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Forza Motorsport

Xbox Live sale photo
Xbox Live sale

Forza Horizon is $15 today on Xbox Live


'Ultimate Game Sale'
Jul 04
// Jordan Devore
Day three of Xbox Live's "Ultimate Game Sale" has a few surprises. Or maybe that's just me still learning to accept that console deals are finally coming around. Today only, you can grab the following discounted games: The W...

Forza Motorsport 5 is set to lead the next-gen pack

Jun 17 // Dale North
Other cars were available for the one test course Turn 10 had set up, including a Ferrari F12berlinetta, but seeing as how Microsoft sprung for having one of two existing McLaren P1 cars in their E3 booth this year, I felt I had to at least give that one a virtual test run. While the in-game model couldn't hold a candle to the real thing that sat some 15 feet away from where I played, we still have to give it to Turn 10 for reaching a new level of photorealism in racing games. The pre-race car porn shots had the P1 shimmering in the sunlight. Detailed close-up shots of lights, wheels, and trim had me shaking my head in disbelief. Forza 5 was easily one of the best examples of Xbox One graphical muscle flexing at E3 this year. The photorealism carries over to the courses. It was hard to keep my eyes on the road with all of the eye-catching background elements found in the sun-drenched Prague course. Insanely detailed roads, sidelines, buildings, sky, and other props looked a world away from the previous Forza title. The jump in quality is crazy -- it's something you'll have to see for yourself to understand. Mind you, this is all running at 60 frames per second at 1080p.  I asked for some kind of measure of how much more is going on in the background over Forza Motorsport 4. Turn 10 executive producer Trevor Laupmanis told us that capture work for the course took a year, 2 billion scanned points, and terrabytes of captured data. How's that for detail? He told us that there is so much visual data for this stage that they can zoom in on any little point and have a high level of detail.  It's not all looks, of course. Being a series fan, I found that I was able to get comfortable very quickly in my test run. Even with as fast as the P1 was, I settled into a groove in no time, which told me that Forza 5 is similar to its predecessor under the hood. But there was something I couldn't put my finger on that felt different. Better, perhaps. When I asked about what I might be feeling, Laupmanis acknowledged that there's definitely something else going on in the drive engine, but said that they weren't ready to talk details yet. He did hint that the Xbox One was able to pump much more data through at once, and this somehow relates to the difference I felt.  Now, one change I could put my finger on (literally) was the haptic feedback felt in the Xbox One controller's triggers. It may not sound like much that the very tips of of the triggers vibrate separately from the controller's standard vibration, but I think this could be a potential game changer. Feeling how sudden braking or acceleration sort of came through the controller was surprising at first, but I found that I had quickly dialed into the feeling, and came to rely on it in turns. Having the brakes shake under your finger just as they would under your foot in a real car is something so useful that I now can't imagine playing a racer without that feature.  I asked Laupmanis about it and he told me that the feature is a really recent addition to the game, from about two weeks before. That is quite impressive for how realistic it felt! He explained that they're still tuning it, and that they're exploring more options for feedback.  During this limited hands-on we weren't able to explore the features of the dorkily named Driveatar AI system in the E3 demo. We'll look forward to seeing more of this later this year. Beyond this, over previous games, all we know so far is that Forza 5 is going to have impossibly realistic visuals, impressive haptic feedback, and even better than before handling. Really, the driving alone was good enough to have me revved up for the next Forza game. The rest is gravy, and I'm sure much more gravy is in the works.
Forza 5 hands-on photo
Orange car alert!
We'll start by saying that what we were able to see of Forza Motorsport 5 was not nearly enough. Though Turn 10's next game is slated to be a launch title for the Xbox One this fall, they were only offering a sneak peek at E3 2013. Still, what we saw was enough to know that we're in for something bigger and better with Forza 5. 

Forza Motorsport 5 photo
Forza Motorsport 5

Forza 5's E3 trailer destroys some beautiful cars


Oooh, Shiny!
Jun 10
// Brett Makedonski
Microsoft cut no corners when it brought a McLaren up on stage at its press conference today, as the gorgeous machine glistened under the event's lights. Almost as beautiful are the high-performance cars featured in Turn 10'...
Forza 5 photo
Forza 5

Forza 5's Drivatar will learn from you


Including your mistakes
Jun 10
// Fraser Brown
Turn 10 Studios was on hand to tout its new Drivatar feature in Forza Motorsport 5 at E3, allowing us all to revel in yet another ridiculous made up word. Taking advantage of cloud processing, the Drivatar removes the need fo...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza Motorsport 5 runs at 1080p, 60 frames per second


Launch game? No problem, says Turn 10
Jun 05
// Jordan Devore
In this video interview from GameSpot, Turn 10 Studios reminisces about the Forza Motorsport franchise leading up to Forza 5. A new console can and often will mean software that could have used more development time, but t...
Xbox One photo
Xbox One

Forza Motorsport 5 announced for Xbox One launch


Check that one off the list
May 21
// Jordan Devore
During Microsoft's Xbox One reveal event, Microsoft Studios head Phil Spencer announced Forza Motorsport 5. Developed by Turn 10 Studios, this latest installment in the long-running franchise will be available as a launch ti...
Forza photo
Forza

Microsoft trademarks game feature 'Forzavista'


Where will it end up?
May 20
// Jordan Devore
A Microsoft trademark for "Forzavista" was recently spotted by Siliconera. According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office listing, this is for "A feature of interactive video game software which allows players to ...
Next Xbox racer? photo
Next Xbox racer?

McLaren hints at next Xbox announcement


It wouldn't be an Xbox launch without PGR
May 20
// Jordan Devore
Ahead of Microsoft's next Xbox event tomorrow, McLaren Automotive has taken to Facebook to tease a gaming-related announcement of some sort -- hey, everyone's doing it! "Tomorrow, 6pm BST/10am PDT, Xbox is revealing something...
Forza Horizon free DLC photo
Forza Horizon free DLC

The Forza Horizon 1000 Club DLC is free today


New challenges for every car added
Apr 16
// Chris Carter
The free "1000 Club" DLC is live today for Forza Horizon. Essentially, it's a challenge mode that tasks you with besting literally 1000 tasks, with every existing car in the game. There's speed tests as well as other technic...
Forza Horizon photo
Forza Horizon

Forza Horizon's March Car Pack adds six new cars


March Meguiar's Car Pack launching March 5
Feb 27
// Harry Monogenis
The amount of DLC for Forza Horizon is really beginning to mount up. I mean, Turn 10 Studios hasn't quite reached Forza 4's level yet, but it's certainly getting there; and thanks to the recently announced car pack, we'...
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Meanwhile, Forza Horizon debuts 2013 Honda Civic


You know I love you, Forza
Jan 14
// Dale North
While Gran Turismo 5 is showing off with their day-after announcement DLC for the awesome looking 2014 Corvette Stingray (see above story), Forza Horizon announces that they'll have a... Civic? Not hatin'. I'm a huge Honda fa...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza Horizon gets Recaro car pack on New Year's Day


That van looks suspicious
Dec 26
// Dale North
Turn 10 and Microsoft have worked it out so that you can welcome the new year with six new cars for Forza Horizon with their Recaro car pack. In this pack, which launches on Jan. 1, 2013, you'll get a 2012 Cadillac Escal...
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Forza Horizon Rally Expansion Pack hits tomorrow


New trailer ahead of launch
Dec 17
// Jordan Devore
The open world of Forza Horizon will journey off the beaten path tomorrow, December 18 with the release of the Rally Expansion Pack (1600 Microsoft Points). Free for season pass owners, this downloadable content adds five ve...
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Forza Horizon devs talk up the coming content


Moar cars!
Nov 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
The creative and community teams working on Forza Horizon are featured in this latest development diary, where they discuss what fans of the game have to look forward to with coming downloadable content. They also pimp the game's integration with Microsoft Smartglass and then call out gamers to compete with them in races.
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Forza Horizon SmartGlass Experience is available now


Interactive map of Horizon's game world
Oct 30
// Dale North
Are you lucky enough to own both Forza Horizon and Windows 8? What are you? Rich? Well, Mr./Mrs. Baller, you're now able to download the free Forza Horizon SmartGlass Experience for Windows 8 PCs. This works as an interactive...

Forza Horizon: From simulation to driving experience

Oct 28 // Conrad Zimmerman
Simulation was a means to this end, but it's certainly not the only path. Horizon is built on the same physics as Forza, but the motivation is different. In traditional Forza, the goal is to shave seconds off your time, while Horizon's focus is about the experience of driving the car as an exercise in enjoyment, bringing together music and driving, to create a road trip atmosphere. "Motorsport has a set candor," said Greenawalt in a recent conversation with Destructoid. "We have some very big ticket features which are expected for the genre. We prided ourselves on doing a lot of innovation in [Forza 4] because we established some of those core features. Horizon had no expectations. "We needed to develop a vision and features which fulfill that vision," he continued. "We went to the [Playground Games] guys hoping that would bring new things to the franchise. The concept they brought was 'summer music festival,' which lead to the open road, and building relationships with cars." Centering the game around the fictional Horizon Summer Festival provided ample opportunities to get creative. Drawing inspiration from open-world titles such as Red Dead Redemption and Assassin's Creed, the environment (based primarily on the US state of Colorado) is designed to evoke a sense that there's a new adventure around every corner and give freedom to the player to explore that.  It's not just the roads which offer opportunities for fun, but the spaces in between also, particularly when combined with the variety of modes found in the Playground Games. "Parts of the world have guard rails, but there are lots of open areas and when those are the arenas for playing these modes, it's a totally different feel to [Forza 4]," Greenawalt remarked. "We do that all the time here in the studio where we're playing 'Cat-and-Mouse.' I think players are going to respond really well to that." Social engagement was clearly a focus, as well, and Greenawalt anticipates that Horizon's Facebook integration and photo sharing features will be a big hit within the game's community in the coming months as players begin flooding their networks with pics of their sweet digital rides.  Turn 10 is hoping that the concept of the Horizon Summer Festival instills in players the idea they are on an journey centered around the joy of driving. It's all about bringing together car lovers of all stripes, using the road trip to create a personal connection. "When going on a road trip with your friends," Greenwalt pointed out, "that car becomes one of your friends."
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Dan Greenawalt of Turn 10 discusses Forza's change of gears
The Forza Motorsport series is known for its dedication to realistic physics and simulation-style race driving. Forza Horizon, released this week to Xbox 360, represents a considerable departure from the formula established b...

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Unboxing: Forza Horizon Limited Collector's Edition


It's all digital
Oct 24
// Dale North
We've popped open a copy of the Forza Horizon Limited Collector's Edition so that you can peek inside for yourself. While the casing is nice (a steelbook and slip case), the innards of this package aren't much to look at as ...
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Forza Horizon: behind-the-scenes look at the festival


Forza Horizon is available today
Oct 23
// Dale North
The latest behind-the-scenes look at Forza Horizon digs into the festival atmosphere that the game is centered around. It's fireworks, lasers, dubstep, and bros, which may be right up your alley, or not at all. It didn't fit...
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Xbox SmartGlass launch on Oct 26, supports Forza Horizon


Handful of games supported at launch
Oct 23
// Dale North
SmatGlass lets your phone or tablet become the most connected remote control ever. Or, in games, turns it into a second screen. All this functionality goes live on October 26, alongside the launch of Windows 8, Windows RT and...
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Forza Horizon Rally Expansion slated for December


With co-driver calls and everything
Oct 17
// Jordan Devore
Upon seeing the price of Forza Horizon's season pass, you had to know that a bunch of post-release content was planned. One of the more appealing packs -- as someone who has not yet played the game, but likes going off-road -...

Review: Forza Horizon

Oct 12 // Dale North
Forza Horizon (Xbox 360)Developer: Playground GamesPublisher: Microsoft Studios / Turn 10Release: October 23, 2012MSRP: $59.99 Set under the clear, open skies of Colorado, Forza Horizon has you playing as an up-and-comer attending the Horizon racing festival. The game is structured to work as an open-world racing sandbox, but it opens with a sort of storyline, complete with characters, dialogue, introductions, and other things you'd never expect to see in a Forza game.  This festival is a celebration of car culture and and all that comes with it, including music, modification, and street racing. Imagine an oasis of thumping beats, colored tents and lights, partying attendees, and at night, fireworks. It's very festive, and serves to bring some excitement to the world of Forza Motorsport, which has always felt a bit sterile to me. The heart of the festival serves as the game's main hub, where you'll go to get race assignments, peruse your garage, buy and upgrade cars, and enter car clubs. From there you'll drive around in this open world to race locations, where you'll meet up with others for official events. Winning brings about money, experience, new cars, and respect. You'll use these to rank higher, earning wristbands that get you into even bigger races, eventually working up to taking on the best of the best at Horizon. The very first race puts you up against others on the open road to get the last open-entry tickets to the festival. Once you're officially entered, you're mostly on your own, free to race and explore as you wish. A world map lets you select desired race locations to call forth a waypoint, but you'll have to get in your car and drive the full distance, traffic and all. A GPS and guidelines will guide you to the location, and you'll need these, as the world is quite large. This is a big change from those that expect to select a race from a menu and magically be teleported to its location. As an impatient gamer that just wants to get into the next race, I found this frustrating at first. But that was before I learned to love the open road. Half the charm of Forza Horizon is the open road, though it took me getting over thinking of the point-to-point travel time as a burden to appreciate this. The game is structured so that everything you do in this car lover's sandbox is eventually rewarded. You start out at the very bottom of the festival's ranking, in 250th place. But by doing things like speeding, drifting, blowing through speed traps, or catching air, you'll earn experience that gradually takes you up through the ranks. And really, just about anything is fair game. Things like taking on other racers in time attacks are a given, but the smaller stuff is what really makes it fun. See a road sign you'd like to plow through? Destroy it and earn points. I love seeing how close I can come to a car without clipping it while passing. This also earns you points. It didn't take long before I was so wrapped up in the playground-ness of it all that I was forgetting about the official race events. The world that Playground Games created for Forza Horizon is so vast and varied that I know I'm spoiled now, and going back to a city-only or racetrack-only racer is going to be a downer. Everything from open freeways to tight city streets can be found among the countless miles of drivable road. Places like ranches and old mining towns are set under scenic mountains and shimmering waterfalls. If real Colorado looks anything like this, I'll have to visit someday. Forza Horizon is packed with all kinds of race events to keep you entertained. The Festival Events are free to pick from, with the only requirements being that you have the proper wristband and vehicle type. You can attack them in any order and even skip the ones you don't like. These are the races that will earn you the most experience points, which go directly toward earning you the next highest wristband, which then opens up more races.  After a few official races are under your belt, some extra types open up to mix things up. Street Races pop up all over the map during play. They're a bit rougher, with looser rules, but they give you the opportunity to earn cars and cred. Expect to be rammed into walls or cut off.  Outposts are also scattered all over the map, and it's here that you can change out cars or upgrade them. These points can serve as teleport locations if you spend 10,000 credits to use them, but choosing to participate in PR Stunts can earn you discounts on that price. These stunts have you doing things like speeding, pulling off skills, or even snapping photos. The Stunts are fun, and I get that Playground Games wants players to enjoy the open world that they've created, but I don't think that players should have to pay out of their hard-earned credits to teleport. Is the cost supposed to be a lesson in patience or something? Just about everything you do in Forza Horizon is compared to the existing standings of others in Rivals Mode. After most races, you'll be prompted with the option to go up against the time of someone else (friends, rivals) in the Forza universe, and your results will then be added to the leaderboards. There's always someone faster, so you'll never be without the option to jump into a rivals race. I enjoyed always seeing my standing against others in the world as I raced around Colorado. This served as a constant, gentle push to be a better racer. I started out as a pretty good racer, though. This was mostly due to the fact that Forza Horizon's racing feels a lot like the Forza Motorsport games. The cars feel like Forza cars. To me this is pretty much the same approachable, great-feeling engine that powers the Motorsport games. You couldn't really call Horizon an arcade racer as you won't get far by keeping that gas pedal mushed the whole time. You have to use the brakes, and you have to at least try to negotiate corners with some sense. There might be some forgiveness padded in some places like off-road sections and corners, and there's always the many assists to switch on or off, but I approach this game's control exactly like I would playing Forza Motorsport 4, and I wouldn't have it any other way. All of that said, I would hate for a potential player to write off Horizon's control as that of a racing sim's. The open-world setting and the nature of the road types makes this game much more forgiving than any sim. Whizzing down wide highways and speeding for long stretches feels quite a bit different than the calculated turns required on the race courses. Besides, catching air, sideswiping and plowing into stop signs is quite the opposite of simulation racing. The key takeaway here is that Horizon's racing never stops being approachable or fun. And there's rarely a moment where it doesn't look amazing. Forza games have always looked great as far as car models were concerned, with the previous entry, Forza 4, sporting impossibly detailed interiors and exteriors. But Horizon ups the ante even further with its settings and lighting engine. I was blown away the first time I witnessed the game's transition from day to night, watching as the sun-drenched ground gave way to moonlight. Headlights took over for a bit as I overtook some country hills, but the wow moment came when I rounded the last corner toward the festival, where I saw fireworks lighting up the sky. No racing game has ever looked this nice. For as much as there is to do in single-player mode, I think most players will be drawn to multiplayer side of the game, as it makes full use of Horizon's open world. There are several different race types to set up for eight-player online matches, most of which put you at one of the courses from the single player mode, with your garage cars available. I liked the free-roaming match mode more than any other standard racing mode. Here, all players have the entire game map available to drive around in, doing whatever they wish. Explore together, set up point-to-point races, play bumper cars -- whatever you'd like. In a couple of test sessions, I worked with seven others to try to acquire 1,000,000 credits in a challenge that required that all eight of us blast through a speed trap together with a top speed above 190 mph. We could never pull it off, but we had fun trying.  The Playground multiplayer games are also a blast. This set throws traditional racing rules out the window for pure craziness. Imagine darting around a golf course in a Lamborghini as the 'King,' racing to not be rammed by any of the seven other players out to get you. When they finally do hit you, they become king, and the focus turns on them as the new target. Another mode, Infected, has one car tagged as a carrier, and every car they hit also becomes infected. The goal is to drive as fast as you can to stay a survivor for as long as you can. Finally, Cat & Mouse has two teams of four working to complete a race. Each team has one slow car (the mouse) and three fast ones (cats) that are out to hinder the other team's mouse in any way possible.  It's almost always racing bliss with Forza Horizon, but were a few bumps in the road. First, the loading times, while not the worst we've seen, still often felt annoyingly long. I'm sure if I tallied how long I spent looking at loading screens while playing this game, I'd have a depressing total time logged. And while the presentation and voice acting of the game's story bits are top notch, there's probably too many of these instances for a racing game. Between the cutscenes and the pre-race taunts, Horizon comes off as a very talky game, and it wasn't too long before I became tired of the constant taunts and interjections. These are both things that got in the way of what this game is supposed to be about -- racing. Forza Horizon mixes authentic racing with an open world to create a unique game that will appeal to both hardcore car freaks and casual racers. Playground Games took a humungous, beautiful world, packed it full of entertaining challenges and events, added in tons of personality and style, and built it all around the proven Forza tech,  giving racing game fans an exceptional automotive experience that they didn't even know they wanted. For as much as I love Forza Motorsport, it's going to be hard to go back after this.
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A new kind of Forza
I've been trying to peg Forza Horizon since its announcement earlier this year, but Turn 10 and Playground Games never gave it to us straight. Is it more of a racing sim? Or a casual, arcade-style thing? Somewhere in-between?...

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Forza Horizon demo available now


Oct 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
If you're looking forward to checking out the latest iteration in Microsoft's racing franchise, Forza, a demo has been released on Xbox Live for Forza Horizon. The demo is set in the Colorado region of the game, and will allo...
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Game packaging saves pennies, prints info on cover slips


Fiscal responsibility!
Oct 08
// Jim Sterling
It's no secret that game publishers hate using all that expensive paper and ink to make videogame manuals. Manuals lost their color, reduced the page count, and eventually started disappearing altogether, leaving only the hea...
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Forza Horizon launch trailer readies us for upcoming demo


Get a bonus car for playing
Oct 01
// Jordan Devore
"Relaxed" and "laid back" are words we've used to describe Playground Games and Turn 10 Studios' Forza Horizon. That's certainly the vibe I got from this launch trailer, which shows some of the nice vistas you'll be able to ...
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Forza Horizon season pass priced at $49.99


Sep 26
// Dale North
Microsoft, Turn 10 Studios, and Playground Games have revealed new pricing details on Forza Horizon's season pass. You'll gain access to the Forza Horizon expansion pack, six car packs (each containing six cars), the launch d...
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Behind the scenes look at Forza Horizon


Sep 07
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Well it seems a lot of you are interested in Forza Horizon based on our last preview. For those looking for more info we have this new behind the scenes trailer from developer Turn 10 Studios showing off some brand new featu...

PAX: Forza Horizon is relaxed, not an arcade racer

Sep 02 // Abel Girmay
Forza Horizon has no fancy partnership with Top Gear. The tone is decidedly more relaxed than past entries in the series, with a summer music festival at the heart of it all. Developers Playground and Turn 10 have really ran with the summer music theme too. Horizon offers three radio stations to choose from, playing rock, indie, and electronic (so expect plenty of the wub wub). It's not a huge variety, but what is here is tuned well for the new feel -- all curated by British DJ Rob da Bank. It's probably this surface change that's fooled folks into thinking that Horizon is an arcade racer. It may let its hair down, but the physics are taken straight from Forza 4, making the moment-to-moment driving feel as true to the series as any fan could hope. The only thing different in the racing is in the events you enter. The biggest switch is Horizon's open world. Based on the roads of Colorado, the locales range from flat plains to farmlands, from rivers and lakes. Being that this is an open world, expect a good amount of distractions. We only got to see a few of the side activities, the first being hidden barnyards in which you'll find busted old cars that you can restore in your garage. Another involved speeding through traffic cameras, with style points being awarded every time you hit a new top speed. If you want to partake in Horizon's more structured offerings, there is a good amount of events to partake in. You have your traditional staples such as circuit races and point-to-point types, and street races with start and finish lines but no directed route to take. But even the most traditional of races are given a bit of a facelift. Rather than the standard goal of shaving tenths of a second of your best time and placing first, Horizon challenges players to drive stylishly. Placing first in races is still important, but in order to win fans and rise in the ranks as the nobody you are cast as, you need to drift, draft, and otherwise make your driving look as sexy as possible. Unique to Horizon, though, are more insane race types, such as the "Mustang vs. Mustang" race we played. The goal here was to drive though a series of checkpoints while using a classic Ford Mustang, the twist being that your opponent is a World War II-era P-51 Mustang fighter plane. The idea is definitely arcade-like, and the event itself speaks to the unique atmosphere that Horzion is going for, but to reiterate, the moment-to-moment driving is still very much Forza. Sharp turns require lowers speeds, and slamming into someone while going 100+ mph is as bad an idea as ever. Horizon will also be bringing a lot of the online modes from series with it, and all the car skin designs you lovingly slaved over can be imported into this game. What's most important to take away from all this is that we are not loosing the Forza we know and love. It's just wearing a different coat of paint.
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There is nary a racing series that exudes car culture and unbridled love for all things auto as much as Forza. This love for real world and digital racing is what sets Forza ahead of the pack, so I was curious when Forza Hori...

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Forza Motorsport 4: August pack brings 10 more cars


Aug 07
// Dale North
The August Playseat Car Pack for Forza Motorsport 4 comes out today, August 7, on Xbox Live, priced at 560 Microsoft Points. You'll get 10 cars for your garage for that outlay, ranging from pretty standard (but still nice!) s...
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July Car Pack for Forza Motorsport 4 adds ten new cars


Jul 04
// Brett Zeidler
It never occurred to me just how much DLC Forza Motorsport 4 has. Hell, the entire series has a mountain of DLC. Not that it's a bad thing, I guess I just never thought about it. That Season Pass would have really come in ha...






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