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Hudson

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Diner Dash and Dream Chronicles removed from PSN, XBLA


Apr 20
// Dale North
No! I'm a big Diner Dash fan. I have various versions on PC, Mac, iPhone and iPad, but one of the coolest is the console version. Moving Flo around with a joystick is a totally new challenge that makes the game a bit more ten...
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Canceled Bonk's soundtrack is free to stream


Apr 14
// Tony Ponce
Bonk: Brink of Extinction was one the more prominent titles to get the big boot once Hudson Entertainment closed. Sure, our impression from last year's E3 was rather lukewarm, but it was still a revival of a beloved property ...
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Nintendo DLC: Super Bonk!


Apr 04
// Dale North
This week's downloadable offerings for Nintendo's systems includes a classic Super Nintendo title that is so old that you could even call it prehistoric. Super Bonk was great on the SNES -- such a fun game. In it you worked t...
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Hudson's final Tweet


Mar 30
// Dale North
Dear Hudson fans. Thanks for your support for all these years! We'll be closing our account tomorrow. Please follow our titles @Konami :(
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Hudson 3DS titles not necessarily canceled


Mar 23
// Jordan Devore
Earlier today, we reported that a few Hudson games for 3DS -- Bomberman, Bonk, and Omega Five -- had been dropped. But, that might not be the case, exactly. "If (the announcement) didn't come from us, it's not true. We have n...
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Hudson games killed: Three 3DS titles including Bomberman


Mar 23
// Dale North
Konami took over Hudson recently, and with that came a canceling of titles. Sad, I know. The latest issue of Famitsu updates us on what exactly was canceled. We don't know why they were canceled, but we do know that...
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Hudson is Konami's April 1st, now a social games arm


Mar 08
// Dale North
Worst April Fools' Day joke ever is Hudson as we know it closing up shop. They become the property of Konami on this day, and they'll be turned into a social networking division for the company. Also, Hudson Entertainment, th...
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Get the full story on why Hudson closed


Feb 24
// Dale North
I'm sure you've heard that Hudson has closed its doors and all of their projects have been canceled. It's one thing to say that Konami gobbled them up, but it's another to hear the full story, which has been a decade in the m...
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Destructoid: Dark Souls, Fox News, Squidbear, and Hudson


Feb 09
// Max Scoville
Good morrow, Toidlings. I come before you with the fiftieth fabulous foray into foul and frivolous feculence. In other words, this is The Destructoid Show Episode 50. (Please ignore the fact that I've only been on it for 5 w...
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Here's the worst piece of news I've heard in a while. According to Morgan Haro, the CEO of Hudson Entertainment, the Western branch of Hudson Soft, will be closing down at the end February when Konami acquires the company. Al...

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Hudson's soul (and property) now belongs to Konami


Jan 20
// Jim Sterling
Hudson Soft is now 100% owned by Konami, it was revealed this morning. The Bomberman publisher is to be fully consumed by the Japanese powerhouse, which already owns a 54% stake in the company.  Hudson shall become a who...
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NA PlayStation Store getting TurboGrafx-16 games


Jan 05
// Jordan Devore
Starting this month, Hudson will gleefully begin pumping out TurboGrafx-16 games for the North American PlayStation Store. They'll be offered as individual downloads for PlayStation 3 and PSP should you feel the need to reliv...

Review: Lost in Shadow

Jan 04 // Nick Chester
Lost in Shadow (Wii)Developer: Hudson SoftPublisher: Hudson EntertainmentReleased: January 4, 2011MSRP: $39.99 While the game unabashedly wears its influences on its sleeve, Lost in Shadow brings its own gimmick to the table: a world where a shadow boy runs, skips, and fights in twilight. While the foreground is almost always visible, it’s the dark shadows that the “real-world” environments cast that are tangible to the player. Navigating the world is mind-bending at first, like taking a trip through a hallucination. It’s natural to focus on the solid object in a game’s forefront, which can lead to some early confusion. But it’s not long before that uncertainty gives way to wholly understanding how to interact with this new world, and you’ll soon find yourself taking pleasure in discovering passages otherwise unobtainable, now shrouded in shadows.Lost in Shadow is played using the Nunchuk and the Wii Remote, the analog stick on the former used to move the shadow boy around on the game’s 2D planes. The remote is home to buttons for other basic actions, like attacking enemies, jumping, and moving switches. It also acts as a pointer, or in this case, to move around Spangle, a helpful little sprite who can move physical switches and lights in the “real world.” Lost in Shadow is as much about playing in the darkness as it is about playing with the darkness, and there’s where Spangle comes into play. The pint-sized fairy can be used to move objects and lights, shifting shadows and changing the lay of the land, creating new paths and allowing you to access new areas. While some of these object manipulation and light-shifting spots can be looked at as puzzles, there are few areas of Lost in Shadow that are so complicated that you’d be able to label them “puzzling.” Most are simply a matter of keeping an eye open or hunting and pecking around an environment for moveable objects. There’s certainly some clever, M.C. Escher-like design at play here, but folks looking for head-scratching moments will probably feel let down. “Shadow Corridors” -- mysterious mini-realms found throughout the game’s areas -- change things up a bit, and feature mechanisms that allow you to shift the world from left to right in 3D space. Shift the wrong way and get crushed by a shadow; move it properly and create a new path. It’s definitely an interesting twist, but doesn’t really offer much beyond the initial novelty. Because you can only shift left or right, you have a 50-50 chance of choosing the right direction. Choose wrong and you’ll die before instantly being revived... in the very same spot where you just perished. The goal is to work your way up the game’s enigmatic tower, and thus has you mostly working upward, with stages broken up in chunks of a few floors. The exits for each area are blocked by “Shadow Walls”; in order to pass through them, you’ll have to find and collect three “Monitor Eyes” found in the region. As the levels get more intricate, this often leads to quite a bit of backtracking, as missing a single tucked-away eye will have you cursing at your television as you stand in front of a dense, unpassable “Shadow Wall.” This gets particularly irritating in some of the game’s larger sections, which may find you doing more backpedaling than working your way up the game’s lofty tower. On the subject of how the game is broken up, it should be mentioned that the only checkpoints come when completing those chunks of floors. That is to say that dying after spending 15 or more minutes traversing a single segment will send you right back to the start to do it again. While the game is light on intricate puzzles, there are plenty of traps and enemies to contend with, and most players will certainly drain their health more than a few times during their adventure. It’s great that Lost in Shadow offers some challenge; that’s not the issue. It’s just unfortunate that the lack of checkpoints can sometimes feel so brutal and exhausting. Lost in Shadow’s combat is also regrettably shallow, sometimes to the point of irritation. It relies on a single-button combo system that has you tapping the Wii Remote’s B button three times to launch a series of attacks. Afterwards, you’re left completely vulnerable, as there is no guard or evade button. The result is an archaic and annoying “run and pop” type of combat, where you’ll move into an enemy, hit them a few times, and then turn your back and run away. This leaves you completely open to taking damage, which can quickly get irritating. Fortunately, this type of encounter repeats itself across almost all of the game’s adversaries, so once you get the pattern down, it becomes easy enough; it’s just not much fun. Visually, Lost in Shadow cribs quite a bit from ICO, with a hazy aesthetic, giving the game a washed-out, mystifying look and feel. As you’d expect from a game called Lost in Shadow, there are some breathtaking plays on light and dark. Coupled with a haunting soundtrack, the developers do a respectable job imitating the same kind of otherworldly vibe found in Team ICO’s titles. But where games like ICO and Shadow of the Colossus managed to use that atmosphere in conjunction with characters to an emotional advantage, that’s where Lost in Shadow fails. Simply put, there’s no real connection to the shadow boy or the game’s narrative, which spends all of its time trying to be mystifying but never really offering up much substance. While this ambiguous storytelling can sometimes work in a game’s favor, there’s usually some storyline breadcrumbs or a relationship that helps ground it in reality. Lost in Shadow offers very little, so it ultimately feels like a series of platforming trials and little more. Thankfully, the designs of the bulk of Lost in Shadow’s platforming trials are clever enough, providing a mostly fun and memorable experience, if an emotionally empty one. For most, that will be enough; there’s something to be said about shrewd level design wrapped in an alluring artistic style that nods towards some of gaming’s greats. Still, it’s regrettable that Lost in Shadow stumbles in key places that make it a “good,” but never truly “great,” adventure. 
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Drawing as much inspiration from Jordan Mechner’s classic Prince of Persia as from Team ICO’s gloomy, haunting aesthetics, Hudson’s Wii-exclusive Lost in Shadow seemingly begs for gamers’ attention. ...

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Best Buy stores get Lost in Shadow demo


Dec 27
// Nick Chester
Odd because it's not a Madden NFL title or something with plastic instruments, you'll be able to find a demo for Hudson's upcoming Wii title, Lost in Shadow, at select Best Buy stores starting this week. By "select" I mean th...
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Fishing Master now available for iPhone, totally free


Dec 17
// Conrad Zimmerman
Laugh if you must, but I love Fishing Master. Lord knows I have taken abuse for it before. But its charm and gameplay are worth more than anybody who would mock me for enjoying them. And now it'll be even easier for me to tak...
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Hudson brings TurboGrafx Gamebox to iPhone, iPad


Dec 13
// Dale North
The TurboGrafx Gamebox app, coming soon to the iPhone and iPad, will let users download and play a bunch of classic TurboGrafx-16 videogames in their device. The app comes with one free title: World Sports Competition. Don't ...
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Bomberman LIVE: Battlefest out on December 8 for XBLA


Nov 30
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Time to blow up your friends all over again as Bomberman LIVE: Battlefest is coming to Xbox Live Arcade on December 8. Expect eight-player online battles, customizing Bomermens and new items too. Four new modes are also inclu...
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New Lost in Shadow screenshots


Oct 05
// Conrad Zimmerman
We got a batch of images for Hudson's Lost in Shadow tonight. They show off the eighth area of the game (according to the name of the folder they arrived in) and, apparently, there's a lot of water in the level. I know t...
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Birth of Lost in Shadow isn't as messy as actual birth


Sep 14
// Nick Chester
 Hudson has released the first of a four part documentary detailing the making of its upcoming Wii title, Lost in Shadow.  In this first part, the game's director, designer, programmer, and sound lead discuss the g...

PAX 10: Lost in Shadow deserves a little spotlight

Sep 07 // Jim Sterling
Lost in Shadow is all about a platforming hero with a major problem -- he's only a silhouette. Robbed of his physical form, our hapless protagonist exists only as a shadow of a body that isn't there. This conceit is the driving force for Lost in Shadow's visual style, and it's a style that is at once incredibly jarring and remarkably beautiful.  The game takes place in the background, and by that I mean that entire levels have been designed for the game that you, as the player, will never navigate. Instead, you play on the shadow that these levels have cast. At first, it's slightly confusing as one's eyes are drawn to the empty platforms in the foreground. Once you get used to it though, Lost in Shadow becomes a strangely alienating yet not unpleasant experience. The major focus is on environmental puzzles, which consists primarily of moving objects in the foreground to spill shadows on the background, allowing you to move onward. As the game progresses, there will be combat and increased interactions, so the game should constantly evolve.  The PAX demo showed me a very competent and solid platformer that was simple but very evocative thanks to its unique aesthetic style. The clever idea creates something that always keeps the player at a distance, yet keeps them playing because they want to be drawn in further. There is serious potential for Lost in Shadow to be a haunting little title in the same vein as ICO or Limbo, but it remains to be seen just how far Hudson pushes the concept.  Right now, all I can say is that Lost in Shadow is a game to keep an eye on. I fear this game may be tragically forgotten in the Wii game stampede, and that would be shame. Don't let yourself forget this one!
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It's looking like a golden year for platformers on the Wii. Sonic Colors, Kirby's Epic Yarn, Donkey Kong Country Returns and Epic Mickey are all to come, and with such an excellent roster of games, it would be easy to fo...

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Half a dozen Lost in Shadow screenshot unveiled


Aug 11
// Conrad Zimmerman
A word like "unveiled" gives an air of drama that probably should not be used to describe the release of screenshots. If I go back and change the headline now, I'll have to spend another twenty minutes trying to find a way to...
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Rare SuperGrafx Ghouls N Ghosts headed to Japanese PSN


Aug 10
// Nick Chester
If you’re okay with not owning one to put on your shelf, here’s an easy way to get the rare SuperGrafx version of Ghouls ‘N Ghosts -- download it from the PlayStation Network. Siliconera is reporting that Hu...

Preview: Deca Sports 3

Aug 06 // Samit Sarkar
Deca Sports 3 (Wii)Developer: Hudson SoftPublisher: Hudson EntertainmentTo be released: October 26, 2010 I actually rather enjoyed lacrosse in Deca Sports 3. I played against a PR rep for the game, Ron Burgess, and we both played in Master Mode with Wii MotionPlus. You flick the Wii Remote to shoot and pass (to shoot, you hold the B button while swinging; you can hold it longer to charge up your shot). Because MotionPlus can detect subtle gestures, you can put a curve on your shots by twisting your wrist as you swing toward the net. In Master Mode, you can pass in any direction -- instead of throwing the ball directly to another player, you can bank a pass off the walls surrounding the playing field (this is done by pointing the Nunchuk's analog stick in a direction before passing). In order to switch players, you tap the Z button. You might toss a ball into open space and then change players to go get it. As you can see above, the screen includes a mini-map of sorts -- it's an overlay that shows the players as dots on the field, so you'll always know where your teammates are. Ron beat me by a goal, but we were both smiling and laughing throughout our game. I also played a round of air racing, which was particularly challenging in Master Mode. The mode offers traditional gate-style courses, but adds a wrinkle: certain gates require you to fly through them in a particular orientation (either with the underside of your plane to the left or right). The Wii Remote is an analog of your on-screen plane: you twist it in order to roll your plane, aim it left or right in order to turn, and aim it up or down in order to raise or lower your plane. The game doesn't follow flight dynamics, though -- in real life, if your plane was at a 90° roll angle (i.e., either on its right or left side), it would be turning in the direction of its roll. But in Deca Sports 3, your roll is independent from your yaw -- that is, twisting the Wii Remote changes the orientation of the plane but has no effect on its movement. You'd think that would make the mode much easier, but because MotionPlus is so responsive, you've really got to work to keep your plane on track. If you miss a gate, you have to loop back and fly through it; you can't complete a race without flying through all the gates in succession. You don't actually race against another plane on the same track; you can only compete with others in terms of the time it takes you to finish a course. Ron went first, and I beat his time by a lot (all it took was missing one gate to cost him the competition). Air racing was fun because it was challenging; I doubt I would've enjoyed it nearly as much if I played it without MotionPlus, which adds a lot to the experience. Deca Sports 3 includes a Team Editor, which allows you to completely customize any of the teams in the game (name, colors, logo, players' attributes, and more). Offline play supports up to four players (depending on the sporting event), while four of the sports -- volleyball, lacrosse, racquetball, and fencing -- can be played head-to-head online. If MotionPlus makes as much of a difference in those games as in the ones I played, Deca Sports 3 might just be worth checking out.
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In April, Hudson announced the third entry (or fourth, if you count Deca Sports DS) in its multi-million-selling Deca Sports series, Deca Sports 3. This time, the franchise is back on the Wii with ten all-new sporti...

Preview: Deca Sports Freedom

Aug 06 // Samit Sarkar
Deca Sports Freedom (Kinect for Xbox 360)Developer: Hudson SoftPublisher: Hudson EntertainmentTo be released: November 2010 First, Ron demoed tennis for me. Its visuals aren't going to amaze anyone; they're serviceable, but they get the job done for this kind of videogame. What is impressive about tennis in Deca Sports Freedom is the fidelity of the experience. In tennis, you stand in front of the Kinect sensor and swing; just like in Wii Sports, the game handles your movement for you. Thanks to Kinect, the game can detect subtleties in your swing that will determine the type of shot you make. This means that you can spin your wrist downward as you swing to initiate a slice, or swing hard and continue your follow-through for a cross-court winner. If you time your shot perfectly, you'll get a power boost (seen in the header image to this preview). It's this kind of functionality that makes me think that technology like Kinect has a promising future ahead. Next, Ron decided to man up and show me the figure-skating game. Again, your on-screen character will skate around the rink by him- or herself. The game marks spots on the ice and tasks you with performing gestures -- which correspond to figure-skating moves such as jumps, spins, and jump-spins -- in those spots. The better you time your gesture (i.e., the closer you get to the center of the on-ice circle), the higher your score. If you miss, your character falls on his or her ass. As you can imagine, the combination of seeing Ron struggle to do ballerina-like poses in front of a TV and watching his avatar fall on the ice a few times was nearly too much for me to handle without bursting out in laughter. I think I managed to keep myself (mostly) composed, though. Figure skating is definitely one of those "make yourself look like an ass" Kinect games. It also has the capacity to burn some calories, although it's no EA Sports Active 2. Deca Sports Freedom will include online play, as well as two-player co-op and competitive play. For example, you can play doubles in tennis -- either on the same team, or against each other. In addition, you can unlock Adidas-branded clothing for your Xbox 360 Avatar by doing well in the game. Hudson hasn't announced a price yet, but if the other eight games work as well as tennis and figure skating, Freedom could be a good purchase to show off Kinect to your families.
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During E3, Hudson announced that it was bringing its Deca Sports franchise -- which has sold more than 2.5 million units worldwide on Wii and DS -- to Kinect this fall. The controller-free compilation of sports offers th...

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Release date for Lost in Shadow comes to light


Jul 28
// Nick Chester
Hudson Entertainment has dated its gloomy Wii platformer, Lost in Shadow, for a January 4 release. To mark this momentous occasion of putting a date on a game release, Hudson has decided to pull the wrapping off one of the g...
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Bonk should never have been rendered in 3D


Jul 28
// Conrad Zimmerman
I don't mean to be such a dick tonight, but what is up with these images of the upcoming Bonk: Brink of Extinction? Now, I'll grant you, these aren't screenshots of the final product but it does not look good. I love Bon...
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E3 10: Platforming in Bonk: Brink of Extinction


Jun 18
// Ben Perlee
It's been an interesting year for retro games making a return, especially those that were b-level at best. For example, Rocket Knight made an acceptable return in a downloadable platformer, and Nintendo has brought back Kid I...
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E3 10: Zombie mode with Bomberman Live: Battlefest


Jun 17
// Ben Perlee
Destructoid has a good relationship with Hudson. Afterall, Mr. Destructoid himself showed up in Hudson's Bomberman Live, an exclusive experience that makes us all proud. However, Mr. Destructoid or not, Bomberman has proven i...
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E3 10: Hudson bringing Deca Sports to Kinect


Jun 14
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Damn, wasn't expecting this! Hudson has just announced that they're bringing the Deca Sports franchise over to the Xbox 360 and Kinect. Deca Sports Freedom will be out this Fall and bring with it new sport games designed arou...
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Lost in Shadow release date [update]


Apr 30
// Jim Sterling
Lost in Shadow looks like a pretty cool guy. It's a platformer from Hudson in which a boy's shadow climbs a tower. He has to walk along other shadows, aided by Spangle the Sylph who can change light sources to create new shad...

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