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Solatorobo has gone gold, will drop on September 27


Sep 11
// Tony Ponce
XSEED has sent out a press release announcing that the colorful action RPG Solatorobo: Red the Hunter has gone gold and will ship across the US on September 27. Along with reiterating details that have been announced previou...
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Solatorobo videos showcase furry combat


Sep 03
// Tony Ponce
With a bunch of incredible-looking games arriving this fall for the DS (that will actually see release in the US, *ahem*), Nintendo's lame duck portable still has some vitality left in it. One such promising title is anthrop...
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Ground control to Fox McCloud ...


Jul 02
// Chad Concelmo
This is one of the oddest, but most awesome videos I have seen in a long time. I don't even know how to describe it. It is a short (the first of a series?) starring the Star Fox characters as stuffed animals, walking, talkin...
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DS Action RPG Solatorobo coming to Europe


Apr 11
// Tony Ponce
If it seems like I've been in a furry mood recently, I can assure you it's all one big unfortunate coincidence. Here's some news that isn't unfortunate! Remember that Japanese DS game Solatorobo that we mentioned a few months...
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Old and new Sonic have reconciled their differences...


Apr 11
// Tony Ponce
... and found love on the battlefield. "Modern x Classic Quickie" by SEGAMew [DeviantART]
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Hey Ash, Whatcha Playin: World of Warcraft


Feb 11
// Jonathan Holmes
HAWP just kicked off its third season, and the opening episode has something for everyone. Sex, Violence, World of Warcraft; it's all here. If you think you knew everything there was to know about the way the Burch family ope...
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Dtoid (the show) week 8: Bad ass Hollywood all stars


Dec 06
// Jonathan Holmes
I can't even begin to recap all the stuff that happened this week on The Destructoid Show. Despite the fact that we're in a pre-VGA's news lull, we still found plenty to talk about. Off the top of my head, I know that Tofu Bo...
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TGS: The Accidental Pervert's best of booth companions


Sep 18
// Jonathan Holmes
So, as it turns out, there is a law in Japan against taking a girl's picture without her permission. Not only did I not know this, but even if I did, I have no idea how to ask a girl in Japanese if I am allowed to take her p...
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Puppies and J-Pop combine in this Okamiden trailer


Aug 07
// Jonathan Holmes
I felt bad for all the DS games at E3 2010, especially Okamiden. How could any DS title possibly follow the unveiling of the 3DS? It just wasn't fair. I hope that Okami fans (all 200,000 or so of you) are still willing to bu...
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Hey, did you read Ben's review of BlazBlue: Continuum Shift? It's pretty awesome, much better than the review some bozo posted on Dtoid for the original game. Ragna is NOT a bounty hunter, OK? OMG, the fact that Ragna is NOT ...

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Ape Escape 4 is coming to Europe


Jul 05
// Jonathan Holmes
This is almost a Captain Obvious post, but hey, I'll take any excuse to talk about Ape Escape 4 that I can get. Not seeing the game at E3 10 was easily one of my biggest disappointments of the show. Sony still seems resistant...
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Squirrel girl Makoto comes to BlazBlue via DLC


Jun 23
// Ben Perlee
In ground breaking news for fans of BlazBlue and squirrels(!!!!), some Famitsu scans reveal that Arc System Works and Aksys are going to release downloads for brand new characters to BlazBlue: Continuum Shift when it lau...
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Animated Pokemon Black/White fights, now in blur-o-vision


May 16
// Jonathan Holmes
Forgive the blurriness of these videos taken straight from this week's Pokemon Sunday, but they're the best that I can post right now. Blurry or not, they show us one thing for certain; the days of fully static Pokemon battl...
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Silhouettes of the Pokemon Black/White starters revealed


May 09
// Jonathan Holmes
Every time a new Pokemon game comes out, people freak over the starters. They're never universally accepted, garnering a lot of "That one looks too much like a (blank) crossed with a (blank), and therefore, it sucks and I hat...

Review: Monster Hunter Tri

May 05 // Jonathan Holmes
Monster Hunter Tri (Wii) Developer: Capcom Publisher: Capcom Released: April 20, 2010 MSRP: $49.99 First off, a quick word about the genre that Monster Hunter falls into: though it may look like a standard adventure game, Monster Hunter is very much a sandbox series -- a Japanese sandbox series. Unlike Western sandbox games such as GTA and Saints Row, Japanese sandbox games tend to focus on expansive, open, largely unpopulated (by humans, anyway) spaces that provide tons to do, but where nothing ever needs to get done. Collecting stuff, leveling up, exploring, and getting away from real-life humanity is the priority here; doing crimes in bustling recreations of real-life cities would just be missing the point. Dead Rising, Animal Crossing, Shadow of the Colossus, The Wind Waker, and No More Heroes are just a few examples of games that fit the profile of the Japanese sandbox game, but when it comes to to providing that special mix of freedom and escapism, Monster Hunter Tri outdoes them all. The game puts you in the role of a (you guessed it) person who hunts monsters, but Monster-Hunter-and-Gatherer is more like it. You start the game by creating your character in a Mass Effect/Mii Channel manner. From there, you are introduced to the Monster Hunter World via some beautiful cut-scenes, meet some villagers, leave town, and do as you please. Wander the wilderness, go fishing, catch some bugs, mine precious stones, and oh yeah, beat a bunch of dinosaur-looking things in the head with a hammer (or sword, or multiple other weapons) until death, then cut into them and take their remains back to town, and repeat. That's your average game of Monster Hunter Tri. There are a lot of things you can do around town, too: pay cat people to cultivate plants and bugs for you on a little farm, cuddle with a pig, send some sailors out on expeditions, decorate your house, forge new items, change weapons and armor, change your hair style, and, of course, buy stuff. It feels like the old, pre-story-focused days of the JRPG: go to town, rest up, hit the road, kick ass, come home, and lick your wounds. It's nothing revolutionary, but it works. Part of that comes from the constant supply of little moments to enjoy. The game provides a constant stream of different items to find, monsters to fight, hidden areas to discover, and surprising interactions with monsters. Oh hey, what are these little cat people doing in this cave? Doing a dance? Awesome. Wait, now they're smashing me in the head and stealing my stuff? Bastards! That's just the cute stuff. You'll also come across giant bugs, dino-sharks, and most often, huge, huge dragon/dinos that own the world of Monster Hunter with an iron fist. This is the most intimidating and beautiful creature design this side of Shadow of the Colossus. The way these monsters look, act, and think is endlessly entertaining. As you play through the single-player mode, new areas open up as well, and though none of them are particularly massive, the land never runs out of surprises. Swimming is a big part of the game, too, with large underwater areas to explore. One second you're "ooh-ing" at the massive beasts, the next you're "aah-ing" at the marvelous backdrops. It's a non-stop awe-fest. The team working on the latest Zelda title has been cited for their respect for the visuals of Monster Hunter Tri, and how they are aspiring to make a game as attractive. Though like many Wii games, the textures in Monster Hunter Tri can look a bit janky when seen extremely up close, there is still no denying that the attention to detail in both the environmental and creature design is top of the class. When you're running through the mountain pass at night, while shooting stars fly overhead and a herd of large, beautiful animals gallop en masse in the valley below, it's nothing short of magnificent. It's especially fun when loads of different types of monsters end up hanging out together in the same area. You'll have a raptor-like Jaggi biting the ass of the heavily armored Rhenoplos. So much care and attention was put into this game's world; you'll really feel like you're living among the beasts. Just as much care was put into Monster Hunter Tri's gameplay. Though you don't capture and train monsters like you do in Pokémon, you do make weapons and armor out of them, and the level of detail and variation in the "evolution trees" of each weapon/armor is staggering. This game has tons of different weapons and armor, with the potential for elemental properties for added flair. There are seven types of weaponry in Monster Hunter Tri: sword and shield, great sword, hammer, lance, switch axe (an axe that can turn into a sword), long sword, and bow gun (light, medium, and heavy barreled). All seven play very differently from each other. They almost feel like Street Fighter II's original seven characters (or eight, if you count Ryu and Ken as two different ones) in their level of variation. The single-player mode is perfectly engaging. For storyline, we get a low-intensity tale of a town that needs saving from a giant sea monster, among other natural enemies. Your real motivation in the single-player comes from curiosity about the game's world, and amassing a plethora of cool weapons/armor/etc. That's all good stuff, but what makes Monster Hunter Tri really special, especially for the Wii, takes place online. The game allows you to take on quests with three other strangers at a time, chosen from a cast of thousands of online strangers, with no need for friend codes. That's right, Capcom somehow got around Nintendo's friend code system. There is a little warning before entering the game's online city about not giving out your phone number and address to people you meet online, but that's it. There's no more protection than that. Teaming up with strangers of different levels of experience is the best way to see new and exciting stuff in the game, and to pick up some awesome new gear along the way -- all of which can be brought back to the single-player experience. You can interact with strangers with in-game texting, a Wii-compatible keyboard, or the Wii Speak speaker/microphone combo. The in-game keyboard is a little clunky, and doesn't allow for pointer controls like those found in Animal Crossing: City Folk, but other than that, it's pretty much flawless. Also, no lag. This lack of online protection and hand-holding is surprising, and speaks to the game's overall philosophy. In fact, that's the one thing about Monster Hunter Tri that may turn people off. This game barely tries to help you out. Unlike many games these days, your character doesn't have a built-in healing factor, and there is often a high price for carelessness in combat. The game also isn't shy about throwing over-powered monsters your way before you're tough enough to take them on, or letting you sign up for a quest that you have no chance of completing. After the initial set of quests, you're rarely given much direction or instruction as to where to go or what you'll need to succeed, which gives the game a certain believability not found in many online-intensive titles. The most striking area where the game leaves you on your own is in actual combat. There is no lock-on, which really forces you to hone your skills on your own. Knowing which weapon is right for which quest will be sure to make or break the career of many a monster hunter, as will the drive to learn the behaviors, strengths, and weaknesses of the monsters you're hunting. It all takes place in real time. Like in Resident Evil 5, there is no pausing the action in the inventory screen. Dodging, charging up attacks, setting traps, retreating, accessing items in your inventory, barbecuing some meat, all while a fire breathing dragon with giant cobra-heads for wings stomps around and scares the crap out of you, is a required skill. To pull off all that, the game's controls will need to become second nature. That's another one of the game's strengths: control options. Not only does each weapon control and feel differently from each other, but there are three overall control schemes you can choose from before starting up a game. The Wii-Remote-and-Nunchuk scheme is definitely playable and for motion control enthusiasts it may actually be preferred, but it really feels like the game was built to be played with the optionally-packed-in Classic Controller Pro. The Classic Controller gets two different control schemes: one that's button-intensive, and one that's analog stick-intensive. Mini review-within-a-review time: the Classic Controller Pro is awesome -- it's more light and comfortable than any other analog pad on the market, Wii or otherwise. The last thing thing you really should know about Monster Hunter Tri is how truly endless it feels. As a wild guess, someone may be able to speed-run through all the quests in the single-player in 30 hours or so, but that's being really generous. For people who want to get the most out of the game, it'll take much longer than that to really see what the game has to offer. It's common to hear a Monster Hunter fan say they've put hundreds of hours into the game, and they're still making gains and seeing new things. Capcom has already promised to make new quests available online free of charge. People pay a monthly subscription fee for this stuff in Japan, but we get it for free.  Fans of Japanese-style sandbox games need to buy Monster Hunter Tri. The only bad thing about it I can think of is that it really doesn't do anything to try to win over today's lazy, lock-on/healing factor-reliant action gamer. Also, the game's local co-op mode is a little lacking. It only allows you to join with one local player and take on one of the game's "bosses" inside an arena, disallowing the option to explore or go item-farming. Other than those tiny complaints, everything else about the game pretty much nails it. For $50 ($60 with the Classic Controller Pro), Monster Hunter Tri provides a World of Warcraft-quality experience without the $14.99 monthly subscription. That makes Monster Hunter Tri the best value going in MMORPGs today. Add to that a more-than-adequate single-player mode, and you get a... Score: 9.0 -- Superb (9s are a hallmark of excellence. There may be flaws, but they are negligible and won't cause massive damage to what is a supreme title.)
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Did you play the Monster Hunter Tri demo? If not, don't bother. It sucked. Okay, that's subjective, but it's definitely fair to say that the Monster Hunter Tri demo did not accurately represent the full game. Imagine if Rocks...

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Rumor: Earthworm Jim 4 coming to Wii


Apr 29
// Jonathan Holmes
Some man went to someplace and met the man who created Earthworm Jim. The man said that the Earthworm Jim making-man said that Earthworm Jim 4 is coming to the Wii. I read what that man heard the other man say, so I decided t...
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Dtoid's guess-packed Marvel Vs. Capcom 3 prediction post


Apr 20
// Jonathan Holmes
After over ten years of waiting, Marvel Vs. Capcom 3 has finally been announced. Yes, we're psyched, but we're also freaked out. A lot has changed for both Marvel and Capcom over the past ten years. Multiple new Marvel and Ca...
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Here comes the new Pokemon...


Feb 06
// Jonathan Holmes
We've known for a little while that an all new Pokemon game is in the works, but that could mean a million different things. It could be a puzzle game, a Wii spin-off with Nintendo 64 quality graphics, or any number of other ...
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Unwrap Banjo-Kazooie 3 this Christmas


Mar 28
// Chad Concelmo
You already know about the appearance of a mysterious teaser site, but now Rare has confirmed that Banjo-Kazooie 3 (oh, please call it Banjo-Threeie) will be released for the Xbox 360 in time for the...
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Living the Dream: Meet GH3 band, Furry Revolution


Nov 05
// NO LONGER WORKS AT DESTRUCTOID
Look I drink... and from time to time, I spout off an idea that only God could make happen. Meet Furry Nation, Furvolution, Furry Revolution. They are the first Dtoid Guitar Hero band and the first one I have ever heard ...
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New PS3 exclusive, Rat Race, revealed


Oct 16
// Nick Chester
Crazy things are happening over at the official PlayStation blog tonight. Greg Easley, founder of Super-Ego Games, has announced their new PlayStation 3 exclusive title, Rat Race.Dubbed a "comedy/adventure game," Ra...
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Final Fantasy XI trailer tries to seduce me, nearly succeeds


Sep 29
// Colette Bennett
World of Warcraft can blow me. Yes, I said it, and I'm not sorry. No amount of friends in that game can convince me that it's fun to play. Give me the characters and surroundings of any Final Fantasy XI expansion and I'll pic...
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Second Life gets even creepier: Sex with unicorns anyone?


Sep 07
// Earnest Cavalli
Every time I write a post about how terrifyingly Caligulan Second Life has become I swear on a copy of Jane Eyre that I will never draw more attention to that digital Sodom, but then, some virtual Guccione manages to push the...
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EIEIO 2007: Hands-on with Fury; this game is HOT


Jul 16
// William Haley
Fury is an upcoming MMO game that strips away all the grinding and leveling of games like Everquest or World of Warcraft and jumps right down to the nitty gritty of PvP while still retaining the things that make RPG's s...
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Wiimbeldon: Barcade, Beers, and Bears! Oh My!


Jun 25
// Tiff
Part hipster costume party, part casual Wii-gamer, and part "Well, I don't really want to fit into either of those other two categories, so I suppose I'll just drink a lot of beer instead" would all aptly d...
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Someone buy our game please, Viva Pinata marketing returns


May 03
// Nick Chester
Microsoft and Rare thought they had it all figured out with Viva Piñata. Here was a game that was not only sickly adorable, but was also supposed to appeal to the same gene that controls a child's frenzied Pok&eacu...
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Welcome to the machine; Life 2.0 teaches Second Life from within Second Life


Apr 06
// Earnest Cavalli
Dr Dobb's is a respected resource for computer development, and has been so for thirty years now, but somewhere along the line, the good doctor started downing handfuls of valium, ketamine and DDR Ram chips, and decided ...
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Summa on Coin-OP TV ... no, for real, it's tonight y'all


Apr 01
// Robert Summa
Sorry, no April Fool's here, I will actually be on Coin-Op TV tonight, live, as a special guest. And only in that special way that I know how. So, if you got nothing better to do at 7 p.m. Pacific (10 Eastern), then tune in, interact, and laugh/cry. Go here for the live show.  
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The true origin of Sonic the Hedgehogs blueness. Update


Mar 25
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
While working on the most epic YTMND ever this past Thursday, I came across this YTMND that had the comic seen above. Who would have ever guessed that Sonic is blue because of the cobalt effect! You know, the cobalt effect! ...
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Earth Eternal provides beast and location


Mar 19
// Earnest Cavalli
Kotaku somehow beat me to this gallery, for which I would declare jihad on them if I was of the proper ethno-religious background. Luckily for them, the worst my people can do is under-salt their marinara.Earth Eternal, an up...

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