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GDC VIDEO photo
GDC VIDEO

GDC 15 DLC #2: Oily hamburgers and Cranberries


Daily Lunch Chronicles
Mar 05
// Steven Hansen
The second lunch of GDC was much messier than the first, which you can watch here. Today (well, two days ago, actually) we went with an American staple, the "Hammed Burger," so named for the first woman who ever went totally...
IGF winners photo
IGF winners

These are the 2015 Independent Games Festival winners


Space exploration game Outer Wilds takes grand prize
Mar 05
// Jordan Devore
The winners of the 17th Annual Independent Games Festival were revealed last night in San Francisco and, my goodness, I've got names to Google today. I hardly recognize any of these! Excellence in Visual Art ($3,000) - Metam...

Rock Band 4 is coming, and it's bringing the party back

Mar 05 // Brett Makedonski
While it's important to look forward, fans also can't help but look back. After all, there are some pretty hefty investments there -- both with regard to instrument peripherals and downloadable tracks. Harmonix acknowledges this and is doing its best to make sure that there's continuity across the Rock Band brand, even if it has jumped to new consoles. With regard to instruments, Sussman says that the team's doing its best to ensure that legacy peripherals will be compatible with Rock Band 4. He couldn't definitively say that it'd happen, but Harmonix is working with Sony and Microsoft to try to work something out. Sussman said that he was confident in the chances those conversations would yield positive results. The other big concern, previously purchased downloadable songs, has an even better outlook. Harmonix is tackling the engineering issue, something that Sony and Microsoft are fully supporting. The only problem is that it'll require a lot of man-hours to essentially recreate every song in the library. It's going to eventually happen, but Harmonix can't say how long it'll take to get there. But, players definitely aren't going to be required to buy tracks a second time or anything in that vein. Of course, alongside Rock Band 4's release will be a set of brand new instruments manufactured by Mad Catz. However, that's not the extent of its involvement. Mad Catz is cooperatively publishing the game with Harmonix. This'll likely mark the largest software publishing deal in Mad Catz's history. [embed]288538:57603:0[/embed] Despite Mad Catz's involvement, Rock Band 4 won't release with a flurry of optional equipment like Rock Band 3 did. Because Harmonix is putting focus on the social aspect, it's mostly doing away with Pro mode. Drums will still be supported because the base instrument is all that's needed. Gone are Pro Guitar and Pro Bass. Also nixed are all forms of keyboard. Sussman said that through data collection, Harmonix saw that keys were played a very small percentage of the time relative to other instruments. Although this is the first time in a half-decade that Rock Band's making a return, there's also the well-founded rumor that Guitar Hero will throw its hat back into the ring this year. When asked if the studio was at all disappointed that it'd face immediate competition, Sussman seemed upbeat about Rock Band 4's chances against Activision's property. "We're focused on things we can control. However, I think our pedigree speaks for itself," he said. He's right; Harmonix has a history that's rooted in quality. However, maybe none of that really matters if the general audience just isn't ready to go back to Rock Band. When we pressed Sussman about the idea that most people from his audience seven years ago are likely in very different places in life now, he was unflinching. "While I realize that people move on, a love for music is all that's needed for Rock Band to be appealing to you. That's something that no one grows out of," he commented. Again, Sussman's right. Even if Harmonix stayed mum on a lot about Rock Band 4, it tipped its hand on what might be the most important facet: the game's tone. Rock Band 4 is all about the unique social experience that comes from playing music together. It wants to be a party, a constant source of good times. Basically, Harmonix is doing everything it can to make sure you want to get the band back together.
Rock Band 4 photo
Releasing in 2015, coming to PS4 and Xbox One
Five years after the latest installment in the seminal music/rhythm franchise, Harmonix is going on a proverbial reunion tour. Rock Band 4 is in development for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, and it's currently scheduled fo...

GDC rumor photo
GDC rumor

Rumor: Phil Harrison taking his talents elsewhere


Goodbye Microsoft, he hardly knew ya
Mar 04
// Robert Summa
News from GDC has it that the one-time Sony exec and now Microsoft executive Phil Harrison is planning to leave his position with the company. Sources have confirmed with GamesIndustry.biz that he is stepping away after being...
GDC photo
GDC

Seen at GDC: Game development is for whites only


Diversity (or lack thereof) gets the stink finger
Mar 04
// Robert Summa
Spotted around the happenings of this year's Game Developers Conference was a sticker that tells us game development is for whites only. Diversity in game development (especially amongst the sexes) continues to be a hot-butto...
GDC photo
GDC

Creative Assembly reveals inital pitch video for Alien: Isolation


See the never before shown video that started development
Mar 04
// Alessandro Fillari
Alien: Isolation was one of my biggest surprises of last year. As huge fan of the film series, I always wanted to play a title that emulated the original movie's tone and style. Though the action of the James Cameron-he...
GDC photo
GDC

Never seen Alien: Isolation third-person footage shown at GDC


Gameplay showing abandoned alternate camera set-up shown during panel
Mar 04
// Alessandro Fillari
One of the great joys of attending GDC is going to panels conducted by developers talking about your favorite games. Not only will you learn new and exciting details about the development, but you might even see somethi...
GDC15DLC photo
GDC15DLC

GDC 15 DLC #1: Chicken shawarma wrap


Daily Lunch Chronicles
Mar 04
// Steven Hansen
We're at the Game Developers Conference all week. GDC is pretty cool, but also a convention, which means gross convention center lunches. We want to have nice lunches all week. Not too nice. Downtown food is overpriced, even...
Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

Wasteland 2 on Xbox One and PS4 is a pleasant surprise


Releasing this summer with improvements
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
[Update: On top of the Xbox One release, Wasteland 2 is also coming to PlayStation 4 this summer, inXile confirmed today. CEO Brian Fargo noted that "if you are backer of Wasteland 2 or have already purchased it on PC, fear ...
Xbox One PC adapter photo
Xbox One PC adapter

Xbox One controller adapts, goes wireless on PC this year


No more cables!
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
At GDC 2015, Microsoft announced plans to release a wireless adapter for Xbox One controllers on Windows later this year. Great news, but we need dates, Phil Spencer. Specific dates! I had terrible luck with my wireless adapter for the Xbox 360 gamepad -- damn thing was spotty at best, non-functional at worst -- so here's hoping these new ones are an improvement.
Elite on Xbox One photo
Elite on Xbox One

Elite: Dangerous lands on Xbox One this summer


Console debut
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
[Update: Elite: Dangerous is a timed console exclusive on Xbox One but will be eventually come to PlayStation 4, according to Frontier Developments founder David Braben.] During a talk at the Game Developers Conference, head...
Steam Controller photo
Steam Controller

Oh hey, this looks like the final Steam Controller


Available this November for $49.99
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
Weird as it might still look, you have to admit that Valve's Steam Controller has come far. Remember this photo? Or this more recent one? It's like leafing through your worst yearbooks. Given that I play PC-centric games with...
Nintendo indies photo
Nintendo indies

Nintendo's big release schedule for Never Alone, Don't Starve, and lots of other indies


'Nindies,' if you will (I won't)
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
Klei's wilderness survival game Don't Starve: Giant Edition is headed to the Wii U eShop this spring with a convenient map viewable on the GamePad screen (or Off-TV play, if you'd rather). Great! Also cool: E-Line's charming ...
Titan X photo
Titan X

Let's guess how much the Nvidia Titan X will cost


Screw it, I'll just burn my money now
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
During an Unreal Engine panel at the Game Developers Conference, Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang showed up to announce the Titan X before handing the video card over to Epic's Tim Sweeney. Presumably, yesterday's Nvidia presentation was just too packed full of Nvidia Shield talk. The Titan X has a 12GB frame buffer and 8 billion transistors. How much is this thing gonna cost?
BOXBOY! photo
Block buds
HAL Laboratories (Super Smash Bros., Mother) has been busying itself with a couple Kirby games recently, but it looks like someone over there had an idea for a lil puzzle game and rolled with it. BOXBOY! (already released on...

A 4K Ouya photo
A 4K Ouya

New Nvidia Shield is a $200 Android console


A 4K Ouya
Mar 03
// Steven Hansen
Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang has announced the company's own sort of Ouya/Amazon Fire TV, the "world's first 4K Android TV console," the Tegra X1-powered Nvidia Shield. Not to be confused with Nvidia's recent Nvidia Shield. It i...

Will Bethesda hurry up and announce Fallout 4?

Mar 03 // Nic Rowen
Love takes time to grow. I got about six hours into Fallout 3 before abandoning my first run. Something wasn't clicking. Trekking around the wasteland as a leather-jacketed hard case set on righting every wrong he came across was proving to be a snooze-fest. As was stopping to help every quailing citizen of post-apocalyptia who was having trouble with their computer, or needed a few more iguanas for their stew. I spent most of those first six hours bumbling around in Megaton, the first settlement you discover, running errands for “survivors” who seemed utterly incapable of keeping themselves alive and resenting them for it. I felt like Dudley Do-Right cosplaying as Mad Max. What was worse was I was incompetent at it. I didn't have a clue how to fix their flipping computers. I built my first character like an Olympic athlete who could field strip an M-16 in the dark and catch bullets out of the air with his freakishly tough and unnaturally quick hands. Computers were for nerds, not wasteland avengers. I didn't make a character who could sneak around picking shitty desk locks looking for a password, or charm his way out of a confrontation. I made the kind of guy I thought the wasteland would need – an asskicker, a soldier, a rebel with a heart of gold. And it was so terribly, terribly boring. I went back to the drawing board. I restarted the game with the kind of guy I thought the wasteland would need the least. Another lunatic set loose on the skeleton of the old world. A lanky freak who was about as tough as a ten-year-old with progeria. A man whose talents included small engine repair, skulking about in the shadows, and an unhealthy interest in explosives. Someone who was likely to rebuild something just to blow it up again. I gave him a mohawk the color of corn-silk and a face too long for its own good. Big bulging eyes that jutted out a little too far from each other, just this side of gonk. His S.P.E.C.I.A.L. stats could truly be considered “special.” Barely any strength or endurance, moderate charisma and intelligence, but preternatural powers of perception and a wild dash of luck. Maybe it reflected being born under a good sign? Or maybe it was just the natural canniness of the criminally ill. Instead of playing a man driven by a sense of justice and righting wrongs, I gave my new character a spirit of raw curiosity. A person less interested in the right or wrong of something, but driven to explore and experiment, regardless of the outcome. I stopped choosing my words based on what I thought was right, instead just going with whatever dialog option I liked the best at the time, even if it made him occasionally contradictory or less than helpful. He had his mind shattered the moment he was cast out of the only life he ever knew and exiled into a poisoned and dead world. Or maybe there was always a spark of madness in him, fanned into a blaze by the VaultTec door swinging shut behind him. He had a mild phobia of guns, preferring to dive into melee swinging a baseball bat or knife with his skinny arms, or better yet, to just toss grenades at his problems. I found the Vault 101 Utility suit with the red converse sneakers in the opening tutorial and kept him in them the whole game. Fuck leather jackets and metal knee braces, I was going to face the end of the world looking like a hipster janitor. I had one guiding principal for this run: I would only do things that interested me. If a quest-line looked boring, I'd skip it. If something caught my eye, I'd abandon what I was doing and go check it out, I would always follow my curiosity. I would never bother to check my karma level, or spend time worrying about my character build (no amount of meta-gaming would ever repair his broken stats anyway). I got over my fear of sequence breaking or wandering into an area that was too tough or advanced for my character. I just assumed it would all work out eventually. What I'm describing might not seem like much to some people. I'm sure this is how a lot of people already experience big open games like Fallout and Skyrim. But for me, it was a revolution. A complete rewiring of my mental pathways, a total inversion of how I usually approached those sorts of games. It cured me from the paralysis of choice. The self-defeating spiral where there is just so much to do and explore that you spend more time fretting about what you “should” be doing, or what you could be missing, than actually enjoying the experience. Making a character who couldn't or wouldn't use most of the best loot in the game freed me from worrying about completing quests the “best” way. I was free from making choices based on what would get me the best laser gun at the end of a story arc to making choices that would bring me satisfaction. I dove back into the wasteland with my funny-red-sneaker-wearing weirdo, and I didn't come back out until 120 hours later. Forget about chasing down Dad or following up on the main quest; I picked a random direction from the door of Vault 101 and started walking. It wasn't long before I came across an abandoned shack and a big ol' combat knife called the Stabhappy. It was like providence was telling me I was on the right track. I explored what was left of The Mall, stumbling over historic sites while trying to dodge super mutant patrols as a puny level 5 wanderer with distressingly few combat skills (landmines and re-purposed booby traps became my best friend). I got the vague sensation that I was probably supposed to end up in this area as part of some epic quest-line later in the game, but so what? I was curious, plus it was more fun having to sneak by all the mutants than it would have been to just hurl plasma at them. Much later on, I was tasked with escorting a teenager named Sticky from the child-only settlement of Little Lamplight to Big Town, where they exile all the chumps who are getting a little too old for their own good. So I did what any responsible adult would do when saddled with an annoying 16-year-old who has the mental competency of a 13-year-old: I gave him a suit of cybernetic war armor and a gigantic mini-gun. When I got him to Big Town, it seemed weird to let him wander about in his powersuit while the rest of the town's residents wore rags and were trying to defend themselves with rusty bolt-action rifles and lead pipes. So militarizing Big Town became my pet project. One of the many quirks of the Gamebryo engine Bethesda uses is the ability to reverse-pickpocket items into an NPC's possession. If you have a high enough sneak rating, you can (somehow) covertly place a flamethrower in a random NPC's pocket, and they'll equip it next time you load up the area. Same with clothes and armor. The items are persistent, so they'll stick with the characters and over time, Big Town became my own living museum of all the cool gear I couldn't or wouldn't use. Custom power armor from The Pitt DLC, named weapons like the Blackhawk magnum and Lincoln's Repeater. Big Town went from a squalid little town of sad-sack victims to the most lethally armed collection of mentally compromised teens in the wastes. That's just a sample of the kind of dumb shit I got up to. I made the Capital Wasteland my sandbox, and Bethesda provided me with all the right tools and set dressings to play in it. It is a rare and precious thing to lose yourself completely in a game, and Fallout 3 provided me with some of the most memorable and potent moments I've ever had the pleasure of experiencing. I want to feel that excitement again. Skyrim was great, but for as much fun as I had with its dragons and necromancers, a part of me was always wistful for the nuclear ashes of America circa 2277. Obsidian’s New Vegas was a good dose for keeping the shakes at bay, with some welcome mechanics that made soft-skills more important and some colorful characters (all hail “kai-sar”). But its endless brown deserts and frustratingly lethal wildlife left me cold. It felt like the game was always trying to punish me for going off the beaten trail and trying to explore it like the Capital Wasteland. I want to see what the A-team can do. I want to see what Bethesda has learned from Skyrim, what ideas it can poach from New Vegas, and what it'll leave on the cutting-room floor. I want to return to the wasteland, see what kind of stories it has left to tell, what kind of characters are still rattling around in the grave of the old world. I'm hungry for it, ready to chomp down on any scrap of news, hell, I'd be happy even for the meager crumbs of a teaser trailer, anything. It's been almost seven years since Fallout 3 came out and Bethesda has been stubbornly, frustratingly silent about the future of the series. Will the studio finally have something to say about it this GDC? Doubtful. But at this point, I have no choice but to hope.
Fallout 4 hopes photo
The wait is worse than the radioactive cannibals
GDC is here, and as is the case with any big trade show or splashy industry event, I'll be on tenterhooks waiting to hear the one piece of news I care about -- When is Fallout 4 going to happen? For years I've expected the an...

Valve in 2015 photo
Valve in 2015

Valve: Steam Link game-streaming device, controller, free Source 2, and VR in 2015


Announce ALL the things, just not Half-Life 3
Mar 03
// Jed Whitaker
Valve just announced a number of new products for 2015 along with some pricing details. (Leave it to Valve to reveal hardware with dates and pricing at the same time.) This year, the company will release: Steam Link, Steam Ma...

Warhammer: End Times - Vermintide goes all in with hectic co-op action

Mar 03 // Alessandro Fillari
Set during The End Times, Warhammer's take on the apocalypse, the world has been plunged into chaos as war breaks out, forcing the many factions and groups to take up arms and fight back. Set within the city of Ubersreik, five heroes must defend the massive metropolis from the hordes of Skaven, a race of quasi-rat creatures, that wish to sack one of the remaining bastions of the world. As a co-op action brawler, players will be able to select a class of hero and take them through several stages throughout Ubersreik. Each with their own weapons and abilities, the characters feel unique from one another. Some classes can jump into the fray, while others might be better off at a distance. The four classes that have been announced so far -- the Witch-Hunter, Imperial Soldier, Wood Elf, and Pyromage -- have an individualized backstory and arc, which unfolds as you move across the city. During my session, I got to play as the Soldier and Wood Elf, and each had their own banter and point of view regarding the End Times. [embed]288516:57596:0[/embed] In case you haven't quite picked up on it, Vermintide channels a lot of Left 4 Dead, which is actually a really good thing. Gameplay-wise, players will travel from one end of the level to other while using melee and ranged abilities to fight off waves of foes and complete objectives -- and on a narrative level, the story happens in real time. While on one hand it feels a bit more subdued and smaller in scale than what Warhammer tends to dabble in, the focus on these characters in such a smaller setting creates a greater connection to them, which was also one of Left 4 Dead's greatest strengths. I'm looking forward to exploring the city with these characters, some of whom don't seem to get along that well. As you travel though the city, you'll come across many different variations of Skaven that seek to eliminate those remaining in Ubersreik.  Often times you will come across the common types, which can be killed with a single blow but can easily overwhelm; there are tougher variants, such as the gatling rat and heavy-armor Skaven, and rats wielding poison bombs that aim to separate your group. What's impressive about these encounters is that the A.I. will randomly spawn enemies and special hordes. During my two rounds of play, the types of encounters were different, and we even got ambushed much earlier than expected. This dynamic aspect of Vermintide is very interesting, and will definitely keep repeated play exciting. As you clear levels, you'll be able to acquire loot for your characters, such as new weapons and trinkets. Each class has their own type of drops, which encourages experimentation. If you're especially adventurous, replaying stages on higher difficulties will lead to much greater rewards -- though be warned that the encounters are much more perilous and the foes are far more cunning. It's refreshing to experience a Warhammer game with a deep focus on action. While the strategy and online games were fun, I always kinda wanted a game set in the universe that allowed you to get up close and personal. Though there's definitely still much work to be done here -- what I played was in pre-alpha -- there is certainly lot for Games Workshop fans to look forward to in Vermintide.
GDC 2015 photo
Warhammer: Apocalypse Edition
I've long been an admirer of the Warhammer franchise. While a lot of people seem to put more of their attention towards the 40K universe, the high-fantasy setting of the former is so rich and features such...

GDC news photo
GDC news

Sony's virtual reality hat Morpheus coming to PlayStation 4 in 2016


Slick new GDC prototype
Mar 03
// Steven Hansen
In the last month or so, invitations to various virtual reality headset demonstrations have made up a huge chunk of my inbox. GDC is into virtual reality.  I worry someone will pull some garish box out of their bag this ...
Oxenfree photo
Oxenfree

Oxenfree is bringing some flair to new-school adventure games


Waiting for the OlliOlli crossover...
Mar 03
// Darren Nakamura
Last year a group of former Telltale and Disney employees came together to form Night School Studio. At GDC this morning, the indie developer unveiled its first project, "supernatural teen thriller" Oxenfree. The studio's Te...
GDC VIDEO photo
GDC VIDEO

Escalator Pitch: Would you shell out for Sonic 2?


A bit of a softball, innit?
Mar 03
// Steven Hansen
Indie developers make some cool as heck games, but they're not always so great at selling them. We want to them work on their pitch game until they're at Bumgarner levels and we want to take advantage of the the horrible, ho...
Unity 5 photo
Unity 5

Unity 5 shows how to properly sell a game engine


This image is the best
Mar 03
// Jordan Devore
Epic unveiled its new free-to-use (with eventual royalties) pricing model for Unreal Engine 4 this week during the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, while Unity launched the new iteration of its engine, Unity 5, wi...

The Flock is an intense, scary game of flashlight tag

Mar 02 // Alessandro Fillari
In The Flock, you play as a hunter living amongst other hunters in a desolate, ruined city. One of the hunters soon discovers an artifact imbued with light that transforms his gangly and horrific appearance into something different. But the other hunters feel threatened by the artifact, and wish to take it for themselves. With a single hunter on the run with the artifact, the others must chase him down before the wielder can discover the secrets that the ancient tool possesses. Much like the recent Evolve, The Flock focuses on asymmetrical multiplayer where one player battles against others. The wielder of the light must make his way through the ruins activating ancient relics to strengthen the artifact, all the while evading the hunters. Though his movement and agility is limited, the light will keep him protected, and any hunter who's touched by the light's reach will be scorched to a cinder. Unfortunately, it's only effective within line of sight. If the hunters get the jump on the wielder from behind, where it is most vulnerable, then it's all over. [embed]288476:57585:0[/embed] Despite their vulnerability to the light, the hunters possess an assortment of abilities to use against the rogue player. Hunters are very fast and make great use of their jumping and sprinting abilities to reach areas the lone player cannot. Moreover, if the hunters remain still, they will turn to statues, making them immune to the light. In addition to this, they can even make duplicates of their statue form to create decoys and blindside the wielder. Initially, I found it very difficult to make any progress against the wielder, as the light's reach goes far -- it's deadly in the hands of a skilled player. Fortunately, my team of hunters made use of the environment to catch him by surprise. It was great getting the best of him just as he was about to clear the level. The Flock is a neat take on traditional horror titles. I didn't really think horror and multiplayer could mix well, but I found that this title was able to retain the best of both genres.
GDC 2015 photo
Three versus one in the dark
With so many horror titles out, it's difficult to keep things interesting for players. While some focus on throwing countless monsters at you, others seek to make players feel nearly powerless against a limited number of foes...

Megaton Rainfall is superhero action on an epic scale

Mar 02 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]287535:57294:0[/embed]I's up to you as the Earth's sole superhero to defend cities against an alien invasion. As the mothership sends out waves of flying drones and attack ships, you'll have to take advantage of enemy weak points to inflict massive damage, all while keeping the cities protected. Though the hero is invincible, civilization is not. The health bar of the city is displayed, showing current damage levels done by the aliens and any collateral damage done by the player. If the bar is depleted, the city is leveled and the invaders succeed. One thing that was very apparent was the sense of scale. Right from the beginning, our hero is floating above the Earth's atmosphere, where he can pinpoint danger from around the world. Once he's needed, he rushes down to the planet's surface, a la Superman, and faces the invading forces head-on. Keep in mind, this was all seamless and featured no load times whatsoever. As you race towards the planet's surface, the terrain begins to magnify and the detail of the land comes into focus. It was immensely satisfying being able to move so freely and quickly, and players will be able to explore the Earth in their own way. Moreover, Alfonso Del Cerro even plans to have players move to different planets and satellites across the universe. In some cases, you'll have to confront the alien forces in space or on the Moon and Mars. It's a real wonder how one person was able to develop such a grand game on his own, but Cerro cites procedural content as one of the big ways to make up for the lack of manpower. I do realize that the word ambitious is thrown around a lot, and it's often used lightly. With that said, I really found the sense of scale very impressive. Moreover, Megaton Rainfall's approach to superhero action, where you're more protector than warrior, is refreshing. Hopefully we can learn more about this unique superhero game soon. I'd love to see more of what this universe holds.
GDC 2015 photo
A one-man Earth Defense Force
Last month, we got a tease from an upcoming indie action title that will put players in the role of a superhero during an alien invasion. The trailer certainly inspired a lot of interest, as it was more somber and earnest, no...

Mushroom 11 is a very different game than we saw in 2014

Mar 02 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]288471:57584:0[/embed] It’s not always easy creating the shapes that Mushroom 11 demands, but the learning process is always useful. This is a much better designed game than was shown at PAX East 2014. Following one of the cardinal design rules, Mushroom 11 builds on the mechanics it taught earlier. A prime example lies within the single boss that we saw. Remember that aforesaid boulder ramp? Chapter four's boss could only be defeated by creating ramps to launch stones at the monster’s several weak points. It was a stressful situation that would’ve been frustrating to learn on-the-fly. Figuring it out under tensionless circumstances and implementing it later made the boss a challenging yet fair fight. Speaking with Untame’s Itay Keren, the care and thought put into Mushroom 11 was immediately obvious. Keren told us that each boss ended up taking almost a month to put into the game, a figure that the production schedule hadn’t necessarily allotted for. However, Keren was adamant that the end of each chapter should serve as a test to prove that the player took away skills from the entirety of the level. Truth be told, Mushroom 11 was an incredible game when we saw it almost a year ago, but it felt a bit like a proof of concept. Now, we get to see it intermingled with classic elements of game design. Mushroom 11 was neat before, but now it's shaping up brilliantly.
Mushroom 11 preview photo
And that's a very good thing
We haven’t gotten a look at Untame’s Mushroom 11 since we gave it a Best of PAX East award in 2014. It captured our hearts at the Boston show, with its approach to kinetic energy proving absolutely entrancing...

Free Unreal Engine 4 photo
Free Unreal Engine 4

Go build something: Unreal Engine 4 is free to use


That's not a real room
Mar 02
// Jordan Devore
Epic Games is no longer charging developers a monthly subscription for Unreal Engine 4. The engine is now free for anyone to use. Well, free to a point -- "When you ship a game or application, you pay a 5% royalty on gross re...
GDC 2015 photo
GDC 2015

Valve to give a talk about physics at GDC on March 3 at 3 PM


Should be a good talk
Mar 02
// Jed Whitaker
Sergiy Migdalskiy, a programmer at Valve, will be giving a talk at GDC this week at the start of the THIRD month on the THIRD day at 3 PM. According to Sergiy's LinkedIn he has worked on games such as Counter-Strike: Glo...
AIPD GDC trailer photo
AIPD GDC trailer

Beautiful UE4-powered shooter AIPD coming to GDC


This GDC trailer is chock-full of glowey, shooty twin-stick goodness
Feb 27
// Rob Morrow
Artificial Intelligence Police Department, or AIPD for short, is an upcoming top-down, twin-stick shooter from Frankfurt-based studio Blazing Badger. It recently released this luminous new trailer for its debu...
Liege trailer photo
Liege trailer

Liege is like chess, but with more face-stabbery


It's looking badass in this new GDC/PAX East trailer
Feb 25
// Rob Morrow
Coda Games' sole developer John Rhee just uploaded a revealing new pre-expo teaser for his Kickstarter-funded SRPG trilogy, Liege. In it, we get to see the most recent gameplay footage of the elegant, turn-based/tactica...

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