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Klei Entertainment

Don't Starve multiplayer photo
Don't Starve multiplayer

Check your library for a free copy of Don't Starve Together


Assuming you own the original PC game
Jun 03
// Jordan Devore
With more people comes more mouths to feed, but I think I'll take that responsibility over crushing loneliness in Don't Starve. A paid, work-in-progress version of the standalone multiplayer expansion, Don't Starve Together, ...
Hack photo
Hack

Locked Steam achievement requires you to hack game's code


Invisible, Inc.
May 26
// Steven Hansen
It's not to say that secrets are no fun anymore, but the internet sure can take the luster out of 'em. I mean, what would have been the point of my dog eared, note scribbled Myst notebook if I could solve the whole thing cons...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

If you buy Don't Starve on Wii U soon, you'll get a free gift copy


Not bad
May 22
// Chris Carter
We already knew that Don't Starve was heading to the Wii U on May 28 (June 4 in Europe), but now we can confirm that developer Klei Entertainment has sweetened the deal a bit. If you buy the game for $14.99 before J...

Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Don't Starve for Wii U will arrive on May 28


With the Giant Edition in tow
May 19
// Chris Carter
I still know quite a few people who haven't stopped playing Don't Starve. Gamers all across the globe are still uncovering secrets for it years later -- a testament to Klei Entertainment's developmental skills. Pretty soon yo...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Four indies, including Don't Starve, are invading LittleBigPlanet


Also, Octodad, Velocity, and Thomas
May 15
// Chris Carter
Sony is still coasting along, supporting LittleBigPlanet 3 with plenty of costumes and level-packs. The last content drop was based around Adventure Time, but the next one will give some indie games some love -- specific...

Review: Invisible, Inc.

May 12 // Steven Hansen
Invisible, Inc. (PC [reviewed], Mac)Developers: Klei EntertainmentPublisher: Klei EntertainmentReleased: May 12, 2015Price: $19.99 Stealth games often offer two tonal paths. You are ill-equipped, powerless and possibly stay that way (horror), or you are preternaturally talented, improving stats and skills further until you are Batman-like (most "detective mode" games). Invisible, Inc. gives you all the information needed to succeed. Sight lines are obvious and clear. Enemy routes can be precisely observed (for 1 AP). You can peek around corners or behind doors (again, 1 AP). And you have the Incognita system which can hack devices -- cameras, turrets, item machines -- to help you complete your infiltrations. Screw ups aren't twitch-based dissonance, like frantically steering Snake into a wall when spotted. What you butt up against, then, is a series of balanced checks that gives you tools to succeed and becomes about execution. Hacking requires power, which can be stolen from consoles or generated once per turn (with the default Incognita setup). Agent movement is limited by action points. Hastily enter a door and you may be exposed, without enough AP to set up behind cover. Peek and observe the patrol route of the guard next door and you may find that he is coming right to where you are, your melee stun device is still recharging, and you no longer have the AP needed to get back into cover. And if you think the answer is to take things slow, creeping along a few squares at a time, know that each procedurally generated stage has an alarm that raises by one tick each turn. Every time the alarm goes up a full level, you'll be facing additional cameras or extra, better outfitted guards, or higher power costs when hacking.  [embed]291971:58506:0[/embed] All the systems are at odds with each other and it is exhilarating. You want to find the exit quickly, before things get too difficult to handle, yet the whole point of your infiltration to to quickly prepare for a big standoff, which means it's better to steal all the credits and gear that you can, to explore every room. You have to spend power to open safes, but also to rewire cameras or turrets, things that can more presently do you in. But not doing enough, not filching everything, feels like it will do you in in the long run, too. Credits buy you new gear, which becomes necessary for dealing with tougher enemies, but it's also what you spend to upgrade your agents' movement distance, ability to gain more power from consoles, and so on. It's elegant as hell. A commensurate arms race. You fly around the world, eating hours off the countdown clock. If you take a harder ranked mission, you're more likely to lose, but if you don't, will you be able to win in the long run? For every "2x armor piercing stun baton" you pick up, the next stage could have 3 times armored enemies. There are killing weapons, too. They're good because the enemies won't wake up a couple turns later (they stay incapacitated if an agent is physically pinning them down), but have limited ammo, raise the alarm level more quickly, and leave you paying a bit of "cleaner costs." Decisions, decisions. I love the constant duress and how many options you have. While all the stages are procedurally generated, you do have some idea of what you're getting into, depending on the type of infiltration (going for a vault? a terminal with locations of more points of interest? an executive's suite?) and the particular company (one is particularly robot heavy, rendering your knock out sticks useless) whose site you're breaking into. There's wiggle room. You decide what you're going for. Money takes precedence for me, mostly for agent upgrades, followed by labs that allow me to add cybernetic upgrades to my agents. Of course, a detention center could be housing a third or fourth agent as well, and numbers can be useful if you have the means to outfit them all, or ruthlessly treat new additions as expendable. And while you start off with two default agents and two default power-gaining and hacking programs, you can unlock more mid-game (buy new programs, rescue captive agents), as well as unlock them for use at the start of a campaign. They have different latent skills or default items. And each agent has an alternate with a different load out yet and a new backstory. The programs, too, offer anxiety-inducing risk-reward choices. One power per turn, or two power per turn with the chance of spawning a harmful daemon? Maybe couple that with a lockable character who gains power on enemy daemon installs in an attempt to even out the risks. Klei has also created a robust set of options that allows you to tune the experience to your liking. There are three "standard" modes: beginner, experienced, and expert. Mind you I've played Invisible, Inc. 40 plus hours prior to this, but I found beginner to be too non-threatening of a cakewalk, so maybe start with experienced? Note that expert is the "base difficulty and tuning." Within these options, you can toggle one-turn rewinds (and how many) as well as whole level retries. You can even go deeper than that to adjust settings to your liking. You can extend the campaign from 72 hours, dictate starting power level, turn off danger zone warnings, and more. And on top of all that, there is an extra difficult "expert plus," an endless mode, and an extra difficult endless mode. You can fine tune 20 or so settings in all of them. The turn-based stealth gameplay is empowering, but fraught and fleeting each time you dive deeper into one of the world's least architecturally sensible corporate buildings, rooms budding off rooms, some empty, some dangerous, all necessary. It's a fight to stay equally matched with your enemies and make it to the end. Things can and will go wrong. Sometimes life-saving maneuvering just delays an impending, inevitable loss as you bring the full weight of the guard down on your head. And it's almost always your own damn fault, which is why you'll try again.
Invisible, Inc. photo
Invisible, man
It feels weird to be finally reviewing a game I played more than anything else last year despite it being in Early Access. I mean, I already gave it a Game of the Year award. Klei (Don't Starve, Mark of the Ninja) has perfect...

Review: Crypt of the NecroDancer

May 04 // Patrick Hancock
Crypt of the NecroDancer (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Brace Yourself GamesPublisher: Brace Yourself Games, KleiRelease Date: April 23, 2015MSRP: $14.99 It would be a criminal act to not immediately mention the music in Crypt of the NecroDancer as it plays a starring role and deserves the first-paragraph treatment. This is mostly due to the fact that music is interwoven into the gameplay itself. The player can only act in time with the beat, which is also when the enemies act. Said beat has a visual representation on the bottom of the screen to help players get accustomed to it, but after a short while most players will be acting based on the audio cue, not the visual. When done correctly, the music, movements, and sound effects line up to create something that can only be described as "groovy."  In a game where music is at the core of the experience, the soundtrack could have easily made the game fall flat. Thankfully, this is not the case. There are three soundtracks built into the game. The default music is by Danny Baranowsky, and it is amazingly brilliant and brilliantly amazing. The tunes for each level are varied, yet all of them are catchy. The other soundtracks are a metal remix by FamilyJules7X and an EDM version by A_Rival, and also assuage the eardrums. Regardless of music preference, players are bound to dig one, if not all, of these versions. It's also possible for players to import their own music for people who don't like good music, or just want to work with something different.  The game isn't just about boppin' along to some great music, though; there is a story at play here. There are cutscenes for characters between zones, and paying attention to them, as well as some in-game hints, alludes to a pretty big overarching story. It's split over multiple playthroughs with different characters, so it will take some time to reveal the whole thing. The lore is legitimately interesting, something many players may not be expecting.  Every action is mapped to the arrow keys. In fact, the game can even be played with a dance pad! There's a specific mode for dance pad play, which makes the game a bit easier since the control method is inherently more difficult. This also serves as an easier mode to introduce players to the game who don't feel they are up to the full challenge quite yet. When playing with a controller, everything is mapped to the face buttons, which can also be remapped to the player's liking. [embed]291156:58414:0[/embed] Attacking is as simple as pressing the direction of the enemy. Items and spells are also available, and are used by pressing a combination of two arrow keys. For example, to use a bomb, players must press down and left (by default) on the beat. Various weapon types will alter where enemies can be killed in relation to the player, and it is of the utmost important to know a weapon's attack range. When moving, the game will check if anything can be attacked first. So if a player is expecting to move forward but an enemy is within attack range, the attack will happen. This means the character will remain stationary, which can be bad news in certain situations. Knowing these attack mechanics is crucial, and thankfully there is a weapon range in the game where players can try out all the different types of weapons and learn them inside and out. I recommend doing this at least once, especially for the whip. In addition to weapons, players have access to a shovel for digging through walls, a consumable item, a torch, armor, a ring, and a spell. Armor is split up into head, chest, and feet, making there a lot of items to equip for a full "set." The items found are random so make sure to pray to RNGesus before each run! Many items must be unlocked before they show up in chests within the dungeon. Unlocking items is permanent and costs diamonds, which can be found in the dungeon itself. Any diamonds not spent in between runs are lost forever, giving the player all the incentive in the world to spend them on something. It's the perfect system of progression in a game that otherwise has very little, ensuring that even the "terrible" runs can usually yield some sort of good news and contribute to the greater good. The dungeon is split into four distinct zones, each with its own atmosphere, enemies, and randomly generated layout. The first two are on the simpler side of things, but the third and fourth zones introduce new tile mechanics and are completely unique. It's amazing how fast confidence plummets after beating one zone and entering another. It's easy to be on a bit of a high after beating a boss for the first time, only to be introduced to a brand new area where players know basically nothing. It's a kick in the pants, and it feels so good. Speaking of the boss fights, each one in NecroDancer is incredibly memorable. Each one has its own theme and executes it perfectly. My favorite is definitely Deep Blues, which puts the player against an entire set of chess pieces as enemies, who move according to the chess ruleset. Seeing a boss for the first time usually results in a bit of laughter followed by an "oh shit" as the gravity of the situation sets in. Then death, of course. Some bosses are definitely easier to comprehend than others (I don't want to use the term "easier in general"), and the boss fights at the end of zones one through three are randomly chosen, which exacerbates the feeling of luck that's inherent in the roguelike genre. There's likely going to be some aggravation from time to time, simply because of bad luck. This frustration is lessened because of the diamond system, but the feeling of futility is occasionally hard to fight back, especially when there's nothing left to spend diamonds on. While each zone shares some common enemies, the enemy variety in each zone is largely unique. Some weapons may feel overpowered in one zone, and completely useless in another simply because of the change in enemy behavior. This makes the "all zones" runs that much harder. Some enemy types will be "buffed" in later zones, adding more health or variants on the original behavior. After completing the four core areas, there is still plenty to keep players occupied. Crypt of the NecroDancer also supports mods, and they are dead simple to use. All you have to do is download a mod from the Steam Workshop, then activate it from the pause menu. Many of the mods are currently music changes or skin changes, but only time will tell how far they go in the future. Different characters are also unlocked by accomplishing certain goals, and these characters are way more than just re-skins of the main character, Candace. The Monk, for example, can choose any one item from the Shopkeeper for free, but will die instantly if he lands on gold. Considering gold is dropped by literally every enemy, this forces a huge change in playstyle. I couldn't even get past the first zone! In addition to the standard dungeon, which can also be tackled with two players in local multiplayer, there is a boss fight arena, an enemy behavior trainer, a codex for advanced skills, a daily challenge, and a level editor. Beating the game once is really only the beginning. There are enough variations on the basic playthrough to keep players coming back for a long time. Crypt of the NecroDancer accomplishes what few games even attempt to do. It merges together two completely different genres: rhythm and roguelike. The frustrations of both come as part of the package, but some intelligent design decisions help to alleviate the issue. For those looking for the next gaming obsession after the likes of Spelunky, Binding of Isaac, or Rogue Legacy, look no further than Crypt of the NecroDancer. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
NecroDancer review! photo
Tunes from the crypt
Dance Dance Revolution was a large part of an earlier era of my life. Going though dance pads year after year until I finally convinced my parents to get me one of the "big boy" pads for a lot more money. Eventually I gr...

Don't Starve Together photo
Don't Starve Together

Don't Starve Together adds Reign of Giants DLC for free


Still isn't out of its testing phase though
Apr 21
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve was released all the way back in 2013, but developer Klei Entertainment still isn't done with it yet. In addition to the Reign of Giants expansion/DLC in 2014, Don't Starve Together, a multiplayer game currently...
Awww heck yeah! photo
Awww heck yeah!

Invisible, Inc launching May 12, PS4 version in development


Awww heck yeah!
Apr 15
// Steven Hansen
I love Invisible, Inc. I gave it a game of the year award despite it being in Early Access. Well that's all done with. The excellent stealth-strategy game -- yes, you read that right, read the preview here -- will officially...

Don't Starve Together works just as well as you'd expect it to

Dec 16 // Chris Carter
[embed]284875:56620:0[/embed] Don't Starve Together is a separate client from the original, and boots up to a similar looking title screen. But because it isn't the same build, a few bells and whistles are noticeably absent, like controller support. Klei promises it will come in time as the beta progresses. Starting a game is just a click away. You can host servers, both temporary and dedicated, join random games, or create password-protected and "friends only" instances for up to six players. Three modes are available: Survival (the basic gametype, where if you die you become a ghost, and can be resurrected with a certain item), Wilderness (players suffer permadeath), and Endless. The former seems to be the standard. I decided to give the game a shot with my wife, who is the resident Don't Starve expert with over 200 hours of experience with the game. We started off in the wilderness with nothing, coming out on the same spot in a portal-like contraption. You are just as naked as you are in the original, picking at leaves and cutting trees to build your first base of operations. Speech bubbles appear above your head in your partner's game, which is a neat effect. Because of the multiplayer aspect of Together, it was fun to plan out our strategy. We split up and went our separate ways at times, or cooperated to chop down the same tree -- it was really open-ended. In theory, you could build an entire base twice as fast, kill enemies at double speed, and so on. With more players in the mix your efficiency will increase, but so will your ability to command the limited pool of goods. The cool thing about Together is how you can share items, or "give" them to another player by clicking on them. I was able to cook a bunch of food for my wife and hand it to her when she came back from an expedition empty-handed. It really works just as well as you'd expect, and I can't wait to see how the combination of multiple minds works service of the already fun game. If you still play Don't Starve from time to time, I'd highly recommend buying into Together if you have a friend willing to go in on it with you. Stay tuned for more coverage as the beta progresses.
Don't Starve Together photo
Still in beta
Starting this week, you can buy into the Don't Starve Together beta if you don't have access already. It's $5 if you own the base game, and it comes with a gift code for the core package as well as two Together code...

Don't Starve co-op photo
Don't Starve co-op

Paid Don't Starve Together beta access coming Monday


$4.99 for Don't Starve owners, or they can just wait for the free final launch
Dec 11
// Jordan Devore
I love that name, Don't Starve Together. Wonder if Steven likes it, too. This standalone expansion introduces multiplayer to Klei's unsettling world and, once released on Steam, it will be free for owners of the original gam...
Don't Starve Together photo
Don't Starve Together

Klei has generated two million beta keys for Don't Starve Together


They'll be giving them out in waves
Sep 24
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve Together is a multiplayer expansion that's set to come to the base game in the future. In anticipation for the release, developer Klei Entertainment has generated two million beta keys. First up for the beta...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

Don't Starve hits PS Vita next week with Cross-Buy


Reign of Giants expansion included
Aug 25
// Jordan Devore
Klei will release its sandbox survival game Don't Starve: Giant Edition for PS Vita on Tuesday, September 2. This port will come with the Reign of Giants DLC (more characters, biomes, seasons) included in its $14.99 price tag...
To dye for photo
To dye for

Invisible, Inc.'s tactical espionage action hits Early Access August 19


To dye for
Aug 14
// Steven Hansen
Invisible, Inc. is going to be one of my obsessions this year. Enough that I am actually going to play a game while it's in Steam Early Access (PC, Mac) rather than waiting for the hard launch. Plus, it will be priced at $16 while in Early Access before bumping up to $20 at launch.
Steam Early Access photo
Steam Early Access

Invisible, Inc. brings its tactical espionage to Steam Early Access this month


August 19
Aug 01
// Jordan Devore
Don't Starve and Mark of the Ninja studio Klei Entertainment has honed in on an August 19 Steam Early Access launch for its turn-based stealth game Invisible, Inc. It's been playable in an alpha capacity already, so this is j...

To dye for: Invisible Inc. is my kind of strategy-stealth game

Jul 17 // Steven Hansen
[embed]269093:52239:0[/embed] Invisible, Inc. (PC)Developer: Klei EntertainmentPublisher:  Klei Entertainment Invisible, Inc. requires balance because there are a lot of overlaid systems. You have roughly a week and half to work up to your final job. Each day is a mission (randomly generated), like having to rescue someone you can recruit to your spy team. There's a bit of Don't Starve's permadeath here, along with the assumption that you will fail, and that's okay. At least you're only losing a few hours of missions rather than an entire 30-hour XCOM campaign.  So, active stealth. On the top right of the screen is a counter that goes up each turn (occasionally by more than one block). As the level rises, extra security cameras will be turned on, more guards will enter the fray, and things will become impossible. That's the fire lit under you to keep the pace up and keep you from a) playing cautiously and b) playing obsessively. Aside from your main objective (which can have time constraints -- in rescuing a courier, he had to be extracted within a certain number of turns of he'd expire from fatigue) and obstacles, levels are all filled with things to hack for more resources. With the threat ticker, though, you won't necessarily have time to scour each and every blacked-out room on the map, which keeps things tense and makes sure you don't end up overpowered in subsequent missions because you got all the things. It isn't just active because of pacing, either. The UI is designed to give you as much information as possible, so that "when you die, it's your fault." You can even be alerted, with red spaces, when an area outside of your field of vision is potentially dangerous so you don't blindly, "fog of war" walk yourself into a game-ending scenario, because losing one of your operatives is basically a game over, though you can keep trying to power through until you lose every operative. And it's tough to keep them alive with guards (and, later, drones and things) walking about. Cross an enemy's field of vision and you're allowed to move exactly one space in reaction, if that helps get you out of the way, or send an ally to deal with the guard, before they one-hit kill you.  Again, active stealth. Even this you can use to your advantage. Edge around a corner in a guard's (separately defined) peripheral field of vision, then set a melee overwatch, and you can lure them to check it out and pounce like a trap-door spider. Every agent has a melee overwatch that incapacitates guards for two turns, or as long as you remain on top of them. If you get off for one turn, then get back on, that guard still only has one turn before they wake back up, confused. You can lure guards similarly by quickly opening and closing doors as you stand off to the side. Even the act of peeping becomes active. Rather than watching an enemy's movement pattern, the Observe action -- newly implemented after feedback from the alpha -- will let you know if a guard is patrolling, or just staying still. The idea, on a mission by mission basis and for the whole course of the game, is to gather information as best you can to become powerful. With Internationale's beefed-up hacking skills, hack a camera from afar to increase your field of view and figure out what's lurking behind obscured corners without putting yourself in danger. And of course everything is properly antagonistic. Even going up against a vanilla, drone-less corporation for the sake of this demo, Cheng nearly blew the entire mission. Some hackable things have protections installed that will do things like up the threat counter a few more ticks or prevent CPU, your hacking resource, from refilling. It will be necessary to hack them anyways and deal with the consequences. Null drones disable the Mainframe view in their radius, keeping you from hacking at all until you dispatch them with an EMP. In the alpha build that's been out this year, Cheng said the "only way [he] can play it is by using exploits the normal player won't know about." This current build, rejiggered from the alpha testing, looks fantastic. Invisible, Inc. will be coming to Early Access next month, sans final boss, in an effort to keep iterating on player feedback and getting the balancing just right. Me, I'll probably wait until the final release. When it comes, though, I have a feeling it'll be one of my favorite games this year. 
Preview Invisible, Inc. photo
XCOM meets Transistor, uh, meets a stealth game
A chasm in stealth games tends to be player skill and the supposed skills of super sleuth avatars. You're often eased into the situation, your lack of skill assumed, or you just fumble your way through -- especially with the ...

Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Don't Starve's Giants DLC is finally coming to PS4


It's a pretty nice addition
Jul 15
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve is a pretty awesome game, and I'm glad that it's playable on the PS4. The only problem is, the massive Reign of Giants DLC pack, which adds spring and summer alongside of over a hundred more updates isn't out ye...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

Don't Starve: Giant Edition will be a good fit for PlayStation Vita


Cause for celebration
Jun 06
// Jordan Devore
Klei Entertainment said it was looking into bringing Don't Starve to PS Vita and the studio confirmed today that it's moving forward with the port. This version will launch with the Reign of Giants DLC included -- that's two ...

Read the writing on the wall with Invisible, Inc.

Apr 17 // Darren Nakamura
Invisible, Inc. (PC)Developer: Klei Entertainment At a base level, Invisible, Inc. is fairly easy to grasp. The player controls a small team of spies tasked with infiltrating a well-guarded building and stealing information. The action takes place on a square grid, with areas out of line of sight not shown. Play alternates between the spy team and the corporate team, rather than by individual units. Units have a certain number of movement points along with one action point to spend every turn. One mechanic that allows the player to feel more like a heist coordinator is that each unit can be activated any number of times during a round, so long as that unit has action or movement points remaining. As a result, the player can move one unit to a corner, peek around it to see if the coast is clear, move a different unit down that hallway, and then return to the first to work toward a different objective. Using this ability to make plans come together feels particularly satisfying, but it also has some use when things fall apart as well. When a guard spots any of the spies, it will pursue unless incapacitated in some way. After stumbling with one character into sight, other characters might be able to jump in and help keep the guard busy. [embed]273342:53446:0[/embed] Directly engaging the guards is rarely the smartest option, but the spies do have a few tricks to employ in case they need to. Each unit can knock a guard out from behind, which incapacitates the guard for a full turn. Other abilities are made available through items, either equipped from the start or found throughout a mission. Of the two characters in the PAX demo, one had a single-shot tranquilizer gun that would put an enemy down for good, while the other had a low damage pistol, meant more for distraction or as a last resort than for taking guards down. The spy units have fairly meager health, only able to take two or three shots before going down. In contrast, the guards had something on the order of eight health apiece. Firefights or face-to-face brawls are not the way to go. One of the other aspects of Invisible, Inc. is the hacking screen. Bringing it up, players can see electronic devices in the vicinity, and by spending CPU points (which accumulate over time or can be found in safes), the devices can be hacked to work to the player's advantage. For instance, taking over a security camera will not only prevent agents from being spotted by it, but will also provide eyes on an area without having to be physically present. With those tools and some patience, the agents can hope to avoid detection, but things can go awry for those who take too long. Each turn, the threat level is increasing, and the corporation is becoming more and more aware of the spies' presence. Toward the end of my time with the demo, I was able to see an elite squad of guards dispatched, in addition to the native guards in the area. Were I not already about to lose, it would have been particularly worrisome. I can imagine getting into Invisible, Inc. pretty deeply. Like a lot of great games with procedurally generated environments, it seems brutally difficult at first, but each defeat teaches a lesson. At no point did I feel it was unfair, because everything that went wrong in my first mission was my fault, and the game systems do a good job at making that clear. Though a single mission does not run especially quickly, it is not so long that the "one more try" mentality is absent. So far, Klei is living up to their name in delivering fair, difficult stealth gameplay. I am looking forward to getting some more time with Invisible, Inc. Next time, I think I can do better...
Invisible Inc. photo
The writing says 'you are bad at this game'
Turn-based tactical espionage. Those words were all it took to sell me on the idea of Invisible, Inc. Going into the PAX demo, I knew I would have to be cunning, thoughtful, and sneaky if I wanted to successfully steal intell...

Don't Starve DLC photo
Don't Starve DLC

Don't Starve's Reign of Giants DLC out on Steam


Coming soon to the PS4
Apr 03
// Chris Carter
For those of you who have experienced countless deaths in Don't Starve, countless more await with the addition of the Reign of Giants DLC, which debuted on Steam today. After you download the add-on you can basically toggle i...
Invisible, Inc. photo
Invisible, Inc.

Invisible, Inc. shows off true tactical espionage action


I have an inkling this will be great
Mar 13
// Steven Hansen
I liked the name Incognita well enough, but I'm still impressed with Invisible, Inc. Damn. Klei's recent efforts (Mark of the Ninja, Don't Starve) should be enough to sell you on Invisible, Inc., which you can buy early and ...
Klei toys photo
Klei toys

Klei opens up an online toy storefront


Featuring Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve
Feb 19
// Chris Carter
Klei, the makers of great games like Mark of the Ninja and Don't Starve, have opened up a digital storefront for the two aforementioned games. Although the former only offers up a $49.99 limited edition vinyl figure (whi...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Klei 'investigating' Don't Starve for PS Vita, mobile


iOS support less of a priority
Jan 21
// Jordan Devore
Klei Entertainment had previously mentioned it was "looking at" possibly doing a dedicated PS Vita version of its survival game Don't Starve, much to our delight. Now, community manager Corey Rollins tells Edge that the devel...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Klei teases Reign of Giants DLC for Don't Starve


Coming soon
Jan 17
// Jordan Devore
As if we don't already have enough to worry about in Don't Starve, from the obvious starvation and creeping insanity to tree monsters and whatever the hell this thing is, Klei Entertainment is adding to the list of things th...
Invisible Inc. photo
Invisible Inc.

Incognita is now called Invisible, Inc.


I just got that...
Jan 16
// Alasdair Duncan
Klei's strategy espionage title Incognita has been on my radar for a while and now the game has been re-christened as Invisible, Inc. I loved its previous game Mark of the Ninja, (Hey, Don't Starve is good too) and...

Even without Plus, Don't Starve is worth playing on PS4

Jan 08 // Jordan Devore
Don't Starve (Linux, Mac, PC, PlayStation 4)Developer: Klei EntertainmentPublisher: Klei EntertainmentReleased: April 23, 2013 (Linux, Mac, PC) / January 7, 2014 (PS4)MSRP: $14.99 (Free with PlayStation Plus) Klei Entertainment built up the Steam version of Don't Starve over the course of last year with continual updates. Like most other work-in-progress games available for purchase, I waited to give it a proper look until what's there was, in my mind, mostly well put together. Eventually, the word-of-mouth got to be too strong for me and I had no choice but to play what has gone on to become my favorite of the studio's titles. PlayStation 4 owners are lucky in that the game they're being introduced to is up to date with what's available on Steam. As described in Fraser Brown's original review for Destructoid, Don't Starve is a brutally difficult game of survival that revolves around acquiring resources and figuring out how best to use them to last another day. I'm quite bad at it, but that doesn't seem to matter one bit. It's entirely possible to have a thrilling time despite continuously failing to reach your own personal goals, whatever those might be. Often times, it's just "Make it to sunrise." The major difference on PS4 is the move away from mouse and keyboard controls. While that input method is more efficient and will be preferable for many players as a result, I quite like playing Don't Starve on a gamepad as well. Pressing L2 brings up your crafting menu, in real time, while pressing R2 pauses the action, zooms in on your inventory, and allows you to make adjustments at your own pace. Besides navigating through your inventory using the right analog stick, everything is about what you'd expect: face buttons perform primary actions, the d-pad allows you to use items in various ways, and the Touch Pad serves as an ideal map button. My only real complaint is that the item names and images can be difficult to make out, even when you enlarge the inventory. Otherwise, Don't Starve looks and plays wonderfully on PS4. Not every feature has made the transition to consoles so don't go in expecting, say, mod support. One omission I was sad to discover relates to how when first starting a run, you're able to customize the individual elements that'll be procedurally generated. The feature is still here, mostly. On PC, you could increase, decrease, or turn off elements -- such as Hounds, which I recommend new players do -- but that first option, making it so more Pigmen (or whatever) spawn in your customized world, doesn't seem to exist in this version. With a PlayStation Plus subscription, you should absolutely play this. You may not ultimately care for the game as it's rather clearly not intended to be enjoyed by everyone, but it represents some of the best in its genre and should be experienced nonetheless. Even without a Plus membership, however, Don't Starve is worth playing -- whether that be here on PS4 or on Steam. You can't go wrong either way. Alternatively, there's been chatter about a possible PS Vita version and that sure would hit the spot, wouldn't it?
Don't Starve PS4 photo
Still hungry
If you happen to be a PlayStation 4 owner who has yet to play Klei Entertainment's excellent Don't Starve, you are in for a real treat this week. PlayStation Plus members in particular should just go ahead and download it bli...

Don't Starve PS4 photo
Don't Starve PS4

Don't Starve is hitting the PS4 today, free on PS Plus


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PS+ free games photo
PS+ free games

PlayStation Plus freebies: Don't Starve (PS4), DmC (PS3)


DMSee you tomorrow
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Don't Starve Vita?

Klei Entertainment 'looking' into Don't Starve on Vita


It would be a perfect union
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Klei photo
Klei

Klei's 'The Screecher' mod for Don't Starve is spooky


Yes, I jumped
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Klei Entertainment has added a free horror mod to Don't Starve, accessible from the main menu. It's called "The Screecher" and while there are shared elements with the core game -- we, the player, are still stranded in the wi...

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