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Guitar Hero

GHTV photo
GHTV

Guitar Hero TV adds Iggy Pop and White Stripes this week


And not much else
Nov 11
// Chris Carter
I'm surprised at how much I'm still playing Guitar Hero Live. It's really easy for me to boot up the TV function and just play random songs, which cycle in new tracks on a constant basis. I have over a hundred "free plays" an...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live is adding 70 new songs to GHTV by the end of the year


Every song is free to play this weekend
Nov 04
// Chris Carter
Guitar Hero Live was a pleasant surprise. After Activision milked that cow for so long, I didn't think it could introduce one of the freshest rhythm games in years, but it did. But this is just the start for Guitar Hero ...
Deals photo
Deals

There's a $370 PS4 bundle with Uncharted, Guitar Hero Live


Including the guitar controller
Oct 22
// Dealzon
We know Black Friday is around the corner, but retailers are trying their darnedest to bundle console offerings to offload inventory. Some are better than others. This PS4 One in particular is decent. Over at Antonline's eBay...

Review: Guitar Hero Live

Oct 20 // Chris Carter
Guitar Hero Live (PS3, PS4, Wii U, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: FreeStyleGamesPublisher: ActivisionMSRP: $99.99 (Game + guitar), $149.99 (Game + two guitars)Released: October 23, 2015 The first thing you'll notice about Guitar Hero Live is that the controller itself has been reworked. Now, instead of the typical color-coded five button setup, you'll find two rows of three buttons -- one row is white, and the other, black. I didn't realize this until later on, but it's actually easier for newcomers to pick up since you don't have to use your pinky finger at all, but tougher for veterans who are used to a 10-year institution of the same old setup. Honestly, I loved having to relearn everything I knew. While I was rocking it out to expert-level songs in Rock Band 4 immediately after years of retirement, it took me multiple days to get a basic grasp on Guitar Hero Live. It recreated that unique feeling of picking up a plastic guitar for the first time. It also helps that Live has five difficulty levels (basic, casual, regular, advanced, and expert), that all ramp up perfectly depending on your skillset. It's especially important to note that the former settings only require you to use one row of buttons, which will help you slowly acclimate to the new setup. As time went on and I started jacking up the difficulty, the game gets crazy tough. There's a major focus on one-finger vertical cords, as well as split cords with multiple combinations, and open strumming cues with no buttons. It's far from a realistic guitar simulator, but I really dug the increased emphasis on chords and fancy finger-work. It may feel like a step down at first glance, but there's a lot of depth found in these six buttons. The chief reason why FreeStyleGames was able to seemingly perfect this aspect of the game is because Live is guitar-centric again. Yep, there's no drums, no keyboard, no "bass" ensemble -- both players play lead guitar. There is the option to hook up a USB microphone to sing vocals, but they are absolutely ancillary to the experience, and I wouldn't recommend picking up the game for singing in the slightest. Technically, vocals add in support for the third player, but Live is definitely focused on the same one or two-person jam session that the original brought to the table in 2005. Again, I'm totally okay with this, as the series started to get stale when it tried to be too much like Rock Band. [embed]315533:60780:0[/embed] There's also a fundamental shift with the story mode, which no longer displays lifeless uncanny valley avatars strumming along to the song. Instead, the developers have recorded live footage with real bands playing each song with a live crowd, and strapped a camera to the lead guitarist to simulate a first-person view. Yes, it's FMV, but the end result is done so well that it blows past the Mad Dog McCrees of old. For each set (three songs), your character will start backstage. Here you'll get a bit of setup, perhaps some light drama, a quick chat with a stagehand, and on occasion, a visit from a makeup artist. It helps set the scene and gives you the basic gist of what it feels like to walk out onto a stage in front of thousands of people. As the song progresses, the camera will dip and dive across the stage with your character. Now here's the neat part -- depending on how well you play, the FMV will shift in a surrealist fashion to suit the situation. For instance, playing well will net you a cheering crowd and lots of smiles from your fellow bandmates. Playing poorly will shift the FMV into a negative state, with shaking heads and plenty of boos from the audience. It's such a little thing, but the band itself will start giving you a hard time vocally as well, which is jarring and motivating at the same time. I'm not going to act like this system elicits any kind of actual emotional response, but it's very cool to watch and it's seamlessly done. I'm genuinely surprised they went through the effort of essentially recording two entire concerts for each set of songs. The included setlist itself is rather diverse, consisting of classic rock songs from Queen, The Who, and The Rolling Stones, alongside of more modern groups like Green Day and Fall Out Boy, all the way up to Skrillex ("Bangarang" works better than you'd think) and a recent Eminem song ("Berzerk"). It has something for everyone, with a good spread of indie hits, folk music, and top 100 joints. While the actual story mode is only playable solo, there is a freeplay mode with all 42 on-disc tracks that you can enjoy with a partner, which also features the FMV setup. So that's the first half of Guitar Hero. Next up is the other half: Guitar Hero TV (GHTV). As you may have heard, this concept is going to be rather controversial in nature, as it features microtransactions, and a "stream-centric" DLC model where you can't actually buy songs, but play them on-demand. I fully expected to hate it based on concept alone, but to my surprise, it's probably one of my favorite modes in any rhythm game to date. Let me explain a bit -- GHTV is a multi-faceted affair. At its core is the "channel" system, which currently hosts two playlists. These shift every half hour with new tracks and genres, and quite literally follow the traditional television model, where everyone is playing the exact same thing at the same time, complete with leaderboards. In other words, if you boot it up, you may be jumping in mid-song into a competition. This aspect of Live is devoid of microtransactions. You can play both channels for free without paying Tokens (more on that later) as long as you want. And that's just what I did for days on end. During one of my testing sessions, I played the channel system for three hours straight, earning Tokens for on-demand plays along the way. Since this system is curated, I stepped out of my comfort zone, and discovered new bands, or played songs that I wouldn't normally play from bands I already knew about. It broke the typical rhythm rut where I'd only play my favorite tracks, and it's a really cool feeling. GHTV also has the added benefit of hosting music videos for every single available song. As someone who grew up with MTV, it was a joy to watch them all over again, especially classics like Tenacious D's "Tribute." It's also a lot more fun to watch music videos as a spectator compared to the aforementioned uncanny avatars. Since the channels are going to be constantly updated over time, I'm excited to see what the future holds.  The other side of GHTV is on-demand and features microtransactions. Here's how it works: for each track played, you'll earn Tokens. If you do poorly, you'll earn roughly 100-130 Tokens on average. If you do well, you'll net close to 200. You can also earn daily rewards for logging into the game and bonuses for ranking up. One on-demand play is about 600 Tokens, and there's also the option to buy cosmetic bits like new note highways and player cards. Finally, there's a "Party Pass" for $5.99 that grants you access to the entire TV catalog (hundreds of songs) for 24 hours. Here's the good news -- you can basically ignore all of this nonsense if you play the channels. Personally, I put in over 20 hours into GHTV and haven't felt compelled to spend a cent, with 70 spare freeplay sessions banked. You might not feel the same if you hate the principle of not owning content, but as a regular subscriber to streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu, it's not a difficult concept to grasp. While GHTV has the potential to turn a lot of people off, I would be satisfied just playing channels for the immediate future. Both the channels and on-demand support two players. Guitar Hero Live completely took me be surprise. I love the new controller design, the FMV portions work far better than they should, and Guitar Hero TV hooked me with its channel concept. Going forward, I'm hoping that the model further reinvents itself by introducing the world to new music. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher, specifically, the dual guitar package.]
Guitar Hero Live photo
An axe to grind
As I've said many times in the past, I was a Guitar Hero man all the way up until I first laid eyes on that beautiful keyboard for Rock Band 3. The Hero series was stale, iterating annually (sometimes multiple times...

Macklemore photo
Macklemore

The Seahawks lost yesterday because Macklemore played Guitar Hero at halftime


Legion of Gloom
Oct 19
// Brett Makedonski
A lot of dumb things happened in football this weekend. Michigan decided it would like Michigan State to continue its recent domination of the intrastate rivalry, so the Wolverines did this -- a not very good football play. T...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

You will know (and love) most of Guitar Hero Live's newest songs


Good god! That's CM Punk's music!
Oct 09
// Brett Makedonski
You know what they say about saving the best for last. Well, I guess they just say to do it. It's a good idea. Then everyone's like "Wow, we doubted you, but some real nice stuff happened at the end." That's Guitar Hero Live'...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live developers muse on the toughest songs in the game


Hangar 18 is on there
Oct 08
// Chris Carter
With Guitar Hero Live only a few weeks away, developer Freestyle Games is sharing its opinions on the most difficult songs in the game, to give players a heads-up of sorts. Said list includes "Hangar 18" (Megadeth), "Cry...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

James Franco and Lenny Kravitz touch butts in Guitar Hero Live trailer


The game launches October 20
Oct 06
// Chris Carter
Activision is pretty good at getting celebrities to do comical commercials, and their latest bit involves James Franco and Lenny Kravitz promoting Guitar Hero Live. It showcases the live crowd aspect, which can boo you if you're doing terrible. Apparently it's terrifying. I had a chance to see Lenny Kravitz live recently, and he's still got it. Also, I got to high-five him, so he's totally cool.
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live is approaching DLC in a fairly controversial way


Streaming instead of ownership
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
FreeStyleGames, the developer of Guitar Hero Live, has posted its plans for the Guitar Hero TV (GHTV) portion of the game, and it's intriguing to say the least. Basically, instead of buying songs piecemeal for $2 or so, you'r...

Guitar Hero Live left me afraid to ever try playing live music

Oct 02 // Laura Kate Dale
On a gameplay level, Guitar Hero Live feels pretty new. Gone is the old five-button single row layout, replaced with two rows of three buttons placed next to each other. On screen you've got three note tracks scrolling, which will either show a white pick pointing down or a black pick pointing up to denote if you should play that note on the top or bottom row. It's a switch up that slightly more closely resembles guitar fingerings, and it feels like a new, manageable challenge to learn. However, what had a far bigger impact on my experience with GH Live at EGX was the impressive integration of full motion video, which is both a blessing and a curse when it comes to living out your teenage rock god fantasies. Firstly, my fears about modern implementations of full motion video were instantly allayed when actually playing the game. I can logically tell which camera pans are likely being used to mask transitions between videos as your performance rises and falls, but try as I might I could not actually see the seams. We seem to have reached a point where smooth transitions in full motion video gameplay are totally possible, and that's really reassuring to see. When I was doing well at Guitar Hero Live, I felt like a guitar shredding legend. The crowd went wild, the pit jumped, the crowd fought to lock eyes with me and everything felt amazing. It's amazing how much difference the switch from computer animated crowds to real human faces can make, but seeing actual people respond well to your performance felt awesome. We have not crossed the uncanny valley, and real human faces in video games have a special power to elicit an emotion. The scary thing about GH Live? It can invoke powerful negative emotions too. Toward the end of my time with the demo, I decided to see how far I could push the limits of the game. I slowly performed worse and worse as the song went on, and my god it got uncomfortable. First the audience began to look mildly confused. Then, they looked upset, personally let down by me. I glance at the bassist and he's trying to ask what's going wrong. I do worse. The audience grows upset, confused and angry. I glance at the drummer and she's freaking out. Mascara is running down her face as she mouths obscenities at me. The singer motions to have the stage hands pull me off stage. At this point, I quit the track I was playing. I felt terrible. My failure felt real. The anxiety related to letting down fans, the disappointment and the anger resting on my shoulders. I felt it all. My time playing Guitar Hero Live at EGX convinced me primarily of two things. If you're doing well, this game is going to be awesome. If you screw up, you are going to be made to suffer for your sins on the guitar. I think that's pretty damn exciting.
Guitar Hero Live photo
I felt like a badass for about 5 seconds
Back in my mid-teens I played drums in a hastily thrown together rock band. We mainly played pretty bad covers of other people's songs, occasionally writing our own tracks that went on far too long and were excessively simpli...

Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live expands its setlist with Pearl Jam and Lamb of God


And too many Crazyfists
Sep 08
// Brett Makedonski
It seems like just yesterday that it was announced, but we're getting dangerously close to Guitar Hero Live's October 20 release. It's basically fall -- the weather's cooling down, the kids are back in school, and this game i...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live's new batch of songs is... actually pretty good


Boston, Rush, MGMT, and others
Aug 05
// Darren Nakamura
Past updates to the Guitar Hero Live set list have puzzled me, betraying how out of touch I am with popular music, but this one brings me back. I don't care how many times I have played Boston's "More than a Feeling" in a mus...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Singing confirmed for Guitar Hero Live


A better look at the in-game festivals
Aug 03
// Chris Carter
Guitar Hero Live could end up being a pretty neat experiment, and if Activision sticks to its word of not annualizing the franchise, I'll be happy. You can get a look at the in-game festivals (Rock the Block and SoundDi...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live adds more of those rock songs whippersnappers like


Seriously though, Live looks pretty rad
Jul 14
// Joe Parlock
The return of the battle of the plastic peripherals is almost upon us once more, with titans Guitar Hero Live and Rock Band 4 both throwing more and more songs at us in the hopes we’ll actually recognise any of them. Th...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Star Power returning in Guitar Hero Live


Seven hero powers to click through
Jul 08
// Laura Kate Dale
Those of you who, like me, used to be heavily invested in plastic instrument music games likely remember Guitar Hero's Star Power. Do well at the song you're playing, tilt the guitar neck up, and get a bonus multiplier to you...

Guitar Hero Live rocks out with a fresher focus

Jun 16 // Alessandro Fillari
Guitar Hero Live (PlayStation 4 [previewed], Playstation 3, Wii U,  Xbox 360, Xbox One, Mobile)Developer: FreeStyle GamesPublisher: ActivisionRelease date: October 20, 2015 First and foremost, if you're a longtime fan of the series that may have felt burned by the last title, Warriors of Rock, you'll be pleased to know that the series has gone back to the basics to keep the focus on jamming out to a variety of tunes ranging from heavy metal, classic rock, and pulsating new metal. While on the surface Guitar Hero Live looks to be a massive departure from the rest of the series, it's very much in line with what was present in the earlier titles. This is purely about the music and experience of building your own personal rocker profile. As you may have seen from the reveal trailers, they've incorporated real video into Guitar Hero this time around. When selecting some of the classics or new tunes, you'll be treated to actual music videos or even concert footage of the band while you play. This is in keeping with the new television aesthetic and architecture that Guitar Hero Live utilizes. Gone are the bizarre storylines and cartoonish visuals showing off your character as they rise from garage-band amateur to international rock star, and in its place is a focus on realism to keep you invested in the songs and the experiences of being a guitar god. During Guitar Hero's absence, the developers have refined the gameplay and tweaked many aspects. The biggest change made is that you can't outright fail songs. As vets know, missing too many notes will fail the song, resulting in game over. In Guitar Hero Live, players that perform poorly can still finish the song. The folks working on the game felt that failing players resulted them in losing interest, so botching songs will only affect your overall score. This gives players the chance to save their performance should they struggle in some spots. Moreover, if players want to take a break during the song, all they'll have to do is stop playing and the song will revert to an attract mode. It's neat, and I feel GHL will be much more welcoming to newcomers. In the two central modes, Live and TV, the game goes about building the rocker experience in different ways; one from the side of media, and the other from in the shoes of a guitar player during a concert. The TV mode will definitely be where most of the action happens. Think of it as the online, multiplayer, and career modes all rolled into one. When in TV mode, you can engage in daily and premium challenges that task you with tackling certain songs to acquire in-game currency and play tokens. Much like cable or satelite television, the TV mode is essentially mix of on-demand and scheduled content. With multiple channels, you'll be able to view the current schedule of upcoming songs that are available to play. If there's one you like, you can jump right in and play. In real time, each 'program' plays a certain genre of music or focuses on a particular band, and is set for half an hour. If there's nothing on the channel's schedule that you like, just switch over to another and check to see what's on. I was impressed with the presentation, and it felt like was tuned to a parallel universe where MTV didn't focus on reality TV and kept with the music. It even made some of the programs feel like events, as you can plan ahead and bring friends over at certain time to rock out. If the channels aren't doing it for you, then you can switch over to the on-demand menu and choose the available songs to add to you playlist and experience at your leisure. Like the previous titles, the base game will come packed with existing songs, and more will be added later. However, the on-demand takes a slightly different approach. While you can play whatever song is present in the menu, they require play tokens for you to add to your playlist. Play tokens are acquired from just playing normally, and you'll accumulate them often. However, if you run out of play tokens, you're unable to play songs on the playlist. If you want to avoid using the tokens -- using them won't technically give you the song -- you can purchase the song outright and make a part of your permanent collection. I suspect this feature draw some ire from fans. While I understand it on an economic level, I feel this can be very annoying for anyone who likes to binge. By my count, there were three different forms of currency in the game: GH credits, real money credits, and play tokens, which will definitely bother people further. While there isn't a cap on play tokens, which can be purchased in bulk from the Guitar Hero store if you don't want to grind, I feel that the system of purchasing that's in place will confuse and annoy people. Thankfully, there are many features to keep players busy. The online mode is robust. Players can compete online against others in real time. During scheduled programs, players will be able to compete for the high score, with the current leader ranks being shown to the left of the screen. There will be many top dogs online, so in order to compete you'll have to make upgrades to your guitar. Using in-game credits acquired from daily challenges and tackling challenging songs, you can invest in a more sophisticated setup. Many of these upgrades range from score multipliers and other boosts to effectiveness. Thankfully, upgrades can only be purchased with in-game currency (which can only be acquired from in-game activity). With the currency, you can also purchase new highways and player cards for further customization. While most of the action will likely be spent in the TV mode, the brand new Live mode offers something a bit different. Ever wonder what it's like to play a guitar to a sold-out concert full of thousands of excited fans and music lovers? Live mode shows that in quasi real-time video that adapts to your performance. With two tours, spread across the U.S. and UK and spanning several sets (songs), you'll jam out with your band as they seek to keep the crowd on their feet and jamming. Playing online is one thing, but the Live mode is incredibly nerve-wracking. Maybe it's just me, because I'm not as good as other players, but watching the crowd and even your band mates turn on me was unsettling. It felt like I was experiencing a bizarre mix between Guitar Hero and those '90s full-motion video games. I don't mean that as a bad thing, however. I was impressed with how well it's presented. It's like those FMV games, except actually good. Shown from the first person, you're in the shoes of the lead guitarist, and when he stumbles, you experience it first hand. It can be tense, especially when your own band starts to turn on you. For the most part, I was largely impressed with my session with Guitar Hero Live. Though I still have some reservations with the game's economy, I still feel there's a lot of good here. The MTV-esque aesthetic was a stroke of genius and it really brought me into the experience much more than any of the other titles did. And given the number of platforms this is on, including mobile, it's clear they want to cover all the bases here. With Rock Band 4 also seeing a release this year, things must be looking up for the music genre now that the two juggernauts have returned. I'm looking forward to seeing how fans will take to it. 
Guitar Hero Live photo
I GOT BLISTERS ON MY FINGERS!
I remember a time when there was this massive swell of music and rhythm-based games. The most dominant one at the time was the Guitar Hero series, which was quite an obsession among many of my classmates back in college. But ...

Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Maybe you'll actually recognize a few of this week's Guitar Hero Live songs


For a change
Jun 02
// Brett Makedonski
After the initial reveal of Guitar Hero Live, Activision's been slowly unveiling ten songs a week to keep us interested. The only problem is that the vast majority of songs (and artists) are completely unknown to the majority...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

I don't recognize most of the new songs revealed for Guitar Hero Live


But that's probably my fault
May 26
// Darren Nakamura
The tracklist so far for Guitar Hero Live has been a bit puzzling for some. Personally, I can suspend disbelief long enough to pretend to play a Skrillex song on guitar. I mean, I'm pretending to play guitar using an electron...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live adds 10 more songs I don't know


Hot acts like Marilyn Manson
May 19
// Steven Hansen
I have willfully ignored Guitar Hero Live until now. I will go back to that after I finish informing you of the 10 songs newly confirmed for the game (?), none of which I recognize by name, but a few of which I have assuredly...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live adds tracks from Alt-J, Judas Priest, and more


Ctrl-Q
May 12
// Mike Cosimano
The first 24 tracks in the Guitar Hero Live soundtrack have been announced, and we must face a dark truth: the latest entry in Activision's venerable rockstar simulation franchise sure does have a lot of tracks without h...
Game News Haikus photo
Game News Haikus

Game News Haikus: Guitar Hero Live, Star Wars Battlefront, emotional reviews, and more


Zen distilled stories
Apr 21
// Darren Nakamura
The biggest story last week was Mortal Kombat X's handling of downloadable content. Warner Bros. should relinquish itself of its greed and earthly possessions. That is the first step on the path to Enlightenment. In this ser...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Get a better look at how Guitar Hero Live will work


I'm still not sure I understand
Apr 21
// Chris Carter
Activision has just released a behind-the-scenes video for Guitar Hero Live, and it attempts to explain the confusing "live" aspect of the game. "Attempt" being the operative word here. FreeStyleGames seems excited for ...
Guitar Hero photo
Guitar Hero

Activision exec promises Guitar Hero isn't getting annualized again


'No Guitar Hero in 2016'
Apr 21
// Chris Carter
Hey, remember when Activision released a Guitar Hero game every year, and in some cases, multiple times annually? Until Warriors of Rock killed off the franchise, of course. Well now the series is back later this year with Gu...
Activision photo
Activision

Does Activision still have selling power for Guitar Hero and Tony Hawk?


In your mind, obviously
Apr 20
// Chris Carter
It's no secret that I'm a Tony Hawk guy. I'd enjoyed nearly every entry in the series outside of the boring Proving Ground and the iffy Ride subseries, and that rumor of a new fully-fledged game has me all hot ...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live wants to give players stage fright


If you suck, don't go for the stage dive
Apr 17
// Darren Nakamura
Just a few days after the trailer reveal, this video showed up going further into what makes Guitar Hero Live new. It's a long one, so if you're not able to sit through 34 minutes of video, Destructoid has you covered. The p...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

The Destructoid UK Podcast 2: Super Sentai tried to kill me


Britpop, Brum, and Pat's tit
Apr 17
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). Destructoid UK Editor Laura Dale is joined this week by Joe Parlock an...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Harmonix says 'don't throw away your old Guitar Hero controllers'


Rock Band 4 dev hopes to support ALL your old - and new - peripherals
Apr 17
// Vikki Blake
Where are all your old Guitar Hero and/or Rock Band guitars now, eh? Stuffed under the couch? Collecting dusting the basement?  If you haven't thrown them away -- and I really, really hope you haven't thrown them away --...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Skrillex is on the list of Guitar Hero Live artists


Wubbing in first position
Apr 14
// Brett Makedonski
Following this morning's official reveal of the long-leaked Guitar Hero Live, Activision's talking a bit about the core of any music game: the music. Of the 13 announced artists, one sticks out like a sore thumb: Skrillex. Th...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live confirmed, will debut this fall


PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and Wii U
Apr 14
// Laura Kate Dale
[Update: A trailer is up, and it looks like a live-action take on Guitar Hero. FMV games are back! The game seems to retail for $99 and will debut on PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and even Wii U. More info can be found here....
Activision photo
Activision

Activision likely teasing a new Guitar Hero with this video


Um, it looks like Guitar Hero
Apr 13
// Chris Carter
Activision has been all about the teasers lately. First we found out about Black Ops III by way of a Snapchat promotion, and now we have this completely obvious teaser this morning that seems to be hinting at a new Guitar He...

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