Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Harvest Moon

Harvest Moon photo
Harvest Moon

Harvest Moon: The Lost Valley's '3D' aspects explained

I'm not entirely sure I'd call this 3D
Jun 11
// Brittany Vincent
After that strange Harvest Moon/Story of Seasons debacle that Kyle so kindly set straight for us, it's good to see more details emerging regarding the actual branded Harvest Moon release, The Lost Valley. The game's E3 inform...

So what the hell is happening with Harvest Moon?

Jun 06 // Kyle MacGregor
A little history on the series and the company behind it: Bokujō Monogatari was initially created by a company by the name of Pack-In-Video, which merged with Victor Entertainment, thereby becoming Victor Interactive Software. Marvelous Entertainment later bought them up, as corporations are wont to do, then merged with AQ Interactive to form Marvelous AQL. Marvelous and its predecessors had a relationship with Natsume for many years. Marvelous handled development and publishing in Japan, and Natsume put them out in America under the name Harvest Moon. And so things went until that association became a little more complex. In 2004, XSEED was born. XSEED serves as Marvelous AQL's subsidiary and North American publishing label. It does the very thing that Marvelous entrusted Natsume with, bringing Japanese games to western audiences. That said, Natsume still handled American distribution for Bokujō Monogatari until now. Well, sort of. Bokujō Monogatari has a spin-off series called Rune Factory. Publishing duties for these titles in America were passed back and forth between XSEED and Natsume up until the launch of Rune Factory 4 last year, and the subsequent bankruptcy of the studio behind the games, Neverland Co. It seems like Marvelous is no longer in need of Natsume's assistance, though. Instead, it's looking to use its in-house team going forward, at least for the time being. Why use a middleman for a job you're perfectly capable of doing yourself? "We are definitely interested in pushing the 'Marvelous' brand as much as possible," XSEED vice president Ken Berry revealed in an interview last year. Though Berry's group publishes titles from a number of Japanese companies, in 2013 XSEED was brought under the umbrella of Marvelous USA in the hopes of unifying and expanding operations. Part of that seems to involve localizing more Marvelous-developed titles than in years past. And Story of Seasons is a prime example of this. Of course, that's certainly a blow to Natsume. It's being cut out of a lucrative equation; Bokujō Monogatari has sold close to ten million copies worldwide. Publishing Harvest Moon games must have provided a nice cash flow for Natsume. And then Marvelous AQL suddenly turned off the taps. This reminds me of that old adage: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach him to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Well, Natsume has been given a lot of fish over the years. Perhaps it's time the company pulled one out of the river by itself. Natsume owns the Harvest Moon name. What's stopping it from making one? Well, nothing really. It may seem a little odd, but it's perfectly within their rights.  It seems like Natsume had a decent amount of notice that this was going to happen. According to Siliconera, the publisher opened a new office in Tokyo last year, and it's this same studio that's been developing Harvest Moon: The Lost Valley since early 2013. So that, as best as we can tell, is how we got here, with muddy waters and two sets of Harvest Moon games. But really, who are we to complain about more of a good thing?
XSEED & Natsume photo
A rose by any other name
A lot of folks seem pretty confused about what's going on with Harvest Moon. And that's perfectly understandable, because it's a tad complicated. Please allow me to try to explain the situation. XSEED recently announced a far...

Natsume at E3 photo
Natsume at E3

Natsume's E3 2014 lineup sure is a lineup

Harvest Moon, End of Serenity, and Alphadia Genesis lead the pack
Jun 05
// Brittany Vincent
Natsume has announced its complete E3 roster for next week, and while it's got a few high points, it's not impressing me too much. It's a strange mishmash of handheld games and iOS releases with a stray PSP game and Wii U pro...
Harvest Moon! photo
Harvest Moon!

Natsume announces Harvest Moon: The Lost Valley for 3DS

Find out more at E3!
Jun 03
// Kyle MacGregor
Well, that didn't take long. Shortly after teasing a trio of projects for Nintendo platforms, Natsume has announced it's bringing Harvest Moon: The Lost Valley to Nintendo 3DS in North America. Here's the synopsis: In Harves...
Natsume photo

Natsume unveiling three Nintendo games at E3

What ever could they be?
Jun 03
// Kyle MacGregor
[Update: One of the games is Harvest Moon: The Lost Valley for Nintendo 3DS] Natsume will reveal three new games for Nintendo platforms at E3 2014, the Harvest Moon distributor divulged while detailing its plans for...
Story of Seasons photo
Story of Seasons

New Harvest Moon being localized as Story of Seasons

Coming to 3DS this winter
May 30
// Brittany Vincent
Call it stereotypical of me if you will, but I'm a huge fan of Harvest Moon and its spinoffs -- even the wannabe games. That's why I'm so excited to see Story of Seasons releasing via XSEED this upcoming winter. After 18 year...

How Legend of Zelda and Sim City influenced the Harvest Moon series

Harvest Moon 64 was Wada's favorite
Apr 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Did You Know Gaming's latest video is all about Harvest Moon. One of the biggest things I learned here is that the series started life after series creator Yasuhiro Wada moved to Tokyo from the countryside. He would regularl...

New 3DS Harvest Moon game coming to Japan next year

Yes. More!
Oct 09
// Dale North
Get ready for more farm fun as the latest issue of Famitsu has revealed that a new Harvest Moon will come to the 3DS in Japan in February. ANN (scan at 0taku) says that the new game Bokujō Monogatari: Tsunagaru Shin...
Harvest Moon photo
Harvest Moon

Hometown Story sells its wares on 3DS this October

Harvest Moon spin-offs incoming!
Oct 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Hometown Story is coming to market on October 22 for Nintendo 3DS in North America, Natsume has announced. A simulation role-playing game directed by Harvest Moon creator Yasuhiro Wada, the title features a premise simil...

Harvest Moon is better than cow poopoo all over your face

Sep 13
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Did you know cows can have explosive diarrhea? I didn't know that until I saw this ad for Harvest Moon: A New Beginning. Thanks for enlightening us with this informational video, Marvelous AQL! [Thanks, Dave!]
Hometown Story photo
Hometown Story

Set up shop with Harvest Moon creator's Hometown Story

C'mon, get happy!
Jun 13
// Tony Ponce
Last year, former Destructoid editor Chad Concelmo and I spoke with Harvest Moon creator Yasuhiro Wada about his latest game, codenamed "Project Happiness." Hoping to take the lifestyle sim to the next level, he envisioned a ...
XSEED photo

Rune Factory 4 is pleasantly complex

'Harvest Moon on steroids'
Jun 12
// Caitlin Cooke
Attending E3 has given me the chance to try out some games I normally wouldn't think of picking up - Rune Factory 4 being one of them. I always considered the Rune Factory series to be a Harvest Moon imitator until I gave it ...
Harvest Moon 3DS eShop photo
Harvest Moon 3DS eShop

Harvest Moon GBC takes root on 3DS eShop this week

Portable potatoes
May 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Harvest Moon for the Game Boy Color is coming to the Nintendo 3DS eShop in North America this week, Natsume has announced. The second title in the prolific farming sim role-playing game series, Harvest Moon GB was initia...

My ultimate gaming tradition of Old School Day

Mar 10 // Taylor Stein
Gaming celebration with a personal twist The trip down retro lane is a cherished monthly spectacle among my siblings and I. Every few weeks we put our adult lives on hold to relive the games from our youth. If there is any day that we truly unite as a family, it's while bonding over the classics. As painfully sappy as that sounds, videogames have always acted as a supernatural Band-Aid, mending all pissed off sentiments and sibling-based grudges.While we each were transformed into instant videogame buffs through the allure of the NES, many of our greatest memories reside with the N64. During our version of Old School Day, we welcome the titles that have contributed to the process of shaping us into the people we are today. Super Mario 64, Goldeneye, Star Fox, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Super Smash Bros., Pokemon Stadium, Rampage, Banjo-Kazooie and Yoshi's Story just to name a few, form the framework of the evening. Those titles served as the backbone of my childhood so it's rather fitting. Each time we get together, we sprinkle in a few different games, maximizing the fun output while minimizing the risk of getting bored through repetition, if that's even possible.Over the course of two to six hours of pizza-induced noshing, old school gaming, and admittedly potent languor, we've typically covered the spectrum of emotions from anger-filled multiplayer sessions, to heartwarming regard in response to a favorite cut scene. In diplomatic fashion, we take turns choosing the next entrant to revitalize our nostalgia, but in reality, any choice is a good one when you're playing favorite games amongst family and friends. Old School Day rocks! Still not convinced? With the next generation of consoles on the horizon, you may be hesitant to turn back the hands of time, to accept the glory of Old School Day. There's no way that earlier generations can compete from a graphical standpoint and not all of the oldies were auditory masterpieces, yet despite these technological inferiorities, the games that defined past generations exude a certain charm that often propels them into superior status. Reliving them for yourself is almost certain to conjure up sentiments such as, "Why don't they make games like this anymore?" rather than, "Yikes, I'll stick with the Xbox." Purchasing the titles through XBLA or PSN is technically a viable option, but summoning the warm feelings of familiarity is that much better in its authentic form. Re-experiencing the definitive moments of a simpler time, a period when eating vegetables and finishing homework were the main opponents of happiness, is satisfying on multiple levels. For one, rekindling ancient memories is enormously rewarding. Exploring old saved files and realizing that wow, I can't believe I actually collected all of those stars, puzzle pieces, coins, or heart pieces is always a heart-warming, ego-boosting find. I recall loading up my saved game from Harvest Moon 64. . . I had ten in-game years worth of gameplay on one file. That's more virtual years than I had spent on Earth at that time; how much would that achievement/trophy be worth? Equally as shocking is the realization that some aspects of older gaming were much more difficult than memory would serve. Conker's Pocket Tales on Gameboy Color was one such instance of perplexity. While I nearly finished the game as a kid and don't recall any Ninja Gaiden-like frustrations, with all my might I can barely get past the first level to this day. I must have had the child-like reflexes of a ninja or at least that's what I keep telling myself. Conker-based inadequacies aside, dusting off your Atari 2600, Dreamcast, or other old console is guaranteed to fulfill your sense of humor as well. Things that were badass in the 1980s or 1990s are often hilarious now. Turok 64 death screams are absolutely priceless, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater has musical accoutrements that will transport you into the late '90s punk scene, and Gex 64 makes in-game references to the X-Files, Poltergeist, and Full House. Who needs a time machine when a gateway to your childhood is right within reach? The essence of forgotten trends and declining fads aids in sweetening any excursion into the past of gaming through hands-on reminiscence and a healthy dose of gut-busting laughter. Beyond the arenas of personal achievement, hilarity, and frustration, hopping on the symbolic DeLorean in the name of Old School Day allows us to respect the pioneers within the industry, those instances of brilliance that set in motion what we now take for granted as technological commodities. Videogames as a medium have come so very far. What started as a hodgepodge of pixels and simplicity has evolved into visual, narrative-driven masterpieces easily on par with cinema. Gaming may have been an obscure hobby decades ago, but whether you adhere to the pastime personally or not, it is impossible to ignore its significance on an economic, cultural, and political scale. The current discussions about videogames and gun control are a testament to that. The industry boasts a powerful presence within the global landscape but also within my own life. I adopted Old School Day as reminder of why I became a gamer in the first place: the fun times with friends and family, the lessons learned from macho protagonists, the ability to step into the shoes of countless characters, and the satisfaction felt from saving the world, galaxy, or universe. If you find yourself in a place of gaming stagnancy, my hope is that after reading this, you'll incorporate a bit of Old School Day into your life and join me in celebrating retro gaming on a regular basis.What are your favorite older games? Do you ever take a break from new releases to play titles from the past?[Note: If you own Pokémon Stadium 2, follow my instructions without restraint for guaranteed laughs. Visit the mini games section and select Streaming Stampede. Make sure to play with the company of an easy or normal com and watch the stupidity ensue. Enjoy!] Image Sources: [1][2][3][4][5]
Screw beer pong photo
Screw beer pong, hand me that controller
Gamers are a diverse breed. From PC aficionados and console fanatics, to retro devotees and casual admirers, there is no one-size-fits-all model of videogame hobbyist. Though we possess many differences, like game preferences...

Harvest Moon reboot photo
Harvest Moon reboot

Harvest Moon: Gritty Reboot goes back to nature

Like Batman Begins but with farming
Mar 08
// Darren Nakamura
Gritty reboots are all the rage these days. Recently, we have seen the release of Battleship, Hansel and Gretel, Jack the Giant Slayer, and more. Once Hollywood runs out of comic books, fairy tales, and board games to b...

Harvest Moon creator's new game, Hometown Story

Coming to North America this year
Mar 04
// Dale North
Remember Project Happiness from last E3? Last year's tease from Harvest Moon creator Yasuhiro Wada has its official title now: Hometown Story.  Famitsu has the full story from Wada himself. He says that the game is nearl...
Stardew Valley photo
Stardew Valley

Relive glorious Harvest Moon memories with Stardew Valley

Brand new trailer sheds some light on the indie PC project
Feb 11
// Chris Carter
Stardew Valley is a farming simulator similar to Harvest Moon on PC, that's currently waiting on a successful Steam Greenlight campaign. It'll feature online support for up to four people (drop-in and out), as well as full s...
XSEED photo

XSEED localizing every Japanese game ever

Localization firm announces four more games for 2013
Jan 31
// Kyle MacGregor
Killer is Dead isn't the only bun in XSEED's oven. The publisher has a whole lot more in store for those with a predilection for all that is obscure and Japanese in the world. First on the docket is Ys I & II Ch...

Holy Cow: Harvest Moon: A New Beginning anniversary ed.

Aug 28
// Dale North
To celebrate the 15th anniversary of Harvest Moon in North America, Natsume is bringing out an anniversary edition of upcoming 3DS game Harvest Moon: A New Beginning. This anniversary edition features a huge twelve inch Harve...

Harvest Moon inspired by violent videogames

Jul 03
// Jim Sterling
Harvest Moon creator Yasuhiro Wada has revealed the driving inspiration for his charming, non-threatening, family friendly games -- violence. According to the developer, the wealth of violent videogames on the market dri...

E3: Interview: Yasuhiro Wada on 'Project Happiness'

Jun 08 // Chad Concelmo
My interview with Yasuhiro Wada was very casual. We sat down together with his kind and professional translator and immediately started talking videogames. As a fan of Harvest Moon, I told Mr. Wada how much I respected the things he has done for videogames. I told him that I thought his games were refreshing in a sea of videogames that are starting to look and feel the same. He expressed gratitude for the kind words and agreed that he likes to create games that mean something to the player and aren't just a bunch of muted colors and loud noises. This brought us to his new game, codenamed "Project Happiness." As of now, "Project Happiness" is shrouded in secrecy, with only a loose 2013 release date attached to it. According to Mr. Wada, "Happiness" will take place in small village that will grow larger as the game progresses. You play a shopkeeper that will have to collect and sell items to the people in the village. Instead of the items doing generic things to generic villagers, Mr. Wada is designing the game to really establish an emotional connection to the things sold in the store. For example, some of the people in the town (all of who will have elaborate backstories) may have one particular item that makes them happier than all others. It is the job of the shopkeeper (and, in turn, the player) to figure this out and help make the villagers' dreams come true. In addition, there will be many moral choices in the game that will really help shape the entire story, which, according to Mr. Wada, will feature one of the most powerful and emotional endings ever experienced in a videogame. This may sound like a bold statement, but after talking with him and thinking back at his body of work, I am confident that Mr. Wada may be speaking the truth. The Harvest Moon games are brave in that they follow around the life of an ordinary farmer and his family. This seemingly simple concept is surprisingly emotional, and Mr. Wada knows how to take everyday experiences and relate them to the player. He revealed to me his favorite game in the Harvest Moon series is A Wonderful Life for the GameCube, and this bodes well for the future of "Project Happiness." A Wonderful Life is also my favorite game in the series and features a very sad, extremely moving ending. If "Project Happiness" has a similar emotional experience, we are all in for something truly special. "Project Happiness" will be released sometime in 2013 for unspecified platforms. We will keep you updated when more information comes in for this promising title. Thanks again, Mr. Wada, for a wonderful chat. The videogame industry needs people like you.

Interviewing the creator of the Harvest Moon series was one of my highlights of E3. In fact, it may have been the highlight. Yasuhiro Wada is an amazing, talented person with an unbelievably refreshing attitude about videogam...


Grasshopper loses two visionaries

Sep 11
// Fraser Brown
Last year Yasuhiro Wada and Yoshiro Kimura, creators of Harvest Moon and Little King's Story, respectively, joined Suda51's Grasshopper Manufacture. It was an exciting addition to the company. Both producers had previously be...

E3: Natsume's line-up announced

Jun 01
// Dale North
Natsume has sent along their E3 floor line-up this morning. They say they'll be showing off 4 games for the July 7-9 event: Rune Factory: Tides of Destiny for the PlayStation 3 and Wii, Harvest Moon: The Tale of Two Towns for...

Rune Factory: Tides of Destiny coming to US on PS3, Wii

May 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
Fans of the Rune Factory series have been waiting some time to hear if the latest release in the series, Rune Factory: Oceans would see release outside of Japan. Finally, some good news on that front. In a statement...

Harvest Moon game announced for the 3DS

Apr 07
// Dale North
Harvest Moon: The Tale of Two Towns is coming to North America, and will be released simultaneously on both the Nintendo DS and the 3DS. Natsume teased this announcement yesterday on their Facebook page, and now we have the o...

Rune Factory 3 has gone gold, releases November 9th

Oct 07
// Conrad Zimmerman
This news may not be exciting to most of you, but I'm the one who gets to write the blog posts and I love Rune Factory. So it pleases me to let you know that Rune Factory 3: A Fantasy Harvest Moon is all finished up and ...

Harvest Moon 64 not coming to the Virtual Console

Aug 15
// Matthew Razak
Look, you either love Harvest Moon or you haven't played it yet. The people in the former group would most likely point towards Harvest Moon 64 in order to get the people in the latter group started on the series. It's one of...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...