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Forza Motorsport

Jimmy Fallon photo
Jimmy Fallon

Jimmy Fallon and Will Forte race on waves with Xbox One

Spoiler: Jimmy loses
Nov 21
// Darren Nakamura
Last week on Late Night we saw Jimmy Fallon and Ice-T kick some robots around with the PlayStation 4 for its launch. Naturally, the Xbox One couldn't go without being demonstrated for its launch week, so Blain Howard visited...

Review: Forza Motorsport 5

Nov 20 // Dale North
Forza Motorsport 5 (Xbox One)Developer: Turn 10Publisher: MicrosoftRelease Date: November 22, 2013 Forza Motorsport 5 is the biggest and best series game yet, packed with loads of new features and new eye-busting visuals, but it sticks to its guns on a few key features. First, it's still all about the thrill of driving in the greatest cars to ever hit the road, with Turn 10's superb physics and car modeling. Cars still take damage on tracks, though this time around the damage looks more real than ever. And the oops-I-took-that-corner-too-fast rewind feature also returns. All the things you'd expect from a Forza game are here.  As for the new stuff, the biggest change to the Forza formula is the Drivatar AI system, which learns the driving habits of all players, and then turns profiles created from this data into computer opponents. This means that, even when real players aren't there, it feels like you're playing against real people. No longer are your opponents shiny boxes moving along scripted paths. Your data is also being pulled after each race to build a Drivatar of your own, and it will be sent to the cloud so that your friends can race against it in their own games. When you're not playing, your Drivatar is out competing in (and hopefully winning!) races for you. Logging back in, you'll collect your Drivatar's win earnings. So it's definitely worth working toward a good Drivatar. Every car has a Drivatar name assigned to it, which gives you a chance to watch it and learn its personality. After a few races you begin to see who has racing chops and who doesn't. You'll begin to watch the particularly good ones closely so that you might have a strategy for when you are running neck and neck alongside them, just as you might with a real person. You'll grin as you speed past the incompetent ones, knowing that you'll never see their name anywhere near yours on the leaderboards. With Drivitar, it really is like always having a room full of people to race against.  It's kind of comforting to see that your AI opponents aren't computer perfect. An AI-controlled driver might slide out and hit the dirt in that one sharp turn in Laguna Seca, for example, as that's what its real-life counterpart might have done there. And when you're being beaten, where previous series games might have had you cursing the game AI in general, Forza 5 will have you cursing a specific Drivatar's name. This all completely changes how the game feels as a single-player experience, making it the most engaging racer campaign I've ever played. This happens because the Drivatar system learns each driver's tendencies, and then places them into your CPU opponents. So, if you're up against my Drivatar, expect corner cutting and lots of rubbing. What's interesting is that adding friends that are great Forza 5 can increase the level of challenge. For example, I had several other games writers in my friends list, but none of them were particularly great at racing games (sorry, friends), so I breezed past their Drivatars. But, days later, after adding Turn 10's Community Manager, Brian Eckberg, I found that I wasn't taking the gold in all of the races. Even now I'm often taking second place in races. I wonder if I can delete him as a friend (sorry, Brian). Forza 5's driving feels better than ever. While Turn 10's unending work toward driving realism is to be credited, a nod also has to go to the Xbox One controller. The new trigger buttons are game changers with their smooth throw and dampened end strike. Their movement is so nice that it's really easy to feel completely tuned into the game's acceleration and braking. The haptic feedback motors inside these triggers let you feel when your tires or slipping, or when you're overdoing it on the gas pedal. I've never felt more connected to the virtual road. After taking your first car for a spin a few times, you'll be let loose to tackle Forza 5's league offerings, free to jump into any event you'd like. There's no progression to follow this time around, so you're free to hop around and play what interests you. Well, mostly free. You'll have to work your way up to some races, depending on the amount of credits you've earned. Don't expect to be able to jump from D-class competitions to a league where exotic cars are used. You won't have nearly enough credit for any of the recommended cars, like the Aston Martin One-77 (which costs 2,051,300 credits).  The freedom is nice, but with no set career structure, some that enjoyed the preformed path of previous series games' career modes may feel a bit lost. If it wasn't for the narrated league openings, the single-player experience would feel kind of empty. But I enjoyed the freedom. I explored sports cars for a bit, then jumped into a league of hot hatchbacks. For each league entry, I dipped into my earnings to buy one of the 200 or so cars that Forza 5 offers, buying to meet league qualifications. Of course, cars can be upgraded and customized freely. A quick upgrade feature can make easy work of taking your favorite car up a class as it figures out the required parts for you. After doing as much damage as I could in a replica of my own car, a Mazdaspeed 3, I tried rally racers, compacts, and historical cars. I'm saving up for the exotics. I want that One-77.  These leagues take you to racetracks all over the world, from the Bernese Alps to Abu Dhabi. The track number has been cut nearly in half from Forza 4, down to 14 tracks, which has you revisiting them often if you spend any decent amount of time with the game. Depending on how you jump around, you may be looking at a lot of the same scenery for awhile. At least it's beautiful scenery. Different event types keep things lively, though. The passing game (Track Days) returns in Forza 5. In this, you work to overtake as many cars as possible in a number of laps. I also enjoyed racing The Stig clone (there's even a story to explain his cloning) in head-to-head matches, and the silly obstacle course race at the Top Gear track was good fun. But, again, with 14 tracks, things start to look the same after awhile, and you start to miss some of the old standbys. New tracks, like Spa Francorchamps and the hilly Bathurst are wonderful additions. But where's Suzuka and Tsukuba? And Maple Valley would be so pretty on the Xbox One. Sadly, I fear that these will come as DLC later. It's understandable that a lot of work goes into taking these tracks up to 1080p, but it feels like too few tracks went into the game.  I'm perfectly fine with the car count, though. There are more than 200 insanely beautiful cars to race in Forza 5. While that's a fair bit less than its predecessor, these 200 or so cars look unbelievable, and it would take a player ages to acquire them all. That's enough game for me. While I understand that some series fans may feel like the car count is low (Forza 4 had over 500 cars), they have to remember that so much more went into each of Forza 5's cars. It's quality over quantity. If you need more cars, there's certain to be plenty of DLC to buy. A $50 season pass will be offered as well, letting you pay once to have new cars delivered with every update. I'm guessing that some series fans will see the lowered car and track count and point to the $50 season pass as milking. The car models in Forza 5 are so detailed that looking over them gives you a real showroom floor browsing feeling. Both the Forza and Gran Turismo franchises have histories of bringing high quality car models to their games, but nothing we've seen before even comes close to what Forza 5 brings. The drool-worthy models in this game look like they're really made of metal, and painted with fine finishes. They reflect light in such a realistic way that the league opening segments look like luxury car commercials. Interiors, exteriors, trim -- everything down to the lug nuts looks perfect. And when you bang your cars up on the track, even the damage looks real. Forza 5 has so much visual detail that some may never see all of it. But it's not just the cars that look fantastic. Every stage is photorealistic, with details so fine that you'll never catch them all unless you're watching someone else race. The level of detail is scary sometimes, as seen in my favorite course -- Prague.  Every building has a facade so detailed that they almost look like photographs at points. I love coming through the track's white archways and around a corner to have the sunlight hitting my eyes, flooding the cobblestone streets with their afternoon light. All of this is happening at 1080p, running at 60 frames per second.  Forget racers. This is one of the best looking videogames I've ever laid eyes on. Forza 5 also sounds nice with its classy string-based musical score, though I liked the menu selections more than the race music. The race music is fast-paced and sufficiently full of energy, but it's lacking in low frequency content, which has it getting lost in the mix. The fast string work over busy percussion might sound fine on its own, but up against the noise of cars, it's a sonic mess, and is sometimes hard on the ears.  If you're like me, and getting all the good cars is your end goal, you'll be at it awhile as a lot of the top cars are really expensive. But you can build up your earnings in a few ways. For example, affinity bonuses have manufacturers paying bigger payouts the more you use their cars. You'll earn experience and credits in multiplayer, so that's another way to rake in earnings. A "Rivals" mode also lets you take on friends' rankings on the leaderboards at your leisure to earn credits and experience. Forza 5 lets you accelerate your experience level with tokens. To try it out, I bought a 30-minute experience accelerator for 75 credits (the game gives you 100 credits automatically; 100 tokens costs $0.99 in Xbox Store). With the clock ticking, I participated in as many races as I could, doing my best to place highest so that I'd get the most out of my time as I was earning twice what I would have without the accelerator. I suppose this option is nice if you didn't have time to work your way up the ranks, but I'd rather take my time and enjoy the experience.  Taking a spin in Forza 5's online multiplayer prior to launch didn't give us much of a chance to experience its match-making technologies. A Smart Match feature has the game's dedicated servers pitting you against other gamers that play the way you play, so a straight-laced player would not go up against a cheater. If it works as intended, cheaters would be placed in matches with other cheaters. Let's hope Smart Match Works! I tried jumping into a few of the multiplayer hoppers, all of which went off without a hitch in matches up against a dozen or so other players (up to 16 supported), looking as good and playing just as well as single-player does. Categories for hoppers included monthly sets, league sets, class races, and specialty (drifting and others) races. If you have a qualifying car in your garage, join in. If not, you can rent a car to play, but you won't earn experience. Beyond all of the fancy AI tech, physics calculations, or high quality visuals, what I really love about Forza Motorsport 5 is that it's packed full with automotive adoration. For me, the walkarounds of a collection of cars narrated by Top Gear's Jeremy Clarkson are just as enjoyable as any race. Being able to pore over every detail of every car I've ever dreamed of owning in Forza 5's virtual showroom, ForzaVista, is fantastic. It's a car lovers happy place on a disc. This all helps make up for what feels like a thinner game than its predecessor. Even with all of its visual wow and cloud features, Forza 5 feels like there should have been more to it. In some ways it feels like an incremental content update with brand new visuals. Maybe more tracks would have helped. Or maybe some kind of underlying progression in the career mode would have made a difference. But, at the end of the day, the racing is what matters. And with this game, the racing is fantastic, and Turn 10 is really onto something with this Drivatar stuff. It alone gives Forza Motorsport 5 something over every other racer out there, pushing the genre forward. They've remedied the racing genre's biggest problem: scripted AI cars. For this, Turn 10 deserves high praise. 
Forza 5 review photo
Next-gen racing
We've had plenty of racing games come out at console launches, but we've never had a Forza Motorsport game. Don't get me wrong -- I love powersliding around silly tracks while rocking out to Japanese techno anthems. It's just...

Forza 5 trailer photo
Forza 5 trailer

Forza 5 launch trailer does a lot of impressive car stuff

Catchy racing phrase
Nov 11
// Brett Makedonski
In the weeks leading up to the release of new consoles, we're being bombarded by a series of trailers for each and every game that's set to launch alongside its respective hardware. This isn't a surprising practice; it's all...
Forza 5 & the cloud photo
Forza 5 & the cloud

Forza 5 only 1080p, 60fps because of the Xbox One cloud

Man talks about cloud
Nov 08
// Steven Hansen
When asked why Forza 5 was billed as, "only possible on the Xbox One," Turn 10 creative director Dan Greenawalt explained, "we could have done cloud-powered opponents last generation, but we would have had to have done all ...
Forza Motorsport 5 photo
Forza Motorsport 5

The Forza Motorsport 5 Car Pass is kind of gross

'Forza Motorsport and add-on content have become virtually synonymous'
Oct 29
// Brett Makedonski
It's usually not particularly surprising when a major release announces that it's sashaying to market with a season pass in tow. I mean, we live in a time where the game you bought isn't the game you get, as former EA CEO Joh...

I hope you like these new Xbox One racing wheels...

Because your Xbox 360 ones won't work with Xbox One
Oct 16
// Dale North
There's big talk of "equation language" for new kinds of force feedback in this Xbox One racing accessories video, and that sounds neat and all, but I think Microsoft is going to find that racing fans are going to push back o...

First Forza 5 direct feed video shows Alps course

YouTube does footage no justice
Sep 26
// Dale North
YouTube can't keep up here, but you can at least watch this direct footage from Forza Motorsport 5 to get some idea of what the Xbox One can do for racing games. Even after being butchered by compression and frame rate chang...
Xbox One photo
Xbox One

Forza 5, Ryse, and Dead Rising 3 have Day One Editions

First-run copies come with bonus content
Aug 27
// Jordan Devore
Early copies of three Xbox One titles -- Forza Motorsport 5, Ryse: Son of Rome, and Dead Rising 3 -- will include exclusive content. These so-called Day One Editions will be available while supplies last or, if you're going f...
Forza photo

Forza 5 limited edition and day-one editions detailed

Buy the game at launch for three more cars at no extra cost
Aug 15
// Jordan Devore
Are you still into buying special editions? I really, truly was, for a while there. Haven't bought one in years -- and it feels great! With Forza Motorsport 5, there are two options: a limited edition ($79.99), and a day-one ...
Xbox One games photo
Xbox One games

Microsoft Studios' head on Xbox One & the future of TV

Phil Spencer spends some time filling us in on the Xbox One's exclusives
Aug 12
// Steven Hansen
Microsoft Studios' head Phil Spencer talked with Official Xbox Magazine about the Xbox One's upcoming library. On the subject of Forza, Spencer noted the first two titles had issues hitting release deadlines, but said having ...
Forza 5 photo
Forza 5

Forza 5 developer: 'Xbox One cloud offers 600% more AI'

Turn 10 talks about the challenges of next-gen development
Aug 01
// Chris Carter
Forza 5 is coming later this year on the Xbox One, and if it's even half as good as promised, it'll probably be a treat for racing fans. Developer Turn 10 recently spoke to OXM about the development process, and mostly chose ...
Forza photo

Forza Motorsport 5 has an answer for griefing

I still can't believe 'Drivatar' is a word
Jul 26
// Jordan Devore
Through its Drivatar tech, Forza Motorsport 5 will create an AI version of you that learns more about your playstyle and driving techniques as you continue to play the game. Other players can compete against this approximatio...
Forza photo

Forza Horizon dev reportedly working on next-gen Forza

You don't say!
Jul 22
// Jordan Devore
Various job listings for Playground Games have hinted at the studio's next project coming off of Forza Horizon. It's referred to as a "visually stunning," "genre-leading" racing title, reports VideoGamer. It wa...
Forza 5 launch news photo
Forza 5 launch news

You'll need to download the rest of Forza 5 at launch

Forza 5 'like a refrigerator,' requires free day one DLC to play
Jul 16
// Steven Hansen
Forza Motorsport 5 will require an online connection at least once to play, as you'll have to download the rest of the game to compliment what is on the disc. Speaking to IGN, Turn 10 Studios head Dan Greenawalt explained how...
Xbox Live sale photo
Xbox Live sale

Forza Horizon is $15 today on Xbox Live

'Ultimate Game Sale'
Jul 04
// Jordan Devore
Day three of Xbox Live's "Ultimate Game Sale" has a few surprises. Or maybe that's just me still learning to accept that console deals are finally coming around. Today only, you can grab the following discounted games: The W...

Forza Motorsport 5 is set to lead the next-gen pack

Jun 17 // Dale North
Other cars were available for the one test course Turn 10 had set up, including a Ferrari F12berlinetta, but seeing as how Microsoft sprung for having one of two existing McLaren P1 cars in their E3 booth this year, I felt I had to at least give that one a virtual test run. While the in-game model couldn't hold a candle to the real thing that sat some 15 feet away from where I played, we still have to give it to Turn 10 for reaching a new level of photorealism in racing games. The pre-race car porn shots had the P1 shimmering in the sunlight. Detailed close-up shots of lights, wheels, and trim had me shaking my head in disbelief. Forza 5 was easily one of the best examples of Xbox One graphical muscle flexing at E3 this year. The photorealism carries over to the courses. It was hard to keep my eyes on the road with all of the eye-catching background elements found in the sun-drenched Prague course. Insanely detailed roads, sidelines, buildings, sky, and other props looked a world away from the previous Forza title. The jump in quality is crazy -- it's something you'll have to see for yourself to understand. Mind you, this is all running at 60 frames per second at 1080p.  I asked for some kind of measure of how much more is going on in the background over Forza Motorsport 4. Turn 10 executive producer Trevor Laupmanis told us that capture work for the course took a year, 2 billion scanned points, and terrabytes of captured data. How's that for detail? He told us that there is so much visual data for this stage that they can zoom in on any little point and have a high level of detail.  It's not all looks, of course. Being a series fan, I found that I was able to get comfortable very quickly in my test run. Even with as fast as the P1 was, I settled into a groove in no time, which told me that Forza 5 is similar to its predecessor under the hood. But there was something I couldn't put my finger on that felt different. Better, perhaps. When I asked about what I might be feeling, Laupmanis acknowledged that there's definitely something else going on in the drive engine, but said that they weren't ready to talk details yet. He did hint that the Xbox One was able to pump much more data through at once, and this somehow relates to the difference I felt.  Now, one change I could put my finger on (literally) was the haptic feedback felt in the Xbox One controller's triggers. It may not sound like much that the very tips of of the triggers vibrate separately from the controller's standard vibration, but I think this could be a potential game changer. Feeling how sudden braking or acceleration sort of came through the controller was surprising at first, but I found that I had quickly dialed into the feeling, and came to rely on it in turns. Having the brakes shake under your finger just as they would under your foot in a real car is something so useful that I now can't imagine playing a racer without that feature.  I asked Laupmanis about it and he told me that the feature is a really recent addition to the game, from about two weeks before. That is quite impressive for how realistic it felt! He explained that they're still tuning it, and that they're exploring more options for feedback.  During this limited hands-on we weren't able to explore the features of the dorkily named Driveatar AI system in the E3 demo. We'll look forward to seeing more of this later this year. Beyond this, over previous games, all we know so far is that Forza 5 is going to have impossibly realistic visuals, impressive haptic feedback, and even better than before handling. Really, the driving alone was good enough to have me revved up for the next Forza game. The rest is gravy, and I'm sure much more gravy is in the works.
Forza 5 hands-on photo
Orange car alert!
We'll start by saying that what we were able to see of Forza Motorsport 5 was not nearly enough. Though Turn 10's next game is slated to be a launch title for the Xbox One this fall, they were only offering a sneak peek at E3 2013. Still, what we saw was enough to know that we're in for something bigger and better with Forza 5. 

Forza Motorsport 5 photo
Forza Motorsport 5

Forza 5's E3 trailer destroys some beautiful cars

Oooh, Shiny!
Jun 10
// Brett Makedonski
Microsoft cut no corners when it brought a McLaren up on stage at its press conference today, as the gorgeous machine glistened under the event's lights. Almost as beautiful are the high-performance cars featured in Turn 10'...
Forza 5 photo
Forza 5

Forza 5's Drivatar will learn from you

Including your mistakes
Jun 10
// Fraser Brown
Turn 10 Studios was on hand to tout its new Drivatar feature in Forza Motorsport 5 at E3, allowing us all to revel in yet another ridiculous made up word. Taking advantage of cloud processing, the Drivatar removes the need fo...
Forza photo

Forza Motorsport 5 runs at 1080p, 60 frames per second

Launch game? No problem, says Turn 10
Jun 05
// Jordan Devore
In this video interview from GameSpot, Turn 10 Studios reminisces about the Forza Motorsport franchise leading up to Forza 5. A new console can and often will mean software that could have used more development time, but t...
Xbox One photo
Xbox One

Forza Motorsport 5 announced for Xbox One launch

Check that one off the list
May 21
// Jordan Devore
During Microsoft's Xbox One reveal event, Microsoft Studios head Phil Spencer announced Forza Motorsport 5. Developed by Turn 10 Studios, this latest installment in the long-running franchise will be available as a launch ti...
Forza photo

Microsoft trademarks game feature 'Forzavista'

Where will it end up?
May 20
// Jordan Devore
A Microsoft trademark for "Forzavista" was recently spotted by Siliconera. According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office listing, this is for "A feature of interactive video game software which allows players to ...
Next Xbox racer? photo
Next Xbox racer?

McLaren hints at next Xbox announcement

It wouldn't be an Xbox launch without PGR
May 20
// Jordan Devore
Ahead of Microsoft's next Xbox event tomorrow, McLaren Automotive has taken to Facebook to tease a gaming-related announcement of some sort -- hey, everyone's doing it! "Tomorrow, 6pm BST/10am PDT, Xbox is revealing something...
Forza Horizon free DLC photo
Forza Horizon free DLC

The Forza Horizon 1000 Club DLC is free today

New challenges for every car added
Apr 16
// Chris Carter
The free "1000 Club" DLC is live today for Forza Horizon. Essentially, it's a challenge mode that tasks you with besting literally 1000 tasks, with every existing car in the game. There's speed tests as well as other technic...
Forza Horizon photo
Forza Horizon

Forza Horizon's March Car Pack adds six new cars

March Meguiar's Car Pack launching March 5
Feb 27
// Harry Monogenis
The amount of DLC for Forza Horizon is really beginning to mount up. I mean, Turn 10 Studios hasn't quite reached Forza 4's level yet, but it's certainly getting there; and thanks to the recently announced car pack, we'...

Meanwhile, Forza Horizon debuts 2013 Honda Civic

You know I love you, Forza
Jan 14
// Dale North
While Gran Turismo 5 is showing off with their day-after announcement DLC for the awesome looking 2014 Corvette Stingray (see above story), Forza Horizon announces that they'll have a... Civic? Not hatin'. I'm a huge Honda fa...
Forza photo

Forza Horizon gets Recaro car pack on New Year's Day

That van looks suspicious
Dec 26
// Dale North
Turn 10 and Microsoft have worked it out so that you can welcome the new year with six new cars for Forza Horizon with their Recaro car pack. In this pack, which launches on Jan. 1, 2013, you'll get a 2012 Cadillac Escal...

Forza Horizon Rally Expansion Pack hits tomorrow

New trailer ahead of launch
Dec 17
// Jordan Devore
The open world of Forza Horizon will journey off the beaten path tomorrow, December 18 with the release of the Rally Expansion Pack (1600 Microsoft Points). Free for season pass owners, this downloadable content adds five ve...

Forza Horizon devs talk up the coming content

Moar cars!
Nov 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
The creative and community teams working on Forza Horizon are featured in this latest development diary, where they discuss what fans of the game have to look forward to with coming downloadable content. They also pimp the game's integration with Microsoft Smartglass and then call out gamers to compete with them in races.

Forza Horizon SmartGlass Experience is available now

Interactive map of Horizon's game world
Oct 30
// Dale North
Are you lucky enough to own both Forza Horizon and Windows 8? What are you? Rich? Well, Mr./Mrs. Baller, you're now able to download the free Forza Horizon SmartGlass Experience for Windows 8 PCs. This works as an interactive...

Forza Horizon: From simulation to driving experience

Oct 28 // Conrad Zimmerman
Simulation was a means to this end, but it's certainly not the only path. Horizon is built on the same physics as Forza, but the motivation is different. In traditional Forza, the goal is to shave seconds off your time, while Horizon's focus is about the experience of driving the car as an exercise in enjoyment, bringing together music and driving, to create a road trip atmosphere. "Motorsport has a set candor," said Greenawalt in a recent conversation with Destructoid. "We have some very big ticket features which are expected for the genre. We prided ourselves on doing a lot of innovation in [Forza 4] because we established some of those core features. Horizon had no expectations. "We needed to develop a vision and features which fulfill that vision," he continued. "We went to the [Playground Games] guys hoping that would bring new things to the franchise. The concept they brought was 'summer music festival,' which lead to the open road, and building relationships with cars." Centering the game around the fictional Horizon Summer Festival provided ample opportunities to get creative. Drawing inspiration from open-world titles such as Red Dead Redemption and Assassin's Creed, the environment (based primarily on the US state of Colorado) is designed to evoke a sense that there's a new adventure around every corner and give freedom to the player to explore that.  It's not just the roads which offer opportunities for fun, but the spaces in between also, particularly when combined with the variety of modes found in the Playground Games. "Parts of the world have guard rails, but there are lots of open areas and when those are the arenas for playing these modes, it's a totally different feel to [Forza 4]," Greenawalt remarked. "We do that all the time here in the studio where we're playing 'Cat-and-Mouse.' I think players are going to respond really well to that." Social engagement was clearly a focus, as well, and Greenawalt anticipates that Horizon's Facebook integration and photo sharing features will be a big hit within the game's community in the coming months as players begin flooding their networks with pics of their sweet digital rides.  Turn 10 is hoping that the concept of the Horizon Summer Festival instills in players the idea they are on an journey centered around the joy of driving. It's all about bringing together car lovers of all stripes, using the road trip to create a personal connection. "When going on a road trip with your friends," Greenwalt pointed out, "that car becomes one of your friends."
Dan Greenawalt of Turn 10 discusses Forza's change of gears
The Forza Motorsport series is known for its dedication to realistic physics and simulation-style race driving. Forza Horizon, released this week to Xbox 360, represents a considerable departure from the formula established b...

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