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Fuse

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Charts

Fuse debuts in the UK charts at number 37


GRID 2 meanwhile takes pole position
Jun 03
// Alasdair Duncan
Whilst many didn't expect it to set the charts alight, it can't be of any comfort to Insomniac Games to know that Fuse entered the UK videogame charts at number 37. Our own Jim Sterling said in his review the game was "lazy" ...

Jimquisition: Damn Fine Coffee

Jun 03 // Jim Sterling
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Jimquisition happens every Monday!
How do you like your coffee? Blacker than midnight on a moonless night? Or is that just what you want people to think? Asking consumers what coffee they drink is a fine example of demonstrating exactly how problematic a focu...

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'New stuff' coming to Fuse, but not DLC


Insomniac claims focus testing didn't dilute the game
May 29
// Jim Sterling
Insomniac Games is working on more content for its recently released Fuse, but it won't just be downloadable content. According to studio head Ted Price, the team is already prototyping some substantial new stuff.  "For ...

Review: Fuse

May 28 // Jim Sterling
Fuse (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Insomniac GamesPublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: May 28, 2013 (NA) / May 31, 2013 (EU)MSRP: $59.99 Fuse has a story, I think. Something about a group of mercenaries (maybe) called Overstrike, on the trail of some terrorists, or maybe a rogue military company. The villains -- all helmeted future soldier types -- have access to some space age technology they're using for weaponry, maybe. The trouble with summarizing Fuse's plot is that it's very easy to start describing one of the thousands of similar near-future sci-fi stories from which this game is utterly indistinguishable.  In any case, nothing really matters in a world where the heroes and villains alike are bland enough to be one and the same, dialog is embarrassingly cliched, and the world feels too shallow and artificial to be worth saving. Fuse's story is as by-the-numbers as videogame plots can get -- a trait unfortunately shared by the rest of the game.  A four-person co-op shooter as dry as a dead tree, Fuse walks the same path as other fabled "me too" middle-ground games like Inversion and Quantum Theory -- a repetitive, flavorless, excruciating slog from cover-based firefight to cover-base firefight. It's ostensibly Gears of War on autopilot -- a slow-paced retread through ground so familiar you could set a watch by it, remorselessly lacking in surprise, while any originality is quickly wasted through overuse and shameless self-exploitation.  [embed]254420:48830:0[/embed] Fuse's one single "hook" is its use  of Xenotech weaponry. Each of the four playable characters has a single unique weapon that runs off "fuse" ammunition -- Dalton is able to deploy a shield for the rest of the team, Jacob has a bow-like weapon that fires burning bolts, Naya can create black holes by concentrating her fire, and Isabelle can freeze enemies into crystals before shattering them. These weapons are upgraded on rudimentary skill trees, but they offer very little in the way of game-altering experiences. Once you've tried each character out, you can see what they bring to the table in a matter of minutes, and you better hope you like it because that's the best you're getting for the next six or seven hours.  The single biggest problem with this game is its sluggish repetition. Every enemy, even the most basic mook, has a considerable amount of health that sees them surviving multiple headshots with all but the cumbersome sniper rifle, and the limited pool of accessible weaponry makes taking each opponent out a tiresome saga in its own right. Even worse, almost every encounter in almost every level is exactly the same. By the end of the game, I was able to predict the basic structure of almost all battles, laid forth as thus: Step one: Enemies don't notice the players. The players take a handful of them out with stealth kills until they're spotted for arbitrary reasons.  Step two: The enemies' HP bars are whittled away wearily until everybody's dead (expect to duck behind cover after every few shots fired, as apparently you're more fragile than any single opponent). Step three: A larger armored enemy will appear that needs to be shot in the back and takes ages to kill. Upon death, it drops a heavy weapon of some variety. Step four: The heavy weapon is used to kill a second wave of mooks that conveniently show up for the single purpose of being killed by the heavy weapon. Occasionally some new soldier variants will appear, but their job seems only to make an already mentally exhausting game all the more draining. From cloaked enemies that grapple you and drag you around the map, to shielded elites that heal all enemies standing in a wide radius, to snipers that can down you in one shot, every trite enemy exists simply to drag out the procedures, and the procedures just aren't fun. With weapons that feel weak, pop-and-shoot combat that feels simplistic and barren, and boss battles that repeat themselves (even the final boss is merely an enhanced version of something fought twice before), Fuse is a game lacking any of the excitement and thrill of those faster paced, dynamic, more varied games it desperately tries to ape. Everything functions exactly as it needs to in order to deliver the basic structure of a serviceable shooter, but that's all we get. A mere skeleton of a game, one that drags its feet and does all it can to waste the player's time.  As if that wasn't enough, moments of lazy enforced co-op hammer home how homologous the whole thing is. You know what I'm talking about -- endless doors that need two or more people to open, two switches on either end of a room that need operating at once. The same prostrated busywork that plagues dozens of "co-op" games for no other reason than to convince you the co-op has a purpose other than looking good on some marketing department's checklist.  Between these sequences of narcoleptic banality, Fuse will require you to perform simple Uncharted-style wall climbing and short walks through laughably massive air vents. None of this adds anything to the actual game. These quiet moments aren't used to impart any interesting exposition, nor are they flowing and scenic enough to provide any of the charm Nathan Drake's acrobatics give us. They're just there to be there, as seems to be the modus operandi of everything in this circus of stereotypes.  When you get bored of the campaign, which is likely to happen often, there's Echelon mode, a wave-based survival game in which up to four players can earn extra cash and XP. Upgrades and level progress are shared between modes, so Echelon is a good way to rack up extra loot. It's also a good way to experience everything the campaign has to offer without the dire writing and bromide rock-climbing getting in the way. It's still the same old shooting against the same old stock enemies, but at least it cuts to the chase and gets the whole thing over with more efficiently.  Graphically, Fuse has nothing going for it. It's not very impressive looking, and the boiler plate art style doesn't help. Characters and environments, like everything else in this game, look like things I could see in any random handful of mediocre science fiction adventures. Voice acting and music, meanwhile, are all kind of just there, and barely worth even this sentence dedicated to their existence.  The most troubling thing about this review is that I am possessed of self awareness enough to know it's going to look like a punishment. It's going to look like I'm one of the many disappointed gamers who saw the changes from Overstrike to Fuse and was prepared, from the outset, to hate it. I cannot disprove such a perception, if that is the perception you wish to have. All I can say is that I, a fan of Insomniac, had faith when I was assured Fuse would be just as good as Overstrike promised to be, and I was looking forward to playing it. To have my residual doubts about the game brought miserably to light was not pleasant, and certainly not desired.  Whether it's true or not, Fuse does feel every bit like another victim of the heavily focus-tested, leader following, perpetually terrified mainstream game industry. It's every cloying and desperate element of the retail console market, brought together -- fused, if you will -- to create a factory standard example of a game that tries to be everything the hypothetical mainstream consumer drools over, and ends up as nothing remarkable.  That's Fuse in a nutshell.  It's nothing.
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I'm at the end of mine
Insomniac turned a lot of heads when it first revealed Overstrike -- a colorful, cartoony, over-the-top cooperative shooter that looked promisingly hilarious. Even more heads turned, but for entirely the wrong reasons, when O...


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Fuse

Fuse demo drops next week with split-screen support


Find some friends to play this with
May 03
// Jordan Devore
The general vibe I'm getting about Fuse is that of disappointment. The cooperative shooter isn't what people want from Insomniac Games, and although I feel similarly, we should probably wait until we have first-hand expe...
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Fuse

Insomniac sets its sights on a May release for Fuse


Co-op-centric shooter for Xbox 360 and PS3
Mar 23
// Jordan Devore
Insomniac Games' cooperative shooter Fuse will be releasing on May 28 and May 31 in North America and Europe, respectively, the studio announced today. This comes after a delay earlier this year and something of a confused id...
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Fuse

Meet the four heroes of Fuse


Get to know the team
Mar 02
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Fuse is the four-player cooperative third-person shooter from Insomniac Games and stars four distinct playable characters. And you can get to know each one through these four new trailers focusing on each star. You get to se...

Fuse skips competitive multiplayer, opts for Echelon

Feb 15 // Keith Swiader
Fuse (Xbox 360 [previewed], PlayStation 3)Developer: Insomniac GamesPublisher: EARelease: March 2013  "Early on we did try competitive multiplayer and we realized we could have done deathmatch and capture the flag, but it seems like a lot of other games are doing that," Ted Price, Insomniac Games Founder and CEO told Destructoid. "We wanted to create something that allowed you to use the abilities you're developing in campaign in a way that feels fun and different." The result is Echelon, a new take on wave-based co-operative play that has you and your squad playing more offensively than what's found in other horde-style modes. In Echelon, you are constantly bringing the fight to the enemy in a 12-round battle that features randomized objectives. There's the obligatory bare-bones, kill 'em all objective, Carnage, but things open up from here, with mini-gun-wielding mini-bosses constantly entering the battle to cause a ruckus.  The only defensive-style objective in Echelon is Hot Zone, which requires you to defend a precious canister from enemy forces. This is where Insomniac said a balanced team would greatly come into use, as Dalton's character, who wields a decked out shield, would be ideal protecting the canister against incoming attacks. Of course, you can always use Fuse's LEAP ability and switch between characters on the fly, if you so wish. High-Value Target is a new spin on the classic "kill this specific guy with the huge marker over his head" mode, because the longer the specified target stays alive, more reinforcements will come to his aid.  Coins, gold bars and money bags are constantly dropped in Echelon, and snatching those up will allow you to buff up your various team perks as well as purchase new gear. And, as Price mentioned, all your upgrades and experience obtained in Fuse are reflected throughout the entire game. "Both of these modes feel like you're constantly building on skills that you've been developing in the other mode," Price said, "and because there's a unified progression system, the progress you make in Echelon is also reflected in the campaign, and vice-versa." Price added that Insomniac is still working out balancing issues pertaining to the universal progression system when asked how the campaign's difficulty would scale if someone plays a ton of Echelon beforehand. In its current build, Price said the campaign only adjusted difficulty per the amount of players in the lobby. After playing multiple rounds with a co-op partner, Echelon was quite an enjoyable experience, and I did notice my play style alter into a more offensive approach than what I would typically perform in say, Gears of War 3's Horde mode. With the seemingly overwhelming amount of wave-based games released nowadays, it's good to know that Insomniac is throwing a curve ball. For a more in-depth look at Echelon, check out our preview.
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Wave-based co-operative with a twist
Contrary to popular belief, competitive multiplayer is not required for every shooter that releases these days. Heck, it's not even required for every AAA game. We've seen multiplayer shoehorned into multiple high-profile gam...

What Insomniac learned from its past when creating Fuse

Feb 14 // Keith Swiader
Lessons learned from the Chimera First and foremost, Insomniac Games learned that, when making a shooter, things need to feel right, and that goes for mechanics such as aiming, auto-targeting, player movement and how the guns feel. Coming from Resistance, Insomniac was ahead of the curve with knowing how a shooter should play. "We took those lessons to heart and brought them to Fuse where we have four completely different characters, each with a totally different arsenal of weapons. And we wanted to make sure that, at the very core, shooting is fun." Ted Price, Insomniac Games Founder and CEO told me.  "Shooting feels good -- it has the right weight and it has the right impact on the enemies. So it was useful coming from the Resistance series onto Fuse." Naturally, my follow-up question dealt with Fuse's story, and how telling such creative, fleshed out narratives in Insomniac's past helped with creating the mythos of Fuse. Price said that, with their past games, the team started focusing more and more on the characters, and that's something that transitioned over to Fuse. "We want to keep it interesting for the player to make sure that the people we are presenting are not cardboard cutouts, that they actually do have distinct personalities and they react to events in a believable fashion," Price said. "This is a story about four very different agents who are thrown together and are working together to solve challenges, and throughout the story you'll see how their interactions change." Not really class-based, but characters with "class-based properties" From the start, Fuse was designed with four-player co-operative play in mind, with Insomniac Games looking to past titles like Ratchet & Clank: All 4 One and Resistance 2's eight-player co-op mode for inspiration and lessons. Resistance 2, for example, had what Price called "light class-based archetypes," or classes that were very one-dimensional and restricted in their roles. A medic could do nothing more than heal, and a tank did nothing more than absorb for the team. Not so with Fuse, which stars characters who are not exclusively class-based, yet have "class-based properties," as Price explains. "To use Izzy as an example, she's great at crowd control, so with her Shattergun she can freeze multiple enemies at once -- but she's also a healer, and one who has varying efficacy as you continue to unlock buffs for her healing ability." In addition to a role, and the standard affair of assault rifles, pistols, mini-guns and shotguns littered throughout the game, each of Fuse's four main characters also have their own unique Fuse-powered weapon, all of which help flesh out the characters even more. Naya Deveraux, for example, is the game's stealth character, and while her Warp Rifle allows her to cloak herself for flanking and CQC, it also annihilates large groups of enemies by chaining together singularities, or black holes, in which they disappear. This layer of depth transcends Fuse's entire cast. "We didn't want to have a game that just gave you different flavors of a machine gun," Price said. That would feel too 'been there, done that' for us.'" Looking ahead With Fuse being a new property for Insomniac Games, I asked Price what possibilities the future would bring for the game, granted, if it were received well. After all, the Ratchet & Clank series saw four games on PlayStation 2, a trilogy on PlayStation 3 and the previously mentioned All 4 One. Resistance also became a trilogy. So, what about Fuse? Are ideas already on the back-burner? "With every IP we've created, our intent has been to create a franchise," Price replied. "And Fuse is a good example of our approach; we love coming up with worlds that don't follow real-world rules." "There's stuff happening in Fuse that would never take place in a military sim at all. And that allows us to branch out in the future, as well as enjoy the current game, and not adhere to any kind of real world politics or physics restrictions -- stuff that a lot more serious games incorporate in their stories and gameplay." Fuse will be available on Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 this March.
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An interview with Ted Price, Insomniac Games Founder and CEO
Fuse is Insomniac Games' first new intellectual property to release since Resistance: Fall of Man on PlayStation 3 in 2006. Before that, the developer worked on the acclaimed Ratchet & Clank series, famous for its ov...

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Insomniac shows off latest Fuse trailer and screenshots


So many graphics!
Dec 18
// Brett Zeidler
I'm not really sure what to think about Fuse. I was all about the game once I heard that it was a third-person shooter coming from Insomniac. Then they decided the game needed a more serious tone, but they were also going to...
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The DTOID Show: Wii U, Bayonetta 2, & Far Cry Monkeybombs


Also Jonathan Holmes played Black Ops II haha
Sep 14
// Max Scoville
The Destructoid Show was LIVE today with fanciful fun and magical treasures for everyone, and blah blah something something, I don't know -- it's Friday why are you making me write these sentences. If you missed it, the Wii U...
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This is what Insomniac's Fuse looks like in action


Sep 14
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
This past week we got to tell you all about Insomniac's Fuse, their new third-person co-op shooter. Originally called Overstrike, the new direction of the game is bringing a more serious tone while still keeping the over-the...

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