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Klei Entertainment

Awww heck yeah! photo
Awww heck yeah!

Invisible, Inc launching May 12, PS4 version in development


Awww heck yeah!
Apr 15
// Steven Hansen
I love Invisible, Inc. I gave it a game of the year award despite it being in Early Access. Well that's all done with. The excellent stealth-strategy game -- yes, you read that right, read the preview here -- will officially...

Don't Starve Together works just as well as you'd expect it to

Dec 16 // Chris Carter
[embed]284875:56620:0[/embed] Don't Starve Together is a separate client from the original, and boots up to a similar looking title screen. But because it isn't the same build, a few bells and whistles are noticeably absent, like controller support. Klei promises it will come in time as the beta progresses. Starting a game is just a click away. You can host servers, both temporary and dedicated, join random games, or create password-protected and "friends only" instances for up to six players. Three modes are available: Survival (the basic gametype, where if you die you become a ghost, and can be resurrected with a certain item), Wilderness (players suffer permadeath), and Endless. The former seems to be the standard. I decided to give the game a shot with my wife, who is the resident Don't Starve expert with over 200 hours of experience with the game. We started off in the wilderness with nothing, coming out on the same spot in a portal-like contraption. You are just as naked as you are in the original, picking at leaves and cutting trees to build your first base of operations. Speech bubbles appear above your head in your partner's game, which is a neat effect. Because of the multiplayer aspect of Together, it was fun to plan out our strategy. We split up and went our separate ways at times, or cooperated to chop down the same tree -- it was really open-ended. In theory, you could build an entire base twice as fast, kill enemies at double speed, and so on. With more players in the mix your efficiency will increase, but so will your ability to command the limited pool of goods. The cool thing about Together is how you can share items, or "give" them to another player by clicking on them. I was able to cook a bunch of food for my wife and hand it to her when she came back from an expedition empty-handed. It really works just as well as you'd expect, and I can't wait to see how the combination of multiple minds works service of the already fun game. If you still play Don't Starve from time to time, I'd highly recommend buying into Together if you have a friend willing to go in on it with you. Stay tuned for more coverage as the beta progresses.
Don't Starve Together photo
Still in beta
Starting this week, you can buy into the Don't Starve Together beta if you don't have access already. It's $5 if you own the base game, and it comes with a gift code for the core package as well as two Together code...

Don't Starve co-op photo
Don't Starve co-op

Paid Don't Starve Together beta access coming Monday


$4.99 for Don't Starve owners, or they can just wait for the free final launch
Dec 11
// Jordan Devore
I love that name, Don't Starve Together. Wonder if Steven likes it, too. This standalone expansion introduces multiplayer to Klei's unsettling world and, once released on Steam, it will be free for owners of the original gam...
Don't Starve Together photo
Don't Starve Together

Klei has generated two million beta keys for Don't Starve Together


They'll be giving them out in waves
Sep 24
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve Together is a multiplayer expansion that's set to come to the base game in the future. In anticipation for the release, developer Klei Entertainment has generated two million beta keys. First up for the beta...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

Don't Starve hits PS Vita next week with Cross-Buy


Reign of Giants expansion included
Aug 25
// Jordan Devore
Klei will release its sandbox survival game Don't Starve: Giant Edition for PS Vita on Tuesday, September 2. This port will come with the Reign of Giants DLC (more characters, biomes, seasons) included in its $14.99 price tag...
To dye for photo
To dye for

Invisible, Inc.'s tactical espionage action hits Early Access August 19


To dye for
Aug 14
// Steven Hansen
Invisible, Inc. is going to be one of my obsessions this year. Enough that I am actually going to play a game while it's in Steam Early Access (PC, Mac) rather than waiting for the hard launch. Plus, it will be priced at $16 while in Early Access before bumping up to $20 at launch.
Steam Early Access photo
Steam Early Access

Invisible, Inc. brings its tactical espionage to Steam Early Access this month


August 19
Aug 01
// Jordan Devore
Don't Starve and Mark of the Ninja studio Klei Entertainment has honed in on an August 19 Steam Early Access launch for its turn-based stealth game Invisible, Inc. It's been playable in an alpha capacity already, so this is j...

To dye for: Invisible Inc. is my kind of strategy-stealth game

Jul 17 // Steven Hansen
[embed]269093:52239:0[/embed] Invisible, Inc. (PC)Developer: Klei EntertainmentPublisher:  Klei Entertainment Invisible, Inc. requires balance because there are a lot of overlaid systems. You have roughly a week and half to work up to your final job. Each day is a mission (randomly generated), like having to rescue someone you can recruit to your spy team. There's a bit of Don't Starve's permadeath here, along with the assumption that you will fail, and that's okay. At least you're only losing a few hours of missions rather than an entire 30-hour XCOM campaign.  So, active stealth. On the top right of the screen is a counter that goes up each turn (occasionally by more than one block). As the level rises, extra security cameras will be turned on, more guards will enter the fray, and things will become impossible. That's the fire lit under you to keep the pace up and keep you from a) playing cautiously and b) playing obsessively. Aside from your main objective (which can have time constraints -- in rescuing a courier, he had to be extracted within a certain number of turns of he'd expire from fatigue) and obstacles, levels are all filled with things to hack for more resources. With the threat ticker, though, you won't necessarily have time to scour each and every blacked-out room on the map, which keeps things tense and makes sure you don't end up overpowered in subsequent missions because you got all the things. It isn't just active because of pacing, either. The UI is designed to give you as much information as possible, so that "when you die, it's your fault." You can even be alerted, with red spaces, when an area outside of your field of vision is potentially dangerous so you don't blindly, "fog of war" walk yourself into a game-ending scenario, because losing one of your operatives is basically a game over, though you can keep trying to power through until you lose every operative. And it's tough to keep them alive with guards (and, later, drones and things) walking about. Cross an enemy's field of vision and you're allowed to move exactly one space in reaction, if that helps get you out of the way, or send an ally to deal with the guard, before they one-hit kill you.  Again, active stealth. Even this you can use to your advantage. Edge around a corner in a guard's (separately defined) peripheral field of vision, then set a melee overwatch, and you can lure them to check it out and pounce like a trap-door spider. Every agent has a melee overwatch that incapacitates guards for two turns, or as long as you remain on top of them. If you get off for one turn, then get back on, that guard still only has one turn before they wake back up, confused. You can lure guards similarly by quickly opening and closing doors as you stand off to the side. Even the act of peeping becomes active. Rather than watching an enemy's movement pattern, the Observe action -- newly implemented after feedback from the alpha -- will let you know if a guard is patrolling, or just staying still. The idea, on a mission by mission basis and for the whole course of the game, is to gather information as best you can to become powerful. With Internationale's beefed-up hacking skills, hack a camera from afar to increase your field of view and figure out what's lurking behind obscured corners without putting yourself in danger. And of course everything is properly antagonistic. Even going up against a vanilla, drone-less corporation for the sake of this demo, Cheng nearly blew the entire mission. Some hackable things have protections installed that will do things like up the threat counter a few more ticks or prevent CPU, your hacking resource, from refilling. It will be necessary to hack them anyways and deal with the consequences. Null drones disable the Mainframe view in their radius, keeping you from hacking at all until you dispatch them with an EMP. In the alpha build that's been out this year, Cheng said the "only way [he] can play it is by using exploits the normal player won't know about." This current build, rejiggered from the alpha testing, looks fantastic. Invisible, Inc. will be coming to Early Access next month, sans final boss, in an effort to keep iterating on player feedback and getting the balancing just right. Me, I'll probably wait until the final release. When it comes, though, I have a feeling it'll be one of my favorite games this year. 
Preview Invisible, Inc. photo
XCOM meets Transistor, uh, meets a stealth game
A chasm in stealth games tends to be player skill and the supposed skills of super sleuth avatars. You're often eased into the situation, your lack of skill assumed, or you just fumble your way through -- especially with the ...

Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Don't Starve's Giants DLC is finally coming to PS4


It's a pretty nice addition
Jul 15
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve is a pretty awesome game, and I'm glad that it's playable on the PS4. The only problem is, the massive Reign of Giants DLC pack, which adds spring and summer alongside of over a hundred more updates isn't out ye...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

Don't Starve: Giant Edition will be a good fit for PlayStation Vita


Cause for celebration
Jun 06
// Jordan Devore
Klei Entertainment said it was looking into bringing Don't Starve to PS Vita and the studio confirmed today that it's moving forward with the port. This version will launch with the Reign of Giants DLC included -- that's two ...

Read the writing on the wall with Invisible, Inc.

Apr 17 // Darren Nakamura
Invisible, Inc. (PC)Developer: Klei Entertainment At a base level, Invisible, Inc. is fairly easy to grasp. The player controls a small team of spies tasked with infiltrating a well-guarded building and stealing information. The action takes place on a square grid, with areas out of line of sight not shown. Play alternates between the spy team and the corporate team, rather than by individual units. Units have a certain number of movement points along with one action point to spend every turn. One mechanic that allows the player to feel more like a heist coordinator is that each unit can be activated any number of times during a round, so long as that unit has action or movement points remaining. As a result, the player can move one unit to a corner, peek around it to see if the coast is clear, move a different unit down that hallway, and then return to the first to work toward a different objective. Using this ability to make plans come together feels particularly satisfying, but it also has some use when things fall apart as well. When a guard spots any of the spies, it will pursue unless incapacitated in some way. After stumbling with one character into sight, other characters might be able to jump in and help keep the guard busy. [embed]273342:53446:0[/embed] Directly engaging the guards is rarely the smartest option, but the spies do have a few tricks to employ in case they need to. Each unit can knock a guard out from behind, which incapacitates the guard for a full turn. Other abilities are made available through items, either equipped from the start or found throughout a mission. Of the two characters in the PAX demo, one had a single-shot tranquilizer gun that would put an enemy down for good, while the other had a low damage pistol, meant more for distraction or as a last resort than for taking guards down. The spy units have fairly meager health, only able to take two or three shots before going down. In contrast, the guards had something on the order of eight health apiece. Firefights or face-to-face brawls are not the way to go. One of the other aspects of Invisible, Inc. is the hacking screen. Bringing it up, players can see electronic devices in the vicinity, and by spending CPU points (which accumulate over time or can be found in safes), the devices can be hacked to work to the player's advantage. For instance, taking over a security camera will not only prevent agents from being spotted by it, but will also provide eyes on an area without having to be physically present. With those tools and some patience, the agents can hope to avoid detection, but things can go awry for those who take too long. Each turn, the threat level is increasing, and the corporation is becoming more and more aware of the spies' presence. Toward the end of my time with the demo, I was able to see an elite squad of guards dispatched, in addition to the native guards in the area. Were I not already about to lose, it would have been particularly worrisome. I can imagine getting into Invisible, Inc. pretty deeply. Like a lot of great games with procedurally generated environments, it seems brutally difficult at first, but each defeat teaches a lesson. At no point did I feel it was unfair, because everything that went wrong in my first mission was my fault, and the game systems do a good job at making that clear. Though a single mission does not run especially quickly, it is not so long that the "one more try" mentality is absent. So far, Klei is living up to their name in delivering fair, difficult stealth gameplay. I am looking forward to getting some more time with Invisible, Inc. Next time, I think I can do better...
Invisible Inc. photo
The writing says 'you are bad at this game'
Turn-based tactical espionage. Those words were all it took to sell me on the idea of Invisible, Inc. Going into the PAX demo, I knew I would have to be cunning, thoughtful, and sneaky if I wanted to successfully steal intell...

Don't Starve DLC photo
Don't Starve DLC

Don't Starve's Reign of Giants DLC out on Steam


Coming soon to the PS4
Apr 03
// Chris Carter
For those of you who have experienced countless deaths in Don't Starve, countless more await with the addition of the Reign of Giants DLC, which debuted on Steam today. After you download the add-on you can basically toggle i...
Invisible, Inc. photo
Invisible, Inc.

Invisible, Inc. shows off true tactical espionage action


I have an inkling this will be great
Mar 13
// Steven Hansen
I liked the name Incognita well enough, but I'm still impressed with Invisible, Inc. Damn. Klei's recent efforts (Mark of the Ninja, Don't Starve) should be enough to sell you on Invisible, Inc., which you can buy early and ...
Klei toys photo
Klei toys

Klei opens up an online toy storefront


Featuring Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve
Feb 19
// Chris Carter
Klei, the makers of great games like Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve, have opened up a digital storefront for the two aforementioned games. Although the former only offers up a $49.99 limited edition vinyl figure (whi...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Klei 'investigating' Don't Starve for PS Vita, mobile


iOS support less of a priority
Jan 21
// Jordan Devore
Klei Entertainment had previously mentioned it was "looking at" possibly doing a dedicated PS Vita version of its survival game Don't Starve, much to our delight. Now, community manager Corey Rollins tells Edge that the devel...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Klei teases Reign of Giants DLC for Don't Starve


Coming soon
Jan 17
// Jordan Devore
As if we don't already have enough to worry about in Don't Starve, from the obvious starvation and creeping insanity to tree monsters and whatever the hell this thing is, Klei Entertainment is adding to the list of things th...
Invisible Inc. photo
Invisible Inc.

Incognita is now called Invisible, Inc.


I just got that...
Jan 16
// Alasdair Duncan
Klei's strategy espionage title Incognita has been on my radar for a while and now the game has been re-christened as Invisible, Inc. I loved its previous game Mark of the Ninja, (Hey, Don't Starve is good too) and...

Even without Plus, Don't Starve is worth playing on PS4

Jan 08 // Jordan Devore
Don't Starve (Linux, Mac, PC, PlayStation 4)Developer: Klei EntertainmentPublisher: Klei EntertainmentReleased: April 23, 2013 (Linux, Mac, PC) / January 7, 2014 (PS4)MSRP: $14.99 (Free with PlayStation Plus) Klei Entertainment built up the Steam version of Don't Starve over the course of last year with continual updates. Like most other work-in-progress games available for purchase, I waited to give it a proper look until what's there was, in my mind, mostly well put together. Eventually, the word-of-mouth got to be too strong for me and I had no choice but to play what has gone on to become my favorite of the studio's titles. PlayStation 4 owners are lucky in that the game they're being introduced to is up to date with what's available on Steam. As described in Fraser Brown's original review for Destructoid, Don't Starve is a brutally difficult game of survival that revolves around acquiring resources and figuring out how best to use them to last another day. I'm quite bad at it, but that doesn't seem to matter one bit. It's entirely possible to have a thrilling time despite continuously failing to reach your own personal goals, whatever those might be. Often times, it's just "Make it to sunrise." The major difference on PS4 is the move away from mouse and keyboard controls. While that input method is more efficient and will be preferable for many players as a result, I quite like playing Don't Starve on a gamepad as well. Pressing L2 brings up your crafting menu, in real time, while pressing R2 pauses the action, zooms in on your inventory, and allows you to make adjustments at your own pace. Besides navigating through your inventory using the right analog stick, everything is about what you'd expect: face buttons perform primary actions, the d-pad allows you to use items in various ways, and the Touch Pad serves as an ideal map button. My only real complaint is that the item names and images can be difficult to make out, even when you enlarge the inventory. Otherwise, Don't Starve looks and plays wonderfully on PS4. Not every feature has made the transition to consoles so don't go in expecting, say, mod support. One omission I was sad to discover relates to how when first starting a run, you're able to customize the individual elements that'll be procedurally generated. The feature is still here, mostly. On PC, you could increase, decrease, or turn off elements -- such as Hounds, which I recommend new players do -- but that first option, making it so more Pigmen (or whatever) spawn in your customized world, doesn't seem to exist in this version. With a PlayStation Plus subscription, you should absolutely play this. You may not ultimately care for the game as it's rather clearly not intended to be enjoyed by everyone, but it represents some of the best in its genre and should be experienced nonetheless. Even without a Plus membership, however, Don't Starve is worth playing -- whether that be here on PS4 or on Steam. You can't go wrong either way. Alternatively, there's been chatter about a possible PS Vita version and that sure would hit the spot, wouldn't it?
Don't Starve PS4 photo
Still hungry
If you happen to be a PlayStation 4 owner who has yet to play Klei Entertainment's excellent Don't Starve, you are in for a real treat this week. PlayStation Plus members in particular should just go ahead and download it bli...

Don't Starve PS4 photo
Don't Starve PS4

Don't Starve is hitting the PS4 today, free on PS Plus


The survival game with horror elements comes to the PSN
Jan 07
// Chris Carter
Last year, Don't Starve hit the PC and took the community by storm. Although the game looks incredibly unique, there's an insane layer of depth there due to its genius design. Today, you can pick the game up on the PlayS...
PS+ free games photo
PS+ free games

PlayStation Plus freebies: Don't Starve (PS4), DmC (PS3)


DMSee you tomorrow
Jan 06
// Steven Hansen
Engorged on the blood of holiday sacrifice, PlayStation Plus is back tomorrow with free games and assorted discounts. The two you really need to know: Don't Starve will be free for PS4 users and last year's DmC will be free f...
Don't Starve Vita? photo
Don't Starve Vita?

Klei Entertainment 'looking' into Don't Starve on Vita


It would be a perfect union
Jan 06
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve was a pleasant surprise. Not only was the art direction wonderfully macabre, but it also provided one of the best survival experiences of 2013. As it gears up to hit consoles in the form of the PlayStation 4, one...
Klei photo
Klei

Klei's 'The Screecher' mod for Don't Starve is spooky


Yes, I jumped
Oct 24
// Jordan Devore
Klei Entertainment has added a free horror mod to Don't Starve, accessible from the main menu. It's called "The Screecher" and while there are shared elements with the core game -- we, the player, are still stranded in the wi...
Klei photo
Klei

Klei launches paid alpha build of Incognita


Sleek turn-based combat
Sep 10
// Jordan Devore
Klei Entertainment has opened pre-orders for its work-in-progress tactical espionage game Incognita. $16.99 gets you immediate access to the current alpha, future alpha and beta builds, and the final game when it releases in...
Klei photo
Klei

Mark of the Ninja Special Edition DLC out next week


Think of it as a 'Criterion Collection' version of the game
Aug 07
// Jordan Devore
On Friday, August 16, we'll have a good reason to boot up Mark of the Ninja again. That's when Klei Entertainment's masterful stealth game is getting its Special Edition DLC on Steam and Xbox Live Arcade for $4.99 / 400 Micro...
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Rayman on PC, Incognita, Saints Row IV & More Oculus XXX


The Destructoid Show likes turtles
Jul 26
// Max Scoville
Hey guys! I'm back! And here's today's Destructoid Show, gettin' nasty and stupid with its bad self. Rayman Legends is hitting PC, which is great. The Oculus Rift is supported by a game about sexy maids, Saints Row IV has a ...
Klei photo
Klei

First look at Klei's turn-based tactical game Incognita


Stick it to the man
Jul 26
// Jordan Devore
So this is what "turn-based tactical espionage" looks like when it's coming from the studio behind Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve. Klei Entertainment has kindly given us a first look at Incognita with a livestream that I...
 photo

GTA V, 400 Days of Summer, & Don Mattrickville


The Destructoid Show eats a whole cake by itself
Jul 02
// Max Scoville
Oh hey! Tara's back from Singapore! Let's talk about video games! Don Mattrick has left Microsoft to work for Zynga, Rockstar answers some Grand Theft Auto V questions, and The Walking Dead gets its interim DLC episode 400 Days in the next week, depending on your platform. Plus, Klei Entertainment's new game, Incognita is tactical turn-based stealth, and Proteus is coming to PS3/Vita.
Klei Entertainment photo
Klei Entertainment

Klei's Incognita offers 'turn-based tactical espionage'


Oh, it's on!
Jul 02
// Jordan Devore
Ever since Shank 2, Klei Entertainment has really stepped up in my mind as a studio to watch. If you've played either Don't Starve or Mark of the Ninja -- two games that killed it in their respective genres -- you're probably...
Weekly Humble Bundle photo
Weekly Humble Bundle

Klei Humble Weekly sale: Shank, Shank 2, Eets


Another slice of Humble pie
Jun 28
// Steven Hansen
You know the drill. A smorgasbord of games. You pay what you want -- as low as a penny, if your conscience can bear it. Preferably, you'll pitch in some dough to charity, some to the developers, and some to Humble Bundle, Inc...

Review: Don't Starve

Apr 29 // Fraser Brown
Don't Starve (PC)Developer: Klei EntertainmentPublisher: Klei EntertainmentReleased: April 23, 2013MSRP: $14.99 Don't Starve is both the title of Klei's latest videogame outing, and its single objective. Waking up in a savage wilderness, players are warned that night is approaching and that they should find something to eat. That one instruction is the impetus for a gruelling adventure filled with ravenous monsters and bad luck. It's a survival game by way of a roguelike, with a permadeath system just waiting to steal everything you've earned. Death lurks around every corner, and pretty much anything can spell your demise. An excursion into the forest for timber could end up with you getting pummelled into oblivion by a sentient tree, eating some unusual meat could give you food poisoning, and even the necessary act of starting a fire could end in a blazing inferno, consuming hundreds of trees and your own flesh. There's all that to look forward to if you manage to actually find something to eat before you die from starvation. At first it's actually quite simple, even if you do have to figure it all out for yourself. Berries and carrots can be found quite easily, and require no tools for gathering; so finding your first meal is as simple as walking around and using your eyes. Twigs and flint, required for making a torch, are also abundant, and so surviving for at least one night is not too tall an order. [embed]252531:48411:0[/embed] Simple scraps won't sustain your rapidly shrivelling belly for long, unfortunately, and the need for more hearty fare is what drives crafting and exploration. Cooking berries and carrots makes them a bit more nutritious, and that requires a proper fire -- none of that torch nonsense -- which means stones must be found along with logs for fuel, and this leads to the crafting of your first axe and pickaxe. Take that, nature! Have you ever chomped on roasted carrot before? It won't stave off a rumbling stomach for much longer than raw carrot. So once more, bigger morsels must be searched for. Rabbits can be snared, and that necessitates a trap, or the mighty beefalo can be hunted, though not without decent weapons and armor.  The wandering life of a beefalo murderer is not a glamorous one, I can tell you. Half of your day will be spent running away from a charging herd, and that's no fun at all. So it's a good thing that farming is an option, albeit a dirty one that smells of manure.   Playing Don't Starve is a bit like watching the history of human civilization in fast forward, if humanity amounted to one man trapped in a horrific wilderness. Simple hunting and gathering leads to farming and construction, and that in turn leads to light industry and invention, but it doesn't take thousands of years.  Within a few days, I had gone from a half starved nomad with a bushy beard and a grass tunic to a clean shaven farmer with cooking appliances, several farms, and even some beehives. It was around that time when I first met Philip. Pigmen are cowardly and stupid, but unlike everything else in the god-forsaken world of Don't Starve, they won't try to kill you unless you try to kill them (or unless it's a full moon and they've all turned into werepigs, I shit you not). They can even be befriended, should you feed them some of your delicious meat. Pig friends will join you on your adventures -- as long as it stays light -- chopping down trees, fighting monsters, and providing much needed conversation... well, they speak at least.  I befriended Philip because I felt sorry for him, and because I was responsible for his status as an orphan. During one of my expeditions, I had encountered a silky, bulbous sack, which I sensibly prodded with my spear. This caused several ebony, skittering, evil spiders to erupt from the sack, and chase me. Lamentably, I led them right into Pigtown.  The pigmen sprung into action, punching and shouting at the foul invaders, but it didn't look like they were going to manage to fend them off. I did the only rational thing a man with a torch could do -- I burned down the whole flipping place. It did, I'm proud to say, kill all of the spiders, but it also lead to the deaths of six pigmen. All that was left was a lot of meat, which I grabbed, and a lot of silk, which I also grabbed, and one solitary pig, young Philip. I fed him some of the meat I'd just acquired, and thinking about it, I probably fed him his uncle or some other relative. Regardless, he became my chum. Even with a companion, Don't Starve is a punishing experience. When night descends -- with unseen monsters and alien noises -- getting caught without light causes death in mere seconds, and as time plods on, new monsters appear, and even daylight ceases to provide safe harbor. There are so many threats that survival becomes a juggling act, requiring a lot of risk assessment. You're starving, so you need to find more food, but you're also exhausted, and sleep deprivation is turning your hallucinations into tangible horrors that will almost certainly kill you. Do you construct a sleeping mat and grab forty winks? Or do you risk venturing out into the wilds to hunt down a potentially dangerous animal? With short day and night cycles and rapidly increasing hunger and decreasing sanity, Don't Starve has a constant sense of urgency -- there's never any time for relaxation. It's stressful, and if you do happen to get caught with your pants down, you'll have to start the process all over again with none of your resources, and on a new map. Starting the exhausting experience all over again can be a bit of a grind, especially during the first few days. Don't Starve's early-game is a bit dull, with berry picking and carrot hunting taking up most of one's time, and if you've done it all before, it can be extremely monotonous. The randomly generated maps -- which can be customized before you begin -- offer up a lot of replay value, but it doesn't make the early stages of the game any more entertaining.  A day is less than ten minutes long, however, so within half an hour, things start to pick up again. The desire to improve and to live longer is a great motivator when starting over, and the continual escalation of challenge should keep anyone looking to test their mettle content. Extra characters, each with their own unique quirks and strengths, also go a long way to increasing the longevity of the title. Sometimes they can make it easier, but sometimes they increase the difficulty.  Though it's hidden away, there's an adventure mode -- complete with a story -- to be discovered within the main survival mode, and that represents the greatest of Don't Starve's challenges. The game ceases to be about mere survival, and becomes a desperate attempt to escape from an invisible prison.  As with all of Klei's games, Don't Starve has a strong, memorable art-style, though it stands out from the developer's other titles. It looks like a pop-up story book devised by Tim Burton, it's quirky but hauntingly ominous. It's matched by a dark sense of humor that permeates throughout the whole game, with characters making quips or amusing observations, and monster appearances being absurd as much as they are off-putting.  Playing Don't Starve can be infuriating. There's absolutely no guidance, and the initial punishing difficulty only increases. It demands that players figure things out for themselves and progress through exploration and experimentation rather than being spoonfed hints and tips. Its uncompromising nature will undoubtedly leave some unsatisfied and irritated, but for those who are willing to work and take risks, it pays off. The feeling of accomplishment when you manage to fend off countless cruel beasties, survive unrelenting foul weather, and fill your belly is potent. Mastering the wilderness is a difficult road, but from it comes a sense of empowerment. Of course, you could still lose it all in an instant. Such is the fickle nature of Don't Starve.  
Don't Starve review photo
Or go insane, eat odd meat, fight trees, get struck by lightning, or die
I sat across the fire from my longtime companion, Philip the pigman, in complete silence. Philip and I had been through a lot together, hunting down terrifying creatures of the night, felling mighty trees, and scoffing all th...


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