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Motion Controller

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New Destructoid Episode: Jimmy Fallon Steals All Our News


Jun 17
// Max Scoville
Move it, football-head. It's Friday, so today's episode of The Destructoid Show was carefree and whimsical. Here's the rundown: Jimmy Fallon, that guy who was in Taxi with Queen Latifah, sometimes covers video game news on h...
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Razer Hydra motion controller shipping in June for $140


Apr 21
// Jordan Devore
I hope you didn't forget about the Razer Hydra. It's a motion-control device for PC, which might seem a little unusual at first, but the market is certainly there for this type of controller. Razer and Sixense have announced ...
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Conquer your food in new Kinect Sports Calorie Challenge


Apr 19
// Conrad Zimmerman
There's new downloadable content available for Kinect Sports on Xbox Live Marketplace. The Calorie Challenge DLC puts you up against food items in events. Yes, your dreams of having a rivalry with a dude in a pizza cost...
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Guerrilla: Motion control will be in most FPS games


Feb 08
// Jim Sterling
Killzone 3 is among the first 360/PS3 shooters to embrace motion control, with full PlayStation Move support. Developer Guerrilla believes this is but one step toward a waggle-scented future, with motion control destined to b...
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The Last Story has 'no shake controls', other details


Jan 15
// Jonathan Holmes
According to a new info dump, the highly anticipated Wii exclusive The Last Story will not use "shake controls". It's also been made clear that the game will not be coming to other consoles because Nintendo worked so closely...
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PrimeSense plans to put motion control into everything


Jan 13
// Conrad Zimmerman
The Israeli company PrimeSense, who built the technology in Microsoft's Kinect motion control system, is now looking put their tech into everything they can. PrimeSense president Aviad Maizels said that the company wants to, ...
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Sony patents show radically different Move controller


Dec 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
Sony's Move motion control system is not too far removed from that of the Wii, when it comes right down to it. Yes, detecting the wand's position in three dimensions is a huge improvement over Nintendo's effort but the device...
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Hacked Kinect used to play Super Mario Bros. 1


Nov 28
// Jonathan Holmes
Here's yet another video of someone using Kinect to do something awesome. Using a PC and some custom-written code, this young man is playing Super Mario Bros. 1 with Microsoft's new un-controller. The controls look a little ...
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Kinect manual confirms you need 6 to 8 feet minimum


Oct 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
VG247 has uploaded photos of the entire Microsoft Kinect manual today and there's some information inside which may affect many users' buying decision. Most significantly is the confirmation that you will require a minimum of...
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PDC World Championship Darts: Pro Tour has a long name


Sep 26
// Matthew Razak
(In honor of the upcoming Rally to Restore Sanity/March to Keep Fear Alive I shall deliver all the news this weekend twice: First the sane way, and then the fear way. It's the weekend, I get to do stuff like this (I h...
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Namco announces Body and Brain Connection for Kinect


Sep 16
// Colette Bennett
We got word of a new Kinect title aimed at powering up your noggin from Namco last week, with the famous Dr. Ryuta Kawashima on board, who is behind Nintendo's famous Brain Training series. Today, Namco spilled the rest of th...
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PAX 10: Long and Holmes Vs. Kung Fu Live!


Sep 09
// Jonathan Holmes
Child of Eden, the one Kinect game that I really wanted to play at PAX 10, was a no show this year. To make up for that, fate tossed Kung Fu Live! my way, and I loved it. It's basically old-school Mortal Kombat but with bett...

Hands-on: John Daly ProStroke Golf

Sep 01 // Ben Perlee
John Daly's Prostroke Golf (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC)Developer: Gusto GamesPublisher: O-GamesTo be released: October 5, 2010 John Daly's Prostroke Golf is the technical sequel to the Prostroke golf series last seen on the PS2, PSP and Xbox. The addition of John Daly is important, as other than Tiger Woods, he's one of the most well known golfers in history, with a unique play style and a perchance for drama. Serious, the man has been married four times, dealt with alcoholism, weight problems, and a whole lot more, and is widely considered the comeback king of golf. Between his outrageous personality and his crazy line of wild Loudmouth golf clothing, Daly has his mark well and true on the game. While Daly himself is playable on the 16 original courses (with some based upon British courses), players will also be making their own character. Nothing particularly remarkable about this, but it's a nice addition that you can even dress your character up in crazy Loudmouth branded clothing that look like quilts. Seriously. Expect DLC of clothing and character options, surely. As far as basic gameplay goes, players will be using the Move controller to indicate and line up their shots on the course. There is a smallish checkerboard grid that both indicates the angle of the course, as well as indicates the general area the ball will go if hit straight on. Moving this grid about is easy, although it is a little sensitive. Most players initially tug the trigger and swing about the course, when a gentle pull and slow motions get the job done. While motion control is important for lining up your shots, the actual swing gameplay is much more important. Players will enter a first person perspective looking down at the ball. From there, they can step closer or farther from the ball to put on some top or back spin, twist their wrist to open or close their shot, as well as practice how they want to hit the ball. Pull the trigger, and then the game measures how far back you pull back your swing, how vertical your club is, and how fast you rip through. Depending on how you hit the ball, your angle, how close or far you are standing, and a whole lot more the ball can go anywhere. However, it was pretty clear how to clean up your shot, and before long, we were pulling off courses at par. For anyone who needs a little assistance, there is a training mode in which John Daly himself will guide players through technique. Apparently the first time he played the game, he did an amazing job on the courses, so the technique in the game is strongly based upon real world skills. Right now, it does take a little getting used to the controls. The Move controller has a lot more buttons than the Wiimote, so it is easy to accidentally press the wrong button, or when you need to calibrate the device (a surprisingly common occurrence) you would press the wrong button. Thankfully, fifteen minutes of play made this a non-issue, and I was in control of everything no problem. Coming away from the motion control, I was pretty impressed. Unlike the Wii experience, it really did feel much more accurate and realistic. While the character models and general graphics are not the most impressive, the gameplay feels solid and functional. It doesn't feel like the game ruins shots that should have been perfect, and there is a lot of flexibility to modify how you want the ball to go. Plainly, it just feels nice. That's a good thing for a golf game. In addition, if motion control isn't your jam, John Daly Prostroke Golf will be coming to the Xbox 360, as well as the PC. However, if you've got the PS3, this would certainly be the version to get.
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When motion control first came out with the Wii, one of the most relaxing activities to take part in was the golf game that came with Wii Sports. It wasn't exactly accurate, and it didn't always work right all the time, but i...

First living room impressions: PlayStation Move

Sep 01 // Nick Chester
Warning! Warning! Warning! Get used to this image -- it's the screen you'll see immediately upon booting up any game that utilizes PlayStation Move. Remember, knocking over a lamp and then smacking a dude in the face is bad. Setting up the controllers As I had only been handed Move controllers already set up for demonstration purposes, I was particularly curious to find out what the setup process would be like in my home. As it turns out, it’s an absolute breeze. It’s a three-step affair to get your controllers paired with the console, and you’re probably already familiar with it -- you simply connect the device to the PS3 console using a USB cable, and then press the “PS” button on the controller. The device is instantly paired with the system (by default, the first Move controller you connect is “Controller 7”), and then you’re free to remove the cable. Because Move requires the use of a PlayStation Eye camera, you’ll want to plug that in if you haven’t already. It plugs right into a USB port on the PlayStation 3; you’d have to be dense to not be able to figure this out. Of course, there’s an odd little issue I have here, and it’s that all of the PS3’s USB ports are located on the front of the console. This means you’ll have to wrap the wire around to the front, leaving an unsightly cord always visible. Given that the slim PS3 was introduced last year (likely well after Sony’s internal R&D had finalized how Move would ultimately work), it’s mind-boggling that there isn’t a single USB port on the back of the console. A bit nit-picky? For sure, but considering how stylish Sony’s products tend to be, it’s likely most gamers will want to keep these cords hidden.Once the controllers are linked to the console and the PS Eye camera is connected, you’re ready to start playing games and navigating the XrossMediaBar. The latter is actually surprisingly intuitive, and one of the “features” of Move I surprised myself by liking so much. To navigate menus, you simply pull and hold the T button (the trigger on the underside of the wand), and slightly move your wrist side to side or up and down. On paper, it doesn’t sound noteworthy, but it actually feels really great to use; I'm finding that I prefer this style of navigation over using an analog stick. You'll find that many games utilize this style of navigation for menus, too. The calibration danceMost software that supports Move will recognize your controller setup, and won’t let you proceed if the game requires the motion controller or the camera and they aren’t detected. You will have to calibrate the controller, and the oddest thing is that how you do this is slightly different for every game. Most titles begin by having you point the bulb on the Move controller directly at the PS Eye while holding down the “Move” button (it’s a squiggly line you’ll become familiar with in time) on the face of the controller. The bulb cycles through colors before settling on one and completing the calibration. But beyond this, many games require other types of calibration, or handle this setup differently. Sports Champions (Sony’s flagship answer to Wii Sports that you can purchase bundled with a Move controller) is of note. Before playing any of the games (and each and every time you begin one), you'll have to hold the controller in three places -- at your side, at your shoulder, and near where a belt buckle would sit -- and then press the Move button. The first time I had to do this, I let out a sigh of exasperation. Was I really expected to do this every single time? The answer, I found, was yes. But after a few games, it became second nature; I’ve mastered the "Sports Champions Calibration Dance," and you will, too. It should be noted that my mastery of the skill may only come in handy with Sports Champions -- that's the only game I played that required this. While it’s not a major concern, I do hope that how the controller is calibrated becomes standardized. Some games ask you to point at the Eye and hold the Move button; others ask you to pull the T trigger. Others, like Sports Champions, wanted me to hold both at once. Another even wanted me to press and hold select, which sits on the side of the controller. The issue isn’t so much that it’s difficult to do any of these things (admittedly, getting to that select button was a bit tricky); it’s that I found myself second-guessing what I was supposed to be doing each time. Just when I got comfortable pressing the Move button to calibrate, I was asked to pull the trigger. Fortunately, it’s likely that as more and more software is designed, developers will settle on a standard. How do the controllers feel?No sense in pretending otherwise -- it’s easiest to compare to the Move and Navigation controllers to the Wii Remote and Nunchuk. It’s an easy point of reference, as most of you have some experience with Nintendo’s controller, the success of which is likely why Move exists. It's a wand, it's a remote, it's... thing with a bulb on it To that end, the Move controller itself is slightly longer than the Wii Remote, mostly because of that big rubbery ball that sits on top of it. But unlike the Wii Remote -- which appears to be designed to mimic the look and feel of a television remote control -- Sony has gone with what I feel is a sleeker, more elegant design. The black controller has curves; it's bigger at the top and bottom, thinner in the middle. In your hand, this actually does feel better than holding a Wii Remote; it provides a better, more comfortable grip. For a person with average-sized hands, the forefinger and the thumb will sit perfectly on the trigger and Move buttons, respectively. Considering all of the games I played mostly required only those buttons, that’s exactly where you’ll want them. The other buttons, however, don’t fare so well. The iconic square, triangle, X, and circle buttons that surround the Move button feel a bit too small. And because they’re not placed in the classic diamond shape I’ve become accustomed to, when I did need to push them -- infrequently, mind you -- I had to look down before making my choice. With time, it’s likely I’ll become more confident in my choices, but it should be mentioned that it’s hardly an issue, as the buttons aren’t often used. The start and select buttons on the controller are probably its biggest issue. They’re off on the sides of the device, just above the set of buttons on the controller’s face. They’re also flush with the plastic housing, which means you can’t really feel them with your thumb when trying to push them. It also requires a bit of a stretch with your finger -- holding it right-handed, it’s nearly impossible to get to the select button (on the left side of the controller) without some serious finger gymnastics (and vice versa for lefties). Fortunately, it seems most developers realized this, as most games will allow you to select menus and such using the Move and trigger buttons. Pausing games, however, can be a bit tricky... "See you later, Navigator!" The Navigation controller features a single analog stick, as well as a D-pad, two triggers, and two face buttons, circle and X. It’s not curved like the Wii Nunchuk, and therefore didn’t feel quite as comfortable in my hand. The lack of curvature isn’t a deal breaker; the controller still feels nice in your palm, and the buttons that count (the two triggers on the back) sit in the right places. It has to be mentioned that not all games require you to use the Navigation controller; the bulk of the games I tested only required one Move controller to play. You also don’t need to buy one if you already have a DualShock 3, which you can hold and use in its place. The pricey $29.99 controller is, however, way easier to use and grip than holding a DualShock with a single hand. Whether that comfort is worth thirty dollars to you will become clear after you try to play few hours of Heavy Rain (which is being updated for Move support) with a DualShock in one hand.OMG! Is it better than the Wii!?!?This is the big question for many gamers: how does it compare to the Wii’s motion controls? Because, let’s face it, the Move plus a Navigation controller looks a hell of a like the Remote and Nunchuk configuration. But is it “better”? The answer to that comes down to two things -- the technology and the software. It works, it works well, and it does some fancy tricksThe first -- the technology -- is easy to answer. Without question, Sony’s Move is head and shoulders above what Nintendo is currently offering, including Wii MotionPlus, in terms of both functionality and accuracy. If you want the details, the Move Wikipedia entry gets down and dirty with what’s inside this thing; I won’t bother boring you with that. But here’s what you should know -- it works, and it works well. When calibrated properly (which is a snap, as mentioned above), the one-to-one motion really works as advertised. Move can also detect slight wrist motions, including minor twists. In addition, Move can detect motion in 3D space, which means it will be able to tell how close you are to the screen. This comes in handy in games like Tumble, where you’re required to reach in (or pull out) to gently place blocks on a platform. While most of the Move software suggests you stand anywhere between six to eight feet from the PS Eye, I found that I had no problems if I stood or sat even closer. Move also seems to work just as well with lights on or lights off, probably because of the blindingly bright (and admittedly distracting) bulb.Pairing Move with Eye also allows for some pretty cool augmented reality scenarios. These play out particularly well in games like EyePet and the multiplayer-centric Start the Party. By sitting in front of the camera and holding the Move controller, the game will map an object onto the on-screen Move controller. Seeing yourself on television holding a sword or a paintbrush is both surreal and, embarrassingly, a bit exhilarating. What it can ultimately add to the gaming experience remains to be seem. EyePet, which has an adorably furry virtual creature prancing around on your living room's carpet, is an interesting example. Whether these kinds of experiences can be extended beyond casual games for something meatier, only time will tell. Some of how well Move worked came down to the software. I had few problems with games like Tumble, and even Sports Champions (across all sports) functioned as advertised. Kung Fu Rider, however, didn’t seem quite as accurate. In this quirky game, players race down a hill on an office chair (and later, other ridiculous items with wheels) by pointing the Move controller at the screen. A quick shake will give you some speed, and tilting the remote left and right will steer you. Flicking the controller up to jump seemed to be the issue; oftentimes the on-screen character would hop at the slightest upward movement, including the aforementioned shaking to get speed. In a game that required split-second accuracy, I found this to be a bit frustrating. It's all about the gamesThe software question is a difficult one to answer. Sony had only provided me with about ten titles, most of which will be available at launch. They ranged from the quirky (the aforementioned Kung Fu Rider) to the expected (Sports Champions, Ubisoft’s Racquet Sports) to the novel (EyePet). I also spent a good amount of time with existing games like EA Sports’ Tiger Woods PGA Tour 11 and Quantic Dream’s Heavy Rain, both of which are being patched and updated to work with Move. Of the handful of games I played, none of them were “bad,” per se. It helped that the Move controller, in almost all instances, simply worked like you'd expect. With a few exceptions, there’s not much I’ve played so far that makes it stand apart from many of Nintendo’s third-party offerings. That is to say, there weren’t many games that took the motion controls in truly original directions. Start the Party, for instance, is a collection of typical motion-controlled party games, albeit with some neat fancy augmented-reality stuff. Tiger Woods 11 also works nicely with the updated Move support, but didn’t feel drastically different from EA’s Tiger Woods offering on the Wii that uses MotionPlus. That’s not to say there isn’t stuff here that doesn’t show promise and potential for innovation. Sports Champions does some very cool stuff using two Move controllers, like giving you one-to-one controls of both a sword and a shield in the game’s “Gladiator” mode. And Tumble, while also being an amazingly fun single and multiplayer block-stacking game, does an amazing job of showing off how well the Move tech works when moving in a 3D space. It should also go without saying that all of the games I played simply looked better from a technical standpoint than anything on the Wii. There’s no arguing that Sony’s console trumps Nintendo’s in the visual department, with all of the games running in crisp, sharp high definition. While for many, this high-definition visual bump won’t matter, it definitely could be an advantage for folks frustrated with the Wii’s visual fidelity (or lack thereof). The bottom line is that it’s too early to tell what the library of games that will support Move will ultimately look like. For a launch, Sony has a solid (but not mind-blowing) lineup of games, with a number of big-name third-parties throwing support behind the controller. For those looking for “hardcore” experiences the Wii may be lacking, Move updates for Resident Evil 5 and Heavy Rain may give us a glimpse at a motion-controlled future. But topping the current Wii library -- with its massive back catalog, hefty third-party support, and high-quality first-party titles -- is a colossal summit that Sony is going to have a hell of a time climbing. Bottom line Out of the gate, Sony is pairing its powerhouse console with some of the most impressive motion-control technology the market has seen. It's got a decent lineup of software that ranges from casual-centric titles to impressive tech demos, along with some updates to already established games, so it should appeal to a wide audience. It's clear that Sony -- with this outstanding technology -- has the bones to be a fighter that can hold its own in the motion-control space. Whether it has the brains is mostly up to developers; whether it has the stamina is up to consumers. PlayStation Move is hits North American retail shelves on September 19. Closer to release, we'll have a full launch guide, along with a more detailed look at the games that will be available.
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When Sony announced that it would be releasing a motion controller for the PlayStation 3, no one was shocked. The success of the Wii had virtually guaranteed that Nintendo's competitors would start scrambling to enter the mot...

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Katamari creator thinks the future for videogames is dark


Aug 13
// Jim Sterling
Keita Takahashi may be famous for making bright, happy games such as Katamari Damacy and Nobi Nobi Boy, but the quirky developer has a bleak and depressing view on the future of the games industry. In fact, he doesn't think h...
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Sundays with Sagat: How about a shower? Sound good?


Aug 11
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sundays with Sagat is a video series where a man named Sagat talks to you about videogames. This is serious business.] Last week, Sagat promised to get out of his depression and start being productive again. First though, i...
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Hey Mommy Bloggers, help market PlayStation Move!


Aug 11
// Nick Chester
Are you a “Mommy Blogger”? You know, a mom who has a blog and you write about mommy things like, uh… shopping, coupons, and other cliché mom-related crap? Well Sony’s looking for you!Social med...
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Molyneux: Kinect won't kill controllers


Aug 03
// Jim Sterling
Microsoft demagogue and game developer Peter Molyneux has assured us all that Kinect won't kill videogame controllers. That's a relief, because Kinect is so hot looking that we were sure it would eliminate all other forms of ...
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Fight Night Champion won't support Move or Kinect


Aug 02
// Samit Sarkar
If you've been having a so-so day, this should cheer you up: EA Sports isn't shoehorning motion control into Fight Night Champion, the next entry in its boxing franchise. Thank goodness! In an interview with Eurogamer, gamepl...
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University of Central Florida developing abstinence game


Jul 30
// Conrad Zimmerman
It's a little weird to write a story that contains the terms, "Fox News," "videogame" and "sex" yet isn't actually negative. Well, not in the traditional sense, anyway. Fox News Orlando reports that the University of Central ...

Bringing the boom shaka laka with NBA Jam

Jul 23 // Ben Perlee
NBA Jam (Wii)Developer: EA CanadaPublisher: EATo be released: October 5, 2010 Some of the most exciting words from Smith indicate strong respect for the original arcade ROM. This isn’t a title that builds off of the SNES or Genesis versions of the game, here it’s all about striving for the best from the Midway original. For example, many players will remember that the shove was a common technique in the original, so EA has added a new ability to counter this with the spin move, which will render the shove useless. Also, there is a new radial attack move called the ankle breaker which will stop opposing players even more. While EA is still remaining mum on the issue that NBA Jam is going to be ported over to the Xbox 360 and the PS3, the fact that it is on the Wii aligns it with some motion control options. Basic turbo, pass, shove, and other moves are performed with the A, B, and Z-buttons, and combinations of those. Dunks and shots, however, are done by swinging the wiimote up, then down. Yeah, some people will hate it, but it's a simple enough motion that it gets the job done just fine without any problems. As a matter of fact, with four bros playing side by side, it's a chaotic and fun experience that recreates the fun of the arcade game quite well. There were two new modes shown. While plenty of different game options will be offered, the Backboard Smash and boss battle are what EA deemed appropriate for the press event. Backboard Smash was described as “NBA meets Street Fighter” as each team’s backboards have a health bar, and each dunk does damage to the backboard. While it’s a bit derivative and doesn’t really feel that different from, say, being the first to reach a certain score, it was still a blast to play. Hearing all of the crazy stuff from the announcer, which are the originals from the old school titles ("Boom shaka laka!", for example), made it feel like 1993 all over again. The second mode I was shown was the boss battles. Do well enough, and powerful players and legacy stars will challenge to a specialized match-up. Magic Johnson was the one we were shown, and the battle took place on a magician-themed half-court for a one-on-one match up. Magic has a teleporting ability, so he's able to pass to himself and even ally-oop, while the player has to struggle with just their normal skills. It's a challenge, to be sure, but a classic way of unlocking new players. There is going to be two ways to play the single player as well. There will be Classic mode, which is a standard tournament mode, and then there is the Remix tour. This mode is more about doing what you want, when you want, so players who want to skip certain modes and rule sets can skip right past. As well, there are some power-ups and extra arcadey stuff tossed in to mix things up. Other major additions include an updated roster to include all of the major recent team shake-ups. LeBron James, for example, is already rocking his Miami Heat uniform. When asked if NBA Jam could become an annual title like Madden, Smith said the dev team was open to the idea, but they are working hard on making this version of NBA Jam a proper return to form for the IP for when it launches on October 5. Visually, it looks like EA has hit this one out of the park. All of the character models have been designed with traditional 3D models, only instead of recreating the heads, EA just uses static images of each player's face. It's a funny method, with only 12 images to provide all of the range of actions and motions, but it actually gets the job done very well. This method is even applied to the cheerleaders and audience members, and the whole “NBA Jam” vibe is recreated very well. A return of cheats codes is a bit of retro nostalgia done right, with big head mode confirmed as just the first of many, making these headshots even more dramatic. NBA Jam is outlandish and gutsy, and is better because of it. Coming away from NBA Jam, I'm very impressed. With an obvious love for the original, while choosing a crazy new visual style, EA is doing something special with this one. Finger's crossed EA can bring the dynamite with this one when it comes out in October.
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NBA Jam is the lost basketball game for a whole generation. Born in the arcades, this legendary title was the very first basketball game to properly recreate the likenesses of the players we grew up and loved. With insane com...

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Survey says E3 didn't do much for PS Move or Kinect


Jul 10
// Jonathan Holmes
I was at E3, but I sort of wasn't. Shooting/editing video non-stop kept me from seeing a lot of what the show had to offer, and don't even get me started on the parties I missed. One thing I did see at E3 was a prevailing lac...
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Could we see Kinect-type tech in TVs and PCs?


Jun 23
// Ben Perlee
Whether you care for Microsoft's Kinect or not, the fact of the matter is that the technology inside the device is pretty damn cool. Thanks can be given to PrimeSense, an Israeli company that developed the technolog...
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E3 10: Hollie Bennett vs. Zelda: Skyward Sword


Jun 17
// Jonathan Holmes
Hollie Bennett and I just got some time in with Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. After seeing Miyamoto basically face-plant in his attempts to get the game's controls to work at the Nintendo press conference, I was sort of sc...
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E3 10: Hollie Bennett vs. pro golfer John Daly


Jun 17
// Jonathan Holmes
We shot a proper interview/hands-on with Hollie and myself playing this new John Daly golf game for the PS Move. I promise we did. For reasons beyond my control, we can't show it to you right now. All we can show you is this...
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E3 10: Majesco's Zumba Fitness is out of control exercise


Jun 15
// Ben Perlee
You know, I'll admit it: some of the most (drunken) fun I have had playing games with friends was with Ubisoft's Just Dance. And after last night, I would have to say that Harmonix's Dance Central for Kinect, after my hands-o...
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E3 10: Heroes on the Move is a PS Move mascot action game


Jun 15
// Josh Tolentino
So you've got a snazzy new motion controller, and need a game to show it off with. What do you go with. Sports? Exercise? Slapping games? Well, there's all that, and PlayStation Move has them, too, but they could certainly do...
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E3 10: PlayStation Move gets moving with Sorcery


Jun 15
// Colette Bennett
Our initial reaction to the PlayStation Move has been all over the map, just like all the gamer reactions out there: will Sony's answer to the Wiimote actually be any fun? We got a better look today during Sony's E3 press con...
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E3 10: Kinect releases worldwide November 4th, 2010!


Jun 14
// Josh Tolentino
That's it! Now you know! Kinect for Xbox 360 is launching worldwide this holiday, beginning with North America on November 4th, 2010. The launch lineup will include over 15 titles, including Kinect Sports, Kinectimals, Kinect...
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E3 10: Kinect Sports by Rare brings full-body waggling


Jun 14
// Josh Tolentino
I'll say it right now: Kinect Sports is Wii Sports...for Kinect. That's hardly a bad thing, as Wii Sports is pretty awesome. Plus, it's being developed by Rare. In fact, a man from Rare was right on hand to demonstrate exactl...

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