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Level 5

Weapon Shop De Omasse photo
Weapon Shop De Omasse

Guild 01's missing Weapon Shop game getting localized

Weapon Shop De Omasse
Jan 09
// Chris Carter
America may have gotten the vast majority of Level-5's Guild 01 and Guild 02 collections, but it was missing one game -- Weapon Shop De Omasse. According to Level-5, the game would have taken far too long to localize given al...
Level-5 new in 2014 photo
Level-5 new in 2014

Level-5 wants to 'surprise' fans in 2014 with new game

I'm still waiting for Fantasy Life
Jan 07
// Chris Carter
Fantasy Life took off in Japan, and as a result, has substantially raised Level-5's coffers beyond all of the other successful projects they had in 2013. Speaking to 4Gamer, a few key developers noted that the Fantasy Life&nb...
Ni No Kuni soundtrack photo
Ni No Kuni soundtrack

Mega-fan re-scores Ni No Kuni out of respect for composer

Sam Joseph Delves loves this game
Nov 08
// Chris Carter
Despite its shortcomings, Ni No Kuni is one of my favorite games of this year, bar none. In fact, depending on how I feel at the end of December, it may even be my outright Game of the Year, amidst everything I've playe...
Wonder Flicl PS4 photo
Wonder Flicl PS4

Level-5 JRPG Wonder Flick gets a PS4 teaser trailer

Unless you want to be rent asunder, click
Sep 25
// Steven Hansen
Our previous look at Level-5's adorable new RPG scored by Final Fantasy's Nobuo Uematsu was tempered because it is a free-to-play mobile title. It's meant to release in Japan this November on Android and iOS. However, some w...
Level-5 game sales photo
Level-5 game sales

Layton series has sold over 15 million units

Level-5 also reveals sales of Ni no Kuni, Inazuma Eleven, and the Guild games
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
Level-5 has kicked the fans in the collective nuts with the complete tonal shift that is Layton 7. That must mean the games are on their last legs and can no longer make bank on Nintendo handhelds alone, right? Not likely if ...
Layton 7 photo
Layton 7

Layton 7 for 3DS and mobile is not MY Layton

This is how it starts
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
I... I brought this upon myself. I said that Layton Brothers: Mystery Room was a great game. I said it was an excellent iOS companion to the traditional Layton series. I never should have had faith that a major gaming compan...
Level-5 photo

Level-5's next role-playing game is Wonder Flick

The 'L' and the 'I' together kind of look like a 'U'
Aug 26
// Jordan Devore
Level-5's got a new role-playing game that has a cutesy art style (yay!) and composer Nobuo Uematsu (double yay!) but it's a free-to-play mobile title. The basic hook of Wonder Flick is that commands are issued by flick...

Review: Layton Brothers: Mystery Room

Aug 19 // Tony Ponce
Layton Brothers: Mystery Room (iPad, iPhone [reviewed on an iPhone 4S])Developer: Matrix SoftwarePublisher: Level-5Release: June 27, 2013 (US / EU)MSRP: Free (Case File No. 000-002), $2.99 (No. 003-006), $1.99 (No. 007-009) You won't find Professor Hershel Layton or his young protégé Luke in this new tale, which takes place an indeterminate number of years following the duo's globetrotting adventures. Instead, you assume the role of Lucy Baker, an eager new detective constable working in Scotland Yard under Alfendi Layton, genius son of the ol' professor. Despite the game's title implying otherwise, Alfendi's unnamed brother is curiously absent aside from a brief offhand mention early on. Perhaps Level-5 hopes to investigate that particular mystery in a future sequel, but it's nonetheless an odd naming choice. Anyway, Mystery Room is split into nine separate "Case Files" (plus a prologue chapter to establish the setting). In each, you must use your investigative skills to examine murder sites and determine the culprit from a small list of suspects. Most cases are unrelated to one another, save for the last few which tie directly into the game's overarching narrative. [embed]259887:49975:0[/embed] The meat of the game is the investigation phase, in which you use the touchscreen to navigate the crime scene for evidence. Unlike your typical point-and-click adventure, all objects you can inspect will be pointed out via markers. Though genre-savvy players might believe this makes the game too easy, the upside is that it eliminates both the tedious exercise of pixel hunting as well as any fears that you can't solve a case because of a single missing clue. After making a list of deductions, you invite the alleged culprit into the office for a final round of questioning; here's where Mystery Room gets deliciously anime-tastic. Much like the "cornered" sequences in the Ace Attorney series, the culprit grows more comically frustrated as you present evidence that contradicts his or her statements. Their composure is visually represented by a heart encased in stone, and each of your accusations take on the form of arrows that literally chip away at their defense. While the earlier cases are fairly straightforward, later ones feature last-second twists that may point the blame elsewhere. As tense as the game can become, there's never any danger of failing. Al will gently guide you towards the correct answers early on, but even in the more complex cases, the penalty for presenting incorrect evidence is just to pick again. You'll never have to replay a section just because of your mistakes, which makes it entirely possible to brute force your way through. However, there is a sense of hearty accomplishment in putting forth an honest effort. The story isn't as massive in scope as those of Al's old man, but that shortcoming is balanced out by a well defined cast. Alfendi himself is a mellow fellow who calculates the percent certainty of his suspicions down to the tenths place, but in the heat of interrogation, his demeanor changes to that of a sinister, sharp-tongued wolf. Lucy of course is the bright-eyed sidekick, anxious to prove her worth despite her lack of experience. Then there are the supporting characters and the criminal suspects, each with distinctive mannerisms and speech. The dialog is one of the game's biggest highlights. Mystery Room successfully textualizes a range of regional dialects -- you can almost hear Lucy's thick Cockney accent whenever she speaks. It's such a shame there is no voice acting whatsoever, considering the incredible voice work in the main Layton games. The other highlight is the incredible jazz soundtrack, produced by famed Streets of Rage composer Yuzo Koshiro. There's such energy and intensity there, as if you are playing a classic radio drama. Once you start putting pressure on your suspect, the trumpets flare, the drums go absolutely mental, and the player feels completely in control. You've got the mind of a super sleuth and have the theme song to prove it! Mystery Room is also a highly digestible experience. Each chapter feels like an episode of a TV show -- long enough that you feel adequately invested, yet short enough that you can easily clear a case in a single sitting. Though there are frequent checkpoints for those who absolutely must quit mid-investigation, the fact that you can tackle a chapter in the time it would take to watch CSI makes the game very inviting. Most of all, there's something immensely satisfying about putting on your thinking cap and solving a harrowing murder mystery. Even if there isn't any true risk of failure, the game creates just enough tension that you feel your actions have purpose. Add to that all the window dressing -- the bizarre characters, the over-the-top interrogations, the music -- and you'd have to be pretty jaded not to have a grand time. Layton Brothers: Mystery Room is a fine companion to the main Layton series. Unless you really, really miss those Highlights brain teasers, that is.
Layton Brothers review photo
A gentleman leaves no murder unsolved
Despite my affection towards the Professor Layton series, I felt no compulsion to download Layton Brothers: Mystery Room when it released a couple months back. I'm not against mobile gaming, nor do I believe it's impossible f...

Review: Attack of the Friday Monsters! A Tokyo Tale

Aug 14 // Jonathan Holmes
Attack of the Friday Monsters! A Tokyo Tale (3DS eShop)Developer: Millennium KitchenPublisher: Level-5Released: July 18, 2013 MSRP: $7.99 Attack of the Friday Monsters opens with an alarmingly adorable, fully-voiced theme song about not knowing why your parents love you. It threw me completely off balance, and that's where I stayed for the rest of my time with the game. The priorities of the developers seem so contrary to where most games are going these days. Their focus is on putting you in a specific place and time and letting you be there, often alone, calmly existing. It's been compared to Animal Crossing and EarthBound, and while the game has similar goals as those two beloved classics, it goes about meeting them in vastly different ways.  You may think that you need to do more in a game than walk around, talk to people, and pick up shiny balls sitting on the ground in order to remain engaged. You may feel you know yourself and your taste in things enough to make such an assumption. If so, Attack of the the Friday Monsters may just prove that assumption wrong.  [embed]258514:50001:0[/embed] The game uses pre-rendered backgrounds like Resident Evil or the old Monkey Island titles that set the camera at different angles as you move throughout the environment. All these backgrounds appear to be hand-painted watercolors, and they invoke a gentle sincerity that packs a punch with each new angle you experience. While most games that take the "cinematic" approach do so with loads of virtual acting and dramatic turns, Attack of the Friday Monsters sticks to pacing, framing, and beautiful artwork. Anyone who has been in awe of a dialogue-free sequence in a Ghibli film -- like Mei's exploration of Totoro's forest, or Ashitaka's quiet journey of exile from his home village -- will know what I'm talking about.  You play as a young boy named Sota who's just moved into town. Along with his new environment comes the understanding that his parent's relationship may be more complicated than they may show on the surface. His mother quickly sends him on an errand, but perhaps because of his age, Sota is simply not able to remember to carry out this task. It doesn't matter how often the player may put Sota in the position to carry out that errand; he just can't remember to do it. This speaks to the relationship that the player will find with the world of Attack of the Friday Monsters as filtered through the eyes and mind of a Japanese boy. Sota is at a time and place where children didn't fear strange adults as they might today, so he runs around town talking to every man, woman, and child without fear of what it may lead to. The only true threat Sota knows comes in the form of giant monsters which have been trampling the countryside. Strangely enough, there is a television show about giant monsters being produced in the very same town. The game dances between leading you to believe the monsters are real and that they are just an elaborate Santa Claus-style fantasy created by the adults of the town, though Sota's belief in the creatures never falters. In the end, it's hard to say what is real and what is Sota's interpretation of reality, though the ideas about bullying, parenthood, family relationships, and what it means to belong are never so ambiguous. The narrative moves along on a pretty straight line. Your objective points are always on the map on the lower screen, so there is never much question as to where to go next, though getting there isn't always as simple. You don't usually have to follow those specific objectives, either. The game contains 26 "episodes," much like the Bombers handbook in Majora's Mask, but those episodes rarely play out in numerical order. One may start while another is half complete, and one may finish before the next begins. Not coincidentally, this structure mimics the attention pattern of your average child who has plenty they could do, but nothing they have to do, so things may fall into place in their own way without need to follow a logical order.  Scattered throughout the town are "glims," which Sota is told are shards of energy that have flown off of the local monsters in the midst of their battles. Collect enough of these glims and you'll magically obtain a card that you can use in a Pokemon-style in-game card combat against other kids. There are only a couple of times that you have to engage in a card battle, but you'll want to play much more often than that, as the game-within-a-game is surprisingly gripping, like a cross between Poker and Rock, Paper, Scissors. That comparison isn't just a lazy reference. The cards literally have the Rock, Paper, or Scissors symbols on them, identifying their strengths and vulnerabilities in a way that is universally clear. By collecting more cards, you can level up older cards, and even obtain cards that represent more than one element at a time (like Rock-Paper or Scissors-Rock). There is no in-game reason to collect all the cards and craft a formidable deck, but seeing all the new card art and feeling the sense of completion for "catching them all" is reason enough.  Whoever wins a card battles gets to cast a spell on the loser, which involves speaking a few magic words (mostly Japanese nonsense phrases) and watching the loser fall down. It's way more fun that it sounds like or deserves to be. You can even customize the order in which the magic words are spoken. It's never clear if the spells are real, or if the children are so convinced that they're real that they are compelled to act out their power by willfully falling over. It's just another way that the game plays with the line between perception of reality and projected illusions.  There is a little post-game fun to be had after the main narrative is over, but you'll likely only get three to four hours of play out of the title altogether. That's about $2 an hour. It's not the kind of game you might want to jump in and replay immediately after seeing the credits, but like most good short stories; it's something you'll want to revisit after your memory of its specifics has faded. The beautiful graphics, evocative soundtrack, selective but effective use of voice acting, excellent story, and occasional fart joke make Attack of the Friday Monsters worth keeping in your permanent collection. Titles like Journey and The Walking Dead have shown that games aren't always about what you do -- it's about where you are and who you're with. Attack of the Friday Monsters stands beside those two critically-acclaimed titles as another example of how fun short story narrative games can be.
Friday Monsters review photo
Pacific Ghibli Rim
Children see the world from a lower vantage point than adults. They're closer to the smaller things, the things they're more able to control. They're also more able to stand back and see the bigger picture in ways that adults...

Layton vs. Ace Attorney photo
[Update: European release also confirmed.] Late last year, Japan got an amazing crossover in Professor Layton vs. Ace Attorney -- leaving everyone else in the dark as to when it would be announced worldwide. But due to today...

Fantasy Life Link photo
Fantasy Life Link

Fantasy Life Link gets an adorable new trailer

New video is mostly multiplayer-centric
Jul 23
// Chris Carter
Last we heard, Fantasy Life wasn't up for an international release just yet, but that didn't stop the game from being insanely popular in Japan, and with the newest "Link" expansion, it's only getting bigger. Link offers up ...
Layton on iOS photo
Layton on iOS

Layton Brothers: Mystery Room hits iOS today

'Who is the mom?' is the real mystery
Jun 27
// Chris Carter
At some point Professor Layton had a child. We don't know how it was conceived, or whether or not it was through natural or unnatural means, but lo and behold, Alfendi Layton is a real thing, and he's starring in his own iOS ...
Level-5 top character photo
Level-5 top character

Level-5's most famous character is... the Aero Porter?

Um, what?
Jun 26
// Chris Carter
To celebrate their 15th anniversary, Level-5 held a fan poll to find out what the current favorite was amongst their colorful stable of characters. As many people know, Professor Layton is a popular Level-5 franchise, alongsi...

Review: BUGS vs. TANKS!

Jun 24 // Chris Carter
BUGS vs. Tanks! (3DS)Developer: ComceptPublisher: Level-5Released: June 20, 2013MSRP: $7.99 Given how easily the World War II time period could have overstayed its welcome, I'm glad Inafune opted for a quick setup and very little story. Simply put, you're a soldier in a shrunken German panzer squad, and the local insects are looking at you for their next meal. Your battlefield isn't a famous war-torn European city but a completely foreign jungle of grass and dirt, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids style. You'll defend yourself with a battalion of tanks with fairly straightforward controls -- your only real abilities are moving, pivoting, firing, and a "once per level" artillery power. By default, your tank will utilize an automatic fire mode to constantly shoot enemies in range; you're going to want to go ahead and turn that off and jack up the difficulty (you can always switch back), because this game is best experienced when its insects are genuinely terrifying. Though the fundamentals and the animations are pretty basic, the game's realistic-looking bugs can get pretty nerve-wracking, especially in swarms. They're extremely relentless and most won't stop until your dead, even if you're backed into a corner begging for breathing room, unable to get a clear shot. The game's brutal difficulty, although frustrating at times due to some occasionally cheap AI, is one of my favorite aspects. Once you're off the battlefield and hitting the game's menus, you'll learn that BUGS vs. Tanks! has a surprising amount of depth. For each tank, you can customize the rate of fire, chassis, and more. The actual tanks themselves are modeled after real vehicles in history, which helps give the game a bit more character. Along with changing in difficulty setting or automatic/manual fire, you can make it feel like a completely different game, which is pretty remarkable. But what you can actually do with these tanks is extremely limited. Missions are pretty standard -- base defense, item collection, kill quests, and things like that. To be blunt, there's really not anything that you haven't seen a million times before, lending itself to something best played in short spurts. Thankfully, no one mission overstays its welcome too often, as these levels are extremely short, and each of the 29 (with 10 bonus) stages feel different enough from one another to justify themselves. There's also a local multiplayer function that allows you to play with three other friends, as well as a fun little StreetPass mechanic that lets you call in extra artillery fire. In terms of visuals, while I never really had any issues telling enemies and areas apart, BUGS vs. TANKS! is extremely unimpressive without the 3D effect on. It looks similar to a low-budget PS1 game, with jagged edges, plain backgrounds, and generally stale models. While I don't have a problem with a low graphical output, given the high quality in the other Guild games, it looks odd when juxtaposed with the total body of work and will disappoint anyone expecting a little more. Like a few of the other Guild offerings, BUGS vs. TANKS! isn't remarkable, but it's a great way to pass the time over the course of a few days. Whether you want to casually roll through and blow up some insects on the easy setting, or wrack your brain to test your mettle with manual shooting and an insanely difficult campaign, BUGS vs. TANKS! offers a little something for everyone.
BUGS vs. TANKS! review photo
Honey, we shrunk the soldiers
The idea of shrinking objects and placing them into ridiculous situations is not new. But in the case of Comcept and Keiji Inafune's BUGS vs. TANKS!, it's somehow fitting to pit a tiny World War II German tank battalion again...

Level-5 mobile RPGs photo
Level-5 mobile RPGs

Level-5 announces a trio of mobile role-playing games

Projects feature Final Fantasy composer, Fire Emblem artist
May 30
// Kyle MacGregor
Ni no Kuni studio Level-5 is developing a set of three role-playing games for mobile platforms, Weekly Famitsu reports. Part of the company's 15th anniversary celebrations, the trio of titles features a few high profile names...
Fantasy Life photo
Fantasy Life

Fantasy Life will be getting an expansion in Japan

The 'Link' add-on enhances online play
May 23
// Chris Carter
Readers know that I've been clamoring for an international release of Fantasy Life for quite some time. As a roaring success in Japan, Level-5 has already seen fit to update the game, calling the enhancement Fantasy Life Link...

Review: The Starship Damrey

May 18 // Tony Ponce
The Starship Damrey (3DS eShop)Developer: Level-5Publisher: Level-5Release: May 16, 2013 (US / EU)MSRP: $7.99 You wake up trapped in a cryogenic sleep capsule with no memory of who you are or how you got there. You discover you are on board the Damrey, a research vessel floating in the far reaches of space, but something has happened to the ship and its crew. Since you are unable to exit your pod, you must remotely operate one of the ship's AR Series robots. They can only turn 90 degrees, which makes navigating around fallen debris quite cumbersome. Furthermore, they can only carry one item at a time, essentially limiting the complexity of any of the "puzzles." The game's biggest problem isn't that you aren't given any instruction on what to do or where to go -- that's the hook, after all. Rather, the solutions are so simple and telegraphed that the game might as well be feeding the answers. Considering that you typically can't drop an item once in your possession, you can safely assume that your next task will involve that very item. [embed]253991:48697:0[/embed] If you had dreams of managing multiple inventory slots, weeding out red herrings, and discovering alternate puzzle solutions, allow me to stamp them out right now. There is only ever one right way. It's akin to locking a person in an empty room save for a key in the corner, then telling the person to "figure it out" without any further clues. Okay, maybe not that simple, but close enough. The most difficult part is probably the opening scene in which you have to figure out how to reboot the corrupted computer console -- an admittedly clever sequence that is never trumped. Afterward, the bulk of your time is spent rolling through darkened hallways, looking for tools, corpses, and notes lying about. But ignoring the core gameplay, you'll find that The Starship Damrey does succeed in being a tense, moody experience. When I say the ship's halls are dark, I mean pitch black. Equipped with a low-power flashlight, your robot typically can only see a few feet in front or glowing signs and panels in the distance. And dogging your search is the ghostly specter of a young girl in a sun hat, fueling the mystery of the crew's fate. There's even a humorous interlude that parodies the famous "Blue Danube" scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Sure, it completely breaks the tone of the game, but it's nonetheless entertaining as a one-off. Figuring time spent wandering around aimlessly in search of objects hidden in the shadows, the game will last you no more than three to four hours. However, if you happen to own any of the three Guild01 titles -- Liberation Maiden, Aero Porter, or Crimson Shroud -- you'll unlock a bonus scene upon completion. There's also an additional bonus should you accomplish an optional late-game task. Sadly, both are text-only prologue chapters that don't add anything substantial to the narrative. Despite being entertaining in its own way, The Starship Damrey ultimately fails to provide a hardcore, old-school adventure as promised. There's potential for an even more expansive campaign, which I hope Level-5 explores one day -- if Liberation Maiden can get a sequel, so can this! For now, rein in your expectations.
Starship Damrey review photo
Lost in space
"This game contains no tutorials or explanations. Part of the experience is to discover things for yourself." Thus reads the disclaimer when you fire up a new game of The Starship Damrey, Level-5's atmospheric sci-fi adventur...

The Starship Damrey photo
The Starship Damrey

Launch trailer for Guild02's The Starship Damrey

The sci-fi eShop adventure is on sale right now
May 16
// Tony Ponce
The first in Level-5's Guild02 triple pack, The Starship Damrey, arrived on the 3DS eShop earlier today for $7.99. A new trailer for the moody sci-fi adventure game has surfaced, featuring choice words from game designer Kaz...
Guild03? photo

Is Level-5 about to announce Guild03?

Trio of Level-5 trademarks have suddenly appeared
May 04
// Tony Ponce
With the three Guild02 games already out in Japan and the first in the set, Starship Damrey, scheduled for release in the States on May 16, it's time to look towards he future. It's never too soon to start thinking "sequel"! ...
Guild02 photo

Starship Damrey flies to Nintendo 3DS on May 16

First Guild02 title lands on eShop in a couple weeks
May 04
// Kyle MacGregor
The Starship Damrey is set to touch down on the Nintendo 3DS eShop in North America on May 16. A survival horror title designed by Kazuya Asano and Takemaru Abiko, it will be the first title from Level-5's Guild02 c...
Liberation Maiden sequel photo
Liberation Maiden sequel

Report: Liberation Maiden to get sequel on PlayStation 3

We fight for our people!
Apr 17
// Kyle MacGregor
Liberation Maiden is getting a sequel! Well, sort of. It seems like Grasshopper Manufacture has decided to eschew Shoko's roots, following up last year's 3DS shooter with a visual novel for PlayStation 3. According to Si...
Professor Layton photo
Professor Layton

Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy to hit 3DS in 2014

Prostitute D is a dog
Apr 17
// Kyle MacGregor
Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy is set to arrive on North American shores in 2014. After arriving in Japan back in late February, the sixth entry in Level-5's series of puzzlers is slated to arrive in Europe someti...
Guild02 photo

Nintendo Direct: All three Guild02 games coming to US

Yes, even Attack of the Friday Monsters!
Apr 17
// Tony Ponce
It was previously announced that two of the three games in Level-5's Guild02 compilation, Bugs vs. Tanks! and The Starship Damrey, would be localized for the US eShop. Missing from that news was any indication that ...
Level-5 photo

Level-5 discounting Guild01 titles starting this week

And the mysterious black box returns
Apr 15
// Jordan Devore
Three distinct games released under the Guild01 banner on the 3DS eShop are going on sale soon. From Thursday, April 18 through May 30, shmup Liberation Maiden ($4.99), airport sim Aero Porter ($2.99), and role-play...
Ni No Kuni DS photo
Ni No Kuni DS

There may be hope yet for a Ni No Kuni DS localization

A Namco Bandai executive reportedly isn't opposed to the idea on 3DS
Apr 11
// Chris Carter
For months now, fans, or prospective fans who don't own a PS3, have been clamoring for a localization of the DS version of Ni No Kuni, which Namco Bandai shut down to due "translation issues and costs regarding the Wizard's C...
Level-5 PS4 photo
Level-5 PS4

Ni no Kuni developer Level-5 working on PS4 game

Hopefully it's Dragon Quest VIII-2
Apr 09
// Kyle MacGregor
What's next for the team behind Ni no Kuni? A mysterious new PlayStation 4 project, apparently. Level-5 boss Akihiro Hino confirmed as much in a recent interview with Nikkei Trendy. Currently in the planning stages, Hino...
Ni no Kuni photo
Ni no Kuni

Amazon and Target have Ni no Kuni for $40

Do it for Mr. Drippy
Apr 08
// Jordan Devore
This is the day I've been waiting for. Level 5's Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch started the year off right all the way back in January and some of us who missed out on the well-received role-playing game have been ...
Fantasy Life photo
Fantasy Life

Fantasy Life may be coming to the US

One can hope, due to a US trademark
Apr 03
// Chris Carter
Following news of the game being sold out in Japan, it seems as if 3DS hit Fantasy Life has been trademarked in the States (and previously, Europe), according to Siliconera. If Level-5's history is anything to go by, trademar...
White Knight Chronicles photo
White Knight Chronicles

White Knight Chronicles servers to go offline this June

The Georama system to be no more
Mar 25
// Harry Monogenis
Some sad news for fans of Level 5's White Knight Chronicles has come from Sony Computer Entertainment America: the game's online servers will cease operation on June 18, 2013. White Knight Chronicles' online mode, known ...
Guild02 photo

Feast on vids for Guild02's Monsters Come Out on Friday

It's like a Studio Ghibli take on kaiju movies
Mar 17
// Tony Ponce
Of the three games announced as part of Level-5's Guild02 lineup, Kaiju ga Deru Kinyoubi ("Monsters Come Out on Friday) sounded the most fascinating. A game in which you play as a boy in a small town turned upside-down by a ...

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