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Hands-on

First hands-on: Beyond: Two Souls

Mar 21 // Dale North
Beyond: Two Souls (PS3)Developer: Quantic DreamPublisher: SCEARelease: October 2013 Starting out, Jodie looked to be returning to a scientific research center just as firefighters and ambulances were wheeling out injured people from the building. It looked as if she was warned not to enter, but she does anyway, moving past debris, injured bodies, and burning walls to go deeper into the building.  Jodie can be moved with the left analog stick, with the navigation of her world being fully contextual. Simply move her to where you need and she'll step over thresholds, climb over obstacles, and more, each with specific animations. I did this to step over debris, through broken windows, and deeper into dangerous looking territory.  The world interaction system is completely new, using the right stick to input moves that make sense in given situations. Unlike Heavy Rain, there are no prompts for action with this system. Instead, a simple white dot will show areas of potential interaction. Moving the right stick at this dot in a way that makes sense for a given action, like pushing up to stand, or down to crouch, executes that action. Movements are always based on where Jodie is and what she's able to do in that location. Some situations involve button-press prompts, while others use the SIXAXIS movement sensors to have players moving the controller around. The first obstacle of the demo that we encountered had Jodie stopped at an elevator door that would not open. She requested that Aiden move ahead to investigate, which had me moving the entity down the elevator shaft to find that the elevator door would not close due to an obstruction. A simple press of the triangle button toggles control between Jodie and Aiden at any time. Being an invisible entity, Aiden can fly around anywhere. Controlling it in a first-person view, I was able to fly through walls and other matter, straight down into the jammed elevator. Aiden can interact with objects in the world through use of the analog sticks and the R1 button, enabling it to push, throw, and blast objects. I used this ability to push the obstruction away from the door, letting the elevator close to be called up to Jodie.  The demo featured other situations where I had to use Aiden to do things move through a door to unlock it, or move through a fire to push a fire extinguisher toward Jodie to help her quell flames. Some situations presented the option to use either Jodie or Aiden to proceed. In one room, glass doors prevented Jodie from progressing. The player could either use Aiden's blast ability to bust the glass, or have Jodie pick up a chair to slam it through the glass.  One of the most interesting team abilities for the duo has Aiden channeling some of another human's aura toward Jodie. This enables Jodie to have a short vision, which, in this case, gave her a fuzzy glimpse of injured or dead people's last moments. In two different situations in this demo, these visions showed that these humans were attacked by some force. The last one seen showed what looked to be semi-transparent tentacles coming out of the wall to thrash some victim around. My guess is that this entity had something to do with the disaster at this research center, and that Jodie went in to deal with it.  Just as things got interesting, a Quantic Dream staffer cut me off from proceeding.  From what we saw in the hour-long presentation and from this hands-on session, it seems that moving through Beyond: Two Souls involves a lot of problem-solving collaboration between Aiden and Jodie. With the simple challenges presented here, it was kind of satisfying to switch between two totally different control types to figure out how to progress. I'd imagine that more complex problem solving will be required as the game progresses.  While Jodie moves exactly as you'd expect with this simple interaction system, the first-person control of Aiden takes a little getting used to. Flying around and whipping through walls and doors is fun and freeing, but with that much freedom it's also a bit disorienting. The camera control feels sufficiently like moving a ghost around, but with no limitations other than distance from Jodie, you can easily end up lost between walls or other structures. Add in Aiden's negative color view and disorientation comes even easier.  While I would have preferred playing what we were shown in the hands-off presentation, this demo was more than enough to show off how Beyond will use Aiden and Jodie's unique control schemes together. Other aspects of Jodie's control, like an action system for combat, and vehicle control, were teased during this visit, but it looks like we'll have to wait to try these out.
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Control system detailed
While a sizable portion of Beyond: Two Souls was shown to press at a event at Quantic Dream this week, unfortunately, it was a hands-off situation. But the studio didn't want to leave us completely empty handed, so they prepa...

Europa Universalis IV: The betrayal of Venice

Feb 14 // Fraser Brown
Europa Universalis IV (PC)Developer: Paradox Development StudioPublisher: Paradox InteractiveReleased: Q3 2013MSRP: $39.99  We started by getting assigned the nations we would lead to victory or death, but there were only eight PCs for nine players. Being a gentleman (the worst trait for an EU player), I said I'd be happy to team up with someone and share responsibility for whatever mess we found ourselves in. So I had joint command of wealthy Venice with Rock, Paper, Shotgun's Adam Smith. Our plan was a simple one: drown in gold. That we actually ended up drowning in blood and rebellions just goes to show that no plan survives the first five minutes in EUIV, especially when other human players are thrown into the mix.  It all began so well, too. We had provinces all down the coast of the Adriatic, and further afield we had Crete under our thumb. Trade seems to have been really fine-tuned this time around, and we had no small amount of options when it came to expanding our coffers. We sent traders into markets connected to our trade network, had them send even more cash our way, and watched as we saw our wee cash counter rise -- we were rolling in it. Just to be safe, we also ordered a sizable fleet to patrol our trade route. Nobody could be allowed to threaten our lovely money. With our financial security well in hand, Adam and I thought it was high time to expand our republic. Now, I would like to point out at this juncture that we're good guys. We aren't warmongers, we aren't conquerors, we just needed room for growth. If you choose to draw parallels with the excuses used by Germany in WWI, then that's your problem. To give greater direction to these vast, meandering, centuries-spanning games, Paradox has implemented a mission system to allow for a more goal-orientated approach, should players wish it. Completing such missions confer extra benefits on top of the land you get for taking a province, or the money you stop your enemy from receiving when you blockade their port. Our first mission -- the impetus for our first war -- was the conquest of Cremona, a province to the west that was under the control of Lombardia. We were hardly in a position to declare war straight away, however. Armies take a long time to raise, what with the training, outfitting, and other tomfoolery associated with gathering a bunch of rowdy men and sending them off to kill people.  Venice was famed for her great mercenary armies, though, so instead of spending most of the year turning chubby blokes into killing machines, we simply hired the finished product. Using our large cash reserves, we purchased a veritable horde of angry gentlemen, and directed them towards our new foes. War was upon us. Things did not go quite as expected. As our mercenary force carved their way through Cremona, Lombardia called in Milan for help. We should have spent more time researching who Lombardia was friendly with. Risk assessment might sound dull, but we learned rather quickly that it's a tad important. Regardless, we had chosen our path and now we were sticking to it. Cremona fell quickly, but we had two large enemy armies marching towards our exhausted mercenaries. At the last moment, one of them -- the Milanese force -- changed its mind and headed straight for our own provinces. We were the bloody invaders, not them, the gall! The next ten minutes passed by slowly as we focused on chasing invaders out of our own territory, keeping the provinces we had just locked down, and pushing back two well-trained armies who weren't suffering from the morale issues that were so crippling our hired swords. Even once we had destroyed the Milanese and accepted their peace offer, the Lombards wouldn't quit. Actually, their army was growing.  After hiring all the mercenaries we could afford (and some that we could not), we were back in the game. Battle by battle, we stripped the Lombards of men and morale, but due to an unfortunate bug, they kept escaping evisceration. This led to the prolonging of a war we could ill-afford. Eventually they were finally put down, however, and we struck a deal with our broken foe. As we had pretty much ravaged all of their provinces, we could dictate terms from a very strong position. We walked away with two new provinces, but a hell of a lot of cuts and bruises. Nothing would have pleased me more than to put my feet up on the desk, drink some Italian wine, and toast our success. Maybe I would have even thrown some coins at a bunch of dirty peasants. This was not to be, unfortunately. The arduous war, depletion of our cash, and the introduction of new citizens who hated our guts meant that rebellions were brewing everywhere. The Cretans and Croatians were demanding independence, peasants were demanding lower taxes, and our new Lombard population wanted revenge. Crete and our single province in Croatia were a bit too far away for us to waste time with, so we set about fixing our problems at home first. We had to disband our mercenary units after the war with Lombardia, so now we had to raise a new one. Lamentably, this was impossible due to our serious lack of money, and it would also take a bit of time to get the number of men we needed to put an end to these rebellions. To speed up recruitment, we selected our first "National Idea." These concepts help players define their nation and contain lots of individual bonuses, from economic boons to religious benefits. The first part of the Plutocracy Idea allows for faster recruitment of mercenaries, making it absolutely perfect for Venice. One loan later and we even had enough currency to purchase them. We were still in a lot of trouble, though, and our lands were in complete disarray. It was time to ask for help from another player. Throughout much of the game, Joe Robinson (you can read his perspective over at Strategy Informer) had been offering us an alliance. He was playing as Austria, leader of the powerhouse known as the Holy Roman Empire. It was time for us to put aside our pride, accepting this new ally into our wine-soaked bosom. Joe was a fantastic ally at first. He quickly rushed in to aid us with our rebel infestation, taking on armies that were far too large for us to handle on our own. He did so freely, and without complaint, despite the border disputes and petulant members of the HRE causing him no amount of stress. This gave Adam and I time consolidate our trade routes once more, start recruiting new troops to augment our mercenary forces, and try to find a peaceful solution to some of our rebellions. One of the new features in EUIV allows players to quickly see why, exactly, rebels are getting up in arms. Frequently, there's even an option to solve the issue immediately by offering them what they want. We managed to put down one rebellion this way, but the demands made by the others were simply too costly. The constant battles were also playing havoc with both our stability and war exhaustion, and raising the former meant that we didn't have enough to lower the latter. It was a tense juggling act. We were also dealing with elections and selecting new technologies. Due to our conflict-ridden state, we were pleased to be able to advance our arms due to new technological improvements, but the aforementioned election didn't please us nearly as much. We'd been previously supporting a Doge with quite a bit of skill when it came to military matters, but electing the same leader over and over again pushed us ever closer to a monarchy, which is the last thing you want to do if you are trying to manage a republic. To stop further problems down the line, we had to choose a new Doge, and our military campaign suffered. Things were going from bad to worse, with nations now declaring war on us. For some reason, Bosnia wanted a piece of the action, and our fellow Italians had stopped circling like carrion birds and were now coming in for the kill. Crete had successfully gained independence at the point of a sword, and now had its own monarch, while our solitary Croation province had seceded from the republic, as well. At this point, Joe decided to pull out, ordering his forces back to Austria to deal with his own domestic issues. We were alone, and completely surrounded by enemies.  That's when the bloody Lollards struck. I can't even begin to describe how much I hate the Lollards. At the time, I didn't have a clue who the hell they were. They simply appeared out of the blue, with several armies, and proceeded to decimate our scattered forces. Their shield icon was a pentagram, so naturally I assumed we were being invaded by Satanists. This was when I started openly shouting, all pretense of "playing a game" for "fun" were flung out the window. This was serious business. I won't even bother listing all of the factions who were slaughtering Venetians, it would simply take too long. It felt like the whole world was out to get us. We had more debt than men, and every few minutes another province would fall to either a rebel army or a foreign aggressor. Where was our Austrian ally during all of this, you ask? Well, we thought he was dealing with his own problems, but no, he was very, very interested in what was going on just south of his border. Austria was a wolf in sheep's clothing. The whole time we thought that we were defending our lands against rebels who had no just cause to go to war, we were actually playing right into a shadowy figure's hands. Some of the rebels had a master, you see, and that master was Joe Robinson, a truly evil man.  At our lowest point, when it seemed like things could not possibly get any worse, we received a notification: "Austria has declared war on you." War. With the leader of the Holy Roman Empire. We were absolutely buggered. Not acknowledging the threat of Austria earlier made me feel like Chamberlain waving that piece of paper in 1938. There will be peace for our time -- not bloody likely. We did what we could, getting more and more into debt, hiring every single mercenary throughout the land, but we had lost before the first Austrian soldier crossed the border. Despite our dire situation, we still put up a noble fight. Thousands of men threw themselves onto the pikes of the Austrian aggressors. If we couldn't kill them, we'd make a wall with the corpses of our mercenaries. Operation Corpse Wall was not a success.  Joe's terms could have been a lot worse -- he only wanted one province. It was his mission, apparently; one that he was so dedicated to that he betrayed his ally and slaughtered countless men. I'm definitely not still bitter. Even with the end of the war, Venice's trials were far from over. Rebels continued to run riot in all of our remaining provinces, our people were exhausted and miserable, and to add insult to injury, one of the provinces taken by the rebels ended up getting snatched by Austria. In total, we'd lost half of our provinces. Before long, all of our surviving holdings were surrounded by our one time ally turned despised enemy. It was a tragedy.  It was then that the game ended. Plans were being formulated which may have allowed Venice to reclaim some of her former glory. Old lands would be taken back, Serbia and Bosnia would be conquered, the Adriatic would once again be dominated by our fleets, and wine would flow freely. It never happened, of course, but it could have. And it would have been amazing. 
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A tale of greed, rebellion, and lost glory
A wee while ago, I was struggling through blizzards raging across Iceland to cover the Paradox Convention in Reykjavik, hence all the previews I've been drip feeding you over the last week or so. The greatest struggle didn't ...

Preview: Madden NFL 13 gets serious on Wii U

Nov 01 // Keith Swiader
Madden NFL 13 (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Vita, Wii, Wii U [previewed])Developer: EA TiburonPublisher: Electronic Arts Release: November 13, 2012 Unlike Madden entries of Nintendo's past, which opted for a more cartoonish, family friendly style of presentation and gameplay as opposed to its more realistic console brethren, Madden NFL 13 on the Wii U is, for the most part, a straight port of the game released earlier this year, with the exception of the new Infinity Engine being MIA. EA assured me, however, that they are looking into making sure the new engine is added with future iterations. Still, for the first time ever, Nintendo players will be able to experience a high-definition version of Madden, complete with the full presentation offerings, HDR lighting, motion blur, and of course, commentary from Phil Simms and Jim Nantz. In short, what you would expect to find in a full-fledged Madden release is now available on a Nintendo console.  Where the Wii U version of Madden NFL 13 falls short with the exclusion of the new Infinity Engine, it makes up for with the slew of Wii U-specific features. The more notable of the bunch has you making pre-snap player adjustments via the Wii U's touchpad. Think you should move that linebacker into the flats? Simply press and hold his icon on the touchscreen and drag it to the far bottom left or right side. Need an extra defender to cover the deep pass? Drag the desired icon to the far top of the screen. Blitzes and man-coverages can also be adjusted in the blink of an eye with the pad. It's quick, intuitive, and highly effective. While one could see this as a gimmick to invite the novice player into the game, a veteran would be hard-pressed to dismiss the invaluable nature of not having to cycle through multiple menus just to adjust coverage.  On the offensive side of the line, the Wii U GamePad allows you to draw even the most squiggly of squiggly routes for your receivers. No, seriously. During my hands-on time, I must've drawn a 15-loop loopty-loop, and sure enough, my receiver followed the play, although it didn't land me the next down. But, on a more serious note, the ability to customize your hot routes now means that you are no longer restricted to the typical lot of slants, streaks, flats, and curls. With this enhancement to offensive hot-routing coupled with the top-down perspective of the field given on the GamePad, you now have a better way to break your receiver away from defenders. If there's a downside to the route-drawing feature, it's that you can't create full playbooks with it, though EA said it hopes to bring this idea to life with future titles. A Detach Mode is also available on the Wii U's version of Madden, which enables you to play the entire game through the Wii U GamePad's display, which, in my time, failed to offer any hiccuping or graphical hitches during gameplay. Both local and online multiplayer can also take advantage of utilizing this display, with the former having one person viewing the game on the pad, and the other playing on the television. Traditional local multiplayer is also on offer if you so prefer. Madden NFL on a Nintendo console is no longer an afterthought. Nor is it merely something you play at a gathering once you get tired of Wii Sports. This offers the same hard-hitting experience as its other HD releases, so much so that the Wii U version will also receive same-day roster updates. Those who feel that the Madden series has become the same ol' thing every year should definitely keep their eyes peeled when Madden NFL 13 drops on the Wii U this November.
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...and touching men feels good
When one thinks of buying the latest installment of John Madden football, one typically goes the route of either the Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 version, instantly shrugging off even the thought of playing a year of pigskin on ...

Preview: The story of Creationism in SimCity

Oct 25 // Keith Swiader
SimCity (PC [previewed], Mac)Developer: MaxisPublisher: Electronic ArtsRelease: March 5, 2013  SimCity is the series' first foray into the three-dimensional realm, whereas past titles portrayed the action in a 2D isometric, or birds' eye view. Developer Maxis states the inspiration comes from the studio's love of model train sets, as well as the idea of being able to reach out and touch the city. While hardware limitations restrain us from being able to touch our created world in SimCity, the game's engine does allow you to zoom in and out of the environment with ease and pan the camera into every nook and cranny possible, which is still pretty darn close to physically touching your city. The world you create in SimCity is made possible by Glass Box, an in-house simulation engine that controls every car on the road, every person working on the street, and every tornado and other natural disaster that wrecks havoc on your utopia. Cars on the road now actually drive to destinations, be it to a job, the local burger shack, and so on, and if you don't have your roads constructed in an organized manner, traffic jams will be on the rise, negatively affecting the flow of the city's ecosystem. If people can't get to work, nothing can be produced and money can't be earned. There's a huge emphasis on cause-and-effect in SimCity, so detailed planning will make the difference in creating a prosperous metropolis or a dismal shanty town.  The desirability of your city will also go up or down depending on what you do with it. Setting your residential zones atop a hill or cliffside, for example, will score you major props with the residents. Placing a smoke-puffing factory next to them afterward, however, will result in a lot of "For Sale" signs. But adding a park, library and multiple areas of education within the vicinity of your housing district will increase the desirability, and in turn, you'll start to see more upscale housing pop up. If you play your cards right, those one-bedroom houses could quickly transform into a dream mansion with 8 1/2 baths and a theater. Think big! Glass Box also features fully detailed maps representing information such as water flow, power flow, and what factories are currently functioning. Before placing a power plant or water tower on the field, you will see exactly where the energy will flow, effectively helping you plan out the best possible setup for your business and residential zones. However, don't try to cram everything into one section with the hopes of creating the all-in-one paradise. Whether you're controlling multiple territories alone or interacting with people online, the best course of action is to have multiple cities, each specializing in one or two aspects, and then have them interact with the adjacent ones. For example, one city could set up housing, and its residents would travel to work to another city, and then travel elsewhere for spending. It's all about inter-city dependence, as Maxis calls it, and having cities work in unison will prove to have extremely profitable results. And yes, I did say "interacting with people online," because EA's latest is not only the series' first 3D iteration, but the first one to come equipped with online play. You now have the ability to work together with others, both on a global scale or in a closed-community among family and friends, with the combined vision of creating the perfect inter-connectivity between cities. There's even a player-driven global market on offer, so if your town has, say, a surplus of oil, you can then put it up on the market at whatever price you choose and sell it to the Mayors (other players) of other cities who aren't so rich on that particular resource. Global and local leaderboards are also present, with boards including the wealthiest and poorest city, the city with the most pollution, and the city richest in a certain resource. SimCity is one of those games that becomes what you make of it and thus has practically no end. If nothing else, that's what's most exciting about SimCity's release date. It's a game that will trap you in its grasp for hours on end, where an all-nighter results in being buried half-alive under mounds of Red Bull and Bawls, with deep, dark bags under your eyes. And yet, that's a good thing. Remember, it's all for the greater good of your citizens, right?
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What the teachers never taught you
Odds are that as a child, you had the fascination of building things out of LEGOs. Or Lincoln Logs and Tinker Toys, if we're going back a ways. Whatever the case, as children, we have a keen enjoyment of building stuff. This ...

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Project P-100 was one of the better Wii U games at PAX


Sep 04
// Tara Long
While I can't say I was wholeheartedly impressed with every one of the Wii U's offerings at PAX this year, one game did stand out as a fun and unique addition to the system's growing compendium of third-party titles. Project...
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PAX: MOGA gives mobile the buttons we've always wanted


Sep 04
// Dale North
Up until now I have always chosen a 3DS or Vita over my phone, even if it meant sacrificing portability. Why? Buttons, man. Buttons. While there are a few smartly designed mobile games that don't need buttons, there are still...

Ten things to know about Defiance

Jul 16 // Jayson Napolitano
[embed]231396:44411[/embed] #1: The Story Defiance has a truly fascinating story. Several alien species, upon discovering that their home systems were going to be destroyed, built ships known as arks and put representatives of their respective species on board along with some of their native flora and fauna. They ended up at Earth, not realizing we were already here, and proceeded to set up colonization rights in exchange for technology. This of course pissed a lot of people off who had to be relocated. Soon thereafter, the in-orbit arks were sabotaged and destroyed, causing their debris to rain down onto Earth with their terra-morphing machinery intact, causing radical changes to the surface of the planet and leading to generalized chaos and war. The game and television show take place 40 years later on a drastically different Earth where governments and primary communications have been destroyed. #2: The Setting While the television show takes place in St. Louis, the game takes place in San Francisco and the surrounding Bay Area. Both cities are frontier cities where a valuable alien mineral called golenite has been discovered, and people are traveling to these areas to stake a claim. The terra-morphing machinery found within the arks has turned portions of the city completely alien, while some are still intact and others are half-alien, half-human hybrids. You’ll explore wilderness and cityscapes, and will come across familiar sites including the Golden Gate Bridge which is now blown up, contorted, and un-crossable. According to Beliaeff, “We want that Planet of the Apes moment. San Francisco has so many landmarks that we wanted people to say, ‘Oh God, this really is Earth, and a lot has changed.’” #3: The Music Bear McCreary, known mostly for his work in television on shows including Battlestar Galactica and The Walking Dead, is composing music for both the game and television show. That puts him in a pretty unique position to bring continuity across the two properties as most game projects based on television shows get different composers. McCreary is working hard to create unique themes for the various alien races as well as reference material from Earth’s musical history, including the 1980s through the 2000s. We’re told that there will be a lot of dramatic orchestral score for the television show while the game may feature more action-oriented themes. Also of note is the fact that McCreary’s unique position as the composer for both the show and game has turned him into somewhat of an expert resource for both teams. “If a member of this race was to pick up an instrument and start playing, what might it look like?” is a question that’s been brought to him several times, so he’s had to work with the team’s full-time mythology coordinator to develop unique instruments for the world’s various races that may even be mocked up and used in the television show. Maybe he ought to file a few patents for these instruments while he's at it! #4: A Complete Story Out of the Box An entire storyline will be available out of the box, although there will be places for the team to plug in events that occur in the show into the game. There will also be regular content updates and possible expansion sets. Zone events (described below) use a modular plug-and-socket model to easily manage events throughout the game world. #5: Intuitive Controls The game plays and feels a lot like Halo. I was able to pick up an Xbox 360 controller and figure it out within 15 seconds, so I will also say that the controls are super intuitive. Using this controller configuration, the right trigger shoots, the left trigger zooms, the right shoulder throws grenades, and the left activities abilities. Pressing the right analog stick down performs a melee attack, and various other buttons are used to jump, crouch, and reload. #6: Lots of Ways to Get Around The game takes place in a large persistent world where players assume the role of a mercenary. The primary hubs where people will meet were described as “mainly outposts where characters can interact and trade.” When asked just how large the world would be given that it only encompasses sections of Northern California, we were told that they’re still working on that, but players will be able to use an ATV to cover more distance, and there will be a travel option to go between major locations (but “not too many, as we want you to interact with the world”). They’re also considering allowing players to spawn into the game next to their friends to immediately get into the action as opposed to having to coordinate a meeting spot. #7: No Political System While there isn’t a planned political system where players can group together and battle with one another for control of certain zones, there are factions that players can align themselves with for quests and notoriety. It seems as though the goal is for Defiance to be more collaborative than competitive. #8: Dynamic Event System (Ark Falls) Pieces of the arks mentioned above are still in orbit with things living within them. These pieces randomly enter orbit and crash down onto the Earth, changing the environment due to the terra-morphing machinery. If players choose to partake in these events which involved killing a bunch of hellbug creatures in the demo we played, special minerals and technology can be obtained. While small ark falls will occur throughout the entire game world, larger, zone-wide ark falls will also be featured using their plug-and-socket model. #9: No Strict Class System The game doesn’t feature a strict class system, but rather allows players to customize their character however they wish. One ability can be equipped at a time, but players can level up any ability he or she chooses, although it will be impossible to achieve the maximum level for all abilities, leaving players to prioritize what kind of character they’d like to play. In groups, it’s beneficial to have each member choose a different ability. These abilities also have an impact on the weapons that can be equipped which include sniper rifles, shotguns, and a beam weapon with an area effect attack and a secondary healing function, effectively making these players a medic class. #10: Enemies and Loot The hellbug creatures that have been featured heavily in promotional materials for the game are actually a mutation and not something that was brought to Earth by the alien races. They were actually small foreign bacteria that mutated and became these hideous creatures. We encountered them frequently during the ark fall events because apparently the minerals contained within the arks are something that the hellbugs thrive on, so they aggressively defend the precious resource both by directly attacking players and by building defensive structures. One such structure has weak points located all around its body that players have to focus their fire on, emphasizing the first-person shooting in the game. Other enemies include cyborg miners and another alien race that acts as a constant threat in both the game and television show that provides somewhat of a rallying point for all of the other races to join together against. When I asked about drops, and what the hellbugs in particular may drop, we were told, “Hellbugs eat everything, so they do drop guns.” There will be rare drops from sub-bosses that appear randomly in the game world as well as in quests and four-player instances, and they will feature different visual appearances so players know they’re important. We asked about PVP, and while we were told it will be in the game, Trion isn’t ready to talk about it until gamescom. -------------------- I had a lot of fun learning about and experiencing the world of Defiance, but are you sold on this hybrid television show/videogame and its first-person shooting gameplay within an MMO world?
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Truly fascinating
Defiance is SyFy and Trion Worlds’ venture that breaks new ground by simultaneously developing a television series and videogame within the same universe, and even sharing a few characters between the two. We were only ...

E3: Hands-on with Rayman Legends

Jun 08 // Chad Concelmo
This game will make you want to buy a Wii U. It is that good. So far it is a Wii-exclusive, and, if it stays that way, this game could really be a system seller. If Pikmin 3 wasn't in the picture, Rayman Legends would easily be the best Wii U game I played at the show. Even me typing this hyperbole feels a little crazy, as the only thing on-display for Rayman Legends was the game's co-op mode. The single-player mode -- and the game definitely has one! -- was not playable. To fall this in love with an "extra" mode is insane. I can't imagine how incredible the single-player campaign will be. When I say "co-op mode," I don't mean it in the regular sense of the word. While you can play up to four-play co-op with four characters on-screen like in Rayman Origins, there is a new co-op mode that involves one player playing with the new Wii U Pro Controller and one playing with the GamePad. Let me break down how this works. As mentioned, one player controls the main character on-screen with the Wii U Pro Controller (you can read my impressions on that fantastic controller right here). The other player holds the GamePad and uses nothing else but the built in touch screen. While the first player is running through the splendid levels, the other player is "assisting" them by interacting with the world around them. This could be very basic like the co-op mode in Super Mario Galaxy, but it is not simple at all. There is so much variety to this "assisting" that it is always interesting and fun. In fact, it is so impressive that I gasped on multiple occasions because I was so impressed with what the game was letting me and my partner do. At first, the assisting is much easier. The second player can cut grass by swiping the touch screen to uncover shiny lums, tap on something in the background to open a secret area, or grab enemies and hold onto them to help the player. As the levels progress, things get much deeper (and much more fun!). In one section, the second player has to shoot projectiles at dragons in the background to protect the first player. In another, player two can grab parts of the environment to help player one proceed further. And this is some of the stuff that impressed me the most. In one level, a huge wooden wheel was in front of Rayman. The wheel had a complicated maze-like passage through it that needs to be traversed in order for the first player to proceed. In the passage were deadly, one-touch-and-you're-dead spikes and hooks to grab on to. In order to proceed, player two has to grab hold of the wheel and turn it for player one. To to this, the second player taps the touch screen to lock in the hold and rotates the actual GamePad back and forth. There is no lag and everything is smooth and intuitive. When the wheel is placed in the right direction, the first player can move forward. This dance between both players takes a lot of cooperation, and, when successful, is ridiculously satisfying. There were several puzzles like this, and they were all extraordinary. And then the second part of the demo started. I was already impressed by everything I played, but the second part of the demo involved Rayman running through a fast, auto-scrolling level timed to the music being played and activated by the second player. It's hard to describe unless you see the video (watch it right here!), but, basically, every jump, item grab, and movement the first player makes is timed to the music playing in the background. To help with the beat, the second player can tap on-screen statues. It is unbelievably cool and one of the most impressive levels I have ever seen in a 2D platformer. After talking about all this, I didn't even mention how beautiful Rayman Legends looks. I mean, it kind of goes without saying. But it should be mentioned. Rayman Legends is jaw-droppingly gorgeous. One of the best-looking 2D platformers ever. Hell, one of the best-looking games ever. I didn't think it was possible, but Rayman Legends looks ever better than Rayman Origins. And, keep in mind again, that I saw only two small sequences in the game. I can't imagine how amazing everything is going to look when all the various levels are opened up. Ubisoft and Nintendo were smart to show off the co-op version of Rayman Legends on the Wii U. A single-player demo would have been a nice bonus, but we already know what that is going to look like -- we have Rayman Origins to play over and over. With Rayman Legends, Ubisoft has taken things to a whole new level. The game looks incredible, it plays just as well as its predecessor, and the Wii U-specific co-op features are fun and never once feel gimmicky. Rayman Legends is a masterpiece in the making. If the final game is as strong as the demo, this could be some serious Game of the Year stuff.
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Rayman Legends is the direct Wii U-exclusive sequel to the beautiful, gorgeous, sublime 2D platformer Rayman Origins that was released last year. The good news if you were a fan of Rayman Origins: Rayman Legends is even more ...

E3: Hands-on with ZombiU

Jun 08 // Chad Concelmo
Let's get to all the good stuff first. Even though zombies are completely overused in videogames, ZombiU surprisingly feels fresh. This is due to a few key things. One, the controls. The Wii U GamePad feels great, and playing a first-person shooter like this with it is totally comfortable. The draw to this game -- and the feature that drew the most applause during the Ubisoft press conference -- is the cool implementation of the GamePad controller. While running around doing normal zombie-killing things, you can use the GamePad for many different things. When opening a box, you can see the contents on your touch screen. Just tap what you want and slide it into your inventory! Get to a door that needs unlocking? You can pick the lock in a super easy (almost too easy) lockpicking minigame on the GamePad! Need to type in a code to open a door? Type it in on the touch screen! This stuff is fun (if a little gimmicky) and helps mix up the action. Another cool addition to the game is permanent death. When you die in ZombiU, you die forever. There are no retries or lives in the game. When you die, you restart as a brand new survivor, with your old character walking around the level as a zombie. It's a really neat addition and makes death feel so much scarier than in most games of the type. Now ... the not so good. First, ZombiU doesn't really look that great. Compared to the Wii, the game looks incredible. The textures are detailed, the lighting is slick, and the environments are appropriately atmospheric. But when you compare the game to other current gen games of the same type, it doesn't hold up. If it was very stylized, this comparison wouldn't be fair. But it's not. It is supposed to look as realistic as possible, and the graphics just don't feel as advanced as they could. The game doesn't look bad by any means, but it's hard not to compare it to similar games on other systems. The comparison is inevitable. Another problem with the game is also one of the ZombiU's greatest strengths: the implementation of the GamePad controller. As mentioned, there are some really cool things about the new control scheme -- lockpicking and item management is particularly neat. But there are some sequences that are just plain weird and a little awkward. Some parts of the game have you hold up the GamePad screen and look "through" the touch screen. Sometimes this is used for aiming with your sniper rifle, which is pretty cool, but most of the times it is used to "scan" the area and find secret thing using a special kind of vision. In concept, it sounds neat, but it doesn't work very well and totally takes you out of the action. (It is also accompanied by a very awkward on-screen animation of your character also looking through the same type of tablet screen. Why does he/she have this device in their backpack?) Adding a few clever elements with the GamePad is great, but add too many and the game collapses under its own cleverness. And, unfortunately, ZombiU falls into this category more often than not. Some of this stuff could be cleaned up before the final version, but, as of now, the game just feels to unsure of its own strengths and weaknesses to excitedly recommend it. Seeing an M-rated game being promoted on the Wii U is very exciting, and bodes well for the future of the system. With ZombiU, though, a little more work needs to be done to stay away from the gimmicks and focus on the core gameplay. I liked ZombiU, but didn't. I was impressed by some of the new features, but confused by them as well. I had fun with the game, but also was frustrated. So, in short: Huh.
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Huh. That was my first reaction after playing ZombiU for the Wii U at Nintendo's booth during E3. Huh. Now, "huh" usually has a negative connotation, but that is not necessarily the case with this particular game. The "huh" i...

E3: Daedalic and the return of the classic adventure game

Jun 08 // Chad Concelmo
The two games Daedalic Entertainment showed off were The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav and Deponia. The Dark Eye is a more traditional fantasy adventure game like King's Quest, while Deponia is a wacky adventure set in space that very much reminded me of Space Quest. Both games look absolutely gorgeous, with hand-drawn backgrounds and smooth animation. Just looking at the games for the first time brought back such memories of how beautiful adventure games used to look with their hand-drawn and hand-painted art. As great as the little I got to see of Deponia was, that game is still a little ways off. I will focus on The Dark Eye, as that is the game that featured an extended demo. It will also be available on Steam on June 22, so the release date is only a few weeks away! Like most point-and-click games, The Dark Eye involves a main character exploring a vast world, interacting with characters, and solving puzzles to reach the end of the game. Obviously, the first thing you will notice about the game is how gorgeous it looks. The fact that a small group of people made a game that looks this good really boggles my mind. It's incredible how talented some people in this world are. Exploring the world is as simple as clicking on any object or character you want to interact with. Again, it is classic graphic adventure stuff. In addition to this, a very large inventory system is also used. Like most adventure games, you can pick up a ton of items, some so random you won't even know where to use them until just the right time. One addition to The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav is a basic, yet effective magic system. Along the way, the main character can learn spells that will interact with the environment. One spell will break items. This can be used in many scenarios with no real result -- it is more of an aesthetic thing. But some items need to be shattered to solve puzzles. In one scenario in the demo, the main character was tied up and trapped in a cave. By using his magic power combined with many items in his inventory, he eventually escapes in a plan of almost Rube Goldberg-proportions. It was quite complicated, but very well-designed, so the solution could be figured out eventually with some focused thinking. In fact, all of the puzzles in the Dark Eye felt very challenging, but never too challenging to be frustrating. I am one of the first people to admit being driven to madness in some old adventure games, due to the puzzles being near-impossible. That is not the case with Dark Eye. Yes, the puzzles are tough, but they are never too daunting. If I had to have one negative about both the Dark Eye and Deponia, it would be the localization. So far, the localization is not perfect, leaving jokes kind of hanging and some dialogue very awkward. It is not a deal breaker by any means, but when the games are so visually strong and beautifully designed, you want everything about them to be perfect. The same can be said for the voice acting. While not bad, it definitely could use a little work. Outside of these small issues (or big, depending on what you look for in an adventure game), both The Dark Eye and Deponia look great. I adore adventure games, and I am very much looking forward to playing both of these promising games. Deponia is still in production, but The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav is set to hit Steam on June 22. If you are a fan of classic adventure games, you will want to check this one out.
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One of my favorite things to do at E3 is visit the smaller publisher and developers and try out their games. Usually creative and made with such a large amount of heart, the smaller games at E3 are always a breath of fresh ai...

E3: Hands-on with Project P-100

Jun 08 // Chad Concelmo
While not nearly as violent as MadWorld or polished as Viewtiful Joe, Project P-100 still has that weird, fascinating vibe that only Platinum Games knows how to create. It almost feels like a hybrid between Pikmin, Little King's Story, and old arcade classic Smash TV. In the game, you play as a group of washed-up superheroes -- superheroes that, alone, don't amount to much at all, but, together, can almost do anything! Project P-100 is entirely controlled with the new Wii U GamePad. The group is moved around the screen with the left analog stick, and all attacks are done with the face buttons. In addition to these normal attacks, special moves can be performed with the GamePad's touch screen or right analog stick. On the touch screen, images of different things are displayed. In the demo, there were three special moves: a sword, a fist, and a gun. By "drawing" a specific shape on the touch screen (like Okami!), the superheroes combine and form whatever power you are summoning. The sword is a great, powerful melee weapon, while the gun is good for long-range attacks. The fist can be used to turn cranks and solve puzzles. Like Pikmin and Little King's Story, all of the heroes move around in a giant group. At certain points, and after defeating certain enemies, citizens can be rescued to join the group and make it bigger. The bigger the group, the more powerful the attacks. It's a simple concept that is made more interesting in a few ways: First and foremost are the somewhat odd controls. Moving around and attacking is easy enough (and really fun!), but accessing the touch screen is really tough to do while holding the GamePad. It just doesn't feel natural. If there was no time limit on drawing your shapes, this would not be as much of a problem. But you have to activate these special powers during some pretty intense battles. It was a stressful process and needlessly difficult. The powers throughout the game can also be "drawn" with the right analog stick, but that is almost trickier, since the accuracy is tough when not using the touch screen. The graphics in the game are colorful and polished, if a little simple. And, at times, some things even looked low-res, which was very strange. All in all, though, Project P-100 looks pretty good and uses a refreshing, bright color palette when compared to many other recent games. My favorite part of the demo was a section when your superhero group enters a warehouse. After entering by turning a crank with the fist power to open a door, the leader of the superhero group runs inside the building. Since the game is played in an isometric, top-down view, the insides of buildings are not shown (the roof blocks the view!). Because of this, the action moves to the Wii U GamePad's screen. Once inside a building, the leader of the group runs around in a third-person perspective as the player navigates him through some simple, yet fun puzzles. The graphics on the GamePad touch screen are really great and it was fun and surprising to switch play to the GamePad and then back to the T.V. screen once exiting the warehouse. It was a great sequence and made me think about all the cool possibilities that could happen with the GamePad in the future. Overall, I liked Project P-100, but didn't love it. I liked the interesting style and gameplay, but did not like the awkward, tricky controls. This could be remedied once the final game is released and players are not just thrown into the middle of the confusing action like the demo, but, as of now, I am hesitant if Project P-100 will be a must-buy when the Wii U is released later this year. If anything, Platinum Games did a good job of surprising with such a different game.
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Project P-100 (working title) from Platinum Games (creators of Viewtiful Joe and MadWorld) was one of the strangest Wii U games I played on the show floor at E3. And that is not necessarily a bad thing. In a way, it reminded ...

E3: Hands-on with Nintendo Land: DK's Crash Course

Jun 07 // Chad Concelmo
The concept of the single-player Donkey Kong's Crash Course is simple: You just have to guide a rolling, triangle-shaped vehicle through a crazy, complicated obstacle course without crashing it or flipping it over. It sounds simple, right? It's not. Crash Course is super-challenging, and, my God, so much fun. The only "simple" thing about it is the controls. All players have to do is tilt the Wii U GamePad back and forth to roll the vehicle left and right. Occasionally, the ZL and ZR triggers are used to activate levers and cranks, but, outside of all this, the controls are very easy to learn. Mastering them is an entirely different story. As you can see in the screenshots, the course in Crash Course is HUGE! And these screens don't even give you the entire picture. The level actually scrolls way up, so it is much larger than the images indicate. Everything starts out easy enough, with some hills to navigate over. Just tilt the GamePad and the vehicle rolls. If the hill is big, just tilt the GamePad even more more and the cart will roll much faster. But you don't want it to roll too fast. If it does, it could easily crash or flip over when you get to the next obstacle. You have to be slow and meticulous. And as the obstacles get more complicated, things get tough! BUT SO MUCH FUN! The whole thing reminded me of a combination of Uniracers and The Incredible Machine -- which is kind of the best combination ever. Some of the obstacles involve navigating giant loops with cranks, riding elevators, and navigating a crazy series of steep hills. To help you out, there are checkpoint markers every once in a while that you spawn from if you die. But with only five lives, getting through the entire course is tough. I played the game multiple times, and never made it. Is is really challenging. To add incentive and competition to the proceedings, your time and distance is recorded on a leaderboard, making getting farther and earning high scores oh-so tempting. I really, really loved Donkey Kong's Crash Course. It was such a breath of fresh air and a genuinely fun and surprisingly deep minigame. I can't wait to play more and finally make it to the end of the course!
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This is the last in the series to preview all five of the games within Nintendo Land for the Wii U. (You can check out the other previews here, here, here, and here! Whew!) Let's talk "Donkey Kong's Crash Course!" I am going ...

E3: Hands-on with Nintendo Land: AC: Sweet Day

Jun 07 // Chad Concelmo
Why did this game surprise me? Well, when I saw video of it, Sweet Day looked the least interesting of all the Nintendo Land games. The good news: It's not. It's actually very fun! Although somewhat similar to Luigi's Ghost Mansion, Sweet Day has enough differences to make it feel unique. In the game, four players control the townsfolk with the Wiimotes, while one player controls the evil chefs with the GamePad. And, yes, I said chefs. With an "s." In a cool mechanic, the player with the GamePad actually controls two chefs at the same time. One is controlled with the left analog stick and one is controlled with the right. This can be tricky, but that is part of the challenge. The other four players have to run around the screen and collect pieces of candy. This can be accomplished by two players standing next to each other on a set of buttons. Once done, the candy flies out of a tree and all over the screen. In total, 50 pieces of candy are eventually released into the Animal Crossing-themed arena. To win, all four players have to pick up all 50 pieces between them. When attacked by a chef, all candy is dropped and the player is stunned. If all 50 pieces are collected in the time limit, the players win! What is really neat about the game, is that when you pick up a piece of candy, your character starts to slow down. Pick up a couple dozen and you almost grind to a halt. This makes it almost imperative to split up the candy collection between the four players, as when you start to move really slow, the chefs can easily stab you with their giant knives. Yup, they have giant knives. Although simple in concept, there is a surprising amount of depth to Sweet Day. Something I wasn't expecting at all. This polished, colorful little game is a welcome addition to Nintendo Land and very fun with five players. It was a good time!
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Only two more left! This is the fourth in a series to preview all of the games within Nintendo Land for the Wii U. You can check out the other three here, here, and here! I swear, I really had a great time with the Nintendo L...

E3: Hands-on with Nintendo Land: Takamuru's Ninja Castle

Jun 07 // Chad Concelmo
Takamuru's Ninja Castle uses the WIi U GamePad in arguably the most creative way. By holding the GamePad to the side, players slide their fingers forward on the touch screen to shoot throwing stars on the T.V. screen. It is a smooth, intuitive, very effective mechanic and works perfectly! If you barely move your finger forward, the throwing star will just fall to the ground. You really need to slide your finger as fast as possible, as speed totally matters. In this minigame, the player is tasked with battling off an army of ninjas through different levels. Each ninja has different specialties, with some just jumping around, others throwing stars back at you, and some super-powered ones attacking with bombs and giant swords. Every time you hit a ninja, the multiplier starts. By not missing, you can rack up your score to be ranked on the in-game leaderboard. Get hit by too many projectiles, though, and it is game over. This was easily the most basic of all the minigames in Nintendo Land, but it was still really fun. Aiming and throwing the ninja stars was completely easy and felt really solid. Of all the Wii U games I played, this is the one that "casual" gamers are going to get the most excited about. Similar to the excitement of playing the Wii for the first time, there is something to interacting on the screen and actually "throwing" things from the GamePad to the T.V. screen. It is a clever gimmick and fun to do over and over again as the ninjas start to fill the screen. Of all the Nintendo Land games, this one may end up being the most repetitive, but with a little more variety in the levels, Takamuru's Ninja Castle could turn out to be an addictive little distraction. At the very least, I know my mom is going to love it.
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This is the third in a series to preview all of the games within Nintendo Land for the Wii U. You can check out The Legend of Zelda: Battle Quest here and Luigi's Ghost Mansion right here! Ninjas star in some of my favorite g...

E3: Hands-on with Nintendo Land: Luigi's Ghost Mansion

Jun 07 // Chad Concelmo
Nintendo Land: Luigi's Ghost Mansion primarily takes place on one screen. Four players control their Miis on-screen (with cute Luigi hats!) while the fifth player controls the terrifying ghost. The twist: The ghost is invisible on the main T.V. screen. The ghost can only be seen on the GamePad screen, which the ghost player uses to control. The object of the game is for the four players to survive for five minutes, or destroy the ghost using their flashlights. The ghost has an opposite, and very nefarious, goal: TO KILL THE FOUR PLAYERS BEFORE TIME RUNS OUT! Well, technically, the players just "faint" when attacked by the ghost ... but we really know what is happening. The ghost only has to touch a player to make him faint, but it is not as easy as it sounds. In fact, the game felt surprisingly balanced. I played the demo so many times, and felt the players and ghosts won equally, which is a really good sign. When a ghost is close, the players controlling with the Wiimotes turned to their side will feel their controllers rumble. The closer it gets, the more intense the rumbling becomes. This is how they know the ghost is around. During the demos, we would yell out "He's by me! Yellow!" while playing to let everyone know where the ghost was. It was a fun bit of interaction. When the ghost is hit by the flashlight, its energy is drained from 100. When it hits zero, the players win! If a player is knocked down, though, they can be revived if another player (or players!) revives them with a flashlight. It is a slow process, but that just adds to the tension. As mentioned before, the ghost just has to touch the player once to make him/her faint. In a nice touch of detail, the ghost has to drag the player for just a few seconds before he officially faints. This is important, as in that brief period of time, another player can hit the ghost with a flashlight and the ghost will drop the captured player. There were some exciting last minute saves during some of my play-throughs that had everyone screaming and laughing in relief. And that's what is so great about Luigi's Ghost Mansion: Everyone was having a great time. Nintendo's E3 2012 theme of "together" is never more prominent than when playing this game. Every person I played the demo with loved it and had a really great time. We all screamed when the ghost would pop out. We all would cheer if we emerged victorious and defeated the ghost (not an easy task). It was a truly fun experience and one of my favorite on the show floor. If all the other minigames are as entertaining as Luigi's Ghost Mansion, Nintendo Land is going to be something pretty special.
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Next up in my series to preview all five of the games within Nintendo Land for the Wii U is Luigi's Ghost Mansion. (Check out The Legend of Zelda: Battle Quest right here!) With Luigi's Ghost Mansion, Nintendo Land is bringin...

E3: Hands-on with Nintendo Land: Zelda: Battle Quest

Jun 07 // Chad Concelmo
During the Nintendo press conference, the main message about the Wii U was "together." And after playing all the minigames in Nintendo Land, this message is  most definitely clear. The games in Nintendo Land are meant to played together with a group of people. They are designed around cooperation and friendly, fun competition. As a guy who has a lot of friends who don't play videogames very often, this is very appealing to me, as I know my friends will look forward to diving into a minigame compilation like this ... and having a blast in the process. The Legend of Zelda: Battle Quest has an interesting look -- one I didn't expect. It looks a lot like Kirby's Epic Yarn and shares the same fabric aesthetic. In this minigame (I am remiss to even call them "minigames" as they feel like more), three players have to work together to make it through a series of dungeons. The game is "on-rails," meaning you don't control the forward movement of your character at all. That part is controlled for you. This is not a huge deal, though, as the game is not about exploring. It's about working together, fighting monsters, and solving puzzles. Two players control with the Wii Motion Plus controller and one plays with the Wii U GamePad. The players with the Wiimotes have swords and swing the Wii Motion Plus to attack. Just like in Skyward Sword, the angle you strike is key, as the one-to-one movement will help you make sure you are attacking the enemies in the right spot. Also like Skyward Sword, your shield can be activated by holding down the trigger to block incoming attacks. The player with the GamePad is the archer, and this is admittedly the most fun part. By holding the GamePad upright, players can actually look through it like looking through a sight and move the entire controller around to aim. A cross-hair appears on the GamePad and players can use it to shoot arrows at enemies. Holding down the trigger button longer to fire will result in a much more powerful and long-reaching shot. While shooting and/or stabbing, the players move slower through the world. By not doing anything, the on-screen Mii Links (Liinks?) move much faster. This can be used to get through the dungeons quicker if needed. In addition to battling enemies, puzzles can also be solved. The only ones I saw in the demo were simple "switch" puzzles, but there were fun and provided some much-needed variety to the action. By hitting switches (some at the same time), locked doors can be opened to move on. Some switches are high up, requiring the use of the archer to access. In addition to all this, a health meter is shared between the players, meaning they have to work together to make sure the life is not depleted. If all hearts are gone, everyone perishes. From what I played, I had fun with The Legend of Zelda: Battle Quest. It wasn't the deepest thing in the world, but the variety in play made it interesting. I am not sure how repetitive this will get, but if the dungeons have a large variety of enemies and puzzles, this could be really fun! Check out my hands-on with the other four Nintendo Land games, coming later today!
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Nintendo Land: The Legend of Zelda: Battle Quest is one of the twelve Nintendo character-themed minigames that will appear in Nintendo Land for the Wii U. Five of these minigames were playable on the show floor. The other sev...

E3: Hands-on with Pikmin 3

Jun 06 // Chad Concelmo
There were two levels to play in the E3 demo. The first was a more traditional Pikmin level and the second was an extraordinary boss battle. Let's get into the first, more classic level first. Pikmin 3 can be played with either the new Wii U GamePad or the Wiimote-and-Nunchuk combo -- very similar to the way the Pikmin Wii re-release plays. Actually, exactly like that. The GamePad was great and comfortable (and the map on the touch screen wonderfully helpful), but I actually preferred the Wiimote and Nunchuk. It felt great and made controlling the Pikmin easy and accurate. But I have to reiterate: the GamePad is fantastic and I will most likely use that when the final game is released. Not being that familiar with it yet, though, the Wiimote and Nunchuk made it easier for me to jump right in. The first thing you will notice about Pikmin 3 is that it is DROP-DEAD GORGEOUS! The animation and colors on the Pikmin are slick, but the backgrounds -- my God, the backgrounds are exquisite. The lush foliage and swaying grass are so detailed and almost photo-realistic that they need to be seen to be believed. Everything just looks so amazing. I can't imagine how incredible everything will look once more varied areas are introduced in the final game. As far as gameplay, things were instantly familiar. For the demo -- a level that is most likely not in the final game -- some things were left out. Your Pikmin couldn't die (and, if they could, not easily at all), and there was no respawning by growing Pikmin from the home base onion. There was only a limited time with the demo, so some sacrifices had to be made to let players do as much as possible. But keep in mind that this stuff will be in the final game. I mean, what is Pikmin without growing and managing your multi-colored troops? The classic Pikmin we all know and love will be back and better than ever. This was just a simple demo. In the level on display, you must use your red Pikmin to collect fruit and kill enemies. The blue and yellow Pikmin were absent from the demo, but they will, of course, be in the final game. After traveling through the gorgeous level, you run into a giant floating jellyfish. Throwing your red Pikmin on the jellyfish to destroy him unlocks the newest member of the Pikmin family: the rock Pikmin. Outside of being AWESOME, these rock Pikmin are very similar to the purple Pikmin in Pikmin 2, as they are super-strong. Instead of just using them to easily kill enemies, though, these new rock Pikmin can do so much more. There are glass walls and rocks everywhere that can only be broken with these powerful Pikmin. This use of specific-colored Pikmin adds more strategy to the proceedings. (More on this deep mechanic when I get to the boss battle later.) A wide variety of enemies and environmental obstacles was present in the booth demo, each more beautiful and daunting than the last. One nice change to the formula comes in the form of bridges and slides. In the last two Pikmin games, bridges were automatically made by Pikmin in certain spots. In Pikmin 3, there are piles of rocks that much be carried to make the bridge. Each rock piece forms the bridge, so it all feels much more realistic than before. The slides are fun pieces of the environment that Olimar and the Pikmin can slide down. (In the demo it was a blade of grass formed in a fun spiral.) These slides are great as shortcuts, but can only be used one way and Pikmin cannot carry certain items down them. They just add to the subtle strategy of the level layout. I really can't stress enough how beautiful and polished this game looks and feels. Everything just comes together perfectly and truly feels like a classic Nintendo game. After collecting a bunch of fruit, killing a bunch of meddlesome creatures, and traveling through a gorgeous world, the demo came to an end and I couldn't have been happier. It felt exactly like Pikmin, just more detailed, smooth, and BEAUTIFUL! Everything I could have asked for. And then I played the boss. And I think I may have died from happiness. The boss in the Pikmin 3 demo was a giant caterpillar/scorpion/beetle kind of thing. Huge, fluid, and gorgeous. The bosses in the other two Pikmin games were great and well-designed, but this boss took things to a new level. Both the red and rock Pikmin needed to be used in this fight. The rock Pikmin had to be thrown first to break apart the hard metallic shell of the monstrous creature. Once the individual sections were shattered, the red Pikmin had to be used to do damage. You see, the only way to damage the boss was to have the Pikmin grab onto the exposed skin and attack away. The heavy rock Pikmin, with their skinny arms, could not grab onto the fast-moving beast, and therefore could not do damage outside of breaking the shell. This attention to detail made the boss even more fun and challenging than I could have imagined. I loved it so much. There's no word on whether the final version of Pikmin 3 will be more like the first Pikmin with its above-ground levels and more straightforward goals, or Pikmin 2 and its deep, wonderful dungeons and higher challenge. I am hoping for something closer to Pikmin 2, but, either way, Pikmin 3 promises to be an unbelievably welcome sequel and an outstanding addition to the early Wii U library. I adored my time with Pikmin 3 and think it is my favorite game of the show so far. I can't wait to play more. No, seriously, I am going to lose my mind waiting for this to be released.
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This is it. The moment I have been anticipating for years. I am a giant fan of the Pikmin series. GIANT! And every year for the last few years, I have hoped and prayed Pikmin 3 would be official and announced at that year's E...

E3: Hands-on with New Super Mario Bros. U

Jun 05 // Chad Concelmo
If you have played New Super Mario Bros. Wii, you are familiar with the basic formula. Hell, if you have played any 2D Mario game you are familiar with how it works. Run right while jumping over obstacles and stomping enemies as you make your way to the flag pole at the end of the level. The gameplay is as smooth and joy-inducing as you would expect. The first thing you will notice when playing New Super Mario Bros. U is the graphics. They are gorgeous. They don't have a super original art style like Kirby's Epic Yarn or Rayman Origins, but the game still looks fantastic. The colors are bright and vibrant, the textures are crisp, and the layered backgrounds are stunning. Once you see a Mario game in HD for the first time you will kind of lose your mind. Especially if you are a huge fan of the Mario games. As far as gameplay, there were three levels on display on the show floor. One was a traditional forest level, one set in the cliffs on the Mushroom Kingdom, and the third was in a star-covered world at night. Each level showed off something new to do and really focused on how cool the new Wii U features are. As a single player, the game can be played with either the Wiimote turned on the side or with the brand new GamePad. Both are great and work pretty much exactly the same. You run with the directional pad and jump with the face buttons. The real features of the GamePad come into play when a second player joins the fun. This second player uses the GamePad to create small platforms which the first player can jump on or use to trap and redirect enemies. This happens with a simple press of the finger on the touch screen. Since the entire game is being streamed on the GamePad touch screen, all the second player has to do is touch anywhere on the screen to create a platform. It is a very simple concept, but really helps add a touch (hehehe) of strategy to the proceedings. It reminded me a lot of the two-player option in Super Mario Galaxy. Yeah, the second player is not doing much, but it is fun to have a friend help you out as you try to make it through a tough level. It wasn't playable, but the menu screen had the option for more than two players, meaning four player co-op like New Super Mario Bros. Wii is likely (and all but confirmed in the screenshots for the game). Heck, five players may even be possible, with one on the GamePad and the rest on the Wiimotes. No confirmation, but I think it will happen. As for the levels themselves, they were classic Nintendo: well-designed and so much fun to play. Outside of the Wii U features, there were two new "power-ups." The first was Flying Squirrel Mario, which is as cute as it sounds. After picking up a special mushroom, Mario puts on a flying squirrel costume and is awarded special powers. He can float in the air when holding down the jump button, or take flight for a short time by shaking the Wiimote. It is awesome and really easy to control. In addition to this, there was a baby Yoshi that Mario could carry around. By shaking the Wiimote, Yoshi blows up into a huge balloon and gives Mario an extra high jump. As far as I could tell, this is infinite and can be used continuously until Mario dies or Yoshi is thrown into a pit by accident. Yes, I did this. BUT IT WAS AN ACCIDENT! Not much was shown of New Super Mario Bros. U, but the stuff I played I totally loved. Even looking past the fact that the game looks amazing in HD, the gameplay was so solid and the new Wii U features so fun that this is shaping up to be a great addition to the classic Mario series. I wish I could have played more.
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Let's get this out of the way right now: Seeing a brand new, 2D Mario in HD is surreal. I have been waiting for so long to finally see a Nintendo franchise in high-definition, so seeing Mario run around the Mushroom Kingdom d...

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To clarify, it's not Juliet's decapitated head - it's her boyfriend Nick's, though it may as well be hers. If you can tie your lover's head to a chain and swing him around in circles repeatedly pummeling any and all zom...

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It's no secret that Borderlands 2 is one of my most anticipated games of this year, so understandably, I jumped at the chance to go hands on with its co-op mode last week. Our producer Zac was playing along with me, so ...

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DTOID Show: Hands-on with Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning


Dec 08
// Max Scoville
Hey guys! Earlier this week, I got some hands-on time with Kingdoms Of Amalur: Reckoning, the mutant brain-baby of fantasy author R.A. Salvatore, comic book artist Todd McFarlane, and Elder Scrolls series alumnus Ken Ro...

Dead or Alive 5 is 'fighting entertainment' at its finest

Dec 08 // Wesley Ruscher
Dead or Alive 5 (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)Developer: Team NinjaPublisher: Tecmo KoeiRelease: TBD 2012 During the teaser trailer at TGS, DOA staples Ryu Hayabusa and Hayate battled it out, in a highly cinematic duel, on the rooftop of a bustling city highrise amongst the night sky. The action was fast, filled with electrifying effects, and culminated with Hayate unleashing a furious attack that sent Hayabusa tumbling to the ledge of the crumbling rooftop. It was an amazing spectacle and one that showcased the imagination behind Team Ninja's new direction. But as amazing as it was to watch, creating this sort of bat-sh@t insanity is even more satisfying. In showcasing DOA5, Team Ninja unveiled its next two fighters: femme fatale Hitomi -- who made her debut in DOA3 -- and legendary kunoichi, Ayane. Along with Hayabusa and Hayate, I was able to take each fighter for a stroll in the stage that starred in the TGS trailer. Though it's been quite some time since I've dabbled with the DOA series, each character felt very similar to their DOA4 incarnates. The same attack, guard/counter, throw system is in place and outside of a new attack called the "Power Blow" not much has been altered within the basics of DOA's fighting system. To me, this is not a bad thing. I have always enjoyed the way the game forces players to use diverse tactics to succeed in combat. Those who tend to mash the same combinations over and over, are generally easily picked apart from seasoned veterans who understand the fine balance of countering high, middle, and low attacks. And while DOA5 feels the same at its core, it's in the game's new Power Blow technique that DOA is able to open up into a much more grandiose, over-the-top, roller coaster ride. With a simple tap of either the RB or R1 button (Xbox 360 or PS3) this new attack is unleashed. The crazy attack that Hayate unfurls at the end of the TGS trailer is actually, this devastating attack landing. What makes this attack so special is -- besides dealing greater damage in highly cinematic style -- is it actually gives the user the ability to direct the trajectory of the impact. DOA has always had impressive, expansive stages -- complete with different levels and destructible environments -- but navigating to see all the sights has always, proven difficult to accomplish in the heat of battle. This is where the Power Blow comes in. Once connected, the player has a brief moment to decide exactly where on the battleground they want to launch their opponent. In the rooftop stage players could guide their opponent into generators, off the side of the building to the streets below, and eventually head-on into an oncoming car. By far the most dynamic environmental hazard was when a player was knocked off the side of the building. When this event is triggered the, players are thrust into a sort of impromptu QTE event. The falling player has a quick chance to grab the ledge( with a quick button press), then quickly try to predict the oncoming strike from their opponent. Success leads in a block, or perhaps an evasion, but failure leads to an even more devastating attack. With the ability to control the flow of the fight, the Power Blow -- more so than ever -- makes each environmental hazards a strategical component in battle. For those wondering, while the Power Blow is simple to execute, it is also as easy to counter when used as a singular strike. The key to its success will be in incorporating the deadly drive into combinations -- which at the moment is fairly challenging due to the moves slow start-up animation. Finally, I wanted to touch on the sense of presence, within each character, that Team Ninja i s looking to build in DOA5. The series has always exemplified beauty -- from its stunning backdrops to its more buxom babes --but it's the finer touches that make each fighter seem more involved this time around. Sweat and dirt glisten and cover each fighter during the coarse of a fight. And while not groundbreaking technology, it adds certain "charisma" -- something Team Ninja hopes to accomplish in creating DOA's "fighting entertainment." -- to each character, as the feel more invested in each battle. Dead or Alive 5 is slated to come out sometime next year. There is a lot of competition for Team Ninja's return to the fighting world, but after getting a chance to give the game a brief run, my thumbs are feverishly twitching for more insane action. What remains to be seen though, is whether the rest of the gaming community is ready to give this series another ride. Regardless, one thing is certain, Dead or Alive is back!
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At this year's Tokyo Game Show, Team Ninja finally revealed that their fabled fighting franchise -- known for its fatal females and potent physics -- was returning, with Dead or Alive 5 (DOA5). Almost six years have passed si...

Preview: Fractured Soul: Deep Void

Nov 29 // Wesley Ruscher
Fractured Soul: Deep Void (Nintendo 3DS)Developer: Endgame StudiosPublisher: UTV Ignition GamesRelease: Summer 2012 The world of Fractured Soul is set amidst the cold bleak confines of outer space. In this solitude of the final frontier you are thrust into the role of Jake Desaul, a man trying to come to grasp with the state of perpetual limbo that has befallen him. See, Jake has acquired a neat trick which has granted him the ability to switch between two physical bodies -- which conveniently enough are located on each screen -- and he must use this new skill to unravel the mysteries that have surrounded him. As in any typical platformer, Jake has the standard running and jumping mechanics at his disposal, but he also possesses a blaster for the baddies and a jetpack for those oh so hard to reach places. My initial hands-on demo threw me into a relatively straightforward level. Enemies only appeared on one screen at a time and switching screens -- with the shoulder buttons -- provided the strategy needed in avoiding enemy fire. It's a simple mechanic for dodging conflict, but I found later levels ramp up the combat with aggressive foes on both screens simultaneous. The puzzle-platforming aspect in this first area was juvenile at best. My progression was halted until I switched screens to climb a ladder that was only available on the other, but later levels really ramp up the difficulty and involvement of both screens. There are many areas where you will have to switch back and forth between screens to navigate a series of platforms. With not every platform available on one screen, there is a lot of liberty for Fractured Soul to mix up the unique aspect of having to traverse the game on two screens.Each game world contains its own special twist on the game's design to help spice up the difficulty and freshness. There was a world completely submerged in water -- slowing Jake's movement speeds -- an ice stage -- complete with a slippery floor -- and a brutally difficult reverse gravity level which really makes one think when jumping and switching states. These changes in each level's dynamics really helps in making every one stand out from the last. Puzzle-platforming isn't the only form of action in Fractured Soul. Side-scrolling shoot-'em-up fans should be excited to know that there are some horizontal stages that provide an intense amount of fun. These levels were by far the most enjoyable one I played -- mainly due to my infatuation with the genre -- thanks to the game's primary mechanic of having to navigate both screens. As waves of enemies fall, jumping back and forth to destroy every enemy fighter is as challenging as fun. Fractured Soul: Deep Void may not be the most visually polished game to land on the 3DS, but it shows the promise for being a unique and challenging experience. It ditches the 3D crutch that has supported many of the handheld's games and instead focuses on what Nintendo's handheld does best: two-screen gaming. With a launch set for next summer, fans of action, platformers, puzzle, and even old-school shoot-'em-ups may find something special when Fractured Soul arrives.
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The Nintendo 3DS is a system built around two simple concepts: portable 3D and dual-screen gaming. Unfortunately, the latter usually finds itself lent to making our experiences less intrusive by acting as a placeholder for ma...

Preview: Planet Crashers 3D

Nov 22 // Wesley Ruscher
Planet Crashers 3D (Nintendo 3DS) Developer: Renegade Kid Publisher: UTV Ignition Games Release: March, 2012 At first glance, Planet Crashers 3D recalls found memories of some of Nintendo’s finest games. It sports the charm of Animal Crossing and mixes it with the rotating planet terrains of the Super Mario Galaxy series. The worlds I saw were bright and colorful and full of eccentric characters that should strike a chord with anyone looking for a light-hearted RPG romp on Nintendo’s little device. Though Planet Crashers 3D supports a joyful look from top to bottom, RPG fans should pay attention. Underneath the modest hood is a fairly deep character customization system that allows for a lot of freedom when designing a protagonist for saving the universe. There’s much to adjust; from eye and skin color all the way to hair and outfit style. It’s not at the level of a Saints Row: The Third character creator, but you will be surprised at the various amounts of freaks that can be birthed in this humble system. Once my hero was ready, I dropped into the game’s home area, Lush Greeny, and began to explore the vivid surroundings. As I ran around, I was really taken back by how impressive the depth of the 3D is. With small planet worlds to explore, the constant rotation allows for the background layers to stack and increase the 3D sensation. The graphics may be on the more simple side of things, but each of the three worlds I saw had its own distinct personality which helped make them memorable. The second world I saw, Haunted Reach, evoked a very Nightmare Before Christmas feel in both its look and music. Running around town I talked to a few of the NPCs -- which carry the typical banter one would find in an RPG -- checked out a few shops, and eventually took a quick dive into one of the dungeon areas. As you collect quests from characters or a quest board in each area -- in the hopes to learn enough about the threatening evil to progress to the next world-- eventually you will make your way into the game’s main areas for combat. Inside Haunted Reach's dungeon I encountered a pair of bizarre and skinny Santa Claus-looking enemies. Combat in Planet Crashers 3D is performed in a traditional turn-based manner, so anyone familiar with the genre's tactics should find combat a breeze. These were the only enemies I encountered, but I was deviously surprised that I was thwarting the likes of a jolly old St. Nicholas with a giant pencil rather than the typical fodder that is expected. It’s the little quirks like this that remind that the same folks who made the haunting Dementium games haven’t lost their creative touch even when changing up genres and themes. Planet Crashers 3D is a warm and friendly dungeon crawl that supports visual style made for the Nickelodeon crowd. Dismissing this game on looks alone may be a big mistake as there is a deep customizable RPG to be found underneath all the cute fuzziness. My time with it was short, but the nostalgic feeling it imparted has put the game on my radar. And really, why not as it covers two things the world could always use more of: RPGs and 3DS games.
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It goes without saying that Nintendo’s handheld needs games. As the system has been out for roughly eight months. one genre -- more than others -- that could use a little kick on the butt is the one that found such an i...

Preview: Furmins

Nov 08 // Wesley Ruscher
Furmins (iPhone, iPad [Previewed])Developer: HousemarquePublisher: HousemarqueRelease: TBD Upon initial glance, two things immediately caught my attention about Furmins. First, it contains the same artistic beauty that I have come to expect from Housemarque's games. The backgrounds all have a hand-painted look to them that really pops on an iPad screen. While they may be gorgeous to look at, it's the subtle effects within each background that adds to the immersion. Leaves blow gently in the backgrounds of the forest stages and the creeping mist in some of the later stages really invites an almost magical presence to the world. But then again this is a Housmarque game and if it's one thing they excel in, it's art design. The second thing that came to my mind when playing Furmins was how much it reminded me of Angry Birds. Now depending on how you look at it that's not necessarily a bad thing, and something the guys at Housemarque don't seem to mind either. They're both puzzle games, they both make physics fun, and they both share some sort of enigmatic bird-like creature in their character design. But I'd be doing Furmins serious harm to call it an Angry Birds clone. In fact it has more in common with the phenomenal Portal series than it does with that bird-launching game. Like the Portal series, the idea behind Furmins is to build the most logical path to the goal. The objective for each stage is to direct the ever-so-cute (just look at their faces in the accompanying screens) Furmins from one end to a glowing basket somewhere in the level. The catch is, you don't have direct control over these mystic little furballs and instead have to use any available items and -- depending on the level -- some well-timed taps to succeed.  Each stage I played presented its own unique puzzle to solve. They start off simple, where a few well adjusted planks (that bounce the Furmins through the air) well get you the result needed, but later really test your thinking prowess when elements like momentum and time delay come into play. While most of the early stages can be quickly solved, every stage contains bonus stars to collect -- all in one run -- for those looking for more complicated solutions. It get really tricky, when you're using pendulums for momentum, ice blocks to delay speed, and have to tap the screen to change the direction of moving conveyor belts in an attempt to earn a perfect three-star rating. Thankfully, there is a quick restart (for OCD types) which allows you to quickly tinker with a setup until perfect. Furmins may not have been what I expected Housemarque to whip up next, but it (yet again) conveyed to me that they really know how to make fun, engaging experiences. Don't let the cutesy design throw you off though, while it may look like a game for your mom -- especially with the music being done by the mind behind Bejewled's seductive melodies -- Furmins' perplexing puzzles should keep those with a thirst for brainteasers quenched for quite some time.
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Housemarque has been in the business for over sixteen years, but it wasn't until Super Stardust HD (back in 2007) that the Finnish developers went on to make a name for themselves. Since then they've racked up quite an impres...

BlizzCon 2011: Hands-on with the Pandaren Monk

Oct 21 // Chris Morris
I moved through the village, picking up my first few quests. There were numerous Pandaren focused on their training, sparring, meditating, or even just rolling around everywhere. Your master directs you to first spar with the punching bags, an important step in understanding the new combat mechanics that Blizzard has created for the class. The Monk has no auto-attack; instead there is a completely manual combat system that utilizes Chi and Light or Dark energy to execute moves. The standard attack button uses Chi, simultaneously generating Light or Dark energy in the process. This energy can be expended during battle to unleash more devastating attacks and even combinations. Button mashing is a perfectly acceptable method of playing the class, simply hitting buttons as they light up, but I suspect that true mastery will require keen focus and timing. The new class encourages players to be constantly active, mobile, and observant of their surroundings. A new roll maneuver, while fun to simply spam while running around, is also an important tool in combat. While it is impossible to tell what all of the uses might be for the ability, I was able to use it both offensively and defensively. I could use the roll to quickly move out of harm's way, or to instantly get range on an opponent to execute a brutal flying kick. With the Monk, Blizzard is trying to cater to as many players as possible who might enjoy the new combat system, allowing the class to fulfill the role of a tank, DPS, or healer depending on their specialization choices. This certainly won't be for everyone, especially if you enjoy playing as passively as possible, but it should hopefully introduce a bit more thrill to the game for players who have gotten tired of the same old combat mechanics. For anyone who is excited about playing a Pandaren or Monk, but worried about potential racial or faction restrictions, fear not! The Pandaren are WoW's first truly neutral playable race, with players able to choose between either Horde or Alliance upon completion of the starting zone story arc. Pandaren are not restricted to playing only as a Monk: they can choose any class with the exception of Death Knights, Druids, Paladins, or Warlocks. Conversely, all other races with the exception of the Goblin and Worgen can start as a Monk. Let us know what you think about the announcement in the comments below.
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After the announcement of the Mists of Pandaria expansion for World of Warcraft, I was able to jump right into the game and get hands-on with the class and race. Upon being dropped into the new starting area, I was instantly ...

Hands-on: Battlefield 3 single-player campaign

Sep 16 // Casey Baker
[embed]211610:40888[/embed] Battlefield 3 (PC, PlayStation 3[previewed], Xbox 360)Developer: EA DICEPublisher: Electronic ArtsTo be released: October 25, 2011 The single-player demo, "Operation Guillotine," kicks off in the early dark morning hours during a raid on Tehran. Your squad of Marines, Misfit 13, begins on a hill overlooking the city as anti-aircraft fire beautifully illuminates the distant sky. As you make your way down, it becomes very clear that the PLR is aware of your presence as mortar strikes explode with visceral bangs and bright explosions all around, denting the earth where they hit. It's very clear that the new sound component of the Frostbite 2.0 engine works overtime to bring you into the experience. I could hear the source of numerous explosions and the way they hit the ground or other objects all around me, as well as ambient noises such as a car alarm going off somewhere in the distance. The lighting is also a vast improvement over the last Battlefield; directional lighting such as flares or flashlight beams can easily blind you and are visible and pretty to look at from several meters away. At the bottom of the hill, I was instructed to launch an illuminating round from my mortar to get a better view of the enemies, and I complied with the press of a button that lead into a quick first-person cutscene of loading the mortar and launching it. Immediately afterwards, I was helped up over the city limit wall and soon the real action began. For anyone familiar with the Battlefield series, you can rest assured in knowing that the game plays pretty much the same as the Bad Company games on consoles -- with all of the aiming, shooting, grenade-lobbing and weapon switching controls to be found in their expected places. You are able to invert the Y and X axis in the menu if needed, of course. After quickly dispatching several enemies with my G3 assault rifle and a few nice shotgun blasts, my squad helped me breach an apartment complex by lobbing a grenade into a window to bring about the expected results. An enemy soldier came flying out the back door in flames, and I was free to enter the building. The lighting effects and character detail really shone through in the brief section of hallway I ran down as my squad checked corners and barged through doorways. Everything has been sharpened and brought more into detail since Bad Company 2, though this ten-minute level portion seemed to have a bit more linearity than the Bad Company series. Granted, it also mainly involved running through enclosed spaces, so it's good to keep that in mind as there are going to be some huge wide-open map spaces in both the single and multiplayer games. As I got ready to kick through another door, I was ambushed by an enemy soldier which launched into a cinematic slow-mo moment where I was able to blast the dude with my shotgun and move on. After dispatching one or two other enemy soldiers, I emerged from the other side of the building, where a convoy was waiting to pick me up. I ran to one of the hummers as instructed and pressed a button to enter, and my demo ended with a short sizzle reel and the Battlefield 3 logo. If nothing else, this too-short demo of single-player left me wanting to see more. The controls are as solid as ever, the framerate runs nicely with no hiccups or anomalies that I could tell, and the character detail, sound, and lighting have made major strides thanks to the Frostbite 2.0 engine. I only wish I was able to play one of those spectacular daytime levels that has been shown off at events like E3 and gamescom. Before leaving, I asked the EA representatives a few multiplayer questions as well -- mainly pertaining to the differences in multiplayer between console and PC versions. My biggest concern that I brought up right away was the issue of balancing and what exactly of the trailers we should expect in the console iterations. The answer? Pretty much everything we've already seen, just scaled a little to fit the console experience. So yes, you will be able to dogfight in jets while a tank obliterates an APC among a battling foot squad far below you. The sense of scale is still going to be there as well -- they've just carefully balanced it to fit the 24-player experience of the console iterations. In other words, huge maps won't feel like you're waiting to see another player for hours before getting a shot in. As for the damage modeling, it depends all upon the map you're fighting within. Don't expect to take down skyscrapers in the same way you could reduce buildings to rubble in Bad Company 2. You can certainly blow out huge chunks of facade and completely destroy cover as seen in the trailers, though you won't be destroying a city block with a tank and then spending the rest of the match fighting on flattened rubble. I was assured however, that mid-sized buildings can still be obliterated with heavy explosives like C4. DICE has taken very careful consideration into developing a Battlefield experience that gives you tons of freedom and destructability while also focusing on what makes the series so addictively fun. I have been counting down the weeks, days, and hours until Battlefield 3 releases and the short demo I got to play today has only made me more thrilled at the prospect of many more evenings wasted squadding up with brothers and friends, laughing at the clueless smurfs on our team while mowing down endlessly re-spawning med squads and rocket-sniping campers. (To see more newly released screens of Battlefield 3's single-player and multiplayer modes, be sure to check out Jordan's post.)
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I am no stranger to the Battlefield series, at least not the console iterations. After sinking hours of my time into both Bad Company games and even convincing family and friends to buy the game so that we could spend countle...

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Skyrim hands-on: Totally awesome promotional hats


Aug 27
// Liam Fisher
Skyrim can go ahead and come out now. Seriously, the potential to have a same-sex vampire couple? It's unbearable. I was already excited for the new Elder Scrolls title to finally hit my disc tray, but Max and Jim's sheer joy at having played it once more is making me more than a little jealous. They got some hands-on time at PAX and were given the coolest hats I've ever seen.
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Max and the ugly frog people of Mass Effect 3


Aug 26
// Liam Fisher
Max got to go hands on with Mass Effect 3 and, spoiler, it's totally still Mass Effect; that's not a bad thing. Putting the last title's gameplay with some welcome refinements looks to be coming together nicely. Max gets some hands on time with one of this generation's most anticipated titles.

Google+ Games: Nothing to get excited about yet

Aug 12 // Dale North
I gave the new game section Google+ some hands-on time this afternoon, poking around through several of the games and features of the service. I expected some kind of polished gaming wonderland, packed with advanced features that have never occurred to me. I was kind of hoping for something that would blow my browser gaming mind. Instead I got some Facebook ports and a lot of browser hangs and crashes.  I instantly clicked on Bejeweled Blitz as I am a big fan of the game. After pushing through a dialogue box asking for permission and then another asking to continue, Blitz instantly started loading. It looks nice, though a bit small. I noticed that an "Add Coins" option was grayed out. I'm sure that will be available soon.  Later I tried several other of the dozen or so launch games. My first session of Wild Ones lasted about 7 seconds, instantly prompting me to spam my friends with a notification before I could even blink. I asked fellow editor Nick Chester for points from this prompt, but he never saw that request.  Hitting the always present Back To Games button I tried others like Zynga Poker, puzzler Diamond Dash and BioWare's Dragon Age Legends. All looked and played just like any Facebook game out there, with no hiccups or problems. Zynga Poker did have me agree to some pretty strict sounding chip rules. It also made clear that I could buy in-game poker chips with real money.  The insanely popular physics-based bird flinger Angry Birds is also a launch game for G+. It looks...just like Angry Birds, though the audio seemed to be of a lower quality than the other available games. Single-player was exactly as expected, with score reminders of how much better everyone else is me. I also loaded up the teamwork-based multiplayer but some of the graphics were broken. Speaking of broken, not all games seemed to be ready for prime time. Luckily most of these games have the "beta" tag attached to their names. Zombie Lane is nothing to write home about with its zombie clicking and coin gathering, but I did want to point out that we saw remnants of Facebook code and graphics. Diamond Dash hung every time I accepted its request to spam my friends with a notification. Edge World never loaded, even after waiting for about 10 minutes. Flood-It crashed a few seconds in. It's not completely clear on how your gaming is shared. In games you'll see high score lists, but I had never heard of some of the people in most of the lists. I 'added' friends to other games, but some of them never saw the requests. In Zynga Poker I didn't know anyone at the table. In Bejewled Blitz the list of 'friends played recently' did not list any of my friends! How does this work, Google? One thing that Google did get right is how notifications appear within the service. You won't have to deal with seeing high scores posts and other junk in your stream as Google games sends that all to your games tab. They're totally separate from your stream, so you can poke through game brag posts when you're in a gaming mood. Under that same tab is a subcategory called Game Notifications, and it's there that you'll find all the silly social game prompts and requests that blanket Facebook walls. Very nice. So what's the big picture? This is more browser gaming, exactly like Facebook. Google has a smarter way of dealing with game notifications, but just about everything else is the same. Hell, I bet all of these games are all Facebook code under the hood. 'What did you expect?' is probably what you're asking. I don't know. Something cooler. Maybe some cool integration of Hangouts with multiplayer games. Maybe pre-made Huddles for game strategies. Maybe I wanted the usage of Circles to be more than just how you decide who to spam with your high scores. But this is just browser gaming, and the quality of the experience depends on how much work each game studio put into their titles. Google has set up a new place and framework for these game makers to offer their products, but I think you'll find that there's not enough here to pull you away from gaming on Facebook. 
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Refresh. Refresh. Refresh again. For some reason we were all anxiously waiting for that Google+ games tab to appear in our accounts this morning in the Destructoid office. When it finally did appear for me I was a bit excited...


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