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Far Cry

Rocky Horror Far Cry Show photo
Rocky Horror Far Cry Show

Far Cry Primal does the Time Warp


Oh, fantasy free me
Feb 04
// Brett Makedonski
Far Cry Primal has a new trailer and it's really well-produced. It's a reverse look at some of the major eras of combat in human history, all culminating in a showdown with a CGI sabretooth tiger. But, it also reminded me of "Time Warp," and now I've been listening to that all morning long. It's just a jump to the left, then a step to the right...

Check out the first hour of Far Cry Primal

Jan 26 // Laura Kate Dale
[embed]336360:61967:0[/embed] As you can see in the above video, there are a few places we had to skip around to keep publishers and PR happy. You don't miss seeing anything important, mainly some running around the map and the lighting of a campfire on the way to walk into a cave.  So, sit back and get an hour's worth of Primal in your face.
Far Cry Primal photo
Your necklace of ears scares me
Hey folks, are you excitedly awaiting the release of Far Cry Primal? Are you eager to see for yourself how being set back twelve thousand years affects the gameplay loop of Far Cry? Well, we have a very special treat for you today. Yep, we've got footage of the first hour of Far Cry Primal for you to feast upon.

Cracking photo
Cracking

Far Cry Primal and Rise of the Tomb Raider will use the Denuvo anti-tampering system


Hopefully it won't hurt the performance
Jan 25
// Joe Parlock
The PC releases of both Far Cry Primal and Rise of the Tomb Raider will make use of the controversial Denuvo anti-tampering software. Denuvo isn’t technically DRM because it doesn’t manage content licenses. Howeve...
Far Cry Primal trailer photo
Far Cry Primal trailer

Drink eyeballs, get power: Far Cry Primal introduces its main character


Be on the look out for lil dicks
Jan 20
// Steven Hansen
Ubisoft has cut a new trailer for next month's Far Cry Primal, which you can read about in-depth over at Brett's preview from last month. The short of it: Far Cry's wanton violence contextualized in the brutal Stone Age inst...

Cave photo
Cave

Ubisoft's sending a 'lucky' contest winner to spend the night in a cave


Cave Story
Jan 18
// Brett Makedonski
Good things don't happen in caves. A best-case scenario has some bats buzzing through your hair. A worst-case scenario? Ummm, bears or dragons or satanic cults. OR, satanic bears riding dragons. Yeah, fuck that. Ubisoft wants...
GOTY 2015 photo
GOTY 2015

Mike Martin's picks for games that he picked in 2015


My picks bring all the boys to the yard
Jan 11
// Mike Martin
Hello everybody! Your (not so) favorite, foul-mouthed, perverted, shit-posting Community Manager here. 2015 was a helluva year for games. All bullshit aside, we are starting to see some truly amazing games come out. When I wa...
Far Cry Primal photo
Far Cry Primal

Far Cry Primal's PC specs are a wild beast tamed


Not so brutal
Jan 07
// Brett Makedonski
Like its animals that can be turned into tender companions, Far Cry Primal's PC requirements had the opportunity to cause havoc. That has certainly been the case with some recent high-profile games, such as Star Wars Battlefr...
Far Cry Primal co-op photo
Far Cry Primal co-op

Far Cry Primal won't have any co-op


Prehistoric Hurk or we riot
Jan 07
// Nic Rowen
You won't be playing with anyone other than tigers, wolves, and whatever beasts are in Far Cry Primal. Community manager Jason Paradise confirmed on the game's Steam forum that Far Cry Primal is going to be a single...
Far Cry Primal photo
Far Cry Primal

They call him Stompy McBigstompers, the best stomper in the land


Guess how he got that name
Dec 04
// Brett Makedonski
My trip to see Far Cry Primal wasn't completely filled with previews and interviews. I sto[m]pped working for a few minutes to see this giant dude crush stuff. Holiday decorations, gingerbread houses, and guitars were no match for this grade-A stomper. In between stomps, I reflected on my career arc that led to this particular moment in time. This job's weird, man; video games are weird.

Why Far Cry Primal is the purest form of Far Cry

Dec 03 // Brett Makedonski
It was a savage and brutal era, and those are the two adjectives that Decant repeatedly returned to when trying to sum up the feeling that any Far Cry game needs to nail. It's no coincidence that a game set in the Stone Age happened sooner than later. "The people behind the Far Cry brand have been dreaming of doing something like Primal for a really long time," Decant confessed. "I think it's just that we have people who are very good who are doing some crazy prototypes about fire population and about controlling animals and stuff like that. One day we just said 'we should do that.' The Far Cry brand is probably the most open brand at Ubisoft. You can really go in different directions with it as long as you remain savage and brutal in an open world." That flexibility is on full display in Primal. For all the elements of Far Cry 4 that are carried over (it's built on the same framework), it feels surprisingly not like a Far Cry game at times. It's an odd sensation knowing the title's roots, identifying them, but not being impacted in the same way. It's likely because what's new in Primal is enough to distract from anything that feels old. The Stone Age aesthetic of orange-like hues and primitive camps feel like a far cry (boo!) from the tropical islands the franchise is used to. Most notable, there's a new buddy system in the form of a beast-master mechanic. The beast-master system allows the player to tame animals in the wild (there are 17 variations), and call on them in battle. They're handy sidekicks whose worth is immediately validated. They're extremely helpful, as they show no hesitation in leaping into battle and taking on several enemies at once. When they're inevitably hurt, a slab of meat nurses them back to health. Decant didn't downplay his excitement for the animal control feature. In fact, he pegged it as Far Cry Primal's greatest strength. "It's the most exciting, most surprising feature I think we have," he said. Decant gave the spiel about Ubisoft's commitment to authenticity and remaining truthful to the era. However, that came with one caveat; liberties were taken whenever it'd make the game more fun. The beast-master mechanic is a shining example of that. But, despite all the historians consulted and research performed, it's not authenticity that'll make a Far Cry game. No, as Decant pointed out, it's that savage and brutal tone that's the staple. No period can claim ruthlessness quite like the Stone Age, and that's why Primal is the purest form of Far Cry.
Far Cry Primal photo
Light my campfire
Far Cry has always been very good at getting the player into an open world and letting them interact with nature. However, the reasons for arriving there haven't always been as strong. It's how you end up with frat boy turned...

The animals are the real stars of Far Cry Primal

Dec 03 // Brett Makedonski
At a preview event this week, I spent an hour with Far Cry Primal. Free rein to the game wasn't quite permitted, as there were no story missions available; Ubisoft seems to be keeping that under wraps for now. Instead, I was left to wander from campfire to campfire ticking off side objectives and open-world encounters along the way. No matter which direction I traveled, from the glaciers of the north to the swamps of the south, there were ferocious animals all along the way. At first, I'd actively seek them out. Sabretooth nearby? That sounds fun to kill, let's go. I never found out if they were actually fun to kill. My defeat was swift each and every time I encountered one. By the end of the hour-long session, I went out of my way to avoid them. I'd watch them chase around other animals, holding my breath until they were finally out of sight. Safe for the time being. [embed]324054:61365:0[/embed] The reason for being appropriately underpowered had everything to do with my arsenal. Primal is the first Far Cry game that doesn't prominently feature guns. Clubs, spears, and arrows are the weapons on-hand, and the adapting process isn't necessarily easy. No longer can you rely on spraying bullets until you're out of a sticky situation. There's a world of difference between unloading a gun's clip and throwing spears one by one when a mammoth is charging at you. To soften the cold, harsh reality of the Stone Age, Ubisoft has taken some liberties with man's connection to creature. Far Cry Primal features a beast-master system that allows for the taming of animals, which can then be summoned to help in battle at any time. There are 17 variations, but I only saw three: a small jaguar, a white wolf, and a bear. Not only do they serve as a great distraction in battle, but they actually take care of some enemies on their own. As seems to be the theme with Primal, your beasts are at their best when facing off against other humans. There are plenty of enemy people wandering the game's sizable map, but they never feel as formidable as the wild animals. Maybe it's because, like you, they also have to get into position to throw a spear. Whatever the reason, these interactions seem as if they pose a considerably simpler challenge than an unfortunate surprise encounter with a good number of the game's many animals. For all the animal-controlling Far Cry Primal asks the player to do, it's a more passive tactic that proves to be the most delightful. With the press of a button, an owl can be summoned to fly overhead and scout out the surrounding area. Basically, it's Primal's response to not having a camera to tag enemies. The owl comes in particularly handy when checking out human outposts. Once you feel satisfied that you've seen enough, you can divebomb an unsuspecting human and murder him. It's a great way to get a jumpstart on a camp before sending your next animal in. That owl is probably the least threatening thing in Far Cry Primal, but even it has no problem asserting its dominance over mankind. That's just kind of how it goes as Far Cry sees the tables turned for the first time; humans weren't yet the dominant force they'll eventually be. Emphasizing animals seems like a good direction for the franchise. It required turning the clock back a few million years, but consistently befriending and battling beasts feels right in line with the Far Cry spirit -- a savage and brutal affair that's more about surviving than anything else.
Far Cry Primal photo
Friends and foes
The Stone Age is a remarkable moment in history ("moment" meaning 3.4 million years, in this instance) because it was a period when mankind wasn't at the top of the food chain. Beasts ruled the roost and humanity had to tread...

Just curious photo
Cry-sis
I was thinking about crying recently (that is, about the physical act of crying, not planning on having a cry) and about how I'm a big baby whom cries a bunch with respect to creative media, or when an animal dies, or even in...

Steam Stealth Sale photo
Steam Stealth Sale

Savvy Steam Stealth Sale sneaks sonto the sinternet


Surprising!
Oct 13
// Mike Cosimano
Today, Steam appropriately dropped a stealth-themed sale on the Internet, comprised of more than 60 games, including games in the Assassin's Creed, Far Cry, and Splinter Cell series. You know, it's only when I write that...
Far Cry Primal photo
Far Cry Primal

Everything we know about Far Cry Primal


Humanity's the underdog
Oct 06
// Brett Makedonski
Well, that didn't take Ubisoft long, eh? Yesterday's tease via stream lasted only a day before the French publisher couldn't stand the excitement anymore and announced Far Cry Primal. Here's what we've learned since then. Far...
Audition photo
Audition

Troy Baker got Far Cry 4 gig by threatening to peel a Ubisoft assistant's face off


Like in that movie, Face/Off
Jul 02
// Steven Hansen
Troy Baker (The Last of Us, Metal Gear Solid V, Batman: Arkham Knight) may be the most in-demand video game voice actor, but even he has to audition, as he recounts in this panel footage. He does get to be more free form with...
BIOS photo
BIOS

Who put racing in my FPS?


These guys did!
Jun 05
// Vikki Blake
Former Far Cry 2 developers Julien Cuny & Louis-Pierre Pharand have formed a new studio to release their new take on first-person shooters... by adding racing into the mix. The Montreal-based developers describe the...

Review: Shooter

Jun 02 // Nic Rowen
Shooter (Book)Released: June 2, 2015MSRP: $5.00 Shooter is a collection of essays from recognizable names in game criticism speaking on a wide range of topics related to games that involve some kind of gunplay. Some chapters take a deep dive into the mechanical and technical details that make shooters what they are. Steven Wright's “The Joys of Projectiles: What We've Forgotten About Doom” for example, laments the rise of “realistic” modern shooters and how their largely interchangeable hitscan assault rifles have abandoned many of the mechanics that made early FPS games so pleasurable and skill testing. Others are more personal, such as Gita Jackson's touching reflection on how Counter-Strike could be seen as a microcosm of the (seemingly one-sided from her self-deprecating perspective) sibling rivalry she shared with her brother. Shooter strikes a great balance, it never gets so bogged down in technical minutia that it feels like a lecture in game design, but has enough mechanical grounding that it doesn't just become a series of anecdotes either. The games Shooter examines are varied and numerous. Of course genre forebears and trendsetters like Doom, Half-Life and Call of Duty are discussed as you would expect, but there is plenty of attention paid to less bombastically popular titles as well. Genre-defying shooters like Red Orchestra 2 with its brutally unforgiving depiction of realistic combat, and the insidious darkness of Far Cry 2, which sets aside the typical rationales for heroic violence to make the player complicit in something unsettling, get entire chapters dedicated to them. It's a great technique. By examining the few games that step outside of the bounds of typical FPS conventions and power fantasy dynamics and figuring out why they feel so different, it is easier to pinpoint the standard tropes and expectations of the genre that have become so ubiquitous that they are nearly invisible. Perhaps the greatest praise I can give to Shooter is that it made me reexamine and reflect on my feelings about a few games. When a piece of criticism grabs you by the collar and demands you take a second look at something, you know its doing it's job right. Filipe Salgado's chapter on the intentional ugliness and barely contained chaos of Kane and Lynch 2: Dog Days almost made me want to play through the game again with a fresh set of eyes -- eyes more willing to see past the clunky mechanics and thoroughly unlikable protagonists to scan for deeper meaning. Almost anyway (this is still Dog Days we're talking about). At its best, Shooter feels like a lively conversation with some very smart people who enjoy, but expect more from, their trigger happy games. Its snappy, intelligent, and occasionally funny. At it's worst, the book veers into the pretentious. At times, it feels less like a conversation and more like an awkward dinner party dominated by a lecturing windbag everyone is too polite to interrupt. Thankfully these rough patches are few and far between. The rest of the book is well worth putting up with the occasional eye-rolling turn of phrase. Mostly though, Shooter feels important. The industry needs more “capital C” Criticism to unravel the subtext and ideas behind the games we love. Games mean something. They impart messages, communicate ideas, either by conscious choice on the part of their developers or by the assumptions they make -- the casual omissions and things taken for granted. We have to start examining these ideas in a mature, intelligent, and yes, academic way. Shooter isn't the first example of this kind of criticism in games writing of course; there have certainly been other books written, and articles penned (on sites like Destructoid, I might add) that dive into these waters. But, it is still very much a nascent field. Video games are a young medium, and we haven't had time to establish a critical tradition like film and literature has. We need to cultivate these voices; the generation of writers that will talk about games in a serious manner in the coming decades. What better way to stake a claim in this new field than to gather a variety of exceptionally talented voices to talk about and critically examine what is generally considered gaming's dumbest, most developmentally arrested genre? The thrill of shooting a Cyber-Demon with a rocket launcher may be obvious and simple, but there is a lot to unpack when you take a closer look.
Shooter Review photo
Looking at life down the barrel of a gun
Shooters seem simple. You step into the shoes of your typical tough guy space-marine or mercenary and empty clip after clip into the faces of Nazis, or aliens, or alien-Nazis from the vaguely disembodied gun bobbing up and do...

Nepal earthquake photo
Nepal earthquake

The Far Cry team is matching Nepal earthquake relief donations


Up to the first $100k
Apr 29
// Brett Makedonski
Late last week, immeasurable disaster struck in Nepal in the form of a 7.8 magnitude earthquake. As a result, the death toll is in the thousands, and thousands more are injured and/or stranded. That's not to mention the devas...
Far Cry 4 photo
Far Cry 4

When Far Cry 4 goes right, it goes so, so right


Style bonus
Apr 10
// Brett Makedonski
"Hmm, shotgun's not gonna work for this boat. Damn. Guess I'll have to go down there. Oooh, cargo truck! Let's take care of this real quick... ... Totally meant to do that."
Funny glitch photo
Funny glitch

His hair is made of the sky


Happy accident
Apr 03
// Jordan Devore
If glitches had sequels, this would be the long-awaited follow-up to Mafia II's "his hair is made of little faces" bug. The accompanying line of dialogue -- "I don't give a fuck" -- makes it even better. How did this happen? ...

Lots of games are morally bankrupt, we get it

Mar 19 // Anthony Burch
Most games are horrifying celebrations of violence and empowerment that prioritize aggression over compassion, and competition over empathy. And that's completely fine. (So long as the game, and the audience, know that that's what is going on.) We all -- to some extent or another -- are aware that the art and media we engage with can often be full of shit. We often love our art for being full of shit! I love Doctor Who, and it's one of the most full-of-shit television shows of all time! It champions optimism and mercy without ever approaching anything even remotely similar to a real-life dilemma, and -- so long as you know that's what it's doing -- it's a perfectly fine bit of escapism. And so it is with violent videogames. Yes, it's really, really weird that you run around massacring orcs because They're The Bad Guys, and it's even weirder that we were more excited to massacre them in Shadow of Mordor specifically because they felt more human. They felt like people with lives and backstories and that made it way more satisfying to slice their heads off what the fuck. But! It's escapism. It's full of shit, but it's full of shit in a way that is decidedly fun and effective. Should we ask greater questions about why Shadow of Mordor is fun, and consider how its fun-ness might be inexorably linked to racism and classism? Absolutely. Should we stop playing Shadow of Mordor and paint everyone who enjoys it as an enormous pile of human waste? Of course not. Or, to quote Anita Sarkeesian: "It is both possible (and even necessary) to simultaneously enjoy media while also being critical of its more problematic or pernicious aspects." (A quote that, if more people actually listened to, might have resulted in a way goddamn calmer gamer culture over the past few years.) So, it's okay to enjoy sadistic, weird, violent bullshit, so long as all parties involved know that that's exactly what they're doing. The only real problem, to me, is when that bullshit starts pretending to be about something else. Going back to Shadow of Mordor -- which was unquestionably my favorite game of last year -- I loved the over-the-top violence and the multitude of horrific things that you could do to your enemies. I distinctly did not love the story that tried to morally justify those things. The story of Talion's vengeance, and how justified he was in killing all those orcs because they are inherently "vile, savage beasts" (again, you should really read Austin Walker's article), is kind of nonsensical. It gets the player from A to B, sure, but it never stopped feeling weird for the game to paint Talion as a hero with one brush, and then allow you to decapitate an orc who is defined by a very human, relatable fear of fire moments later. But we've heard this argument before, right? Ludonarrative dissonance, blah blah blah. We've heard this argument so much, in fact, that it spawned an entirely new genre of games: the Violent Games That Criticize Violence And People Who Enjoy Violence genre. Anyone who has played Hotline Miami will remember the constant, enigmatic questions posed to the player by its cast of animal-faced murderers. "Knowing oneself means acknowledging one's actions." "You like hurting people, don't you?" "You're not a nice person, are you?" "Do you like hurting other people?" On its surface, these questions -- questions that many games pose to their players -- are deep, interesting queries. Functionally, though, they do nothing but jab an accusatory finger at the player. You fucking caveman, they shout. What's wrong with you? Why do you like this horrible, violent pornography? The answer to these condescending questions is simple: because these games are fun, and you know they're fun, and you spent hours and hours and hours of development time making sure I'd find them fun. These games never broach the actual social or biological reasons we find violence entertaining. Evolutionarily, it's to our advantage to find violence more stimulating and interesting than other aspects of the human experience, because a failure to find violence noteworthy can result in our deaths. Culturally, there are reams and reams of academic papers on violence as a (chiefly male) expression of worth and power that can often poison the aggressor almost as much as their victim. These games don't address that. Far Cry 3 says you like violence because you're a racist, simple-minded tourist (or at least, you have no problem taking on the role of one because, as a player, you're so eager to get to the murdering that your avatar is meaningless). Hotline Miami says you like it because you're kind-of-sort-of-bad-person-I-guess-but-maybe-not-really-I-don't-know. Spec Ops: The Line suggests you've just never given any thought to what the hell you've done as a player of games. These games chastise the player for enjoying consequence-free violence, right before offering them a smorgasbord of beautifully rendered, lovingly visceral consequence-free violence (Spec Ops less so, as it actually gives a shit about the choices you made in the story. Additionally, it forbids the player from being as graphically sadistic toward his or her enemies as FC3 and Hotline Miami). This is kind of weird, right? This is a hypocritical way of having your cake and eating it too -- of pretending you're making a grand statement about violence, without actually saying anything of note beyond -- bizarrely -- blaming the player for buying your game. If a game truly cared about exploring violence and its consequences, wouldn't it bake that into its game systems? XCOM, to me, is a greater treatise on violence and death than any of the other games I've mentioned because its systems force the player to make real, consequential, dynamic choices about the value of life. Should I put my elite assault trooper into the path of a crysalid if it means that he'll be able to save two or three civilians? Is it worthwhile to use my rookie to draw a sectoid's fire, just so my sniper can get a shot off? How much do I care about "winning" versus being a good person? What is the actual, financial cost of a human being? XCOM, while seemingly just a silly game about marines fighting aliens, directly engages with these questions in a way that the Hotline Miamis and Far Crys of the world never do. (And what's more, they do it without relying on gore for spectacle's sake). The answer for that is, perhaps, obvious: because it's hard. Because to do so is expensive, and means you're making a mechanically complex game in a time where it's easier and cheaper and often more profitable to make simple games. But if you're going to make a simple game that casts the player in a simple, hyperviolent role, why pretend to be an exploration of violence when your game mechanics obviously aren't? Why not go the other direction? Why not celebrate the fact that you're, to be brutally cynical, kinda full of shit? That's what Borderlands 2 was about -- from my perspective, at least. (It should probably go without saying, but a TON of people worked on Borderlands 2, and though I wrote about 90% of the dialogue, that dialogue makes up a comparatively small percentage of the overall Borderlands 2 experience. I can only speak for myself, and my own frame of mind when I worked on the game.) Early on, after the player kills a few psycho bandits, I had Claptrap comment on the battle: "Minion! What did you DO?! Those people had LIVES, and FAMILIES, and -- nah, I'm totally kidding. SCREW those guys!" As a joke, this line of dialogue isn't great. It's too long, its punchline is obvious, and it's just plain not all that funny. But nonetheless, this was a line I found myself coming back to as a thematic touchstone for the series as a whole. Yes, you are a murderer. Yes, you only exist to kill people and rob their corpses so you can kill more powerful things and rob more shiny stuff from their corpses. But it's all bullshit, so don't sweat it. Don't forget that you're being kind of a murderous antihero, but have fun with it! It's entertaining to be a murderous antihero. Don't pretend you're something that you're not (a hero), but don't beat yourself up over your antiheroism -- revel in it. There was a bit of internal worry about casting the player as such an amoral mercenary, but by making the bad guy an even bigger asshole, and by surrounding the people with (hopefully) charming, equally amoral good guys, everything basically turned out okay. We didn't, to my recollection, get any letters about how horrific it was to play as an antihero -- if anything, people seemed to enjoy that Borderlands was so jovially honest with its players about what it was and what it asked them to do. Saints Row works for exactly the same reason. The first two Saints Row games can often veer toward the horrifying, as the player upholds "values" like loyalty (which manifests itself in the player brutally murdering Julius, the founder of the Saints who rats on them in an attempt to bring peace back to Stillwater) and justice (which sees the player kidnap an unarmed woman, lock her in the trunk of a destruction derby car, and trick her boyfriend into ramming her to death as a means of avenging one of their fallen comrades). But Saints Row 3 and 4? The games where the franchise fully accepted just how batshit insane its players, characters, and world are? God damn, those are some good fucking videogames. Yes, your only method of interaction with civilians sees you punching or bludgeoning or shooting them. "Fuck it," the game says -- "let's incentivize that kind of behavior by making civilians drop health when you kill them." The moment Saints Row stopped trying to make serious statements about anything was the moment it reached its full potential. It accepted its own ludicrousness, and in so doing became the most honest videogame ever made: you play like a psychopath in these games, so we'll cast you as a mass-murderer and have everyone talk about how hilariously fun it is to be a mass-murderer. Fuck it, we'll make you president because you were so good at being a mass-murderer. Sure, the Saints Row games aren't "deep" (except for the fact that they totally are, thanks to their treatment of sexuality), but they're honest. Their messages, such as they are, match up perfectly with their mechanics. In my dumb, ex-game-dev opinion, XCOM and Saints Row represent the two best ways of actually tackling violence in games. Either build your systems around violence and its consequences -- actually force your players to answer questions of morality and power for themselves --  or just throw up your hands and create a world where the player can have fun being a total piece of shit. Above all, just be honest in what you're doing -- don't pretend your game is about How Bad Violence Is when it's really about How Awesome Pixelated Blood Looks.
Immoral games photo
Now move on, already
With Hotline Miami 2 recently released, I realized I am really, really tired of games that belong in its genre. When I say "genre," I refer not to "action games" or "indie games" or even "violent games," but a subtler, more h...

Far Cry 4 DLC photo
Far Cry 4 DLC

Far Cry 4 somehow gets more dangerous in Valley of the Yetis


Didn't think that was possible
Feb 26
// Brett Makedonski
If Far Cry 4's jaunt through Kyrat serves as any indication, the Himalayas are an incredibly dangerous place. Whatever isn't trying to maul you is trying to shoot bullets at you. It's like being caught between a rock and a h...
Far Cry 4 photo
Far Cry 4

Visit the steep mountains of Far Cry 4 at a steep discount


Plus a few other deals
Feb 13
// Brett Makedonski
Plane tickets are expensive. If you want to go check out the Himalayas, you're looking at several thousand dollars. "In this economy?!," Steven might scoff. A more affordable route to world tourism is through Ubisoft's rendit...
Ubisoft photo
Ubisoft

Ubisoft had a good quarter despite mediocre showing from Assassin's Creeds


No year-over-year change
Feb 12
// Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft didn't have a disappointing holiday season, as it posted financial reports today indicating that the publisher exceeded its quarterly sales expectations by approximately €80 million. More surprising, it did ...
Far Cry 4 photo
Far Cry 4

Ride a dune buggy in Far Cry 4's 'Overrun' DLC


Or just keep on riding on elephants, that's cool too
Feb 10
// Jason Faulkner
Already tired of everything Far Cry 4 has to offer? You're in luck, because Overrun, the latest batch of content for Far Cry 4, is available today. This is a more multiplayer-focused endeavor, with a brand new PvP mode in whi...
Far Cry 4 photo
Far Cry 4

Ubisoft restores some third-party Far Cry 4 keys


Keys were purchased with stolen credit cards
Feb 03
// Mike Cosimano
Just over a week after Ubisoft deactivated digital copies of Far Cry 4 purchased through various third-party resellers, the publisher has reactivated copies of the game that have been played in some capacity and has permanent...
Far Cry 4 photo
Far Cry 4

Ubisoft kills copies of Far Cry 4 sold through third parties (Update)


This sounds like something Pagan Min would do
Jan 26
// Mike Cosimano
[Update: Marek Zimny of G2A recently got in touch with Destructoid regarding this story. According to his comment, the company is not responsible for "any of these procedures" and is working towards obtaining refunds for affe...
Far Cry 4 photo
Far Cry 4

Far Cry 4 'Escape From Durgesh Prison' DLC is out today


This one isn't free
Jan 13
// Chris Carter
In addition to the free Assassin's Creed Unity DLC out today, Far Cry 4 is also getting an add-on. Escape From Durgesh Prison is a timetrial of sorts, where you race the clock to best your friends on leaderboa...
Far Cry's future photo
Far Cry's future

Alaska, vampires, Jurassic Park: Ubisoft polls future Far Cry settings


Copy-paste the formula to a new locale
Jan 06
// Steven Hansen
Not that it was in doubt after Far Cry 4's sameness (to FC3), but Far Cry has been Ubisoft'd, its mechanics ripped and torn from one setting to another in the name of disconnected virtual tourism. Ubisoft polled its fans...
Far Cry 4 issue photo
The Great Elephant Shortage of 2015
[Update: Far Cry 4 has been reinstated on the Xbox One games store, restoring permissions for several users. For those who are still experiencing difficulties, Ubisoft officially recommends a hard reboot of the Xbox One conso...


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