hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Gravity Rush

 photo

Here's your first look at Kat in Hot Shots Golf 6


Aug 30
// Chris Carter
We already knew that Kat from Gravity Rush would be playable in the Vita's Japanese version of Hot Shots Golf 6, but now, compliments of Andriasang, we have a better look at her in-game model. It looks like she's c...
 photo

Kat from Gravity Rush playable in Hot Shots Golf on Vita


Aug 28
// Dale North
If you're anything like me, you're still playing Vita launch title Hot Shots Golf: World Invitational. Every day, folks. Errrr day, ya'll.  I don't expect you to be like me though, as I have some kind of strange videogam...
 photo

Amazon: Get Gravity Rush, screen guard free with PS Vita


Jul 30
// Dale North
Don't have a PlayStation Vita yet? Well, if you're thinking about getting one, you're going to need to think about getting Gravity Rush with it. Jim didn't love it, but I still say it's a game you need to play on the Vita. If...

Review: Gravity Rush

May 24 // Jim Sterling
Gravity Rush (PlayStation Vita)Developer: Sony Japan StudioPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: June 12, 2012MSRP: $39.99 Gravity Rush revolves around an amnesiac girl called Kat who, aided by her magical cat Dusty, becomes something of a superhero in the floating town of Hekseville. Hekseville has been split apart, its multiple locales strewn across a sea of deadly gravity storms, while a mysterious race of creatures known as the Nevi threaten the peace. Armed with her ability to shift the world's gravitational pull, Kat must save the city and uncover the truth behind the Nevi. Or something like that. It all begins to stop making sense halfway through.  Something of an open-world superhero game, only with a very specific super power in a rather small world, players are encouraged to explore Hekseville by bending gravity to their will ("shifting," to use the game's terminology). With the press of a shoulder button, Kat will start to float, allowing players to freely move the camera and select a destination. Once selected, the destination will serve as a new gravitational point, and the entire world will alter its physics. Using this power, Kat can "fly" across the city at a rapid pace, although she's actually falling by turning the world on its side, upside down, and any direction in between. Think the anti-grav environments in Visceral's Dead Space, but spread across a more open and free world. Oh, and don't try to think about how Kat and the civilians are surviving falls of several hundred feet. It's not important.  [embed]227786:43745[/embed] When called upon to fight, Kat can land simple kicks to the Nevi in order to shatter their glowing weak spots. However, she's far more deadly when using the air to her advantage. While shifting, players can launch devastating gravity kicks by selecting a weak point and launching an attack from afar. Kat will fall toward the Nevi at a rapid pace, landing a huge kick that deals a lot more damage.  Gravity Rush is more about exploration than combat. Hekseville is littered with purple gems that can be collected and spent on upgrading Kat's powers, making her more durable, powerful, and better able to exploit her shifting ability -- though I felt many upgrades were incremental enough to not make too big a difference in the long run. These gems can be hidden atop tall buildings or underneath the city itself, and uncovering new pockets of gems is a rather compelling experience. Even with upgrades not feeling too spectacular, it nonetheless grows addictive to find the currency necessary for them. There are also plenty of side missions to unlock and play, which will reward Kat with even more gems.  Navigating Hekseville is, simply put, a joy. There's something breathtaking about falling upwards, changing directions, and whizzing past buildings at an angle, and the magic never quite seems to dissipate. When Kat gains the ability to slide along surfaces and pick up objects with a gravitational pull, the potential to feel spectacularly superior is immense. It's great fun to just fly around the world, come crashing down to Earth, and terrify the poor locals who never seem to cope with the shock of it all.  The problem is, when it comes time to stop simply exploring and get on with actual objectives, the free-floating mayhem abruptly ceases to become enjoyable. For one thing, the power to gravity shift is not used in any greatly unique way, with story missions almost always involving combat sequences or back-and-forth escort objectives. The side quests, too, are limited in scope, consisting entirely of time-attacks and races. What's more, Kat's powers just aren't fun when they come with rules attached. The chaotic power to shift gravity is a messy way to travel, which is fine when there's no pressure, but it makes working to a time limit very frustrating. Having to get one's bearings and cope with the constant shifts in perspective just isn't conducive to winning a checkpoint race.  The combat, too, suffers due to some fairly sloppy targeting. While I absolutely love the combat in theory, it doesn't work a lot of the time, with Kat's gravity kick proving insurmountably unwieldy. Most of the enemies move too swiftly and jerk around a lot, meaning they're often gone before Kat can reach them. Even if they remain in place, there's often a good chance that the punt will still miss, as Kat harmlessly glides off the opponent's body and kicks the great yonder behind it. Fights against large creatures with multiple weak points can become skin-crawlingly frustrating, while there is an ever-present threat of Kat smacking into a small bench or tree that might be near any potential targets. While our hero seems able to glide smoothly over her enemies, she can't seem to do it for anything else in the way of them.  When it works, fighting feels fantastic. Landing a successful attack from far enough away to smash an opponent in one hit is the source of some stupendous gratification, and the Nevi themselves are so varied and bizarre that encountering them always seems remarkable. Shifting into monsters, shifting away, and dodging projectiles is all great when it comes together. It's just that it comes together only half the time, with the other half consisting of wanting to throw the Vita against a wall.  One thing that can be said in Gravity Rush's favor is that the controls are surprisingly well adjusted to the gameplay. Touch and gyroscopic interactions have been nicely blended with traditional buttons to create a game that feels functional and comfortable to use. The touch screen is used for menus, and to dodge attacks. Pressing two thumbs at the bottom of the screen also allows Kat to slide along any surface, with tilt controls taking over her steering. It's quite intuitive, and the sensible touch areas mean that the screen becomes an extension of the buttons, rather than a forced move away from them. It's exactly how a Vita game should feel in the hand, and I can't praise it enough.  That said, there's no escaping the fact that Gravity Rush is a better game when it's not being a game. Its mechanics are much better suited to the exploration that Hekseville offers than the dodgy combat sequences and the trite time trials it pushes to the fore. It never stops being fun to fall from A to B, but it's never quite enjoyable to do any of the mandatory busywork. The objectives themselves are either tedious or aggravating (there are attempts at stealth sections that go beyond remedial), and it's not like the story is sensible enough to be worth fighting for, although Kat makes a very adorable protagonist.  Gravity Rush is certainly an odd duck. Its controls work perfectly, it's fundamentally polished and fluid, yet still the game doesn't quite work. It seems to be that, after getting everything in great shape, Sony Japan just used it in the wrong way. Gravity Rush's appeal comes not from picking up objects and moving them elsewhere within a time limit. It's not in wrestling with an unwieldy targeting system. It's in simply existing in Hekseville, and playing around at one's own pace. If less emphasis were put on objectives, and more on building a true sandbox world with more emphasis on discovery at one's own pace, I think we could have had something special on our hands.  As it stands, Gravity Rush is a decent attempt at bringing something fresh to the PlayStation Vita. The fact that it works as well as it does is commendable, and it's amazing how much fun it is to essentially plummet from place to place. Sadly, the game couldn't just be about that, and the direction it chooses to go in doesn't play to the strengths of the concept. Fighting the Nevi is the interactive equivalent of building up to a sneeze that never comes, and everything else feels like a desperate play for more time.  Gravity Rush is worth checking out, especially with the Vita being so quiet since launch, and as the system's library fills, this title will still stand out as something uniquely charming. However, one must be honest about the questionable design decisions that lets the whole thing down on a dismayingly consistent basis. Gravity Rush has everything it needs to be something great, but it takes all the wrong forks in the road and ends up rather unfulfilling. It's a real shame, too, because you it's so clear how brilliant it truly could have been.
 photo

Of all the titles showcased ahead of the PlayStation Vita's launch, Gravity Rush (or Gravity Daze as it's known in Japan) turned the most heads. One of the more unique action games to be released on any system, complete ...

 photo

Final wave of Gravity Rush DLC revealed


Apr 02
// Chris Carter
As predicted, the last bit of DLC Gravity Rush will have on offer (so far at least) is the Maid DLC pack. This pack is actually kind of odd, as it features a mission that involves doing actual maid-like duties, like cleaning ...
 photo

Second wave of Gravity Rush DLC seen in the wild


Mar 26
// Chris Carter
Later this year, you can salute more than just your shorts -- Gravity Rush's Kat will be getting a new special forces uniform, among other bonuses. The second wave of paid Gravity Rush DLC has been unveiled, and along wi...
 photo

Gravity Rush will hot up the PS Vita on June 12


Feb 29
// Jim Sterling
Oh yes! I've sadly had to review the less stellar PS Vita games while Dale "Hollywood" North got to rock Uncharted and Lumines. He'll probably get Gravity Rush too, but that doesn't matter -- no amount of work obligations wil...
 photo

Sony planning three weeks of Gravity Rush DLC


Feb 29
// Chris Carter
[Update: Sony has stated that Gravity Rush is now on target for a June 12th North American release] - thanks to Stop Spoilers and whoever else sent this in. I feel for you, Destructoid readers. Like you, I was convinced Gravi...
 photo

Wow: Check out these Gravity Daze whiteboard drawings


Feb 03
// Dale North
A Japanese press event for Vita game Gravity Daze (Gravity Rush in the US) could have been one of those dull game office visit affairs, but the devs did their best to keep attendees engaged with some cosplay, cute drinks...

Destructoid's most wanted PS Vita games of 2012

Jan 13 // Jim Sterling
Killzone (PlayStation Vita) Developer: Sony Cambridge StudioPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentRelease: TBD There's no way Destructoid's biggest Killzone fanboy wouldn't list Killzone, so don't act surprised. While Killzone: Liberation was a cute enough game for the PSP, the arrival of a system with dual analog sticks means that a "real" Killzone game can finally be had on the small screen, and it's by far one of the most exciting aspects of the PS Vita.  No firm announcements have been made on this title, in development by the solid Cambridge Studio guys (what's left of them). Nevertheless, footage revealed in early Vita trailers makes it look pretty damn good already, and I'm very much looking forward to playing a fully-fledged FPS with authentic FPS controls on a handheld system. Not exactly the most innovative of desires, I know, but it's still an astounding testament to how far portable gaming's come.  Escape Plan (PlayStation Vita) Developer: Fun BitsPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentRelease: February 15, 2011 This game looks like an absolute delight, and is a shoe-in first-day pickup for me. A delightfully vicious little puzzle game in which two differently sized creatures have to escape from various Saw-like traps, Escape Plan marries intricate environmental puzzling to beautiful, stylized graphics to create something very unique looking. The protagonists, Lil and Laarg, are some of the most unusual game heroes I've seen in a while, and the ability to play around with them using touch controls ought to make for some remarkably tangible characters.  From trailers, it seems defeat will be just as rewarding as victory, with Escape Plan carrying the old school adventure mentality that failure equals grisly, hilarious death. If they can keep up the level of inventiveness seen in the promotional material, this could be one of the surprise hits of 2012.  Dynasty Warriors NEXT (PlayStation Vita) Developer: Omega ForcePublisher: Tecmo KoeiRelease: February 15, 2011 Oh shut up! Dynasty Warriors is the greatest game series ever developed, and anybody who says otherwise is a thieving liar! In any case, Dynasty Warriors NEXT looks to inject some fresh ideas into the franchise, utilizing as it does every single mode of input the Vita boasts. Traditional controls are married to a range of touch-screen, tilt and even camera-based interfaces, making for a game that'll give the fingers quite a workout. There's plenty of button mashing, but there are also boss fights that take a page from Infinity Blade, as well as minigames that require EyeToy-like interactions.  With plenty of hack n' slash nonsense, as well as the returning create-a-warrior mode, there should be lots on offer for fans of the series, and even non-fans who want a guided tour of everything the Vita has to offer. Can't say fairer than that!   Army Corps of Hell (PlayStation Vita) Developer: EnterspherePublisher: Square EnixRelease: February 15, 2011 In Army Corps of Hell you play as the king of Hell, trying to work his way back to the top of the heap after being taken down a few notches. You'll gather what little power you have left to command a horde of minions to rip apart every monster in Hell and take over the place. Heads are literally ripped off mythical beast bosses by your little subdemons. You'll feel like the devil as blood splatters all over the Underworld while heavy metal rages in the background. Demonic laughter comes naturally as you watch your minions rip at the leftover flesh, looting it for food and prizes.  Pikmin and Overlord fused together in the fires of Hell, set to music that makes you want to whip your hair around in a headbanging fury? Smart dual stick controls, big bosses and hilarious dialogue move this title to the top of my launch list. Where do I sign? I'll sign in blood! Uncharted: Golden Abyss (PlayStation Vita) Developer: Bend StudioPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentRelease: February 15, 2011 I've already finished Uncharted Golden Abyss and gave it high marks in our review, so it has to be on our list of most wanted Vita games. If you missed it, know that this title is just as cinematic and huge as its PS3 predecessors, with all the cliffhangers (literal) and crumbling floors you've come to know and love. I could tell you that I think this one is going to be good, like we have with our other recommendations, but I know it is good, as I'm on my second play-through. What you're getting here is a perfect translation of the series' PS3 action, thanks to the dual analog sticks and Dual Shock 3-ish button layout. The Vita does not miss a beat. You want this. Trust me. Gravity Rush (PlayStation Vita) Developer: Sony Studio JapanPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentRelease: February 15, 2011 Gravity Rush has been on our radar from announcement. Here's why: launch titles are supposed to be ports and rushed, re-rigged tech demos -- not polished, original experiences with distinctive art and gameplay. This odd one out is at the top of my personal list of most-wanted Vita games.  Keiichiro Toyama, the guy behind early work on Silent Hill and Siren, is heading up this anime-like, cell-shaded action/adventure. Instead of playing with scares, this title toys with gravity and the Vita's motion sensors. You'll play as Kat, a girl that learns that she can defy gravity to walk on walls and kick baddies out of the sky. We don't know much about the story yet, but we know that Gravity Rush is fun and really easy on the eyes. [Good news: We recently learned that Gravity Rush will be ready for Vita's launch.]   Additional staff picks for the PS Vita: Kyle MacGregor:  Dragon's Crown, Lumines: Electronic Symphony, Papo & Yo Jonathan Holmes: Touch My Katamari, Little King's Story 2, Street Fighter X TekkenMax Scoville: Escape Plan, Touch My KatamariTara Long: Touch My Katamari, Rayman OriginsJosh Tolentino: Dragon's Crown, Persona 4: The Golden, Gravity Rush, Extreme Escape Adventure: Good People DieChad Concelmo: Uncharted: Golden Abyss, Touch My Katamari, Sound ShapesSean Daisy: Escape Plan, Sound Shapes, Street Fighter X Tekken
 photo

It's a new year, and a new handheld is looming on the horizon, as Sony prepares its PlayStation Vita for a Western launch. Already out in Japan, the Vita is slow to gain traction with fans, but that doesn't mean it's not an e...

 photo

The DTOID Show: It's 2012 and we're back - with NEWS!


Jan 03
// Tara Long
That's right! Now a solid two weeks older and wiser, Max and I are back from holiday vacation with an extended hangover and a handful of hearty news. Because the studio was unexpectedly closed yesterday, we weren't able...
 photo

Gravity Rush for PS Vita looks hawt


Dec 13
// Jim Sterling
I'm surprised by Gravity Rush every time I see it, mostly because I keep forgetting what it is and assume it's a puzzle game. Then I'm reminded that it's a weird action title with a colorful girl in a comic book world, and I...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...