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Hatoful Boyfriend photo
Hatoful Boyfriend

The Hatoful Boyfriend plushie Kickstarter passed $95,000

All birds unlocked, but in limited stock
Nov 18
// Joe Parlock
Everyone has a favourite Hatoful Boyfriend pigeon, and anyone who says they don’t is a god damn liar. It is impossible to have gotten to 2015 without falling for the charm and class of Sakuya, or the zany life-loving Ok...
Friday the 13th The Game photo
Friday the 13th The Game

Watch the first in-game footage of Friday the 13th The Game

'Sneak Peak'
Nov 16
// Vikki Blake
To celebrate hitting its Kickstarter success, Gun Media - the team behind upcoming horror Friday the 13th The Game - has released a "RARE glimpse" of the work-in-progress game. "This is a RARE glimpse into a game development ...
Dad Quest Kickstarter photo
Dad Quest Kickstarter

Close to home: dad throws son at foes in Dad Quest

Ah, the memories
Nov 09
// Darren Nakamura
I don't know why fatherhood has become such a prevalent theme among indie games lately, but I like it. There was Octodad, then Dad by the Sword, then Dad Beat Dads. Now there is Dad Quest, and it reminds me a lot of my own ch...

Divinity: Original Sin - Enhanced Edition is comfortable on console, if a little slower

Nov 03 // Zack Furniss
Split-screen co-op functions much like ToeJam & Earl from back in the day: both players share a screen when they're close to one another, but if they drift far enough away, the screen splits and each player has their own camera to control. This can be jarring if you separate and rejoin multiple times in rapid succession (imagine someone flailing their hands in front of your face really fast to obscure your vision) , but it otherwise works surprisingly well. I also didn't anticipate being able to wander so far away from you partner. There were multiple times in the ten or so hours we played where he would be in town and I'd be fighting enemies on a distant beach. Controlling characters works better than expected in that it actually works without making me want to throw my controller into the toilet in exchange for a mouse and keyboard. You can move your character around with the left thumbstick, or you can click it to create a small cursor. This effectively allows you to maneuver your avatars like a point and click RPG and is blessing when you want to go to the bathroom while you traverse to the other side of a map. Combat is easy enough to handle, with multiple radial menus and shortcuts providing quick-enough means to an end.  An RPG can live or die by its inventory, and Divinity: Original Sin was never exceptionally manageable in the first place. While the presentation is pleasant (little chests, barrels, and gore piles show up as a cute lil' grid when you look through them), picking up items can be a tad tedious. Holding down the X button brings up a search circle around you so that you can look at multiple items simultaneously, which minimizes minutia but still isn't completely ideal. If you hadn't played the PC version before you'd probably think it was a little slow but nothing out of the ordinary. Unfortunately, even with hands-off experience I know how much faster that can be, and in a game as large as this one, poor inventory accessibility goes from a wrinkle to a wound after awhile. Moving items out of your way is probably the offensive activity here. Instead of just clicking and dragging it out of your way, you have to hold down that search button, choose the item, go to a separate small menu, choose move, and then determine where you'd like to place said item. That is entirely too many commas and clauses to complete an action that you'll do often. It does work better if you use the point and click control scheme, which I found myself utilizing often. Overall, I wouldn't call these controls unwieldy so much as inconvenient. But if you can manage to acclimate to these puppets' strings, there's a fantastic game underneath. Divinity: Original Sin - Enhanced Edition is one of those rare fantasy RPGs that has charm, charisma, and doesn't feel completely generic. Now that almost every NPC is voiced, the world feels even more alive and personable. The co-op conversations, in which your main characters can agree, disagree, argue, and jest with one another, eventually leading to traits that have a tangible effect, are perfect for couch sessions. Turn-based combat doesn't seem like it would flow as well, but it does. Each time my brother covered an orc in oil and I set him ablaze, we high-fived like a couple of douches. The environmental/elemental battles always find a way to remain exciting. I'm no Chris Carter, so I can't finish a 100 hour game in two days. There's still a garbage dump's worth of shit that I haven't in Divinity. So far, the extra quests and dialogue feel right at home, and the addition of dual-wielding has made my rogueish spellcaster even more formidable. Even after the little that I have played, though, I'm confident in saying that this one's worth your time. Just remember to pick up every shell on the beach and send one to your brother's inventory every time he checks his phone. See how many shells you can send before they notice. Have fun!
Divinity: Original Sin photo
Couch co-op clickiness
While playing through the lukewarm Sword Coast Legends last week, I kept telling myself there was a light at the end of the tunnel. Once I finished my slog through the Sword Coast, I could revisit Rivellon in Divinity: O...

Failsafe photo

Failsafe wants to inject Mirror's Edge with a bit of Studio Ghibli

Not to mention sweet grappling hooks
Nov 03
// Joe Parlock
I’d never realised how much I needed Mirror’s Edge with a Studio Ghibli coat of paint until I saw the Kickstarter for Failsafe. Developed by Game Over, it appears to combine Mirror’s Edge, Studio Ghibli, Sh...
Tides of Numener delay photo
Tides of Numener delay

Torment: Tides of Numenera replaces project lead, moved to 2016

Replaced by inXile vet
Nov 02
// Steven Hansen
If this month's alpha showing inspired faith Torment: Tides of Numenera would hits is previously planned Q4 2015 release window, sorry, a bit longer to wait yet as the $5 million crowd-funded RPG has settled on a new 2016 re...
BattleTech photo

BattleTech Kickstarter stomps to the homestretch

PVP for a few dollars more
Nov 01
// Nic Rowen
The BattleTech reboot Kickstarter launched a little more than a month ago and by all appearances has been a total success. Harebrained Schemes smashed through the original funding targets, and now in the final days of the cam...
Dragon's Lair: The Movie photo
Dragon's Lair: The Movie

Don Bluth and Gary Goldman are kickstarting Dragon's Lair: The Movie

First Bluth-animated film since 2000
Oct 27
// Joe Parlock
In the '80s, Don Bluth was almost single-handedly the biggest competition Disney had in the animation industry. When he wasn’t pumping out amazing films like An American Tail, All Dogs go to Heaven, and The Land B...
Woolfe photo

Rebellion has bought the 'Woolfe: The Red Hood Diaries' IP

I need Sniper Elite: Happily Never After
Oct 22
// Joe Parlock
A while ago, we reported that developer GRIN was closing down. Unfortunately, this meant all of the physical Kickstarter rewards for its game Woolfe: The Red Hood Diaries would not be given to backers, and there would be no m...

Review: Pulse

Oct 20 // Jed Whitaker
Pulse (PC)Developer: Pixel Pi GamesPublisher: Pixel Pi GamesReleased: October 20, 2015MSRP: $14.99 Eva's story isn't exactly original as it is essentially a mashup of a Disney cartoon and M. Night Shyamalan's The Village. Pulse centers around Eva, a girl blinded at a young age, who defies her parents and attempts a dangerous pilgrimage using only echolocation and her imagination to visualize the world around her. What motivated Eva to embark on this journey is never explained, though the results of her actions are evident by the time credits roll in around an hour and a half later. That's right, an hour and a half for a penny shy of 15 dollars, which means you're paying over 16 cents per minute of gameplay. On top of that, there is a Steam achievement for beating the game under 30 minutes, so it clearly can be done faster. Whether or not the cost of entry is worth it depends on how much you value the artistic style of Pulse, because the gameplay leaves a lot to be desired. That isn't to say that it's bad, just that it doesn't really go anywhere. From the moment the game starts and you take your first few steps, you'll have grasped everything it has to offer. [embed]316434:60795:0[/embed] Walking causes colorful rippling sound waves to trace the world hidden within the black void that is Eva's vision. Following the paths as they are revealed in the darkness, you'll come across Mokos, which are round, Furby-like critters with giant puppy dog eyes. Mokos can be picked up and thrown to cause sound in the distance -- giving Eva a brief glimpse at the level ahead -- and can be placed in giant hamster wheels to open closed doors.  The only area where Pulse really deviates the gameplay is one requiring Eva to walk slowly across a frozen lake, taking care to pay attention to where the ice is cracking beneath her feet thus allowing a safe passage. Aside from that, you'll come across a couple of areas of simple platforming, and not much more, which is honestly a shame for how great the game looks. Unity isn't exactly known for having the best-looking games, but Pulse proves that the engine isn't the problem by having one of the most gorgeous presentations this year; from a vibrant forest, to a tundra, to a living cave, Pulse is stunning. Due to the way Eva is imagining how the world around her looks, the world is brightly colored in a minimalist way, meaning each level only has a few colors total. One level is mostly blue, while another is mostly shades of orange, which sounds like it would hard to navigate, but the creators made it work and I never found myself lost a single time.  Pixel Pi Games managed to take the concept of a blind heroine and create something beautiful around it, but considering the game took less time to complete than this review and costs 15 dollars, it is hard to recommend to anyone but those thirsty for an artistic game or a unique character. If Pulse had a longer, more in-depth story with evolving gameplay, it would be easily recommendable. As it stands now, it feels more like a proof-of-concept than a full-fledged game. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Review: Pulse photo
Expensive art without vision
While having a blind protagonist isn't exactly a brand new idea, Pulse tackles the subject in a unique way that proves that video games are indeed art by being one of the most colorful experiences I've played to date.  Unfortunately art sometimes comes with a high price and ends up not only lacking vision, but being a bit short-sighted.

Kickstarter photo

Hello, Neighbor! is unexpectedly terrifying

Monsters among us
Oct 15
// Jordan Devore
"Whatever happened to that old saying: 'Love thy neighbor'?" I don't remember the last time I was caught this off guard by a game announcement. Hello, Neighbor! is a first-person thriller with shades of Rear Window. Your goal...
Wanderer photo

Feast your eyes on sci-fi platformer-RPG Wanderer

Lo-fi Firefly
Oct 14
// Darren Nakamura
When it comes to pixel art, there is good stuff and there is bad stuff. Recently launched on Kickstarter, Wanderer falls easily into the former category. I just love the look of the pixelated characters on the more painterly ...
Friday the 13th photo
Friday the 13th

Friday the 13th game comes to Kickstarter

For once, copyright works out
Oct 13
// Mike Cosimano
The Friday the 13th game announced back in January has been fully revealed -- it's the game formerly known as Slasher Vol. 1: Summer Camp, by Breach and Clear developers Gun Media. With the help of TV's Adam Sessler, the...
Home Free photo
Home Free

Dog adventure Home Free headed to PS4

The logo has a dog's butt!
Oct 13
// Jordan Devore
I was as pleasantly surprised as Darren to see Home Free, a survival game about a lost dog in a randomly generated city, reach its funding goal on Kickstarter in under a week. More good news: it's coming to PlayStation 4 in a...
Survival horror photo
Survival horror

Allison Road leaves Kickstarter for a publisher

It's joining the Team17 label
Oct 12
// Jordan Devore
Last month, Lilith brought its home-based horror game, Allison Road, to Kickstarter. The fledgling studio asked for £250,000 in crowdfunding to create what many have called a spiritual successor to P.T., the lead-in to ...
Aurion photo

African-developed Aurion: Legacy of the Kori-Odan looking for funds on Kickstarter

Developers are from Cameroon
Oct 08
// Joe Parlock
Aurion: Legacy of the Kori-Odan is an incredibly interesting game. It’s billed as an “African-fantasy action-RPG,” putting a lot of emphasis on combos and combat while also having a setting based on African...
Numenera photo

The branching paths of Torment: Tides of Numenera

A short look at Crisis encounters
Oct 07
// Jordan Devore
It seems like so long ago that inXile brought Torment: Tides of Numenera to Kickstarter. But really, it's only been a couple of years. Much has changed for video game crowdfunding. Much hasn't. Have I been keeping tabs on the...

Joe Mad (Darksiders, Battle Chasers) has answered your questions

Oct 06 // Jonathan Holmes
[embed]314164:60637:0[/embed] Kevin Bowyer: Wii U version? Loved Darkstalkers II for the Wii U. Joe Mad: It’s not currently in the plan, unfortunately. We are a small team on a tight budget, so we had to be choosy about which consoles to launch on. Doesn’t mean it won’t happen further down the road though. Jesse Johnson: How does he feel about the new apple flavored skittle? I feel it ruined the candy as a whole. I'm a bit pissed really. Joe Mad: I actually really like it (sorry!). I usually buy Darkside Skittles (because I like to pretend it says Darksiders) but for some reason the yellow skittle in the blue ‘Tropical’ bag is one of my favorites. Pineapple I think? ThePich: How does that armor bra on the redhead work?  Joe Mad: I honestly have no idea. Magic, probably! [embed]314164:60638:0[/embed] Dango: Who are these Darksiders that the games are named after? Joe Mad: It was meant to describe the Horsemen, but really encompasses the game as a whole, since even the ‘good’ guys are ‘dark’ characters. You seek the aid of Dead Lords and go on quests for Demons. Angels are corrupt. It’s not your typical ‘save humanity’ hero story! Cosmonstropolis: What's your go-to while pooping? What book are you currently reading?  Joe Mad: Usually, if I’ve forgotten to bring my phone into the bathroom with me, I’ll just grab at whatever’s nearby—shampoo labels, toothpaste, etc. But I’m currently reading The Lies of Locke Lamora and The Black Company. And don’t worry, I always put my phone back in my pocket before I touch anything nasty. Swear! Barry Kelly: With a very ambitious game and what appears to be a very frugal budget and development time, which changes in the industry over the last few years do you most attribute to being able to deliver a project like this? Better experience? A tighter, closer knit team? A more focused and defined game design and scope? Better development tools? etc  Joe Mad: All of the above! Our small team is very experienced, and we’ve all worked together for years. We carefully scoped this game to be manageable for our team size and budget from the onset. You’d be surprised what a small dedicated team can do when it’s a passion project. Alex Heat: Darksiders 3 when? Joe Mad: We get this question a lot. The information is out there, but for those that don’t know, Vigil Games was dissolved when THQ went bankrupt, and Darksiders was sold to Nordic Games. They own it now, and seem very committed to continuing to do great things with the series (Check out the Deathinitive Edition, coming out in October!) We are just as curious/excited as you guys about the possibility of a DS3! It’s out of our hands! [embed]314164:60643:0[/embed] Ahr Ech: Why is the guy from Berserk just standing in the background of that header?   Lex: Same reason why Miss Fortune is in the front maybe? Joe Mad: Heh. Not taking the bait! Keiichi Morisato: What is your favorite Zelda game? Joe Mad: Gameplay wise, Ocarina of Time. Art wise, Windwaker! John Seiler: Are we going to see new collections of the old Battle Chasers book along with new comic stories? I really liked the issue that Adam Warren did and would love to see other writers and artists take a stab at that world. Really, I just miss that world. Joe Mad: Thank you. Yes, I plan on making all the old books available again in physical form. Stay tuned for details! Brandon Dunlap: From what we see from the game play videos there will be 3 active players and everyone else will be reserved, will there be an on the fly swap feature in combat, and why did you choose to go with 3 active characters, and not 4? Joe Mad: There’s more weight to choosing your party makeup when you’re forced to pick 3 (out of 6 available characters). You can switch them out at any point when you’re in town prepping for your adventure. It also speeds up the combat a bit, the pace feels better. And visually, it allows the characters to all be larger on screen. So, lots of reasons! [embed]314164:60639:0[/embed] Adolfo Arredondo: Have you thought about selling Battle Chasers action figures? Cartoonish like Disney Infinity or more detailed? Joe Mad: Yes! There’s no solid plan at the moment, but it’s something we all geek out about, so hopefully we can make it happen before too long! Anthony Griego: Any chance we will see Akimon in the game? He was one of my favorites and I was always bummed he was *spoiler* killed! Joe Mad: Actually, Akiman is very much alive, it was Bengus who we saw get blasted (though there’s no proof he’s actually dead). I will for sure touch on these guys in the books again—as far as the game, we will have to wait and see. Toshiro Miphony: Will Battle Chasers the game be released as timely as Battle Chasers the comic? If so, I can't wait until it's released in 2021. Joe Mad: No, it’ll be on a tighter schedule. Mastersith40: Will Liquid! return to color the comics? Joe Mad: I would really love for this to happen. Both Aron Lusen and Christian Lichtner have gone on to become video game art director rock stars, so they are out of the comics biz these days. But I will use all my powers of persuasion (and guilt!)  to try to lure them back when the time comes… [embed]314164:60640:0[/embed] churchofvirus: Why no physical copy of the game at any backer level? This turns off a large amount of potential backers. Joe Mad: We would really love to do these! We decided against it for Kickstarter since we were strongly cautioned against it by some of our good friends who had large successful KS campaigns. It mainly comes down to (very unpredictable!) shipping costs, production costs, and managing order fulfillment (among other reasons).  Maybe we can make it happen later down the road. I’d love one sitting on my shelf too! Mike Payne: Of your own work, what sticks out in your mind as some of your favorite pieces? what's your least favorite?  Joe Mad: I definitely think my BC era stuff is among my best as far as comics go. I was really happy with the splash art I did recently for Battle Chasers: Nightwar. Sadly, I tend to hate most of my stuff shortly after I do it, so I don’t latch on to specific pieces very often. And of course, I absolutely hate all the older stuff I’ve done, like Excalibur, Deadpool, and a lot of my X-Men stuff (sorry guys!!! ). I was just going through growing pains still as an artist back then, and I only see the bad when I look back on it, never the good! Mike Payne: When you started to bring anime into your style were you ever unsure about it? Did editors ever make you doubt your style choices? Joe Mad: No, actually the editors were very supportive! It was some of the fans who really, really hated it and made me doubt, lol! Specifically on the Uncanny X-men stuff. I’d get comments on the dumb hairstyles, missing nostrils and giant eyes quite often. Back then, we still had fan mail in the form of letters, so I would have these huge piles of hate mail that I eventually stopped going through in order to preserve my sanity! [embed]314164:60642:0[/embed]  Jonathan Holmes: I'd love to see Battle Chasers crossover with other games, like Darksiders, Shovel Knight or maybe Skullgirls. Is it possible? Do you want me to get you in touch with those guys? The Skullgirls team just announced just announed a party based RPG, so it could be a perfect fit.  Joe Mad: Oh man, Shovel Knight rocks. You don’t know how bad we wanted to make a Metroidvania game (cannot wait for Chasm!). An intro would be awesome. I definitely wouldn’t rule out a Darksiders crossover. We are still good friends with those guys (which is why they let us use the Chaoseater in Battle Chasers!) And Indivisible looks fucking gorgeous. I’m backing it for sure.
Battle Chasers photo
Comics, game development, and Skittles
The Battle Chasers: Nightwar Kickstarter is in its final days, and to help celebrate its resounding success, comics legend Joe Mad, creator of Battle Chasers and Darksiders, has answered a boat load of questions from you, the...

Review: Armikrog

Oct 06 // Caitlin Cooke
Armikrog (PC)Developer: Pencil Test StudiosPublisher: Versus EvilReleased: September 30, 2015MSRP: $29.99 The game opens with a spectacular bang, showcasing an animated sequence of our hero Tommynaut and his sidekick Beak Beak crash landing into Armikrog, a strange complex on planet Spiro 5. Within its walls there are puzzles to explore, secrets to unlock, and history to discover as Tommy and Beak Beak make their way through the desolate alien buildings full of various oddities to find a way home. From the onset Armikrog contains the charming, silly humor you’d expect from a TenNapel game, and of course throwback themes that reference The Neverhood. Gameplay rests on your ability to explore and figure things out on your own, moving from room to room collecting items that will come into play later. The age-old point-and-click rule of thumb “click on literally everything” especially rings true as each area contains various puzzles which you (hopefully) put together to make it through to the next building in the complex. There’s not much life to Armikrog save for a few adorable fuzzy blocks, raptor-like creatures on wheels, and alien octopi who speak in a strange tongue – but it’s up to you to figure out why. A statue of a wise-looking man appears in different rooms from time to time and talks to you in a whimsical manner imparting general advice, but that’s about the most interaction you’ll have besides chatting with Beak Beak. Just like being in The Neverhood, for the most part, you’re on your own. At any given time you can switch between controlling Tommy and Beak Beak with a simple click. Beak Beak’s abilities allow him to fit into small doors and occasionally fly around which prove useful when finding various items, however that’s generally the extent of the dual-character system. Tommy doesn’t really have any special abilities going for him (besides being the protagonist, if that counts). It’s fairly obvious when you need to use Tommy vs. Beak Beak, like when a button needs to be pressed or stood on, but the tricky part is understanding the order of when these things need to happen as contextual clues are virtually non-existent. The gameplay mechanics are quite simple since there’s not much to the action besides clicking on things and moving from room to room, however it’s the complication of the controls which may throw players off. Old-school game logic is very much prevalent – I often took an extremely long time to figure something out only to realize I wasn’t in the exact spot for it to trigger. There were also moments when the opposite was true, and actions were far too fluid – like a traveling cart that can send you flying in various directions if you’re not careful. Puzzles range from straightforward to insanely obtuse, and there were a few interesting ones in between that hit the sweet spot. I particularly enjoyed a music-based puzzle that popped up from time to time which had me placing little adorable nursery toys in a certain order. For the most part, puzzles rely on your ability to keep track of certain themes and recall various symbols and patterns throughout your journey. Unless you want to rely on GameFAQs, keeping a notebook and pen handy are pretty much key. Armikrog didn’t hold my hand and indicate what I’d done right or wrong, so blindly guessing and forging through by clicking around was a common strategy. I found myself backtracking through rooms multiple times to see if I had missed anything, but more often than not I just had a general misunderstanding or difficulty navigating puzzles. Some puzzles have a distinct or unclear order to them that won't register if done incorrectly. I also had trouble with certain color-specific puzzles – some feature yellow and orange, or blue and purple pieces that I found to be nearly indistinguishable from each other. Those who have a hard time with colors may have difficulty getting through these puzzles as well. The lack of an inventory, although a callback to The Neverhood, was still something sorely needed. After picking up an item, Tommy puts it into his stomach, and it’s never to be seen again save for when you click on the correct place on the screen. I would often forget which items were on hand, making it hard to connect the dots when the time came. There were also a few outdated choices in terms of the interface – the manual save/load function is ancient, the cursor is plain without indicating what can be interacted with and how, to name a few. I believe Armikrog aimed to be specifically old school in this sense, but it was a tad frustrating. Whether these choices were intentionally nostalgic or not, it got in the way of actual gameplay. Armikrog could use a bit more tightening in general. Subtitles were inaccurate to the point that it was fun for me just to turn them on and see what dialogue was meant to be in the game originally. However, the biggest offender was the bugginess around puzzles. At some points, they wouldn’t trigger correctly – for example after feeding a bug to Beak Beak (which is meant to trigger his flying abilities), he just sat there staring at me instead. There was also one point when he became stuck in his flying state, unable to move or trigger anything. Saving often is necessary to prevent situations like this. On the brighter side, the environments are stunning and truly make the game come to life in a way that was hard to achieve back in The Neverhood days. Graphics are crisp and vibrant, animations are smooth, and the environment is full of quirky textures like fuzz and moss that make it pop. The clay is of course the hallmark style of the game, and sometimes I found myself getting lost looking thinking how long it took someone to mold that particular scene. Music by Terry Scott Taylor was wonderfully quirky, but I wish there were more of it throughout. It was especially noticeable when working on a puzzle for a long time, as a single song would play and stop for a long period of time, then pick back up again later at a random interval. Similarly, despite the voice acting being top notch, I also noticed that sound clips would fade in and out when Tommy or Beak Beak were meant to speak – subtitles would appear but nothing would come out of their mouths. Armikrog’s story is simple and charming, even though the pacing is a tad rushed for my tastes. Besides the opening sequence, there’s not much to the plot until the very end. I was hoping for more substance, or even more silly vignettes to keep me company – but perhaps I’m being selfish considering how long it takes to animate one of those sequences. Overall, I appreciated the atmosphere and especially one of the very last puzzles, which I felt was one of the more creative things I’d ever experienced in a game. Armikrog does not surpass The Neverhood, but just like a successor to any celebrated piece of media, that would have been an impossible task. However, it does contain a unique charm in its own right which fans of The Neverhood or other old-school point-and-click adventures will especially appreciate. Those followers will likely forgive its faults for a taste of nostalgia, but others new to this realm may find it too outdated and unpolished.
Armikrog review photo
Claymation heaven
I still have my original copy of The Neverhood, bestowed upon me when my family bought our first Gateway computer in the mid-'90s. I was in complete awe over the challengingly silly puzzles, phenomenal claymation, and the ecl...

Home Free photo
Home Free

Dog RPG Home Free funded in five days

Kicks Arfer
Oct 05
// Darren Nakamura
Things have been looking kind of sad over on Kickstarter lately. Aside from the huge names making games like Mighty No. 9, Yooka-Laylee, Bloodstained, and Shenmue 3, it seems like the ratio of successes to failures has i...
Shenmue 3 photo
Shenmue 3

$6M isn't enough to make Shenmue 3 'gorgeous visually'

'I could do with a bit more money'
Oct 05
// Vikki Blake
$6.3 million isn't enough for Shenmue creator Yu Suzuki. Talking to Eurogamer, Suzuki said that while the game will be crafted in line with the funds available to it, the game "doesn't have to be gorgeous visually."
Cave photo

Cave is considering crowdfunding to bring more shooters to PS4

Would you support them?
Oct 01
// Chris Carter
Cave is working on getting more of its games on Steam, starting with Mushihimesama this winter for $19.99. But apparently it has bigger plans in store, and is brainstorming as to how it can achieve those goals. For ...
Original Sin 2 photo
Original Sin 2

Divinity: Original Sin 2 cleared all of its Kickstarter goals

$2 million raised
Sep 30
// Jordan Devore
In the final days of its Kickstarter, Divinity: Original Sin 2 only had two stretch goals left -- one for a Shapeshifting Mask, the other for a Game Master mode. Both are happening. The crowdfunding campaign came to a close w...
Home Free Kickstarter photo
Home Free Kickstarter

Control an abandoned dog in the city in action-RPG Home Free

Control your tears watching the video
Sep 30
// Darren Nakamura
The first few moments of the Kickstarter trailer for Home Free bring up sad memories of the Futurama episode "Jurassic Bark," which I apparently cannot even read the Wikipedia entry for without getting misty-eyed. Dogs, man. ...
BattleTech photo

BattleTech Kickstarter begins, immediately secures funding for 'stage 1'

Turn-based stompy robots live again
Sep 29
// Nic Rowen
[Correction: Contrary to what I reported earlier, Harebrained Schemes did not fund the initial $250K goal of basic funding on its Kickstarter. All of those funds came from backers. Harebrained has invested $1 million into the...
Divinity photo

Divinity: Original Sin 2 is in its final days on Kickstarter

Last call
Sep 28
// Jordan Devore
When we last talked about Divinity: Original Sin 2, it had only just cleared its base goal of $500,000 on Kickstarter. That was last month. Now, with less than two days left in the crowdfunding campaign, Larian Studios is sit...
Frog Fractions photo
Frog Fractions

Where in the world is Frog Fractions 2?

We might have our next clue
Sep 24
// Jordan Devore
The jig is not up. We still don't know the secret identity of Frog Fractions 2, the Kickstarter-funded sequel to the most interesting game I played on November 9, 2012. For all we know, it's lurking among us with an unassumin...
Spaceteam card game photo
Spaceteam card game

'Cooperative shouting game' Spaceteam getting a card version

Up now on Kickstarter
Sep 23
// Darren Nakamura
Back when we interviewed Spaceteam developer Henry Smith about the free cooperative mobile game, he mentions the real-time board game Space Alert as an influence. Now things come full circle, with Mathew Sisson taking the tab...
Kickstarter photo

P.T. lookalike Allison Road turns to Kickstarter

Fingers crossed
Sep 21
// Jordan Devore
There's a chance Allison Road can fill the heartbreaking void left by P.T., and I sure am rooting for it. But it's going to be a real challenge for the small team at Lilith to meet such lofty expectations. The game's Kickstar...
Mighty No. 9 photo
Mighty No. 9

Comcept confirms Mighty No. 9 demo delay

I hope you like delays
Sep 18
// Chris Carter
Hey remember that Mighty No. 9 demo delay that was snuck into a contest post? Well it didn't give people much information, hinting at a possible delay for some users. Now, thanks to a backer email (read: I'm a backer), we hav...

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