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Lara Croft

Lara statue photo
Lara statue

Free life-sized Tomb Raider statue for your Lara Croft shrine

Go get it, for our honor!
Oct 16
// Steven Hansen
Who says Twitter is not good for anything? Apparently PCGamer-et al publisher Future US is moving office and giving away this gigantic Lara Croft (or Future's president is a very small man) to anyone who "re-tweets" the post....
Rise of the Tomb Raider photo
Rise of the Tomb Raider

Rise of the Tomb Raider trailer shows off hot grappling hook action

Also: tomb exploding
Sep 21
// Darren Nakamura
Lara Croft probably has some sort of death wish. Mountain climbing can be good exercise and recreation, but I don't think anybody in her right mind would swing from a grappling hook, launch 30 feet, then catch on a vertical r...

Review: Lara Croft GO

Aug 27 // Zack Furniss
Lara Croft GO (iOS [reviewed on iPad Air], Android, Windows Phones)Developer: Square Enix MontréalPublisher: Square EnixRelease Date: August 27, 2015MSRP: $4.99 Lara Croft GO immediately establishes itself as a contemplative foray into a forgotten world. Meditative music gently ebbs and flows as Lara slowly walks up to a well-preserved ruin in one of the game's few brief cutscenes. The environments are vibrantly rendered in a simplistic yet gorgeous manner while gentle camerawork plays with the foreground, asserting a sense of depth. Lara's expedition takes you deeper into this ancient land, and before long a gargantuan serpent begins pursuing this new trespasser.  Similar to Hitman GO, you can only move along pre-carved lines on the ground and scalable walls, darting from spot to spot. Here, however, Ms. Croft is fluidly animated, doing somersaults and even her famous hand-stand ledge climb on occasion. It's initially jarring to see her do stilted little jumps between spots (there's no way to hold down a run button, as that would quickly end in death), but I stopped noticing it just a few levels in. Enemies and obstacles can only move whenever you do, so movement needs to be precise and measured. Unlike early Tomb Raider games, you'll never die due to stepping a tad too far or misjudging a jump.  Puzzles start as simplistic fare involving levers and floor panels that can only be safely crossed one time, but add elements every few levels (of which there are 40) to stave off repetition. Snakes, lizards, and giant spiders will do their best to prevent you from reaching your desired MacGuffin and each provide their own set of challenges. You'll eventually find single-use tools to combat them, such as a javelin and a torch. Then there are boulders, sawblades, and other traps that will make you doubt every step you take. Since the checkpoints are very forgiving and most levels will only take you a few minutes to complete, dying isn't discouraging. Death, more than anything, is your most reliable tool when it comes to deciphering the machinations of the deathtraps hindering your progress. You'll step on plenty of floor panels only to launch arrows into your soon-to-be lifeless body, but it's never a frustrating affair. While this is appreciated, the one and only quibble I have with Lara Croft GO is that it never quite feels like it fully ramps up to a satisfying difficulty. Despite a couple of "A-ha!" moments, the slow addition of complications and intensifying music build to a climax that doesn't deliver. It's always appreciated when a mobile game can be played in short sessions, but I wouldn't have balked at being stumped a few times. Perhaps it's my love towards past installments and the enjoyment of being utterly stonewalled by a puzzle, having to think about it even when I'm not playing. On the off-chance that you every get completely stuck, you can use microtransactions for hints (this feature was not online when I was playing for review). If you miss the older games in the series, you'll find cute references that aren't cloyingly nostalgic. The main menu is radial like it was in the olden days of yore, and that satisfyingly reverbed BRRINNGG sound effect denoting the discovery of a hidden treasure has returned. Find enough of those treasures and you'll even find costumes from the old games, like the wetsuit from Tomb Raider II. This affords Lara Croft GO some replayability (since you'll be able to finish it in around three hours depending on your skill level), but they aren't exactly well-hidden until the back half of the adventure. Though other games featuring Lara Croft have elicited a gamut of reactions such as horror and anxiety, I never expected to find spelunking so calming. The dreamlike soundscapes bring to mind a massage parlor and slowly slipping into sleep as someone caresses your tired feet. This is an easy game to fall asleep to, and I'm almost positive you'll have good dreams. I don't think Square Enix is claiming that one solely because of the lawsuits that will occur when players start rolling over and crushing their iPads. Lara Croft GO is clearly the product of a love for what the Tomb Raider series used to mean. Your pistols are more of a tool than a weapon, and you certainly won't be killing an island's worth of men. A lovely visual style and a zen-inspiring score provide backdrops to my favorite Croft adventure in some time. I'm now grateful for the delineation between the action-filled Tomb Raider and puzzle-focused Lara Croft games. Even though I enjoyed 2013's hectic reboot, sometimes you just want to stop and breathe it all in, tomb dust and all.
Lara Croft GO photo
Spa Raider
Last year, Square Enix Montréal surprised us by distilling the Hitman series into a minimalistic mobile game with a tabletop aesthetic. It was a risky move, but Hitman GO ended up a critical success that show...

Rise of the Tomb Raider photo
Rise of the Tomb Raider

Lara doesn't need to murder everyone in Rise of the Tomb Raider

Just some people
Aug 21
// Brett Makedonski
The Rise of the Tomb Raider section of Microsoft's gamescom press conference was filled with knives to the back and arrows to the head. Given the large stage, it's obvious why Crystal Dynamics showed a violent slice of ...

gamescom trailer photo
gamescom trailer

Watch the Rise of the Tomb Raider gamescom demo

Rise from your tomb!
Aug 10
// Steven Hansen
Brett caught up with (and previewed) Rise of the Tomb Raider at gamescom 2015 and what we saw didn't sound all that different from what I saw at E3 2015. Not too surprising this close to launch of a sequel that already has i...

Lara Croft GO captures the essence of pure Tomb Raider

Aug 08 // Brett Makedonski
Lara Croft GO fits soundly into that latter category by more than just name alone. Despite being a mobile title, it nicely captures the spirit of the very first Tomb Raider games. Donning her classic outfit, Lara works through level after level in search of an artifact. Puzzle-solving and exploration are earmarks, just as they had been all those years ago. However, the mobile format is what makes GO distinct. Rather than continuous action, this game is turn-based which places a greater emphasis on thinking before moving. A rudimentary example might be a pair of snakes that are facing opposite directions. You always have to attack from the side or back, lest they strike and kill you first. There's only one path that allows for the correct order of operations; the others just leave you dead. But, even when Lara Croft GO deals out frustration, it doesn't negate progress. This is the mobile crowd, after all -- a group that might not have the patience to have its time wasted. Checkpoints come frequently and everything is ever-so bite-sized. On a micro-level, the scale of each section is obviously intentional. Routon says that the studio knows who it's developing for. Despite Lara Croft GO allowing for minimal time investments, Square Enix Montreal is seeing a more encouraging trend. "People intend to play for five minutes, and they end up playing for an hour or more," Routon comments. "We tell playtesters they can leave, but they say they want to finish this puzzle first. I guess that's not a bad thing." [embed]297421:59880:0[/embed] It really doesn't come as a surprise that people don't want to put Lara Croft GO down. It elegantly encapsulates what makes Tomb Raider work, and boils it down to its purest form. Swipe, swipe, swiping on the screen is so simple, yet it doesn't feel cheap to lead Lara on an adventure in this fashion. Helping production values are the strong aesthetic and the narrative told only through gameplay details. Although it's in the mobile market, Square Enix Montreal prices its titles more traditionally. GO will be available on August 27, but the cost is unknown right now (Hitman Go released at $4.99). Once invested, this game is fully playable at any speed; there are no energy meters to temper progress. Routon confirmed that there will be microtransactions of some sort, but their nature will be puzzle solutions for those who are struggling. In a wasteland of freemium games, this price model is commendable. More commendable, however, is the way that Square Enix Montreal boldly gets back to the roots of Tomb Raider. Series veterans will rediscover a Lara Croft that they know and love in a format that's undiscovered to them. Fitting, seeing as Tomb Raider should be all about discovery.
Lara Croft GO preview photo
Swipe right
Antoine Routon grinned. "We have people knocking down our door saying 'Can you do our game too?'" Routon's the lead programmer at Square Enix Montreal -- the publisher's studio that's dedicated to mobile titles. Square Enix h...

Lara Croft GO photo
Lara Croft GO

Lara Croft GO launches on August 27

Just in time for PAX
Aug 08
// Kyle MacGregor
I was pretty fond of Lara Croft GO, the new minimalist Tomb Raider from Square Enix Monréal, when I checked out the game at E3 a couple months ago. So, I'm delighted to hear we needn't wait too much...

Rise of the Tomb Raider is a little easier on Lara (but still kicks the shit out of her)

Aug 06 // Brett Makedonski
The most obvious example lies within the fact that Rise of the Tomb Raider places less emphasis on campfires. They're still necessary for fast travelling and general checkpointing, but they're no longer required to upgrade skills. That can be done on the fly, meaning that Lara can become a more formidable foe in the thick of the fighting. She also has the opportunity to use materials in the wild to her advantage. Rise of the Tomb Raider features a new crafting system (again, no campfire needed) that acts as further upgrades. The likes of berries and pelts can be collected and turned into items far more useful than berries and pelts. Hardly the first game to do it, but it'll place more emphasis on exploration and scavenging when that should be a pillar of Tomb Raider. Crystal Dynamics knows that was a drawback of 2013's game, and it's making right this time. Speaking with members of the development team at gamescom, they assured that there will in fact be more tomb raiding in Rise of the Tomb Raider. The early section we played was a critical path tomb, but there will be more optional ones -- they'll be more expansive and intricate, to boot. One of the more intriguing aspects of this is that Lara will have to become proficient in various languages to access certain areas. We saw her discover a religious-looking artifact that raised her Greek skill a level. It seems as if finding these along the way will be the only method of unlocking certain side paths. It can probably be assumed that these languages correlate to the many countries Lara will find herself visiting. The demo we played took place in Syria, and those events led to her winding up in Siberia (which was shown at E3). When asked where else she'll go, we were given the well-rehearsed PR-trained line of "We're not ready to get into that quite yet; right now, we're focused on talking about Syria." Though brief, the demo showed nicely showed what Rise of the Tomb Raider has in store. It's just as cinematic, dramatic, and action-filled as we'd expect. Lara's going to do plenty of rough falling, labored climbing, and "wow, you just barely made that" jumping. Even though it's an origin story, she should know by now that tomb raidin' ain't easy.
Tomb Raider preview photo
At least she might learn something
Lara Croft has never been the best archaeologist. Carefully digging for hours so as to not damage an artifact wouldn't make for a very good video game. Still, there's a disconnect when she knocks over human skulls that are pe...

Eatings disorders suck photo
Eatings disorders suck

What the ladies of gaming would look like as average Americans

Arguably sexier
Jul 22
// Jed Whitaker, a website dedicated to helping those with eating disorders find treatment, has "reverse Photoshopped" some characters from popular games series to make them look more like the average American woman. "If video game creators are going to pride themselves on accurate digital representations, then it's time for them to get real about women," says the site.

Mobile Tomb Raider Lara Croft GO feels lovely

Jun 18 // Kyle MacGregor
[embed]294301:59143:0[/embed] At first glance, Lara Croft GO bears a strikingly close resemblance to Square Enix Montréal's first effort. It echoes the quiet, clean aesthetic of Hitman GO, while featuring similar turn-based puzzle design, but pushes the concepts further. Fresh elements like verticality quite literally add new dimensions to the experience, and go a long way to making this feel like a legitimate Tomb Raider. The characters are no longer static figurines, as the designers felt it wouldn't be natural for Lara, a character known for her athleticism, to be portrayed in such a rigid fashion. So while our heroine is still navigating an on-rails obstacle course, she's fully animated, looking very much at home as she climbs and scrambles around ancient, subterranean ruins. Perspective is also used to great effect, with the isometric camera allowing the developers to add little flourishes like a silhouetted beetle crawling along a tree branch in the foreground, or see a bridge appear in the distance when Lara toggles a switch. Square Enix Montréal is also keen on avoiding unnecessary hand-holding. The title's 40 levels (which are quite a bit larger than those found in Hitman GO) are based around trial and error. With each stage now divided into segments with checkpoints, new mechanics can be introduced and then used in rather sophisticated ways in short order without a loss of progress.  One example of this is terrain that will fall away when walked over or climbed across twice. Shortly after being introduced to this by falling to my death, I was using it to evade an enemy. Knowing a certain surface would crumble away, I used it to lay a trap for the giant lizard nipping at my heels.  Not all of the obstacles I saw were quite that compelling, though. While it was a rush to see an Indiana Jones-style boulder trap, the turn-based nature of the game makes this sort of scene less compelling than if were to play out in real time. Still, what I've witnessed thus far has me eager to see what else awaits in the full game. Lara Croft GO is coming to iOS and Android devices sometime later this year.
Lara Croft GO photo
Small in scale, but no less impressive
Square Enix Montréal possesses a genuine talent for artfully distilling series down to their essence. In 2014, the developer released Hitman GO, a turn-based deconstruction of IO Interactive's stealth franchise, w...

Lara Croft GO photo
Lara Croft GO

Lara Croft GO headed to mobile and tablet 'soon'

'Set in a long-forgotten world'
Jun 16
// Darren Nakamura
Square Enix has some experience putting out mobile games with big name IPs. Hitman GO released last year and by most accounts it was a solid title. Now it looks like it's our favorite tomb raider's turn with Lara Croft GO. Co...
Lara Croft: Relic Run photo
Lara Croft: Relic Run

Lara Croft's in a new mobile runner \_(ツ)_/

The Lara you used to know and love
Apr 13
// Brett Makedonski
Crystal Dynamics has announced a new mobile runner titled Lara Croft: Relic Run. The name's fittingly nebulous. Is Lara running after relics? Or, is the old-school Lara the running relic, a classic character hearkening back t...
Tomb Raider movie photo
Tomb Raider movie

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles writer tied to Tomb Raider film reboot

Feb 26
// Steven Hansen
A potential movie reboot of Tomb Raider just came a bit closer to reality with scriptwriter Evan Daugherty being hired to pen the tale of young Lara Croft's first adventure -- not unlike the recent game reboot. Warner Bros. h...
Deals photo

Kane & Lynch join the Square Enix Humble Bundle 2

Also Guardian of Light and Startopia
Feb 24
// Jordan Devore
With just under a week left to go before it vanishes, the Square Enix Humble Bundle 2 has added bonus titles: Startopia, Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light, and the Kane & Lynch Collection. If you already locked in your...
Lara Croft photo
Lara Croft

Square Enix trademarks Lara Croft: Relic Run in Europe

Uh oh
Feb 12
// Chris Carter
According to this European trademark, Square Enix has registered the name Lara Croft: Relic Run. There's no platform or window set, so right now we're basically in the dark. "Relic Run?" That sounds an awful lot like Temple R...
Promoted Blog photo
Promoted Blog

Gaming and Misbehaving: Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light

Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Nov 02
// RedHeadPeak
[Dtoid community blogger RedHeadPeak shares a bit of fun he and a friend had at poor Lara's expense. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something! --Mr Andy Dixon] Tomb Raider has always been a rela...
Lara Croft photo
Lara Croft

This happens when you play Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris with a jerk

Oct 08
// Brett Makedonski
Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris is shaping up to be a good time as a four-player venture. I played it at gamescom 2014, and it was a lot of fun. However, maybe that's because I didn't have a jerkface in my group tha...

Rediscover a Lara Croft you already know in Temple of Osiris

Aug 16 // Brett Makedonski
Perhaps the biggest alteration that Temple of Osiris employs is simply the number of people that are in on the action. Whereas the first game in the series featured two-player co-op, Temple of Osiris drops up to four into the fray. The characters pair off into two groups with unique capabilities. Lara and fellow treasure hunter Carter Bell can grapple to distant locations, while Egyptian gods Horus and Isis are equipped with light staffs. Each proves essential for clearing certain sections, but no characters feel more powerful than others. In the event that there's only a single player, Lara is given a staff to assist with certain sections. On the surface, Temple of Osiris is all about teamwork. Traversing across several tombs in an Egyptian setting in an effort to stop the god Osiris' evil brother Set is technically the reason for this dangerous endeavor. Your partners will feel invaluable as you fight monsters, solve puzzles, and wander off into intriguing nooks. Don't be naive -- they have an ulterior motive just like you. Underscoring the entirety of Temple of Osiris is a sense of competition. The game ranks players after each level, elevating the top performer on a pedestal where they're showered with gems. These gems act as the game's currency, so it's easy to get caught up in wanting more than your compadres. Before long, you're scrambling to pick up the point bonuses, get the final blow on enemies, and find that secret area first. It gives you that one-up that isn't necessary, but you just want so badly. [embed]279606:55317:0[/embed] The pursuit of gems is how the game accentuates its light RPG system. A treasure room that's available in between levels features a wealth of chests that all have random gear to equip. Chests vary in cost to open -- the higher the cost, the better the chance that it'll hold rare items. Crystal Dynamics isn't too willing to talk about the economy of Temple of Osiris yet, so it's unknown whether you'll be able to just buy specific items. Regardless, it's a certainty that gems are something you'll want lots of. Temple of Osiris offers the ability to go back to previous sections and grind out gems if you so wish. After each level, an elevator option is available, which takes the team back to an overworld hub where everything's replayable. It'll end up being a great help when seeking to clear side challenges or set high scores, especially considering that doing so is how some of the game's best gear is unlocked. These challenges won't be a cakewalk. In our demo, gameplay wasn't overly difficult, but it also gave the impression that it'd be tough to do consistently well. Dying resets a point multiplier along with a deduction in points, meaning that consistency is absolutely key. Compounding matters are the typical flaws associated with this style of game. Depth of field and precision platforming aren't Osiris' strengths, but it's likely that familiarity will eventually mitigate most frustrations that arise as a result. It may not be perfect but it works, and it'll probably work really well. It brings with it a sense of exploration and adventure that'll be welcome by those who grew up with Lara. Crystal Dynamics may have taken divergent paths with her character, but Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris proves that it hasn't forgotten the series' roots.
Lara Croft preview photo
She likes shootin' and lootin'
Which Lara Croft do you prefer? Crystal Dynamics has two versions of her, splitting the iconic character into distinctly different properties. The recent Tomb Raider reboot and the scheduled follow-up Rise of t...

Lara Croft  photo
Lara Croft

Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris receives a Gold Edition

Plenty of extras and retailer-specific DLC
Aug 08
// Brittany Vincent
Square Enix has just announced a "Gold Edition" of the upcoming Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris that includes a bevy of extras that Tomb Raider fans will want to pay attention to. The Gold Edition comes rocking a three-in...
Lara Croft photo
Lara Croft

Unwrap Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris in December

Bring some friends
Jul 23
// Brett Makedonski
The sequel to the critically-acclaimed Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light will arrive just in time to unite friends and family for festivities at the end of the year. Crystal Dynamics' Lara Croft and the Temple o...
Lara Croft photo
Lara Croft

Guardian of Light's free now for Xbox Live Gold members

You have two weeks
Jan 16
// Brett Makedonski
It's time for another predictable but helpful bi-weekly reminder that a new game is free for Xbox Live Gold subscribers. This time, it's 2010's Summer of Arcade title Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light. Of course, this offe...
Freebies photo

Games with Gold: Sleeping Dogs, Guardian of Light

Free games for Xbox Live Gold members this month
Dec 30
// Jordan Devore
Before Crystal Dynamics' Tomb Raider reboot, Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light was my go-to game in the franchise. In many ways, this twin-stick co-op shooter still is. It's joining United Front Games' open-world action ti...

It's never a good idea to steal Mario's power-ups

Kenway, Lara, and Master Chief, get their ass kicked
Dec 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Three iconic videogame heroes try to take on Mario with his own weapons. They should have known better than to cross the master.

Lara Croft is more than a survivor

Mar 11 // Taylor Stein
Survivor is too passive of a word to describe Lara's feats This Tomb Raider reboot serves a unique purpose: not to further the image of a gaming icon, but to explore the origins of how she became a legend. A theme is carried throughout the narrative as a transition from innocence to maturity. Naivety fades in the midst of hardship, and she is forced to bear a burden of life or death proportions. It was Lara's idea to enter the Dragon's Triangle in pursuit of archeological discovery, an area infamous for sinking ships, and it is her responsibility to save her crewmates from certain disaster.  The game hits the nail on the head in this regard, showcasing a completely different Lara before and after the experience; one driven by blind ambition and the other hardened by the weight of survival. Despite successfully presenting a thematic rite of passage, I would argue that the Lara Croft who emerges from the catastrophe is beyond a survivor. She is a warrior, a leader, and a hero. Lara actively pursues her foes from forest to mountain to hidden temple and successfully discovers the secrets of the lost kingdom of Yamatai. Even when seemingly perfect plans of escape crumble under misfortune, she remains determined and adapts to the circumstances whether it requires her to climb atop a frozen radio tower or traverse the depths of a derelict ship. For those who have yet to experience the game for yourself, let me grant you a brief preview. Lara Croft goes through absolute hell. Pushed to the brink of mental and physical exhaustion, the once inexperienced explorer is tested under the most extreme conditions. Impaled, strangled, stabbed, burnt, shot, pistol-whipped, and sliced are just a few of the inflictions that Lara endures. The physical wounds will heal as scars of remembrance, but the psychological toll is undoubtedly a harder pill to swallow. Lara is forced to make sacrifices for the greater good, to select choices when no appealing option is present. She is the picture of fortitude but her resilience is not the only aspect that makes her noteworthy. She doesn't just survive the ordeal; she charges it head-on and shoots it in the face. Channeling the anguish from the journey, Lara evolves into a true fighter. Any who cross her path are incapacitated without a second thought. Despite what seems like a constant flow of hindrances, challenges, and confrontations, she tackles each trial and thwarts almost certain death time and time again. Lara Croft has always exemplified the badass category, but now she owns it. Ferocity becomes second nature in a landscape riddled with danger in the form of wild animals, samurai warriors, and unpredictable terrain.  As heroes often represent the perfect models of humanity, the best and the brightest of us all, Lara Croft adheres to the standard perfectly. She is amazingly resourceful, fashioning life-saving devices out of discarded remains, determined, physically and mentally strong, adaptable, and intelligent; not to mention notably attractive. While her initial goal may begin as a primal urge to live, it evolves into a much more complicated objective; one driven by altruism and duty. Escaping isn't enough, the madness surrounding the resurrection of the omnipotent Sun Queen must be ended. Being a survivor is just the tip of the iceberg for Lara. While the term in question is technically applicable to the protagonist, it only scrapes the surface of her newfound strength. The transformation from ambitious explorer into the self-reliant, powerful Lara Croft is a revolution on every level. Rescue from this particular adventure is only the beginning of her story. Returning home to live as a regular woman, is not the life that Lara Croft will pursue and fittingly so. After facing such adversity, normalcy is a luxury that she can no longer find solace in and as we know from the franchise, she'll continue to co-mingle with danger for years to come.  Lara Croft is a survivor, but she is also a savior, a warrior, a leader, and a hero. Tomb Raider serves as an origin story but she has never been a damsel in distress. Staying alive was not the gift of coincidence or happenstance. Lady luck was undoubtedly on her side, but Lara continued to proactively fight throughout the entire ordeal. Perhaps this is a connotative dilemma spurred by personal meanings associated with the word, my definition of survivor may be different to yours for example, but I wholeheartedly believe that the, "A survivor is born" slogan does not do the game or Lara Croft as a character justice. Image sources [1][2]
More like epic hero photo
More like epic hero
For the past 48 hours, I have been completely enthralled in the world of Tomb Raider. Explosions, gun-fights, stealthy takedowns, weapon upgrading, and shooting defenseless bunnies has characterized my adventure, one that has...

Lara Croft photo
Lara Croft

Lara Croft time-lapse painting makes you feel empowered

Seven minutes in artsy Tomb Raider heaven
Mar 07
// Tony Ponce
Our speed-painter pal Josh Summana is back with another lovely, lovely sippy cup of art juice. This time, he has set his sights on Lara Croft from the new Tomb Raider. It's definitely a lot more tasteful than the sick filth ...
Guardian of Light photo
Guardian of Light

No plans for more Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light

You're breaking my heart, Crystal Dynamics
Mar 06
// Jordan Devore
Crystal Dynamics creative director Noah Hughes was asked by OXM if there are any plans to continue the rather terrific Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light. Here's what he had to say: "Guardian was a great opportunity to expl...
Tomb Raider Reborn photo
Tomb Raider Reborn

DeviantArt hosts Tomb Raider art contest

Draw for fun and profit
Feb 28
// Joshua Derocher
DeviantArt is hosting a Tomb Raider-themed art contest and prizes include Xbox 360s and up to $6,000 in cash. The goal is create an image that captures your personal interpretation of Lara Croft. All the official rules are a...

Reviews Elsewhere: Tomb Raider

Lara needs no 'protection' from critics
Feb 25
// Jim Sterling
Tomb Raider reviews spilled their juicy guts all over the Internet today, and it seems Square Enix was right to confidently lift embargo a week early. Reviews across the board have been almost universally positive, with Lara ...

James Gunn: Some sexism controversies are 'silly'

Jul 20 // Jim Sterling
"Here's the thing. People online -- and in life in general -- are always looking for reasons to be 'right.' They look for ways to be morally superior by making someone else 'wrong,' or some work of art 'wrong.' That's what both the Lollipop Chainsaw controversy and the Tomb Raider controversy are mostly about. They're people looking to be outraged and offended so they can let off some steam.   "In LC's case I say 'more power to them.' I believe they've helped to bring attention to a very small game and turn it into a very big game," he continued. "Our sales are way beyond what we could have ever imagined, and I think that those offended helped in some small way. In Tomb Raider's case, a much bigger property, I think they're being a little unfair, and I think we need to wait to see the game. I remember when Scorsese's Last Temptation of Christ came out and all those people were picketing, and none of them had seen the movie. These people are pretty much the same. Fifty years ago they probably also would have been calling up the Ed Sullivan show, protesting Elvis's hip movements." Gunn also had a few words to say about the issues surrounding the notorious Hitman trailer.  "What was poor Hitman supposed to do!? The poor guy was being attacked by those nuns in garter belts with huge guns," he argued. "OF COURSE he had to hit them and shoot them and strangle them. It was his life or theirs! What controversial about that?! "Oh, I see ... you mean that the creators decided to make the sexy nuns in the first place. Well, admittedly, that trailer IS shocking as hell. But, that's the point, isn't it? I think 'shocking' is written into the Hitman franchise's DNA.  As for the 'controversy' surrounding it, I just watched the trailer again on YouTube -- there were 3,200 'likes' and 130 'dislikes.' That doesn't really seem controversial. Obviously most people don't give a shit." Gunn closed by saying that a lot of the controversies are made up by news sites looking for content -- though he was kind enough to give Destructoid a free pass, stating that everything we post is "100% necessary." Thanks, James! As for Gunn's opinion on these controversies, I'm not as willing as he is to write any of them off. Even if some of the debacles are silly -- and I certainly agree that there is too much anger surrounding them, on both sides of the fence -- I still think the end result is beneficial. The fact that these discussions are happening, and exposing gamers to fresh perspectives, is ultimately a good thing, as I argued in my video series a while back. Some engrossing debate has been had, and I like to believe a good number of us have learned a lot.  Some elements have gotten too far, with people harassing and trying to take each other down, but I think the reasonable and rational among us will ultimately benefit from these storms. Maybe I'm just being far too optimistic ... but I'd rather be that than perpetually upset by the whole thing.  In any case, be sure to check out our full interview with James Gunn, as he discusses Lollipop Chainsaw and the issues of sexism in greater depth. 

The videogame industry has had a fair few controversies pertaining to gender equality lately, with both Hitman: Absolution and Tomb Raider coming under heavy criticism for the way women have been used in their marketing. Acco...


The EU Playstation Plus program nets two extra games

Jul 17
// Chris Carter
The EU Playstation Plus instant game collection is adding a few games this week -- Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light, and Saints Row 2. For those who are unaware, the program is running in different regions across the worl...

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