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Ghost Recon

Humble Tom Clancy Bundle photo
Humble Tom Clancy Bundle

Splinter Cell, Ghost Recon, Rainbow Six abound in the Humble Tom Clancy Bundle


...Redeem on uPlay
Sep 01
// Darren Nakamura
Years ago, my friends and I used to make a habit of sneaking up on one another from behind and putting each other in headlocks. We called it "Splinter Celling." We also called series protagonist Sam Fisher "Tom Clancy" as a l...
Ghost Recon Wildlands photo
Ghost Recon Wildlands

Ghost Recon Wildlands trailer needs to be more careful with the yayo


That stuff is expensive, I've heard
Jul 31
// Brett Makedonski
Look at all these nice people saying nice things about Ubisoft's Ghost Recon Wildlands. The compliments aren't the reason we're sharing it, though; we just figured maybe you wanted to watch a guy walk menacingly toward a pig...
Ghost Recon Wildlands photo
Ghost Recon Wildlands

Ghost Recon goes open world with Wildlands


Eww, bloody cocaine
Jun 15
// Jordan Devore
Ubisoft showed an intriguing new open-world game about taking down a Bolivian drug cartel during its E3 2015 press conference and, oh, it's just a new Ghost Recon. That's our Ubisoft! Ghost Recon Wildlands is a third-pe...
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Assassin's Creed cumulative franchise sales cross 73 million


Ubisoft employs over 9,000 people worldwide
Apr 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Videogame detective superannuation recently saw that Ubisoft updated their worldwide cumulative franchise sales figures over on the corporate site. Top seller? The Assassin's Creed series with 73 million. Second place goes to...

Ghost Recon photo
Ghost Recon

Ghost Recon Online making its way onto Steam


Apparently this was Ubisoft's plan all along
Jan 16
// Harry Monogenis
Ubisoft's announced that Ghost Recon Online, its online, free-to-play version of the Ghost Recon franchise, which I may or may not have completely forgotten about until just now, will be making its way onto Steam's Early...
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Ghost Recon Online gears up with Assassin's-themed DLC


New armor and weaponry based on Assassin's Creed 3
Feb 11
// Keith Swiader
Ubisoft has announced a cross promotion that will see new equipment in Ghost Recon Online based on the upcoming Assassin's Creed 3 downloadable content, The Tyranny of King Washington: The Infamy. The equipment...
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Ghost Recon Online's Halloween celebration


With real ghosts, possibly
Oct 26
// Fraser Brown
Ubisoft's free-to-play online shooter, Ghost Recon Online, just got a Halloween update. Nothing screams horror and pranks like tactical multiplayer combat. The surely terrifying Halloween content pack comes with new pla...
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PC Season Pass for Ghost Recon: Future Soldier launched


Coincides with first DLC on platform
Oct 25
// Alasdair Duncan
From the book of "better late than never," Ubisoft have released a Season Pass for Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier on PC along with the arrival of the game's first piece of  DLC entitled, Arctic Strike. The...
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Ghost Recon's Khyber Strike DLC dropping on October 9


Oct 02
// Jason Cabral
For those of you looking for a reason to dust off your copies of Ghost Recon Future Soldier, look no further! Ubisoft has just announced the next content release for Future Soldier across all platform, Khyber Strike. This pac...
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Arctic Strike DLC launches today for Future Soldier


Jul 17
// Brett Zeidler
Well, here's the first in what I can only assume will be a long series of DLC for Ghost Recon: Future Soldier. The "Arctic Strike" pack is out today and includes three new multiplayer maps, a new Guerrilla co-op level, ...
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This weekend on Dtoid TV: Toast Recon: Lucha Soldier


May 25
// Bill Zoeker
This weekend on Destructoid TV, we have guns, funs, and possibly even the runs. Okay, that was too much information. My point is, we've got a hell of a weekend for you. Saturday Morning Hangover is playing the grandaddy of al...
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The DTOID Show: Diablo III, Marvel MMO, & Tom Clancy GRFS


May 23
// Max Scoville
Hey guys! Here's today's Destructoid Show, the only show about video games on the internet. Ever. Don't argue with me. Today we talk about how Diablo III is the fastest selling PC game of all time, and how people are still gr...

Review: Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

May 22 // Maurice Tan
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Ubisoft Paris, Ubisoft Bucharest, Ubisoft Red StormPublisher: UbisoftReleased: May 22, 2012MSRP: $59.99 Much of the slow-paced careful planning and executing of tactical engagements in the original Ghost Recon was lost in the console versions of Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter, while the Rainbow Six: Vegas series cannibalized the franchise with its beloved co-op tactics. Future Soldier attempts to take the franchise back to its roots, but in a modern fashion. In more ways than one, it's also somewhat of a stylistic reboot in the way Conviction changed the way we look at, and play, Splinter Cell. The influence of Ubisofts last installment of the spy thriller series is evident through Future Soldier's bountiful visual aids -- such as overlaid text on top of the 3D scenery -- and the action in general is much more dynamic and in-your-face than before, largely helped by a competent camera system that appears to be handled by by a shaky hands cameraman directed by someone like Paul Greengrass. If Conviction was the Bourne Ultimatum of Splinter Cell, Future Soldier is The Hurt Locker of the Ghost Recon series. [embed]227603:43744[/embed] Perhaps the biggest change to the formula is the way the artificial intelligence now works with the player, instead of being delegated to a position where it constantly looks at the telephone every five minutes, desperately waiting for your call. Computer-controllerd squad-mates can no longer be assigned to move to specific locations, nor ordered to a specific placement to get ready to breach a room. Instead, the AI takes care of a lot of these aspects on its own, which works much better than a potential lack of freedom would suggest. AI direction still plays a major role when it comes to stealth squad tactics, however. Up to four enemy targets can be tagged with the press of a bumper button, leaving the player free to either aim at the fourth target yourself so your team-mates eliminate their assigned tangos on your shot, or you can simply command your three brothers in arms to execute their shots in sync by holding down the same bumper. Remaining undetected is often rewarded, but sometimes open engagement is inevitable. In that case, targets can no longer be quietly lined up and silenced, and the bumper becomes a "please kill this guy here please" button. Between running around from place to place and stealthily walking in a crouched position -- which enables an active camouflage system that renders you largely invisible -- various locations require the team to work in unison. Breaching a door is now simply a matter of getting to an appointed location, waiting for the team to get ready, and pressing a button, which leads to the breach and a slow-motion sequence of shooting down bad guys. Likewise, you'll need to move to a pre-determined spot to get the team ready in yoga-like positions before sliding open a panel door. Occasionally, you'll automatically form up in a diamond formation around a VIP, which leads to an "on rails" section where you take care of all the enemies in your field of view, as the team makes its way through a hostile environment as a single unit of capable of 360 degrees of devastation. Perhaps some fans of the traditional Ghost Recon experience may lament the more scripted approaches, but it never feels like player freedom is taken away in favor of added variety. In no small part, this is because the style of careful planning and tactics has made a big return, largely thanks to the toys of the future which provide you with the necessary situational awareness. Sensor grenades can be tossed in the field to highlight enemies, a magnetic view vision mode allows you to discriminate armed soldiers from civilians through walls and terrain, and the ever-popular quad-rotor UAV drone can be used to scout the terrain ahead from the skies. If running into the action isn't your thing, this drone allows you to tag enemies and let the rest of your team take care of them, provided you only select those targets that won't be spotted by patrols if they go down. In some of the twelve very lenghty missions in the campaign, you can rely on this drone and the resulting tactical disposal puzzles without firing a single shot yourself. Those in favor of getting down to business themselves can rely on their AI squad-mates to take smart positions, lay down effective fields of fire, and generally make you feel like you are part of a team consisting of equally qualified members. The same can't always be said for the enemy AI, which tends to run between the same positions or pops out of cover in predictable ways, and which seems designed to turn any engagement into either a scripted event or a balanced-yet-fluid standoff between your team and countless enemies. Having said that, the missions' linear nature and the ease with which you can be shot down by enemy fire means the lacking enemy AI never becomes a big detriment. If you prefer the human approach, all of the campaign missions can be played cooperatively with up to four players -- something that is all too evident when you are supposed to move into breach positions in solo mode. Each mission also includes specific weapon challenges (make 12 kills with one SMG clip), and tactical challenges (reach location X without alerting any enemies), that affect your final "Ghost" score for that mission. A few of these challenges make co-op partners a necessity, although these are few and far between, and many of the challenges won't likely be completed on your first run through the game, which adds a lot of replayability if you're not into multiplayer. For its part, multiplayer is an expansive affair. A Guerrilla "horde" mode pits you against up to 50 increasingly hard waves of enemies on five maps, alternating defensive action with a stealth wave whenever you switch to a new HQ location to defend. Surviving waves unlocks wavestreaks, such as becoming invisible, using a sentry turret, or calling in an airstrike, and surviving successive waves upgrades your wavestreaks' potency. While Guerrilla mode can be played with two players in split-screen, you'll want at least one extra player to join online since the waves become pretty damn hard around the midway point. Traditional multiplayer comes in the form of "Conflict" mode, and this mode can best be described as a mix between Gears of War and Call of Duty (or any other online military shooter) with the addition of gadgets and goals. Your gadgets allow you to do things like planting claymores, throwing sensor grenades, and placing fixed cameras, while each mode has certain goals on the map to create a dynamic between the two teams as a round progresses. Capture and hold an EMP location goal, for instance, and the enemy team loses its HUD to make it very hard to distinguish between friend and foe. It turns regular team deathmatch into a more tactical affair than running and gunning, although there's still plenty of that on offer if you tailor your character to that style of play. Other modes include "Decoy," in which a team has to locate the real target out of a potential of three without either team knowing which is the real one, "Saboteur" which is your typical place-the-bomb mode, and the hardcore "Siege" mode, which requires the attacking team to complete an objective without respawns. A big part of multiplayer is leveling up our character and unlocking and tailoring weapons. This "Gunsmith" system is more effective at changing your playstyle in multiplayer than it is during the campaign. A huge amount of weapons can be easily customized at the component level, meaning you can change barrel sizes, types of triggers, scopes, muzzles, ammunition, and parts of a weapon that most people won't even know had names. Each weapon component costs "attachment credits" in multiplayer, which are gained by leveling up, forcing you to focus on specific weapons in order to get the most out of them. On Xbox 360, the Gunsmith system can be used with Kinect if you want to, but while the Kinect integration isn't intrusive, there really is no point in doing so when it's faster to use a controller. While the different multiplayer modes are a lot of fun depending on how much you care about this aspect of any military shooter, they are unlikely to surprise anyone. It's a carefully crafted and polished component, but despite the added variety in terms of both classic game types and customization, it largely boils down to the tried-and-trusted methods of online play with the addition of a bunch of toys to spice things up. The campaign, though, is a completely different affair, surprisingly enough. Future Soldier's story sends our team of Ghosts to a hugely varied set of current hotspots of international tension. From the Niger delta, to Dagestan, and Pakistan's Peshawar, the slightly traditional Tom Clancy fair fits better into the current post-War on Terror era than any other ridiculous near-future military shooter. Strip away the advanced hardware at your disposal and the overarching storyline, and each mission could've taken place in a fictional version of today's world. Perhaps the most impressive aspect of the campaign is how it shifts the flow of shooting people in the head to create variety, both inside and between missions, and keeps you continuously pressing onwards. One mission you are sneaking around, the next you are going in guns blazing, and suddenly you find yourself without your toys or playing as a lone ranger. An early mission, reminiscent of Call of Duty 4's excellent "Ghillies in the Mist" Chernobyl sniping level, is particularly noteworthy: you are sent into an African refugee camp to stealthily kill patrols and guards, while civilians go about their business and are often harassed by militia. There are times when Future Soldier's mechanics and pacing fall into place masterfully, and in the process creates some of the most enjoyable tactical shooting on offer at the moment. Just when you're starting to get tired of using the methods you've come up with, the game throws you a bone in the form of a mobile weapons platform with which to absolutely annihilate a winter landscape with infinite mortars. Outside of the advances in the streamlining of the mechanics and its approach to a total package of singleplayer, co-op, and multiplayer modes, Ghost Recon: Future Soldier displays a level of content maturation that has been evident in some of Ubisoft's big-budget action games, and which has served to set the publisher's games apart from the competition in recent years. From the biting social commentary of Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood's database info, to the gritty Bourne-esque and visually distinct Splinter Cell: Conviction, to even the concept of using homegrown terrorism in the upcoming Rainbow Six: Patriots, there is a prevalent sense that Ubisoft doesn't shy away from threading off the safe and beaten path. It is somewhat disappointing that Future Soldier doesn't fully evolve the series along this trend as much as it shows it's capable of doing. When one mission reduces your team from save-the-world heroes to government-sponsored assassins with the simple objective to commit sanctioned murder, you can hear a target's wife scream as you execute your orders and riddle the invisible family's rustic safehouse with bullets. You never know why the cries are silenced, and there's nothing else to do but carry on with the job. The masses of civilians you encounter are almost always at the receiving end of militia and soldiers who have rape and torture on their mind, and saving them from their plight is often optional and extremely satisfying. At other times, you find yourself in situations where it's very hard not to accidentally create collateral deaths while trying to stay alive, as hundreds of civilians panic and flee the sudden eruption of violence you bring to a town. The manner in which these moments offer a level of self-reflection, making you think about just how you're feeling about actively going through events you have little control over, due to both your orders and shifting circumstances, are great, and it's something we need to see more of in modern mainstream gaming. It's just too bad that such moments, while worthy of praise, are still sparse in Future Soldier when they are so effective. To offset the aspects that shine, attempts at humanizing the members of the Ghost squad are not very effective, and it's hard to care about the members of your squad when it's so hard to know who is who behind their masks. Being a Tom Clancy game, the actual story is of course a bit cliché and ends rather abruptly, yet it does a great job at placing the diverse scenarios at play in a wide enough context to care. Ghost Recon: Future Soldier is the type of title that might be easy to overlook if you're not partial to the franchise, or even if you are tired of warfare in post-modern times, but it's a great title nonetheless. Between the impressive campaign, the myriad of co-op options and the added replayability of the mission challenges, as well as the expansive multiplayer component, it's as solid a package as military shooters provide. 
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It's an interesting world we live in, where games with titles such as Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter 2 and the near-future Call of Duty: Black Ops II end up looking more "out there" when it comes to future warfare than...

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Here's how the tech of Ghost Recon: Future Soldier looks


May 21
// Brett Zeidler
It's finally here, guys. After what feels like an eternity (or just five years, depending on how you look at it), a proper new Ghost Recon title will be in our hands come tomorrow. Are you as excited as I am? Well, if you ha...

Preview: Ghost Recon Commander shoots you in the Facebook

May 21 // Ryan Perez
Ghost Recon Commander (PC) Developer: Loot Drop Publisher: Ubisoft Release: TBA (Currently in BETA) Not that I have anything against housewives, but, let's just face the truth here: A blatant distinction exists between the games on Facebook and the ones we play on consoles. Thankfully, Loot Drop recognizes this distinction and aims (no pun intended) to tap into a relatively untouched Facebook market ... people who like to shoot things. And yes, Commander lets you shoot plenty of things, including poor, defenseless chickens -- to my personal gratification. For those who don't know, Loot Drop is headed by one of the founding fathers of shooters, John Romero, and possibly the most articulate and insanely attractive woman I've met in this industry thus far, Brenda Brathwaite, who is best known for her work on the Wizardry series. Let me tell you, I've met plenty of fervent designers, but these two retain an enthusiasm for game development that I originally thought was exclusive only to college students and aspiring creators. So what does this mean for Ghost Recon Commander? Well, a lot of passion has gone into the project. So much that Brenda actually bothered asking for direct feedback from the press while they were present. It's rare enough that the typical game journalist will surrender passivity enough to constructively criticize a game in a preview, but it's nearly unheard of for a developer to actively seek such information. Most developers see previews as a mechanism of marketing; these people saw them as a means of taking notes. This approach is very admirable, honestly speaking, and it shows in the product. Ghost Recon Commander is an isometric shooter that takes place in the sunny, drug-riddled paradise that is Venezuela. Players take control of up to three soldiers, and embark on missions that entail everything from rescuing hostages to securing mounds of good ol' Columbian crop dust (AKA a shit-ton of cocaine). Players are given a choice between six missions, all of which are repayable later on harder difficulties. The premise is simple enough, but customization and upgrades are a key component to the gameplay. Players are given a "camp," a sort of home base that acts as a centralized upgrading hub where every new object or structure purchased translates directly to better, stronger soldiers. Buy medical tents and hammocks to make your freedom fighters more durable on the field. Set up some training targets to ensure that every shot from your boys finds its mark. Basically, camps provide the typical Facebook game appeal of building things, though in this case it's only a minor aspect of the gameplay as a whole. Speaking of gameplay, Commander is actually turn-based, but you wouldn't really notice it if you played it. Facebook has redefined the term "casual" by allowing people to leave their shit running, without anything actually happening in their absence. As "hardcore" as Loot Drop intends Commander to be, they realized that ignoring the game at a whim is something the platform's audience wouldn't want to give up ... and it'd especially piss them off to return to a squad of dead soldiers. So every click is essentially a turn, and enemies will only ever move when you do. Since there's no "end turn" button, though, everything flows quite nicely and gives the illusion of a real-time experience. One thing that really stood out for me was the game's sound, courtesy of Loot Drop Sound Designer Dren McDonald. Facebook titles are typically bogged down by the limits of web media, so sound often suffers as a result. At times, I find online games so fucking obnoxious that I just mute the damned things. Ghost Recon Commander actually kind of shocked me with the quality of its effects. Guns actually sound like real guns; soldiers confirm orders with the intelligibility of actual humans. I recommend paying attention to all of the audible effects the game has to offer, because it's obvious that McDonald knows what he's doing. The one thing most of you are probably wondering is what relation Ghost Recon Commander has to Ghost Recon: Future Soldier. The answer? Not much. Both games are stand-alone titles, featuring their own type of gameplay, story, and characters. However, playing one does unlock new content for the other, which is a neat feature that I enjoy seeing Facebook games provide more of. Acquiring specific guns in Commander will make them available in Future Soldier, which is good news for people who like to expand their gaming experience ... bad news for anal-retentive neurotics who have to unlock every single thing a game features. Nothing a little Prozac can't fix, though. Overall, Ghost Recon Commander is actually starting to look like a decent distraction from office duties. One of Ubisoft's PR reps asked me for some feedback, and one of my responses was, "Well, I kept playing, even when I knew I didn't have to." That's not because of the cheaply addictive Skinner-box qualities that Facebook games tend to have (see here), but because I was actually having fun shooting up the game's drug cartels. Mind you, I do so on my own time, so that perhaps had something to do with it. The great thing is, you don't have to just take my word for it. The Commander BETA is actually playable on Facebook right now, so go check it out for yourself!
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Woah, a Facebook game! I don't think I've played one of these for a while. In fact, the last Facebook game I played was over a year ago, coincidentally another one linked to Ubisoft -- something about castles that my girlfrie...

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Ghost Recon's 'Alpha' short film released to the wilds


May 14
// Liam Fisher
With Ghost Recon: Future Soldier due out next week, Ubisoft's hype train is at full speed. Rather than the usual spread of screens, trailers, and announcements of preorder goodies though, they've released a nearly 25 mi...
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[Update: Contest closed! Winner is MeowShark!] Destructoid is sponsored in part this week by spam musubi (Dale is in Hawaii with his wife celebrating his anniversary, congratulations!) and Ghost Recon: Future Soldier.  ...

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Ghosts in the machine: Ghost Recon Online's Specialist


Apr 30
// Jason Cabral
Ubisoft has shed some more light on another one of Ghost Recon Online's classes; this one focusing on the technological sabotaging prowess of the Specialist. The Specialist class abilities centre mainly around support, by ke...
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Ghost Recon Future Soldier drops a creepy new trailer


Apr 26
// Chris Carter
When you hear "creepy" and "Ghost Recon" in the same sentence, it might make you think of how easily a special forces unit could infiltrate your home and slit your throat while you sleep. But this trailer is a different sort...
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Ghost Recon: Future Soldier multiplayer looks impressive


Apr 18
// Brett Zeidler
Ubisoft recently put out a video walkthrough of Ghost Recon: Future Soldier's multiplayer featuring Red Storm's Creative Director Tommy Jacob as the narrator. Tommy was kind enough to explain all the nuances that can be foun...
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New Ghost Recon: Future Soldier trailer shows multiplayer


Apr 12
// Brett Zeidler
I can remember playing Ghost Recon 2's multiplayer for hours and hours. GRAW 1 and 2 both had amazing single player campaigns, but Ghost Recon's multiplayer always had a bigger draw for me. So, you can imagine the anticipati...
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Here's how to join the Ghost Recon: Future Soldier beta


Apr 05
// Jordan Devore
Ghost Recon: Future Soldier isn't terribly far away -- it'll be releasing on consoles in late May -- but there's still apparently plenty of time to push out a beta for the multiplayer. That'll be starting on April 19 and cont...
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Microwave your enemies in Ghost Recon Online


Mar 31
// Kyle MacGregor
Ubisoft just rolled out a new trailer for their upcoming free-to-play shooter, Ghost Recon Online. The video details the assault class, its weapons, armor and -- OH MY GOD YOU CAN MICROWAVE PEOPLE! As much fun as f...
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Ghost Recon's Guerilla Mode gets its own trailer


Mar 30
// Liam Fisher
Oh look, Ghost Recon Future Soldier has a 4-player co-op survival mode. There was a time when the knowledge of horde-mode style multiplayer really excited me, but it's been run into the ground at this point. Surprisingl...
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See Assassin's Creed III in action at PAX East


Mar 28
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Ubisoft is bringing some of their biggest games to PAX East next week. The biggest of them all will be Assassin's Creed III. It won't be playable, but there will be live demo presentations in a fully-enclosed theater at their...

Preview: Teaming up in Ghost Recon: Future Soldier

Mar 22 // Casey Baker
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [previewed], PC)Developer: Ubisoft Paris / Ubisoft Red StormPublisher: UbisoftRelease: May 22, 2012 (US) / May 25, 2012 (UK) I immediately noticed that the controls and the camera in Ghost Recon: Future Soldier both feel closer to the Rainbow Six series than to the original Ghost Recon games. Future Soldier generally moves at a much faster pace than GRAW or GRAW 2, and using cover has been refined a great deal as well. An online cooperative mode called "Guerrilla" set my team of four at a small outdoor location, which we were instructed to defend from incoming groups of soldiers. With each successive wave of soldiers, the challenge ramped up considerably so that newer enemies deployed more skill or firepower. Our team bottomed out at the tenth wave, when jeeps with turrets were introduced, as well as soldiers with riot shields who rushed our base at every possible moment and made it very difficult to coordinate our attacks without getting taken down. Guerrilla was really fun and addictive, as our team shouted out plans and devised strategies together to take down the incoming soldiers. As a reward for completing each wave, we received certain gameplay perks, such as defense turrets that we could set around the perimeter of our base area, or a guided satellite missile to deploy at an opportune moment. Between each wave, you can also switch weapons and grenades and stock up on ammo. I generally favored a sniper rifle until the turret-mounted jeeps appeared; then I decided that a grenade launcher would be much more useful. For the most part, the A.I. was also pretty intelligent, with soldiers flanking, taking cover and rushing us when our defense was weak. I do have to mention one strange glitch during my play-through, though -- one of the enemy soldiers (let's call him "Hank") would tend to get lost somehow in his A.I. subroutine and would stand around in a corner near our base. I had to seek him out and kill him on more than one occasion so that we could properly advance to the next wave. This bug didn't necessarily affect our overall gameplay much, and "Hank" generally disappeared in later waves, but since the game is set for release in only a couple of months, I certainly hope the developers are planning to fix this issue. After getting our asses handed to us several times on the 10th wave, we decided to give up and move on to the main campaign. Future Soldier's faster pace depends largely upon the presence of three other live squadmates. Coordinating attacks with them works more quickly than patiently planning and choosing where to deploy A.I. partners. I played through two different campaign missions, Firefly Rain and Valiant Hammer. In Firefly Rain, the sixth mission of the game, our team advanced through an enemy base in a dry chaparral environment with limited cover. As mentioned in earlier looks at the game, your soldiers can turn invisible by crouching and moving slowly through the environment. The moment you engage in live combat, every squadmate is exposed, so getting to cover becomes crucial to survival. I really appreciated the sorts of combat scenarios that our team encountered -- they forced us to use critical thinking and cooperative strategic planning. In one area we were pinned down by turret towers and heavy machine guns, so a partner and I eventually found a way to flank the enemy position and discover a good vantage point to help our teammates advance from the forward position. Valiant Hammer, Future Soldier's tenth mission, began in a forest at night with a large enemy presence. In both of the missions I played, a crucial and very familiar part of the strategy involved marking targets (numbered 1 through 4) and then using teamwork to decide who would take down which target and when. This became especially important in the tenth mission, as our group of four snuck through the forest and carefully took down groups of soldiers without alerting anyone to our presence. At times, we had to take out multiple targets, and as we watched enemy movement patterns it became very important to know exactly which targets our teammates were going to clear. The uniqueness of Future Soldier comes in playing with a group of other friends and advancing upon enemies with an eye to strategy and careful planning. I came away from the experience excited at the prospect of investing a good chunk of my life in playing through both the campaign and the multiplayer modes with a strong and determined squad. Ghost Recon: Future Soldier releases on May 22nd, which coincides with my birthday. If the game offers the same strong experience that the GRAW series brought onto the market a few years ago, I know one of the gifts I'll be getting myself and my twin to bring on another great year of cooperative online games.
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When I first bought my Xbox 360, one of the games I purchased with it was the original Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter. After beating the main campaign and really enjoying my time with it, I jumped online and discovered a co...

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This weekend on Twitch TV: Big ups to all of the lurkers


Mar 16
// Bill Zoeker
As another week of programming on Destructoid's Twitch TV channel comes to a close, and the excitement of the weekend approaches, I'm going to take this opportunity to do something slightly unorthodox. Spamfish and the Melted...
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'Believe in Ghosts' Future Soldier trailer all about guns


Mar 08
// Brett Zeidler
The second episode of the three-part video series called "Believe in Ghosts" to help promote Ghost Recon: Future Soldier features former U.S. Navy SEAL sniper/scout Richard "Mack" Machowicz. Now, I'm not doubting he's a bada...
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The future tech of Ghost Recon: Future Soldier


Mar 05
// Fraser Brown
It looks like the future is going to be a scary place with invisible, all-seeing assassins who blow crap up and break down doors and windows for fun. My vision of a future solider involves more singing and dancing and possib...
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Meet the Recon: new Ghost Recon Online class trailer


Feb 28
// Jason Cabral
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Online, Ubisoft's next entry into the world of free-to-play titles, just released a new trailer detailing the capabilities of the iconic Recon class. The trailer features the weapons of the Recon, sn...

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