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Bandai Namco photo
Bandai Namco

Bandai Namco might be localizing Tales of Link

Trademark filed in Europe
Aug 09
// Kyle MacGregor
As spotted by Gematsu, Bandai Namco filed a European trademark for Tales of Link last week. The free-to-play role-playing game launched on iOS and Android devices in early 2014, but only in the Japanese market. Given the publ...
gamescom trailer photo
gamescom trailer

Pac-Man 256 turns infamous glitch into gameplay

Namco not using Pac-Man inappropriately?
Aug 07
// Steven Hansen
Namco has finally managed to do something with Pac-Man that is not hopelessly sad. Here's an extended look at Hipster Whale's (Crossy Road) Pac-Man 256 out of gamescom. It's coming this summer to iPhone, iPad, Google Play a...

Panic! Dark Souls III is so easy I didn't die by the boss once

Aug 05 // Steven Hansen
[embed]297197:59811:0[/embed] Site Souls-expert Chris Carter reckons this slice of Dark Souls III was about five hours into the game, so it's no first boss gimme that I took down casually and without a sweat. Also, henceforth, I am Destructoid's resident Souls expert. Chris was the first to beat the boss out of everyone (I came in a close second), but not even he managed to do it first try and so he is usurped. In fact, I almost made it all the way to the boss without dying until I got stuck investigating a corner and some malnourished dogs attacked me. My attacks got caught on the shelves and wall on either side, interrupting the animation, and I was pinned. Streak nixed, I explored a bit more, fought a black tendril-y roof monster, and so on. My natural investigative nature is probably the only reason Chris beat me to the boss, if you think about it. Even to a handsome newbie like myself, Dark Souls III was instantly familiar. Despite matching Bloodborne's speed, it doesn't have that same novelty learning curve that came with playing sans shield, with a giant transforming axe scythe thing and a gun. The big new addition, Weapon Arts, are activated by holding L2 and then doing attacks for alternate strikes, but I never put them into play during combat. The skill went from unlimited to a cap of 20, refueled at bonfires, which should help undercut my joking fear mongering regarding the difficulty level of the game. All of this could change and likely will. We were shown a stage and system that feels completely final (art, animation, etc.) save for the most important thing: balance and tuning to feel. [Disclosure: Bandai Namco provided local travel to the event, as well as dinner.]
Dank souls photo
Hands-on preview
When I wrote about why Souls games are not that hard earlier this year, I told you all that I was neither expert (under 30 series hours total) nor savant (not skilled at anything). And yet, this lumbering galoot, after quite ...

Dark Souls III wears its Bloodborne influences on its sleeve

Aug 05 // Chris Carter
Our demo started out in an era called the "Wall of Lodeleth," which to me, looks like a mix between the Undead Burg and Boletarian Palace. The layout was fairly linear, but offered up a ton of surprises like the standard "dragon guarding loot" offshoot, and a mini-boss of sorts. Lodeleth was multi-tiered, and featured a number of side rooms accessed by way of ladders, as well as some rooftop shenanigans. It was par for the course, but still felt right. Combat as a whole is quicker, which is likely a direct response to Bloodborne changing the game. Rolls and dodges are faster, and enemies as a whole feel faster, too. It's not quite "fighting game" fast, but it's a comfortable medium between Souls and Bloodborne, which I'm more than okay with. One big addition is "Battle Arts," which are basically super moves triggered by different equipment combinations. "Not all shields parry now," I was told by Bandai Namco producer Brandon Williams, and you can see that distinction by way of an icon on the item itself in the lower-left equipment corner. A shield icon denotes a defensive action, and a sword icon is more aggressive. In this instance, it allowed my axe to power up for a short period, granting me a damage boon, which was depicted by a glowing aura on my weapon. In essence, it's a more "on-demand" spell system for folks who prefer direct combat -- I say bring it on. My personal style for Souls games involves using the shield as blocking insurance, but not necessarily for parrying, so I'm all for this change. As a note, these are limited-use abilities, and will recharge at a bonfire much like flasks. As I made my way through the demo, I eventually encountered the only boss, the Dancer of the Frigid Valley (1:45 in the trailer). Based on my experience, it was very similar to Bloodborne's Vicar Amelia fight -- for the most part attacks are easy to dodge, but if you get caught up, you're going to get punished, and possibly one-shotted. The boss also sports a flaming sword, which produces chip damage even if you block, forcing you to be more aggressive. It was a standard but fun fight. [embed]296887:59812:0[/embed] One problem area I noticed during my hands-on session however was the frame rate. There was often times a lot of enemies on-screen, but it chugged on all of those occasions. Bloodborne was 30fps as well, but it's high-time that the series moved on without needing a re-release to bring us into higher territory -- Scholar of the First Sin is incredibly smooth at 60fps. For reference, the build we played with seemed to be PC-based, using an Xbox One controller. Another sort of more personal issue I had was the fact that it felt a little too samey. As I mentioned above, Lodeleth felt like an amalgamation of existing areas in past Souls games. Even something like Huntsman's Copse in Dark Souls II, which is for all intents and purposes a "forest area" that had been done before, felt like something completely different. Bloodborne was a breath of fresh air, providing a unique perspective with a harrowing blight and a darker tone in general. With Dark Souls III, I'm distinctly getting the feeling of "more Souls," which for the most part is a good thing, but did wear on me a bit even during my brief time with the game. It took me roughly 30 minutes to make my way through the demo area and defeat the Dancer -- of which I was the first in the group to do (though Steven beat the boss in one shot!). At the end of it all, amidst the claps from my colleagues and the Namco Bandai reps, I felt that sense of accomplishment that I've felt since downing the Phalanx boss in Demon's Souls. I think Dark Souls III will be fine. [Disclosure: Bandai Namco provided travel to the event, as well as dinner.]
Dark Souls III preview photo
I also see a few problem areas
It's crazy to think that we're on the verge of yet another Souls game right after Bloodborne and Scholar of the First Sin. From Software doesn't seem to rest, and as soon as the studio has wrapped up one project, it's on...

Humble Bundle photo
Humble Bundle

Humble Namco Bundle has Dark Souls, Enslaved

Good gift-giving potential
Aug 04
// Jordan Devore
Humble Bundle and Bandai Namco have partnered for a sale on some older games that are still well worth playing. If nothing else, I'd say this is a great way to give the gift of Pac-Man CE. Name your price: Pac-Man Championsh...
Dark Souls III photo
Dark Souls III

Tremble in fear at our first look at Dark Souls III

Yep, that's some Dark Souls right there
Aug 04
// Laura Kate Dale
At today's Microsoft gamescom press conference, the general public finally got its first look at Dark Souls III, and it certainly looks like a new-gen Dark Souls game. The trailer showed off several new bosses, multiple larg...
Naruto Shippuden photo
Naruto Shippuden

Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 delayed into 2016

In Japan and North America
Aug 04
// Chris Carter
Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 was supposed to be released later this year worldwide, but Bandai Namco has just confirmed that it will be delayed into 2016. At first, the company just noted a delay in Japan to Febru...
Pac-Min photo

Wow, I CANNOT believe Namco's Pac-Man redesign

Jul 23
// Steven Hansen
I've been seeing this (above) and similar images all over the 'net and I am stunned that Namco would choose to redesign an iconic character like Pac-Man so dramatically. I mean, the arms and legs in all those earlier 3D Pac-M...

Review: F1 2015

Jul 23 // Brett Makedonski
F1 2015 (PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Codemasters BirminghamPublisher: Bandai NamcoMSRP: $54.99 (PC), $59.99 (PS4, Xbox One)Released: July 10, 2015 (Europe), July 21, 2015 (North America) Most of F1 2015's missing horsepower comes in the form of features. Only the barest of essentials are to be found, and even those feel further stripped-down. The mode that everyone will get the most mileage out of is a single season of play (either 2014 or 2015). Pick a driver from the pre-set list of real racers, practice, qualify, and race. Repeat 18 more times, and F1 2015's longest goal has been completed. There's no career mode, creation tools, or management simulator present, so season play has to carry a strong sense of progression. Unfortunately, that's almost completely absent apart from watching you and your teammate earn points after each race. There are no contracts to chase or sponsors to keep happy. Your crew assigns goals, but they are absolutely pointless. After they're achieved or failed, they're never spoken of again and they don't affect anything. There isn't even a calendar to keep track of how many races are left; I had to look it up on F1's official site. [embed]296540:59670:0[/embed] Compounding matters is the race length. The shortest possible race in season mode is 25 percent of a real race. This usually works out to about half an hour. If you add in practice and qualifying, it's upward of an hour. That's quite the time commitment to a game that doesn't adequately reward you for playing. It becomes a slog before long. Other modes offer little reprieve from the tedium. Time trial puts you on a track alone. Quick race is a better suit for seeing the different tracks than anything else. Multiplayer is plagued by a litany of bugs -- one of my first races there saw a player finish last by more than 30 seconds only for the game to award him first place by more than a minute, with a best lap time of 457 minutes. This lack of polish isn't isolated to the netcode. F1 2015 is an uninspired-looking game. Driver models are almost offensively bland. Several of the tracks are adorned by blocky, blurry backdrops. Crowds are completely static. The screen tears regularly, which thankfully isn't always easily noticed due to concentrating on racing. There are exceptions to this, though. Codemasters put in care in the most obvious spots -- where it knew players would look for it. Iconic courses in Monaco, Singapore, and Abu Dhabi are absolutely fantastic. The claustrophobic streets of Monaco almost feel like an entirely different game given the attention to detail on all the close-quarters buildings. And, like in real life, it's where F1 is at its most exciting. Strangely, for a title that's supposed to simulate the highest tier of performance racing, F1 2015's cars handle remarkably easily. There's a disconcerting disconnect to the road. The pavement offers little in the way of challenge, as simply steering in the correct direction at full throttle works flawlessly. Brake for those tight corners and then slam the gas back down. It's nowhere near as nuanced as one would expect, and it takes a lot of skill out of what should be the most skilled driving in the world. The saving grace for the driving mechanics -- and I say this without an iota of sarcasm or irony -- is the tire wear. Over the course of a race, the tires degrade to the point of being nearly useless. The turns you once took efficiently suddenly have you pointing in the wrong direction. It adds a sense of tension around the midway point and final laps. You'll know that you have to pit as you're losing time on each circuit, but when's the best time? Have your opponents pitted yet? Can you squeeze out one more lap? Similarly, rain adds a lot to the driving. While it's visually unimpressive, it certainly negates the problem of cars being too easy to steer. All of a sudden, these vehicles might as well be on ice. If it starts pouring, it's paramount to tell the crew to switch to a different style of tire and hit the pits as soon as possible. Otherwise, drivers who have already adjusted will overtake you in no time at all. One last mode in F1 2015 also takes care of the "too easy to drive" issue. Pro Season is the most simulation-like the game has to offer, and it's only for the most hardcore of players. It ramps the difficulty up to the highest degree, turns off all assists, locks the view to cockpit, and sets everything to full length. It's intense. Realistically, only a small percentage of people will care enough to attempt this, and those are the ones dedicated enough to the genre that they have much better offerings with way more options in several other games. But, it's not only those racing enthusiasts who will see F1 2015 as lacking. Everyone who tries it will. Its development was short-sighted, and its appeal is thusly short-lived. This is a game that excels in a very small handful of areas -- imagine how thrilling it is when your tires wear away in Monaco! -- but is mediocre or bad almost everywhere else. As centuries of racing have taught us, no one remembers the guy who finishes toward the back of the pack. That will be F1 2015's legacy: a forgotten one.  [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
F1 review photo
Caution's out
No matter the length of race chosen, F1 2015 mandates at least one pit stop per outing. When pulling into the pits, control of the car is seized from the player and the steering wheel displays the words "pit limiter." Th...

Hands-on photo

You can play Dark Souls III at gamescom

You can also buy me a beer
Jul 22
// Steven Hansen
Namco Bandai announced Dark Souls III at E3 this year, just a few months after the release of Bloodborne exclusively to PS4. It's coming early 2016. And any of you planning on attending gamescom in Germany in a couple of week...
Project CARS photo
Project CARS

Project CARS on Wii U earns a DNF, officially cancelled

Did not finish
Jul 21
// Brett Makedonski
While Slightly Mad Studios' Project CARS has been zooming past one million sales on PC, PS4, and Xbox One, it won't get off the starting line on Wii U. That had been the murmured whisper around town, but the studio has n...
Unfair photo

Tekken 7 gets Idolmaster costumes, but not for the men

Jul 20
// Steven Hansen
Namco is celebrating 10 years of Idolmaster by way of costume cross over with Tekken 7. Unfortunately, Japanese pop idol Paul coming to Idolmaster is just a joke and it seems only Tekken's women get pop idol attire. In the s...

Vote for support Pokemon in Pokken Tournament

One week to vote for your favorites
Jul 17
// Steven Hansen
Brutal Blaziken was introduced yesterday to the Namco-developed fighter Pokkén Tournament, so the weed-loving fan favorite is in, but perhaps some 'mons less suited for 1-on-1 combat can still make an appearance? Fenne...
Pokken Tournament photo
Pokken Tournament

And that's why you don't mess with Blaziken

New Pokken Tournament trailer
Jul 16
// Jordan Devore
Oh my god, that poor Pikachu! Following word of Blaziken's upcoming arrival in Pokken Tournament in Japanese arcades, Bandai Namco has a trailer of the fiery bipedal chicken kicking the crap out of its fellow Pokémon. I feel bad for them, which has traditionally not been the case for any of the core series games.
Pokken Tournament photo
Pokken Tournament

Blaziken joins the Pokken Tournament roster in August

Don't Google Image Search 'Blaziken'
Jul 15
// Jordan Devore
As we await the full lineup for Pokken Tournament, I can rest easy knowing that my boy Gengar is in. Gardevoir, too. The latest character announcement isn't so much a reveal as a reiteration. Long before we knew the Pok&eacut...

Review: Godzilla

Jul 14 // Jordan Devore
Godzilla (PS3, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Natsume Atari Inc.Publisher: Bandai Namco GamesMSRP: $59.99Released: July 14, 2015 Half an hour and several levels in, I wasn't sure Godzilla could really be hurt, much less die. That's not an inherently bad thing, as he's supposed to be tough, but I wondered where the challenge was. A few hours later, I found it. Godzilla is far too easy except when it veers into overwhelming, unfair, not-fun territory. Then it becomes a boring battle of attrition against the same old kaiju. A lot of frustration lies in the controls. You use L1/R1 to turn Godzilla, which is weird at first but eventually feels fine. He's got a forward-charging attack (that you'll frequently use given his normal plodding pace), a standard three-hit punch combo, a heavy tail whip, and atomic breath. The latter needs to charge up before you can fire it, but the cooldown isn't terribly long, especially with upgrades. Aiming, however, is a total nightmare; you don't have exact control over it. Say you want to shoot down a helicopter. You'll need to position Godzilla close to it -- but not too close! -- and line up his body. Next, you can turn the camera to confirm his head is more or less tilted in the correct direction. Now fire away and hope that a) the helicopter hasn't moved and b) the blast doesn't just hit the ground. That's my best strategy and it's not even consistently successful. Thankfully, it got me through the aggravating fights in which you're forced to take down a kaiju while multiple aerial vehicles (Super X, X2, and X3) come close, shoot you, then zip away. [embed]296005:59509:0[/embed] For some baffling reason, there's no blocking in the traditional sense. While Godzilla's roar acts like a block to an extent, initiating it is by no means instantaneous. You have to know in advance that an attack is imminent or you'll be too late. There is also this odd invincible dodge move, but it runs on the same gauge as your atomic breath, so it's often unavailable when you need it most. The end result is a slow, awkward fighting system that effectively recreates the movies but is annoying in practice. Although your attacks can and will be interrupted by strings of combos, you can't always interrupt your enemy's moves. To that end, I stuck with Battra whenever and wherever possible (Versus, King of Kaiju, etc.) -- the moth is quick, easy to control, and cheap. The main mode, God of Destruction, is something out of an arcade game. Levels are tiny, bland, and feature the same goal: destroy the generators. That's the focus. Generally, you'll also need to fight a monster, work within a time limit, or both. As you blow up vehicles and buildings, you'll earn points that fuel Godzilla's growth. There's a multiplier to encourage you to move quickly from structure to structure. By the end, he'll be about twice as big as when he first came ashore. Branching levels give you control over which kaiju you engage as well as the overall difficulty. You're meant to replay this mode several times to see all of the (super-light) story and unlock characters, but environments are so similar, so unengaging. I've literally punched hundreds of generators to death. There are variations on God of Destruction that have you invading as another beast, or defending as a protector like Jet Jaguar or Mothra. The format doesn't help. The game's extensive character upgrade system requires even more replays. Godzilla has quite a few moves that are locked until you can find and defeat specific monsters, some of which appear under mysterious circumstances. King of Kaiju mode's six quick back-to-back fights help with gathering resources, but tied to such repetitious content, the progression system is flat-out awful. It was also disappointing to learn that the Versus mode for up to three players is online only. No split-screen support. There are Godzilla-obsessed fans playing, at least, so it's not a total wasteland. The only other bright spot is the Kaiju Guide, a collection detailing the playable creatures as well as quite a few not featured. I adored seeing old stills from the films and, sure, there is a certain appeal to playing as a bunch of these guys. But the feeling fades before long. A love of the movies can only get you so far when the experience is this frustrating and hollow. What a letdown. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Godzilla PS4 review photo
Better luck next time
This was supposed to be the game for Godzilla fans -- an authentic adaptation that captured the look and feel of the films. In some ways, it is. There's a satisfying cast of playable characters including Mothra, Destroyah, an...


Namco's Supernova gets closed beta, adds BRO-bot

Jul 14
// Steven Hansen
Namco's supermoba Supernova is getting a closed beta this month. Alpha testers are automagically entered into the beta; all else can sign up here to join the space robot wars. Supernova's closed beta also includes new comman...
Tekken X Street Fighter photo
Tekken X Street Fighter

Tekken X Street Fighter is 'pretty far into its development'

Has Harada forgotten about it?
Jul 14
// Vikki Blake
It's been five years since Tekken X Street Fighter was announced at SDCC in 2010, but panic not, the game is still in development. Famitsu (as translated by Siliconera) asked producer Katsuhiro Harada if he'd forgot...
DBZ photo

DBZ: Extreme Butoden's 'Get a free SNES game' bonus is coming to the US

Right on
Jul 09
// Chris Carter
Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden is looking pretty sharp, and will arrive overseas this year from Arc System Works. We finally have some concrete information on pre-order bonuses as it applies to the US (the UK gets a limi...
Saint Seiya photo
Saint Seiya

Get a much better look at Saint Seiya: Soldier's Soul

More info revealed for Japan Expo
Jul 07
// Chris Carter
Saint Seiya is making a comeback with an all-new anime series and a fighting game, and I'm pretty excited for the future of the franchise. Although I didn't get a hands-on session with Soldier's Soul back when I at...
First! photo

King of the Iron Fist: $80,000 Tekken 7 tournament

Are you good at Tekken?
Jul 07
// Steven Hansen
To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the series and the upcoming Tekken 7, Bandai Namco is hosting the "King of the Iron Fist 2015" Tekken 7 tournament. There's a 10 million yen cash grand prize ($81,463) for the winner, so ...
Tekken 7 machines photo
Tekken 7 machines

Tekken 7 hitting select North American arcades this month

Once you finish 'getting hype'
Jul 07
// Steven Hansen
Tekken 7 will be at EVO this month despite not having made it out of Japanese arcades. Tournament participants will have to use a DualShock 4, too. Perhaps a little too late, the Tekken Facebook page announced North American ...
Crows: Burning Edge photo
Crows: Burning Edge

Crows: Burning Edge announced for PS4 and Vita

Based off the manga
Jul 06
// Chris Carter
Bandai Namco has revealed an unlikely project, titled Crows: Burning Edge, set to debut on the PS4 and Vita at some point in the future. It's based off of the Japanese manga series, which features delinquents in high school ...
Digimon photo

Digimon Story Cyber Sleuth comes to kick Pikachu's arse in 2016

Note: I do really, really love Pokemon
Jul 03
// Joe Parlock
Oh lordy I can feel something growing inside of me. An urge, buried deep for over ten years now that must spring forth: Digimon was way better than Pokemon. Sure, the Pokemon games were great and I love them dearly, but when...
Project X Zone 2 photo
Project X Zone 2

Bandai Namco delays Project X Zone 2 until 2016

Have a new trailer to pass the time
Jul 02
// Kyle MacGregor
Project X Zone 2 has been pushed back to early 2016. The upcoming tactical role-playing game, which features a myriad of iconic characters from Bandai Namco, Capcom, and Sega, was previously announced for an autumn release i...
Disney Magical World photo
Disney Magical World

Disney Magical World 2 is coming to the 3DS in Japan

Also known as 'Magical Castle'
Jul 01
// Chris Carter
Disney Magical World was released in the west last year, and it was a decent entry-level Animal Crossing game that resonated with a younger audience. Bandai Namco has just announced a full sequel, which is titled Disney Magical Castle 2: My Happy Life in the east. Evidently the full unveiling will happen on July 6, at which point we'll get more information on some updated features.
Dark Souls photo
Dark Souls

Dark Souls franchise sells 8M copies

Just think of all those deaths
Jul 01
// Vikki Blake
The Dark Souls franchise has sold over eight million copies worldwide, with more than 3.25 million copies sold on PC alone. Famitsu - reporting from a From Software presentation - confirmed the original Dark Souls game s...
Dark Souls photo
Dark Souls

Play Dark Souls like a boss...literally

Get your own back with this new mod
Jul 01
// Vikki Blake
Dark Souls modder White Lord of DaTeHaCKs has created a mod that'll put you squarely in the shoes/hooves/claws/whatever of your favourite worst nightmare. The Darks Souls Boss Arena Mod "enhances the Debug Mode opt...
Tekken 7 photo
Tekken 7

Tekken teasing major announcement next week, console tease imminent?

Jun 29
// Chris Carter
Tekken 7 still hasn't been announced for consoles. It's assumed to be coming to the PS4 and Xbox One, and hell, it even listed those platforms in a console sizzle reel trailer a while back, but Namco Bandai hasn't confirmed a...

Review: J-Stars Victory VS+

Jun 28 // Laura Kate Dale
J-Stars Victory Vs+ (PS3, PS4 [reviewed], Vita) Developer: Spike ChunsoftPublisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentRelease: June 26, 2015 (EU), June 30, 2015 (US) I may not be the most knowledgeable anime fan out there, but I'm always willing to try out a new series if it looks interesting. As such, I was pretty excited coming into J-Stars Victory VS+. I was hoping to experience well known characters I already knew, as well as finding new characters to get invested in and try watching going forward. Unfortunately, J-Stars Victory VS+ was a bit of a disappointment in that regard. The representations of characters I already knew didn't feel accurate and the hooks to get invested in new series just weren't there for me. So, as this is a fighting game first and foremost, let's talk about the fighting mechanics at play. Every character has one light attack button, a heavy attack button, a special attack button, a block and a dash. While these are tailored to each character, the movesets all feel very similar to play using. While it's cool to see Ichigo pull off a Getsuga Tensho and Goku a Kamehameha, both on a mechanical level act near identically. Every move is an approximation designed to fit a specific combat system's mold, which ultimately takes away some of what makes these characters unique. Defensive techniques like cancels are minimal, so if you wait for an attack animation to start then start mashing buttons you'll usually win. J-Stars Victory VS+ is not a game of skill, it's a game of waiting for any enemy to attempt anything slower than a light attack, interrupting with a light attack then button mashing while they remain locked in your combo. [embed]294934:59255:0[/embed] So, ignoring the fact the combat system itself lacks depth, lets look at how this functions as a pure fanservice game. Just looking at the numbers there is a lot here for fans of Shonen anime to love. There's representation from newer series like D.Gray-man as well as older series like Rurouni Kenshin and a whole host of series in between. There's even inclusions from my super niche sports anime, but only as support characters rather than full playable roster members. Damn, I was just about ready to praise this game for supporting my niche interests. So, let's talk about the modes on offer in J-Stars Victory VS+. There's J-Adventure, where you sail around the world on a tiny boat given to you by god to earn your way into a tournament of champions, where everyone involved seems perfectly fine with the fact god gave them a boat that couldn't get most of the places it needed to go and needlessly pads out the experience with narrative fluff between fights. This mode has four arcs, each of them near narratively identical. I couldn't see any reason players would want to go through all four of these, they're all equally padded and dull. Your other options are Victory Road which sets up special fights loosely themed around anime dream team fights, a standard Arcade mode which offers minimal challenge, local free battles and online free battles. None of these modes felt terribly coherent or fleshed out. On paper, the roster of nearly 40 playable characters is certainly impressive, but what makes these characters unique is rarely utilized fully. Each character's ultimate attack feels decidedly less visually impressive than comparable titles like Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4. The story mode offered on disk features static 2D images of characters that may say the odd single word to each other, but otherwise remain silent. Their dialogue feels terribly homogeneous, stripped down so that every character speaks with the same uniform voice. This doesn't feel like a series of characters clashing for the first time, rather it feels like one person in many different outfits badly acting out their alternative universe fanfiction. Where the games opening cinematic gave me hope for a visually impressive, fanservice heavy experience, the single player largely boiled down to watching static images talk to each other in a weirdly unemotional tone then fight for no adequately explained reason. It just wasn't compelling. Ultimately, J-Stars Victory VS+ only succeeds as numbers on paper, the game itself being largely disappointing. The roster have had much of what made them unique stripped down, stopping me getting truly excited about the characters I knew and preventing me getting a sense of which characters were worth me investing future time watching. The mechanics are shallow, the fanservice is surface level and it only succeeds in terms of its pure number of supported characters. Overall, I walked away rather disappointed. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
J-Stars Victory VS+ photo
Mash, mash, mash, mash, mash, mash......
J-Stars Victory VS+ is a game that's mechanically light, heavy on fanservice volume but that only ever skims the surface of the characters it includes. If you want an anime brawler that focuses on the sheer volume of anime ch...

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