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Thief photo

Steal everything in sight in this Thief gameplay video

The shinier the better
Feb 18
// Brett Makedonski
There doesn't seem to be any doubt about it, Thief will certainly live up to its namesake. In this 17-minute video that shows the game's first mission, Garrett gets his klepto on and does his best magpie impression, as ...
Thief photo

New Thief video teaches how to steal in style

Any way you want it
Feb 04
// Brett Makedonski
The title of this Thief video calls it a trailer, but I'd be hard-pressed to classify it as such. Not many trailers run six minutes, but whatever this is, it remains interesting the whole time. I guess badass thievery a...
Thief photo

Let's look at the customization options for Thief on PS4

Iron Man mode still scares me
Jan 27
// Alasdair Duncan
We already knew that the upcoming reboot of Thief was going to have lots of customization on PC, but it's good to see the PlayStation 4 (and presumably all console versions) will have those options too. From the start of the...

Preview: The first four hours of Thief

Jan 24 // Alessandro Fillari
Thief (PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 [previewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One, PC)Developer: Eidos MontrealPublisher: Square-EnixRelease Date: February 25, 2014 After a long absence from a job gone wrong with a reckless protege, Garrett returns to The City looking for answers about what happened. Finding the metropolis in a state of decay from a mysterious plague, Garrett must re-establish himself and discover the mysteries of the sickness along with its possible supernatural origins. Along the way, he'll pillage and loot the wicked and wealthy of the city while restoring his reputation as a master thief. Ever since their showing at last year's E3, the developers at Eidos Montreal have been mindful of fan reactions towards the game, and they've since made a number of changes to the game's design and structure. One feature that received backlash from fans and critics alike was the experience points and leveling system. This element came off as jarring and broke the immersion of a stealth action game, as Garrett would receive headshot bonuses as if he were a soldier in a Call of Duty game.  As of last year, this facet of character growth has been entirely reworked and designed around a more grounded system, and of course by how much coin you've got on hand. Many of the items and gadgets that Garrett could level up and acquire before have been made available to various black marketeers and item shops, creating an in-game economy based on player needs. In addition to this, new items known as trinkets will decorate Garrett with accessories that give subtle increases to his abilities and skills while in the field. Right from the opening menus in the title screen, Thief allows players to tailor their experience however they see fit. In the options screen, you can customize the HUD and gameplay by removing indicators and clues from the game world, and even turn off gameplay features such the Focus mode, which augments Garrett's sight and skills for duration of the focus meter. To take the customization even further, you can even fine tune the difficulty and style of game to your liking. Along with the standard easy, medium, and hard (called Master Thief), there's an option available for Custom difficulty. When the custom mode is selected, you can set it to any of the previous difficulty modes in addition to a number of tweaks and changes to the style of game you're looking for. Want to play on Master Thief difficulty with instant game over upon harming and/or alerting enemies? You can do that. Want to increase the challenge by raising the prices of black market items across the board and make a no-damage run through the game? Sure, absolutely you can. Want to do all the scenarios I've just listed and more in a single run? Go right ahead. The designers were clear to let players know that they can play the game in any way they want, and Thief will accommodate and provide the challenge. During the opening hour of the game, players much venture through the streets of The City as martial law has been put in place. Garrett observes dialog from the guards and citizens learning what happened while getting back into the swing of things. Although this may sound restricted and guided, and it was -- because it was still the tutorial sequences -- there were plenty of moments to take your time and explore the space. While entering a jewelry store, you can choose to loot the whole place, even though you only needed one item. Learn to use the shadows and Garrett's agility to move in and out of cover, and you'll have the guards none the wiser of your presence. The controls are fluid and swift, and players can move in and around the environment with ease. The light gem makes a return, which helps players see if they're visible or not. A new skill known as the 'swoop' allows Garrett to make swift dashes in any direction during stealth and combat to evade attacks or the eyes of people on watch. Keeping on the move and at the ready is a key part of the stealth gameplay. While there is a focus on contextual situations for certain actions, such as jumping, I didn't find myself missing the option to jump manually. I found moving around with the sprint, maintaining momentum, and vaulting over objects with the contextual actions to feel pretty smooth. It's certainly different, but I honestly didn't feel too restricted by this approach, as much of the depth and level design was still dense with options.  It's clear that a lot of thought has went into the design of the stealth system for Thief, as each situation and setting features a variety of options for the player to engage in. While there’s plenty of stealth options on the streets, vertically also plays into it and you can observe situations and avoid enemies from the rooftops and rafters of buildings. Playing for skill is a big focus of the stealth gameplay, and after each central mission in Thief, players are graded and scored on their performance. Moreover, stealth gameplay is judged between three styles of play. Ghost style focuses on not engaging enemies and staying unnoticed; predator style takes the aggressive approach rewarding players for stealth takedowns and combat; and opportunist is a mix of the two previous styles. How you play is up to you, and Thief's gameplay system will judge you accordingly. If you have any desire to repeat main missions, you can do so immediately after completion or in the main menu. Upon arriving at the The City's clock tower, which also serves as Garrett's base of operations, the game opens up considerably, as the markets and streets of the city are densely packed with content. These streets serve as the HUB area of the game, where players can venture out and move towards new areas. Eventually, players will take Garrett to abandoned mansions used for nefarious purposes, and a brightly-lit brothel doubling as an opium den. Many of these players are a refreshing change of pace from the dark and dank streets of The City, and allow for players to adapt to new enemies and settings. While there is a clear objective and destination, you can venture out of your clock tower and discover hidden treasure spots and optional quests to uncover in the nearby areas. It felt very open, somewhat like a sandbox. Some homes can even be entered and looted for valuable collectables. Deciding to take time away from your current objective can reward players with new side-quests and other missions. Another new feature to spring out of the game's removal of the experience system are Focus Points. Throughout Garrett's quest around The City, he can meet certain characters that will reward him after quests with FP that can upgrade his core abilities. These points can go towards upgrading Garrett's skills in marksmanship, stealth, intuition, dexterity, speed, combat, sense, and his overall efficiency in completing jobs. Though keep in mind that FP are somewhat rare, and they'll have to be spent wisely. How you manage resources is one of the most important skills players have to pick up. Thief takes a more classic approach to health and resource management, where health and focus meters need items to restore to full strength. Items such as arrows or potions are a risk, as being out in the field during main missions will leave you no access to vendors. Visually, the game looks stunning. As I was playing this on PS4, I took advantage of a number of features using the touchpad. When you place your finger on the touchpad, a mini inventory grid pops up in real-time and sliding your finger across the pad can select items. It was a pretty neat feature and a cool way to use the touch capabilities, but I still found the traditional inventory screen (which can be switched to in the options menu) to be more my thing. The stealth gameplay is very sharp and requires a lot of careful planning as there are a number of obstacles that can trip up Garrett. Some guards and houses in The City keep bird cages nearby, and any frantic action will cause the birds to panic and alert anyone nearby. Even during lockpicking, players must endure the risk of being spotted or altering guards -- messing up during opening safes will make noise and catch the attention of nearby guards. Though if worse comes to worse, players can utilize Garrett's skills and gadgets to subdue foes. The thief's trusty blackjack and bow (with multiple arrow types) allows for both melee and ranged options. Moreover, focus mode during combat allows for Garrett to target specific enemies for an instant takedown. To be totally honest, I found very little to enjoy about actual combat. I can understand Garrett's reluctance to engage in actual fights -- he's just not good at it. Fights feel clunky and cumbersome, attacks lack any sense of feedback, parrying with your blackjack comes off as awkward and futile when facing multiple foes, and the dodge feature can leave you in a sketchy spot while evading the enemy attack can cause you to lose track of where they are. I found myself avoiding fights and sticking with stealth takedowns, just so I wouldn't have to endure the fights. Despite this, I still found much to like about my time with Thief after about four hours of play. During this period, I examined how I tend to play stealth games, and how this one manages to nudge me out of my comfort zone in places. Sometimes it pays off to be aggressive and forceful, but other times it's best to let things pass and be passive. It's rare when a game makes you analyze how you play, and Thief tasks players with making unique choices. It's very clear that the developers at Eidos Montreal spent the last year looking at their game and fine tuning it with fan feedback and criticisms in mind. Even after his long absence, Garrett still has got some neat tricks up his sleeve. If you're of an open mind and willing to try out this new take on a classic series, you may find more to like about it than you think.
Thief preview photo
Sneak, loot, adapt
Back in October, I got the chance to sit down to chat with members of Eidos Montreal after a lengthy session with the new entry in the Thief series. Since the reveal in 2009, the game has gone through many different iteration...

Lara Croft photo
Lara Croft

Guardian of Light's free now for Xbox Live Gold members

You have two weeks
Jan 16
// Brett Makedonski
It's time for another predictable but helpful bi-weekly reminder that a new game is free for Xbox Live Gold subscribers. This time, it's 2010's Summer of Arcade title Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light. Of course, this offe...
Deus Ex: The Fall photo
Deus Ex: The Fall

Deus Ex: The Fall is now on sale for a buck

$0.99 until January 2nd
Dec 20
// Chris Carter
That Deus Ex mobile game The Fall is now $0.99 on iTunes, which is a decent price to check it out at. It basically pares down the Human Revolution experience into a mobile offering, but it still has that "steal...
Thief drops QTEs photo
Thief drops QTEs

Thief dropping QTEs because everyone hated them

You won't have to mash the X button anymore
Nov 15
// Joshua Derocher
Thief, the sequel/reboot of the classic stealth game, had a demo awhile back that had some people upset over the use of a quick time events (QTEs), which had players smashing buttons to complete scripted parts of the game. No...
Crowdfunding photo

Square Enix's Collective gives devs access to Fear Effect

Plus Gex and Anachronox
Nov 07
// Jordan Devore
At GDC Next, Square Enix gave more concrete details regarding its new game pitching-and-publishing platform called Collective. Most notably, we now know which Eidos intellectual properties are open for developers to potential...

Eidos could be next in line to make a Final Fantasy game

Oct 29 // Abel Girmay
Considering the way the series has been going, a change of studio could be the best move at this point, though it remains to be seen how well Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn will live out the rest of its days, and what the Tetsuya Nomura's team manages to do with the re-branded Final Fantasy XV. Picture it if you will. Dim house lights at E3 2017 as the words, "From the studio that brought you Deus Ex: Human Revolution, comes the next entry in the Final Fantasy series" adorn the screen. It can't be the worst idea in the world, right? Lighting Returns: Final Fantasy XIII is set for release in Japan on November 13, 2013, and February 2014 everywhere else. Eidos Montreal's Thief is also set for release in February 2014. Square Enix has "discussed" letting Eidos work on Final Fantasy - could be "very interesting" [OXM]  
Eidos Final Fantasy? photo
Kind of, sort of, maybe...yes please
Handing off the development of an established Japanese series to a western studio isn't the most shocking idea around. When both Silent Hill and Devil May Cry were feared long in the tooth, Konami and Capcom, respectively, le...

Review: Deus Ex Human Revolution: Director's Cut (Wii U)

Oct 21 // Chris Carter
Deus Ex: Human Revolution: Director's Cut (PC, PlayStation 3, Wii U [reviewed] Xbox 360)Developer: Eidos MontrealPublisher: Square EnixTo be released: August 23, 2011MSRP: $49.99 (Wii U)  / $29.99 (PC, PS3, 360) In a nutshell, Deus Ex: Human Revolution: Director's Cut is basically the original game with The Missing Link DLC added to it, on top of new control schemes and a few minor gameplay tweaks. I don't want to go into too much detail about the core game as that can be found in Jim's original review, but rest assured the entire experience is still intact. The amazing soundtrack is still there, the social boss fights are still enjoyable, and the mix of combat, hacking, and sneaking-oriented gameplay remains top notch. You won't find much of a visual upgrade however, as the slightly improved visuals for Director's Cut do look like they're from the current generation, but they are noticeably better than the previous console counterparts. For the purposes of this review I was able to test the Wii U edition of the game, which is curiously $20 more expensive than the PC, PS3, or 360 versions. One major new selling point of the Director's Cut is the ability to defeat bosses "without firing a bullet." The absence of this option was a major flaw in the original, in that it didn't maintain the consistency with the rest of the game, which normally offered you hacking or stealth options. The only problem is, the new tweaks in the Director's Cut are not that impressive. Rather than drastically altering the fights, the developers have instead slightly recreated each arena, and added new options like vents and terminals to change the encounter. This lack of bravado is especially evident in the first boss fight, which only has one one terminal to unlock doors and turrets, with added vents -- that's literally it, and it feels mostly the same. The rest of the fights add a few more intriguing options, but they're still not very unique, and don't go as far as they should have. Thankfully there aren't that many bosses in general to go through, so even if they aren't up to snuff with the rest of the game, they're very minor annoyances on top of an otherwise stellar package. The other major addition to the Director's Cut is the ability to use the Wii U GamePad, giving you access to a host of new features like a tablet map, and touch-screen inventory management. It works just as well as any other controller, and I had very little issues getting protagonist Adam Jensen to do what I wanted him to after acclimating myself to the scheme. As an added bonus, pretty much everything you can think of is tied to the GamePad, including grenade throw-back (by swiping the Pad), Miiverse integration, Remote Play, hacking, inventory management, and a fully functional map. Hacking on the GamePad is one of my favorite additions, as it adds another level of strategy to the proceedings when you're able to look up fully at your surroundings on the TV and use a second screen. The radar with the ability to draw patrols is also incredibly useful, as is the touch-screen inventory. If you're playing this on Wii U all this new functionality is done through the GamePad, but you can also optionally use a Vita or SmartGlass device to access some of these features on a PS3 or Xbox 360, respectively (since I wasn't able to test out the PS3 or 360 versions, I'm not able to comment on what functionality is available for the Vita or Smartglass). In addition to everything I've discussed so far, you'll also get a New Game+ mode, a 45-minute "Making Of" video, a full in-game strategy guide, and a developer commentary mode, which will take up eight hours of your time throughout the campaign. Point blank, the commentary is very good, and much more insightful than I thought it would be. Commentary during cutscenes is automatic (and is played throughout most, if not all scenes) and during certain portions of gameplay, all you have to do is push the "Minus" button on the GamePad to play the sound bites. The main reason I love the commentary is because you can clearly hear the passion of the team, and they seem to be having a good time during the roundtable session that comprises the track. You'll learn about a number of different topics, like the significance of something as miniscule as a Pearl necklace, or even some things the developers didn't like, changed, or fought over. You'll also learn about a few inside jokes and Easter eggs, such as the fact that every map has a Nigerian email scam to read, and the scammer himself almost had his own special storyline that didn't make the final cut. You'll also hear about some gaffes and goofs, plus real developmental insight, which gives you a decent inside look at what it takes to produce a high-budget game. Going into the next generation of consoles, I really hope more games use this feature in the future. Deus Ex: Human Revolution: Director's Cut gives you a ton of extra bang for your buck on top of an already stellar game, and if you haven't experienced it yet, this is the perfect opportunity to do so. If you have played it, I'm not sure the $20 Wii U premium is worth it, especially if you don't plan on using the Remote Play option. But somewhere down the line, the lower price of the other versions is a very enticing offer should you get that Human Revolution itch at some point, because this is the clear-cut best version of the game.
Deus Ex Wii U photo
Still quite revolutionary
Deus Ex: Human Revolution was quite the accomplishment when it was released. It wasn't everything an old-school Deus Ex fan could ask for (those boss fights), but it was a very reasonable compromise, and a great game in its o...


Preview: The world is yours for the taking in Thief

Pillaging in The City
Oct 09
// Alessandro Fillari
In recent times, it seems like the term ‘reboot’ has been treated as an ugly word. The type of phrase that causes fans of a particular franchise to cringe and become fearful knowing their adored series is making s...
Square Enix photo
Square Enix

Square Enix gets into crowdfunding with Collective

The publisher's new curated platform with Indiegogo
Oct 08
// Jordan Devore
Square Enix getting into crowdfunding isn't that unusual, but the way the company is going about it sure is. It's partnering with Indiegogo for Collective, which is described as a "game pitching-and-publishing platform" that ...
Eidos photo

Ian Livingstone to leave Eidos after almost 20 years

Long-serving Eidos board member is leaving to pursue other interests
Sep 30
// Alasdair Duncan
Ian Livingstone, one of the UK games industry's leading figures, is stepping down from from his duties at Eidos Interactive, a company he joined in 1995. GamesIndustry International is reporting Livingstone has stepped down b...
Eidos Montreal photo
Eidos Montreal

David Anfossi is the new head of Eidos Montreal studio

Anfossi was the executive producer of Deus Ex: Human Revolution
Aug 01
// Alasdair Duncan
After the surprising resignation of Stephane D'Astous earlier in July, Eidos Montreal have announced that David Anfossi is the new head of the studio. Anfossi was the Executive Producer of Deus Ex: Human Revolution, the studi...
Eidos founder quits photo
Eidos founder quits

Eidos Montreal founder resigns

Irreconcilable differences with Square Enix Europe
Jul 23
// Jordan Devore
Citing a lack of leadership following the failure of Tomb Raider, Hitman: Absolution, and Sleeping Dogs to meet sales expectations despite all three games being well received, Eidos Montreal founder and general manager Stepha...
Deus Ex: The Gall  photo
Deus Ex: The Gall

PSA: iOS Deus Ex disables shooting on jailbroken devices

Deus Ex: The Gall
Jul 11
// Steven Hansen
[Update: An impending update for The Fall will allow the game to be played on jailbroken devices. "We did not state clearly that the game would not support jailbroken devices and so we will be switching this off via an updat...

Review: Deus Ex: The Fall

Jul 11 // Chris Carter
Deus Ex: The Fall (Android iPad, iPhone [reviewed on an iPhone 5])Developer: Eidos MontrealPublisher: Square EnixReleased: July 11, 2013 (iOS) / TBA (Android)MSRP: $6.99 The Fall opts to jump in at a fairly odd part of the overall Deus Ex narrative, picking up with the story of soldier Ben Saxon after the novel Deus Ex: The Icarus Effect. The "Icarus Effect" is the psychological practice of limiting the individual potential of humankind to maintain the status quo, and the "Tyrants" -- a PMC of sorts that Saxon formerly belonged to before he was betrayed -- are a delivery system for said effect. To be blunt, the narrative is not nearly as engaging as the story of Adam Jensen in Human Revolution, as the vast majority of the story tends to fall short of your typical "soldier's revenge" tale. But despite the less engaging narrative, Ben's method of revenge and destruction is very similar to Jensen's tactics in Human Revolution, as the core gameplay of the franchise is preserved despite the move to the mobile platform. I'm pleased to say that although they are pared down at times, there are situations that faithfully mirror Human Revolution, such as the ability to choose between a guns blazing, stealth, and hacking approach (or any combination thereof). This freedom is immediately evident, as one particular area towards the beginning of the game gave me the ability to hack through a shortcut to avoid a dangerous trip through a drug den -- but only if I had enhanced my hacking abilities fairly early into the game. This design continues throughout the entire game, offering up a decent chunk of sidequests, hidden areas, and collectibles to keep you interested. Ben can upgrade his abilities via augmentations in all three disciplines, which allows you to customize him the way you want to play. The first and third person mixed perspective returns from Human Revolution, offering up a zoomed out viewpoint when in cover, and an FPS style view during the vast majority of the game. Movement and aiming are controlled by two virtual joysticks on the left and right side respectively, and most of your actions (including firing) are performed with virtual buttons, which can get a bit dicey when you're really in the thick of combat. Now, I don't mind touch controls in the slightest for the vast majority of mobile experiences. Games that are designed for the platform tend to have a variety of tricks of the trade that help curb the lack of tactile feedback, and sometimes, games can actually feel better with touch controls. But here, even with the accommodations with auto-aiming and on-screen buttons, I can safely say a controller would have provided a clear-cut better way to play The Fall. Thankfully, there are some moments of reprieve, such as the ability to re-arrange the entire UI to your liking, and the option to toggle the virtual analog sticks on or off. You can also just tap the screen to move to the desired location, tap cover to snap to it, and tap enemies to auto-target them, so it is manageable if you embrace it -- it's just not ideal. It helps that the visuals look very sharp on an iPhone 5, to the point where it approaches early life cycle PS3/360 quality. The Fall should last you around five hours, which, for a Deus Ex game, is fairly brief. There are a few story choices, to make but these don't really feel poignant as much as vessels for a slightly different narrative. Thankfully, the variety in how you approach actual scenarios is where you're going to get your replay value from, and thanks to a New Game+ option, The Fall offers a chance to try out different missions, augmentations, playstyles, and seek out new areas or collectibles. There are microtransactions present that allow you to buy items with real cash, but I never felt compelled to use them, and many times I tested the game in Airplane Mode just to see if it would break if it couldn't contact the in-game store -- it didn't. Thank goodness for that, because The Fall would be a pretty hard sell with egregious paywalls. Deus Ex: The Fall works far better with touch controls than one would think, and it offers up a lighter, if a little bare-bones Human Revolution experience. In many ways though this experiment feels like a waste, as it would really be stronger as either a PlayStation Vita game or even a downloadable console title. Until a potential port rolls along, I'd only really recommend The Fall for mobile veterans who are already acquainted with first-person games on the go.
Deus Ex: The Fall photo
Falls just short of a mobile revolution
After a pretty tantalizing teaser, Square Enix was all set to announce the anticipated follow-up to the successful Deus Ex Human Revolution -- and much to the ire of fans, it ended up being a mobile exclusive. It's not all ba...

Deus Ex: The Fall is a full-fledged experience

Jun 07 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Deus Ex: The Fall (Android, iOS)Developer: N-fusion, Square Enix Mobile EuropePublisher: Square EnixRelease: TBA (Android) / Summer 2013 (iOS) Storywise, The Fall picks up immediately after the events of the Deus Ex: Icarus Effect novel and continues the story of Ben Saxon, which is also taking place shortly after the attack on Sarif Industries during Human Revolution. Ben is part of the Tyrants initially, but doesn't stick with group for too long when he learns that they lied and tricked him into joining. Ben breaks away from them and hides out in Costa Rica to maintain a low cover. He's a cybernetically enhanced soldier though, and soon has to come out of hiding to find some neuropozyne as his body is rejecting the cyber implants. From here, Ben learns that there's a global shortage of the vital drug, and will go about unraveling the conspiracy surrounding all this that threatens the world over. [embed]255403:48955:0[/embed] The story should take you about five hours to complete from start to finish. Of course, this is a Deus Ex game and you'll want to replay thanks to all the options presented. You can play through the game action hero-like, or be a pacifistic throughout the entire thing and not kill a single person ever. Plus there's dialogue choices that opens and closes different paths of the branching story. There's up to 29 different weapons to find, with plenty of upgrades and attachments that can be placed on them. Plus of course you can upgrade Ben's skills, improving his combat, hacking, or stealth abilities. The inventory and store have been combined for mobile, so you can buy weapons, Praxis, and ammo whenever you want. While you will earn in-game credits, you can also spend real cash to accelerate your progress in purchasing weapons and the sort. That said, you never have to spend any cash outside the initial purchase of the game, and performing three playthroughs of the story (that features new game plus mode) will get you everything the game has to offer. As for the controls, given the limitations of touch screens. Movement happens via dual virtual thumbsticks (the virtual sticks can be shown or hidden) or you can use single and/or double tap to move through your environment. Tapping against walls will put you into cover, vaulting over objects replaces jumping, and you can either manually aim or tap to lock-on to targets to fire your weapons. Plus the takedowns -- lethal and non-lethal -- are all streamlined into the experience. Moving Ben around felt great, and the controls were very tight. At the end of the day, would I prefer a controller to play? Yes, of course, for any game. But for once I didn't mind using touch based inputs in an experience like this. The Fall really feels like it's capturing what we've come to expect out of the Deus Ex series. It looks great for being a mobile title (all things considered) and I was quite happy with the controls. The one thing that bugs me though is that you can't pick up a body after you've downed someone. Bodies will disappear after a while (GoldenEye 64 style), but guards and cameras can still see a body until it of course has finally vanished. I should note that this is the first installment of course, and the story will continue. Whether that means this is going to be episodic or a sequel will take place on a different platform remains to be seen though, as the developers were strictly focused on just talking about The Fall. Otherwise, this will be a nice treat for players on the mobile platform. I do hope the 3DS and PlayStation Vita will one day see The Fall as well. It would be great on those platforms, but I do also understand the reason for focusing on the mobile sector for now, as it reaches a humongous new userbase. 
Deus Ex: The Fall photo
Built from the ground up to be a true Deus Ex game
Deus Ex: The Fall is a the next entry to the much loved series, heading for iOS this summer, with an Android version coming sometime there after. This may not be what you asked for, but don't write it off either. Mobile games...

Nintendo IP photo
Nintendo IP

Eidos: 'Nintendo should have their IP on every platform'

Around and around we go
Jun 06
// Tony Ponce
At the Bristol Games Hub in South West England, Eidos president Ian Livingstone doled out lessons to both industry newcomers and industry vets. But it was his choice words to Kyoto giant Nintendo that raised eyebrows. "Ninten...

Deus Ex: The Fall is a mobile title

Coming this summer
Jun 05
// Dale North
The next Deus Ex game is a mobile/tablet title. It was developed by Square Enix Mobile Europe in cooperation with Eidos Montreal, the folks behind Deus Ex: Human Revolution. They're calling Deus Ex: The Fall an action RPG; i...
Deus Ex photo
Deus Ex

Eidos asks if we're ready for Deus Ex: The Fall

Gee, I wonder!
Jun 03
// Jordan Devore
Assuming that Deus Ex: The Fall is another game installment and not some spinoff project like a graphic novel, as some of you have suggested, then yes, Eidos Montréal, we are ready for it. Thanks for asking. And thanks...
Sneakity sneak sneak photo
Sneakity sneak sneak

First Thief trailer: Redesign, new voice and an explosion

I also really like him grabbing the game logo at the end!
Apr 04
// Steven Hansen
Meet the new Thief, not the same as the old Thief. As you can see from this first trailer, the series has undergone some expected changes for its first entry in near a decade. Its sardonic lead, Garrett has a whole new look ...
Human Revolution photo
Human Revolution

New Deus Ex: HR Director's Cut content won't leave Wii U

That's the current plan, anyway
Apr 03
// Jordan Devore
Speaking to Penny Arcade Report, game designer Emile Pedneault stressed that the goal for the Wii U-exclusive Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut was for it to not be considered a port. "We really wanted to tak...
Focusing in Thief photo
Focusing in Thief

Hocus Focus: One of Thief's newest systems is optional

And yet...still present. At least presently.
Mar 27
// Steven Hansen
A lot of scrutiny has been directed toward the newly announced, next generation Thief game. In fact, enough people in the official Thief forum have been concerned about a detective mode-esque "Focus" ability that Eidos Montre...

PAX: Deus Ex on Wii U might be the best version

Mar 23 // Alasdair Duncan
When it comes to those contentious boss fights, they've not been drastically altered in story terms, at least; you'll still need to kill each boss battle to progress. What has changed are the levels and the fact that you can now approach a boss either with stealth or hacking instead of a simple gun fight as before. I watched Square Enix designer Emil talk me through a hacking approach against the first boss, Lawrence Barrett. After evading his initial bursts, Emil guided Adam Jensen to a first floor in the area which is totally new to the encounter. Thanks to some handy vents, Emil was able to guide Jensen to a security room where he was able to unlock new rooms. From there he headed back to the ground floor, again evading Barrett who was stalking the lower level. In this lower level Emil demonstrated the newer hacking interface where the actual hacking game is located on the Wii U GamePad screen, allowing your TV to still remain "in game" so you can see approaching threats. This was really handy as Barrett eventually stomped around the corner and saw Jensen hacking another terminal to activate some security turrets. After that it was simply a matter of grabbing a turret and using it as a shield to finally dispatch the first boss. The WiiU GamePad is useful in this version of Human Revolution; a new smart vision augmentation lets you use the GamePad as an enhanced AR vision mode giving you more info on enemies, their health and armor as well as any items they might be carrying. The GamePad also clears up a lot of clutter on the main screen: for example, looting enemies becomes a really simple process instead of navigating menus. The hacking game is really fluid and intuitive and there's also a new swipe feature that let's player flick away enemy grenades with a simple swipe on the GamePad screen. Also included in the Director's Cut is 8 hours of commentary from developer Eidos Montreal and a built-in smart strategy guide which will locate the appropriate chapter depending on your position in-game. There's Miiverse implementation too, with a screenshot and note capture device that leaves AR tags in the game world for your friends to find. It all adds up to a compelling package that Wii U users should check out, if they haven't already played Deus Ex: Human Revolution on another platform.
Deus Ex Wii U photo
Human Revolution really takes advantage of the GamePad
It seems the one thing we've really heard the most fuss about Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut is the boss battles. Whilst they were a bone of contention in the original versions of the game, this newer version on the...

Tyrannosaurus Tex photo
Tyrannosaurus Tex

Lost footage of Game Boy FPS Tyrannosaurus Tex is found

Mar 15
// Chris Carter
In 2001, Tyrannosaurus Tex, a first-person shooter for the Game Boy Color was all set to change the world as one of the only portable FPS games on the market -- the only problem is, it was never released, as publisher Eidos ...
Office Chat photo
Office Chat

Dead Space needs a break, SimCity launch woes and Thief!

Another casual discussion from the Dtoid news room
Mar 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
In another casual discussion from Dtoid's virtual news room, I'm joined by Jordan Devore and Spencer Hayes to discuss the deflated rumor of a Dead Space development hiatus (one we kind of wish were true). Plus, SimCity's rocky launch demonstrates once again that you can't count on anybody to successfully launch an online-only game and the gang discusses the recently announced Thief reboot.
Deus Ex photo
Deus Ex

Listing for 'modified' Deus Ex: Human Revolution spotted

Did anyone ask for this?
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
An Australian Classification Board listing for a "modified" version of Deus Ex: Human Revolution was spotted recently, possibly pointing to either a new edition with downloadable content packed in or, as suggested by CVG, a W...
Deus Ex photo
Deus Ex

'Deus Ex: Human Defiance' is just the upcoming movie

Oh ... I see
Mar 01
// Jordan Devore
When word got out about Square Enix trademarking Deus Ex: Human Defiance, some of us got a bit carried away. The name, in our defense, did seem like a rather fitting title for a potential follow-up to 2011's Human Revolution....
Deus Ex: Human Defiance photo
Deus Ex: Human Defiance

Deus Ex: Human Defiance trademarked by Square Enix

A sequel to Deus Ex: Human Revolution?
Feb 27
// Joshua Derocher
It looks like we'll be getting a sequel to Deus Ex: Human Revolution. Square Enix has taken out a trademark on Deus Ex: Human Defiance, and since the first game was rather successful, this isn't a huge surprise. Maybe th...

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