser Brown
It's Monday, and that can only mean one thing: it's the beginning of another week of new releases! And what a great week it is, most notably containing the release of the long awaited Ni no Kuni, Level-5 and Studio Ghibli's ...
Ninja Gaiden photo
Ninja Gaiden

Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus gets a fancy gameplay trailer


I'm still on the fence
Jan 18
// Chris Carter
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus is on the way, and to celebrate, Tecmo Koei has a new gameplay trailer ready for eye consumption. Of course, that stupid armadillo boss is back, and I can hear the sounds of my controller hitting th...
Razor's Edge photo
Razor's Edge

Ninja Gaiden 3: RE is Australia's first game rated R18+


You finally did it, Australia
Jan 11
// Jordan Devore
It was a good day when Australia's R18+ rating was passed for videogames, paving the way for adults to purchase games that might have previously either been edited for content or refused classification. Of all the games that ...
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New releases: Anarchy Reigns and not much else


Start the year off with a chainsaw
Jan 07
// Fraser Brown
Have you suitably recovered from bringing in the New Year? I hope so, because the first new releases of 2013 are upon us, and they may require your attention. This week's offerings aren't particularly bountiful, but you will...
Ninja Gaiden Z photo
Ninja Gaiden Z

Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z development consoles detailed


Set for 360 and PS3
Dec 25
// Chris Carter
Remember Ninja Gaiden Z? That weird spinoff game where the chief goal is to kill the franchise hero Ryu Hayabusa? Although details on planned platforms have been scarce, leading some to believe it was a next-gen project, it s...
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Dead or Alive 5 Plus headed to Vita this March


And some Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 screenshots
Dec 06
// Jordan Devore
While the initial announcement made the rounds a few days ago, Tecmo Koei has given more details on Dead or Alive 5 Plus for PlayStation Vita. Scheduled to launch in March 2013, this version will naturally offer touch-based m...

Review: Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge

Nov 13 // Jim Sterling
Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge (Wii U)Developer: Team NinjaPublisher: Tecmo KoeiRelease: November 18, 2012MSRP: $59.99 To its credit, Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge demonstrates how aware Team Ninja is of the original game's faults, since the studio really has done its best to fix those areas that let it down so badly in March of 2012. Variety has been ramped up, along with greater intensity from enemies, and a decent offering of fresh content. At face value, Razor's Edge goes out of its way to be the game Ninja Gaiden 3 should have been. For a start, combat is granted a higher degree of challenge with more aggressive opposition. While they're still not quite the smartest cats in the cradle, NG3's perpetually angry soldiers at least spend a little less time queuing up to receive their blood-drenched retribution from Ryu's hungry blade. Guarding and dodging now have a greater emphasis, evoking memories of older Ninja Gaiden titles, and making the game slightly more challenging.  Downloadable weapons from the original release, plus two new ones in the form of the Dual Katanas and Lunar Staff, are available during the course of the campaign without having to wait for them to appear on a digital marketplace, meaning Ryu will not be stuck with his sword for the majority of the experience. The added weapon variety is also accompanied by an all-new upgrade system, where Ryu can spend karma to gain new combo moves, special abilities, and enhance Ninpo magic attacks. By spending Karma, players can gain more health, the ability to self-heal, and cool (if useless) moves such as combat throws and head stomps.  [embed]238412:45740[/embed] Ryu's magic red arm, which allowed him to instantly kill opponents in the original release, has been given a few alterations as well. Although he can still use it to absorb souls and slaughter folk, he can't execute quite so many at a time, and the "cinematic" camera angles accompanying each kill have been toned down somewhat. In addition, those slow moments where Ryu would be overcome by his curse and trudge through a room one-hit killing everything have been removed entirely, replaced by dream-sequence arenas where Ryu basically just fights even more opponents in a gray, blurry, nightmare realm.  In addition to the original game, Ayane boasts two playable chapters of her own. As one might expect, she's nimble and unconventional in her attacks, wielding a pair of blades and tossing explosive kunai at her enemies. That said, her opponents are all made up of those found in Ryu's story, so while her moveset can provide a bit of a break, it's ultimately just more of the same.  More of the same, unfortunately, is what holds the whole package back. For all its genuine (and appreciated) attempts at evolution, Razor's Edge is still, at heart, the same messy soup of repetitious carnage. It might be a bit more difficult, but combat is still impossible to follow onscreen, as enemies surround Ryu and the button-mashing frenzy renders everything a blur. Level structure remains the same -- our hero walks down a corridor, hacks his way through an arena of predictable foes, and then walks down another corridor, from the beginning of the game to its dreary end. Rather than provide dramatic changes in any way, the Wii U iteration instead attempts to take several small steps forward. A lot has been improved, by a tiny amount. You can see evolution in almost every aspect of the game, but the evolution is only slight enough to be vaguely detected, rather than openly and instantly appreciated. This is not what the game required, as it was in dire need of significant fixing on a grand scale, not a microcosmic plethora of amendments.  Ninja Gaiden 3 is fundamentally mediocre, and Razor's Edge can only do so much to solve that. The new weapons and playable character help, but when combat remains a sloppy serving of soulless anarchy and level structure is as trite and unimaginative as its always been, the changes mean very little. In fact, given how boring the combat gets, one could make a fair argument that giving us more of it is something of a bad idea. The ultimate result of the changes is that the game simply drags on longer than it used to, which largely equates to the same amount of tired contempt per game.  Ninja Gaiden 3's online mode makes its return, though I must add that, at the time of writing, the Wii U is unable to go online. Looking through its solo challenges and offerings, however, it's all pretty much the same as last time, and last time was absolutely awful. You can read our original review to see what I thought of the pointless disaster that was NG3's attempts at versus play. When using the GamePad, Razor's Edge keeps it subtle, using the screen to display attack combos at a glance, and providing virtual buttons at the edges for players to touch and access such things as the inventory, upgrade menu, Ninpo attacks, and Ninja Sense. Pleasantly, all these items can also be accessed using the Pad's buttons, allowing players to use whatever feels more comfortable to them. If you're stuck in a level, you can press the Ninja Sense icon on the touchscreen or hold in the right stick. It's up to you, and I wish more developers would use these new input ideas to encourage versatility rather than force something on the user.  The GamePad is surprisingly comfortable and convenient to wield in one's button mashing endeavors. The wider play surface is appreciated for a game that encourages thumb cramps so enthusiastically, moreso than the optional Pro Controller input. While many may feel that Nintendo's optional peripheral is the preferred way to play Ninja Gaiden, the cramped design of that particular controller is nowhere near as usable as the spacious layout on the Pad. I'd recommend sticking with the Wii U's prime controller if you insist on playing this at all.  Like its first incarnation, Razor's Edge is visually unimpressive, and actually looks worse due to its capitulation on a fan-requested addition -- extra gore. While the power to dismember enemies has returned, it's clear from the outset that this feature was implemented with no elegance whatsoever. Limbs awkwardly fly off in a manner that suggests they were copied and pasted over the screen rather than ever belonging to the soldier they're falling from.  As enemies are reduced to kibble and torsos, they land awkwardly on the floor, frozen in peculiar angles and often wedged through solid surfaces. In all honestly, I'd rather the dismemberment remain out of the equation if the alternative is this laughable cut-and-shut job where gore reminds me of fake props found in 80's slasher movies.  Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge tried. It definitely did try, and nobody can take that away from it. However, nothing this Wii U release does can improve upon the core gameplay, which remains as dry, disaffected, and banausic as ever before. Razor's Edge gives us more, but when the original serving exceeded that which the player could stomach, "more" isn't a very tasty prospect. There are extra weapons, another playable character, and ultimately a greater level of content, but it all serves, in the end, to drag out what was already far too much of the same, vapid waste of time.  As it stands, Razor's Edge is a slight improvement of something that needed to be thrown away and started again from scratch. A turd, Team Ninja demonstrates, can indeed be polished -- but it still stinks.
Ninja Gaiden 3 Wii U photo
Disposable razors
Ninja Gaiden 3 was remarkable in its lack of remarkability. Team Ninja's ability to drop the ball with its franchise so spectacularly was damn near impressive, even if the result was a monotonous and exhausting slog thro...

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Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge Wii U dated Nov. 18


Exclusive features detailed
Oct 25
// Dale North
Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge will be released alongside the Wii U on November 18. This version of the game contains several Wii U exclusive features, including a new battle system and online multiplayer modes. Here's what you...
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Jimquisition: Monster Boobs And Plastic Children


Jimquisition happens every Monday!
Oct 01
// Jim Sterling
Oh, Team Ninja. Oh my dear, sweet Team Ninja. Oh my dear, sweet, misguided Team Ninja. Oh my dear, sweet, misguided, pervy, creepy, sleazy, weird, freaky, pervy, pervy, pervy Team Ninja. Your boobs are so bad. Your justification of said boobs are worse. Boobs. FYI, I fully admit today's episode is silly and quite possibly pointless. It was, however fun to make and I hope it is fun to watch.
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The DTOID Show: CoD Zombies, YAIBA, & Valve hardware?!


Sep 19
// Tara Long
Greetings, dear readers! Max is still out parkouring in Boston this week, so I forced Anthony Carbon to come on my show and make fun of Max with me instead. It worked out pretty well! We also talked about some video games, I...

Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge: Getting bloody with Ayane

Sep 19 // Dale North
Ayane loves to spill blood. Her first appearance in this demo is on a massage table, showing gratuitous side boob and hip in a massage session in Paris. Masked goons surround her outside as she receives her rubdown, but one manages to sneak in and hold Ayane at gunpoint. She's not at all intimidated as the attacker holds the muzzle of his semi-automatic to her face, but does take offense as he starts to tilt it down into her cleavage, pulling at the towel that she had covered herself with. Ayane reacts with over-the-top violence, slicing off limbs of the attackers cleanly. It's a bloodfest as the arterial content of all attackers rains up and out from her swift cuts. I got a real sense of just how sharp Ayane's blade must be with the speed and effortlessness of her attacks. These were quick but defined moves that felt really good on the Wii U Pro Controller.  A second section of the demo took Ayane out of the massage parlor and into the streets of Paris, where countless other attackers lay waiting. Even with Ayane's double blades and fast attacks I struggled to stay alive against the bullets, punches, blades and even missiles came at me from every direction. Area-effective specials and throwing blades helped keep attackers at bay, but individual enemies never go down easily in Ninja Gaiden games, and with this many to contend with, I was having trouble keeping afloat. Maybe I should have looked into the newly added Ninja Skills, which are unlocked by using earned karma.  But I held fast with what I had for this demo, pushing back with against seemingly endless circles of thugs with everything in my arsenal. I'm pleased to say that the combat in Razor's Edge hits that rare zone where things feel nearly impossible, and sometimes gets close to exhausting, but also somehow still manageable when you play at the very top of your game. The game makes you work your fingers and your reflexes in continual streams of battles that make you feel like you just barely survived. If you do manage to survive, it makes you feel like a really skillful player, and that always feels great. Even with the little time I spent with Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge, I got a good sense of the work that Team Ninja put into it in response to the fan criticisms of the previous version. I would need a lot more time with the game to make a stronger call, but it's already clear that Team Ninja has been hard at work here. Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge will be released alongside the Wii U console on November 18.
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I was able to give Ayane a go in upcoming Wii U game Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge tonight at a Tecmo Koei press event in Tokyo. Tecmo Koei said that they were only offering a playable demo at their event as what they had...

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TGS: Ninja Gaiden 3 brings the gore to Wii U in this clip


Sep 19
// Allistair Pinsof
Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge for the Wii U is shaping up to be the best version of the game with fan-requested tweaks, new ninja skills, free DLC, and other improvements. Here's a glimpse to tide you over until the game releases in the US on November 18.
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TGS: Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 comes to Vita next year


Sep 19
// Allistair Pinsof
Team Ninja is bringing it tonight! Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus will come to PlayStation Vita next year. That's right, the OFFICIAL best Ninja Gaiden (fact!) will come to Sony's handheld. Here's hoping you can decapitate ninjas ...
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[Update: We now have the debut trailer, which you can see above. Prepare your mind to be blown.] At tonight's Tecmo Koei event in Shibuya, Keiji Inafune appeared to reveal that the "YAIBA" game we heard about last week ...

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Ayane is a bloody mess in Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge


Sep 13
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge is looking like it'll be the best version of the game, thanks largely to the refocus on violence. Look at those body parts fly off! It also helps that Ayane is now a playable character for the Wii U version of the game. I need to point out that the English voice acting sounds hilariously bad here. "What the hell's a girl flying in here for?!" Really?
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Team Ninja: Ninja Gaiden 3 for the Wii U is 'hardcore'


Aug 17
// Chris Carter
Team Ninja's hype train has just left the station, as they are hard at work convincing us that Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge for the Wii U will actually be good this time."We left out some of the things the series was well-kno...
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E3: Ninja Gaiden 3 coming to Wii U, published by Nintendo


Jun 05
// Conrad Zimmerman
Among the list of upcoming titles for the new Wii U console shown at today's Nintendo E3 press conference was Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge. And, just below the title, the video lists Nintendo as the publisher. I don't really ...
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Ninja Gaiden 3 DLC Pack 1 now available


Apr 03
// Jim Sterling
Ninja Gaiden 3 has received its first downloadable content package, available as a bundle or as a selection of paid and free downloads. They include weaponry missing from the main game, and items for the multiplayer mode.&nbs...

Review: Ninja Gaiden 3

Mar 20 // Jim Sterling
Ninja Gaiden 3 (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Team NinjaPublisher: Tecmo KoeiRelease: March 20, 2012MSRP: $59.99 Ninja Gaiden 3 wants Ryu to pay for what he's done. His previous outings have seen him mercilessly slaughter enough people to make even the world's most oppressive dictator look like a sleeping hedgehog. The overall theme of the Dragon Ninja's latest adventure is guilt, as well as the difference between a hero and a killer.  At least that's what Ninja Gaiden 3 would like you to believe. On paper, it's a noble endeavor to want to add some narrative depth to a series so devoted to casual genocide. In practice, this enterprise amounts to Ryu muttering something about being a murderer once or twice, before being told by some random Japanese man that he isn't. In between, there are plenty of overwrought cutscenes in which Ryu looks slightly upset, and a camp British man in a mask warbles incoherently about how he and the ninja are "the same." For all its attempts to look philosophical, Team Ninja's story has the emotional depth of a damp sponge, which wouldn't be so bad if the action sequences weren't constantly broken up by these desperately cloying moments of exposition.  [embed]224210:43129[/embed] At its heart, the story serves only to justify Ryu's magical red arm, which supposedly contains the souls of the people he's murdered in past missions. What this ostensibly means is that when Ryu kills enough enemies, the arm will glow red and he can instantly kill even more enemies at the touch of a button. It seems quite a shame that for all the talk of Ninja Gaiden 3's thoughtful story, the sole result is that Ryu gets a special attack from a glow-in-the-dark bicep.  This reductive approach to Ninja Gaiden 3's themes points to a larger problem overall with the game. While previous titles emphasized difficult battles against even low-level opponents, where blocking, countering, and varied attacks were crucial to victory, Ninja Gaiden 3 has streamlined its combat to the point of becoming a mindless hack-n'-slash game. Ryu's arsenal of exotic melee weapons has been reduced to a single sword (other weapons are coming later as free DLC, for some reason), while attacking simply consists of hammering buttons until everything's dead. Every now and then, players will be required to take out distant enemies with a bow that automatically locks onto targets, but these moments usually serve only to make players vulnerable to attack from short-range foes.  Enemies are no longer the threat they once were, and Team Ninja has compensated by throwing a lot more of them at Ryu, to the point where the entire game becomes one long, repetitive brawl. Almost every single stage consists of walking down a linear path, entering a large arena, decimating tons of generic soldiers, and jogging along another path to repeat the process for seven more hours. There's no room for strategic battles anymore, as there are too many enemies on-screen to even see what's going on. I found that the most effective strategy was to hammer buttons until Ryu's health bar started to deplete, then switch to dodging around the room. Combat is too chaotic to really do anything else, especially thanks to a dynamic camera that frequently zooms in and out to try and provide a "cinematic" experience, and regularly allows unseen opponents to land cheap shots from off-screen. There's just no point trying to make sense of it. Merely attack until you receive some clue that Ryu's being hurt, dodge, and start over. That's the key to victory. Ultimately, Ninja Gaiden 3 is Dynasty Warriors with more aggressive enemies and sloppier presentation. As a fan of Omega Force's hack-n'-slash series, I don't think the combat is a universally dreadful thing. There is some base gratification to be had in mindlessly slaughtering soldiers before unleashing a vicious special move or magical ninpo attack. Still, I have Dynasty Warriors for such things already, and fans of Ninja Gaiden's more strategic challenge will be left quite unfulfilled by the vapid button mashing on offer. The formulaic level structure and predictable arenas, not to mention lack of weapon variety, make for a game that actually feels less engaging and more tiresome than anything produced by Koei's hack-n'-slash alternative. At least Dynasty Warriors has large maps and a sizable stable of playable characters. Ninja Gaiden 3 is one ninja, one sword, and an army of pointless mooks. To be fair, the flamboyant violence is quite a spectacle, and the streamlined gameplay is at least solid enough to be worth a few hours' entertainment. Even without the ability to cut off limbs, the brutal sword-slashes and buckets of blood still provide some sadistic amusement, and those moments of calm after a particularly vicious fight are made all the more pleasant by the sounds of the dying, who plead and whimper as they crawl around in the dirt. Every now and then, the pace really slows down as a lone soldier begs for his life, or Ryu's cursed arm completely takes him over. These sequences can prove rather engrossing, if a little irrelevant.  The boss fights, while noticeably less challenging than encounters in previous games, are all quite thrilling in their shallow way. Ryu will face off against giant mechanical spiders, genetic monstrosities, and military helicopters during huge, delightfully ridiculous battles. While they all have fairly predictable patterns, each fight usually spans multiple locations and regularly involves some surprisingly effective quick-time events that actually feel engaging rather than alienating. The large battles lack depth, but Team Ninja has certainly done a magnificent job of creating the illusion of a more exciting game, which contributes toward making Ninja Gaiden 3 more fun than it otherwise would be.  It's a shame, then, that for all its reliance on visual flair, Ninja Gaiden 3 isn't graphically impressive. The animations are bombastic and rousing, but the colors are washed out, character models lack any sense of diversity, and the textures -- especially in the environments -- are flat and featureless. The drab visuals make combat even more irritating, as it becomes far too easy to lose Ryu within the murky sea of enemies. There's also a rather bizarre bug that sees the game attempting to autosave to the hard-drive at moments when it's not supposed to (especially when saving is manually done at checkpoints). Rather than save anything, the entire thing just freezes and the console will need to be restarted. It happened only twice during my play-through, but more than once is an indication that there's an actual problem there.   Team Ninja dabbles in Ninja Gaiden 3 with a new online component, Shadow of the World. In this mode, players take control of their own ninja, completing co-op or competitive games to level up, earn new costume pieces, and strengthen their prowess. While this could have provided some of the meatier content missing from the campaign, it really doesn't. The co-op offering is just a set of arena battles copied from the solo mode, the only difference being "contracts" that demand certain enemies be defeated with certain attacks. The addition of a second player only makes the whole thing quicker -- there's no real "cooperation" to speak of. It's just two players temporarily sharing the same space. Versus mode brings four-on-four battles to the table, and they're about as messy as you'd expect. Each match seems to consist of players sliding around the arenas, hitting buttons and hoping they hit something. It's the same combat seen in the rest of the game, absolutely not designed for multiplayer purposes and fit only for confusing and frustrating the players who inflict it upon themselves. Gameplay wasn't altered at all to account for the human element, and with the game's imprecise targeting locks causing people to hit thin air more than enemies, the whole thing looks like an elaborate costumed dance as opposed to brutal ninja-on-ninja warfare.  Character customization is fairly weak, boasting a meager handful of physical elements to tweak, like a game from five or six years ago. The leveling system is as straightforward as could possibly be, with costume pieces and expanded special moves tossed in at intermittent stages of progress. The character building seems to exist solely to obtain the most amount of replay "value" with the least amount of effort involved. All told, NG3's multiplayer mode is the very definition of a lazy online component, tacked on simply for the sake of existing.  Ninja Gaiden 3 isn't wholly terrible, but it is a significant step down from previous titles, removing many elements that made the series stand out from the crowd and adding features we've seen in dozens of previous action titles. Ironically, Team Ninja's attempts to revamp the series and do new things have only led to it feeling more stale and mundane than ever before. Sporadically entertaining, yes, and seasoned with shallow-yet-satisfying moments of carnage, but ultimately nonessential and forgettable.  Players desperate for traditional action gaming may glean some passing repletion from what is ultimately an inoffensive waste of time. However, the monotonous action long outstays its welcome and a series of this pedigree should be bringing so much more to the table. Instead, it does just enough to be a videogame available for purchase, and not a lot more than that. 
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Ninja Gaiden has always been about brutal difficulty, skillful combat, a ton of limbs flying in all directions, and a variety of increasingly ridiculous monsters to battle. With Team Ninja under new leadership, its flagship s...

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Ninja Gaiden 3 online passes not working (Update)


Mar 20
// Jim Sterling
[Update: I've been informed that the passes will go live for the PS3 version between 2pm and 5pm PT. Tecmo Koei is currently trying to hear back from Microsoft about the Xbox 360 version. Apparently they were supposed to be r...
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The DTOID Show: Tap A to watch our Ninja Gaiden 3 review


Mar 20
// Max Scoville
Hey gang -- We've been busy lately over at the Revision3 studios. By some bizarre fluke magical turn of events, we got a handful of review copies for Ninja Gaiden 3. I haven't played much in the way of Ninja Gaiden aside from...
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Ninja Gaiden 3 review late due to online pass


Mar 19
// Jim Sterling
Hey guys,So you might have noticed Ninja Gaiden 3 reviews have gone live around the Web. Where's ours? What sinister filling of a devil taco is this? Well, Tecmo Koei has decided in its wisdom that what Ninja Gaiden 3 really ...

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