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Eidos Montreal

Deus Ex photo
Deus Ex

This is Eidos' new engine for Deus Ex


Find the snakes
Dec 04
// Jordan Devore
You're looking at Eidos Montréal's new engine for current-gen consoles and PC, the Dawn Engine. The studio says it "will form the cornerstone" for future core games in the Deus Ex franchise and "any other projects that...

Go on a sniping rampage in Hitman Sniper

Jun 13 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Your objective in the game is to take out a target on any given level. In the one I was playing, I was able to take my target out the second the sniper scope came up to my face at the start of the level. Sure you can just shoot your target right there and then, but you’d be missing the point. Really what you’re trying to do is kill as many bad guys as possible in creative ways to score as many points as you can. Hitman Sniper is emphasizing competitive play through a leaderboard system. You’ll see in real time as you’ve scored more points/money than your friends, and you’ll also see as they pass you up.  So you’ll need to get creative with how you kill others, as the more creative the kill the more points you get. Thankfully creative killing is something that Hitman has always been good at. One example involved me shooting at the front of a parked car. This set off the car alarm, which caused two nearby guards to come investigate the noise. One was near the car already, and another guard was a couple of stories above in the house, looking down to see the fuss. As soon as that guard leaned over the railing, I shot out the glass that was a part of the railing, and this caused him to fall over and land right on top of the guard on the ground. Double kill!  What you’ll have to be careful of is that the main target will eventually start to notice that his guards are going missing. Plus, other guards can potentially find the dead bodies if they’re simply just taken out where they stand. Eventually this will scare the main target, causing him to flee the scene and you’ll fail the mission. It starts off with how much do you really want to risk, but as you replay scenarios and understand the layouts better you’ll find yourself really cleaning up house. There will be multiple goals and missions you can take on a level too, so it’s not always going to be same thing if you don’t want it to be.  Along with your main sniper you’ll be able to equip perks and the like. A couple I saw included a super sonic round which removed the need for lead time, and another that made my bolt-action rifle fire rounds off like a semi-automatic. You’ll be able to earn a variety of perks, plus improvements and additions to the rifle itself. And that in turn will help in scoring more points in the game.  The developers behind are looking to have a variety of locations available for players, and they’re looking to develop the game along with the community. If there’s a demand for classic hits, or say certain places from around the world the team will work something out.  Hitman Sniper will be out this fall, and it will be a free-to-play title. Players will be able to unlock everything without ever having to pay, but those that just want to get to the good stuff as fast as possible will have the option to put some money down.  Nothing too complicated, but it’s easily going to be one of those games I will enjoy playing while on a flight or looking to pass the time. 
Hitman photo
A fun, simple little game in the Hitman universe
Square hasn’t been afraid to use the Hitman IP in fun and creative ways. Hitman GO was a critical success for doing something unique, and while Hitman Sniper isn’t on that same scale, it is still at least a ton of fun.

Hitman photo
Hitman

Turn-based Hitman GO comes to iOS next week


Such a neat concept for a spinoff game
Apr 10
// Jordan Devore
Square Enix Montréal's turn-based strategy title Hitman GO looks like a decent excursion while we wait for the next major franchise installment from IO Interactive. It's coming real soon -- first to iOS devices on Apri...
Deus Ex photo
Deus Ex

Square Enix trademarks Deus Ex: Mankind Divided


Cool name
Mar 28
// Jordan Devore
The folks behind Human Revolution are working on a new Deus Ex for current-generation consoles and PC. Could its title be Deus Ex: Mankind Divided? Square Enix trademarked the phrase in the United Kingdom, reports CVG. It sur...
Deux Ex photo
Deux Ex

Square Enix brings Deux Ex: The Fall to Steam early


Original game included in $9.99 purchase price
Mar 18
// Jordan Devore
As of today, Deus Ex: The Fall is now on Steam following its mobile release last year. Players command former British SAS mercenary Ben Saxon as he tracks down a drug conspiracy in 2027. Once you get over the fact that the p...
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Layoffs

Now that Thief is out, Eidos Montreal lays off 27 people


'War makes thieves and peace hangs them'
Mar 05
// Steven Hansen
AAA development works, the large studio tells you. "Yes it is true we've let 27 people go today," its press release reads as you imagine it dabbing crocodile tears with a fan of c-notes. "Unfortunately it's something that ev...

PC Port Report: Thief

Mar 04 // Alasdair Duncan
The first thing that will become apparent is that Thief has been designed to be played with a controller, which makes sense for a couple of reasons. It doesn't really require the precision aiming that you'd need in some other first-person games; Garret isn't a character that needs to be pulling off quick headshots. The other big reason is movement; the analog sticks give a much smoother rate of movement than on a keyboard. Garret has three distinct speeds, either walking, sprinting, or a slow creep and transitioning between them feels a lot smoother using the control sticks as opposed to the keyboard. Traversing the occasional third-person climbing sequences feels a lot more fluid using the controller too.  Thankfully, Thief will automatically detect your controller once you plug it in. There were times where I was considering having the controller on my lap even though I was playing through the game with my mouse and keyboard. For instance, the lockpicking system benefits from having the rumble functionality of the Xbox 360 controller, as this will alert you to when you can pick the pin. If you're using a mouse, then you'll have to make a circular motion with your mouse to pick the lock. It's feels really ungainly and it's something you'll be doing whenever you turn a wheel as well. Performance wise, it's a bit of a mixed bag. I have a pretty powerful PC with an SSD but some of the load times still felt a little long, especially when loading a previous save file. Aside from that, I didn't see any drop in performance, not even in some of the rare action sequences. The lighting effects are consistently top drawer and the detail on the characters and buildings is really sharp. There's a handy benchmarking tool built into the PC version but it doesn't actually make adjustments for you -- it's a matter of running the benchmark tool and adjusting your settings to get the best mix of performance and good looks. Whilst it doesn't hit the high points of the previous Thief titles, this 2014 release is still worth playing on PC. Give the controller option a try if you're not feeling that the keyboard and mouse controls are your thing; both have their places as far as I'm concerned. Oh, and take on some of the side missions as soon as you can; to me, that's where the heart of the game really lies. 
Thief PC Port photo
PC version didn't steal my heart like a thief in the night
The Thief series began on the PC, and it's one of those games that old people like me say has its spiritual home there. So it's no surprise that the new Thief reboot/remake would come under scrutiny as to how well it performs...

Review: Thief

Feb 24 // Chris Carter
Thief (PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Eidos MontrealPublisher: Square EnixReleased: February 25, 2014MSRP: $59.99 There are naturally going to be direct comparisons to Dishonored with Thief, but it has a decidedly different feel to it. For starters, the main character, Garrett, talks and has a personality. He's a thief but he has a code, and doesn't like to kill if possible -- in fact he means not to. Funnily enough there's an option to turn off Garrett's speech during gameplay which would make him a bit more Corvo-ish, but by default, he chats constantly nonetheless. After a strange and jarring supernatural fueled intro, the narrative takes a bit to really get going, as the crux of the start of the game is "you're a master thief -- steal stuff." You'll be doing this in an old school medieval setting, where thieves are hanged without trial, and there's a disease lurking around similar to the Black Death, called "The Gloom." It's your typical bleak medieval framework, but it works well enough. While the stage is set for an interesting tale, it never really takes off into anything memorable. There are no real twists or turns, and the vast majority of the story is predictable -- Garrett's actions included. Simply put, we see what Garrett is about at the beginning of Thief, and that's all you're really going to get throughout. He kind of reminds me of The Witcher's Geralt of Rivia, but with a less interesting backstory and no real interesting development throughout the game itself. It would have been fine if any sort of attempt at character development took a backseat in favor of gameplay, but Eidos Montreal tried to incorporate it in Thief, and somewhat failed. [embed]270433:52688:0[/embed] But that stage is a beauty though, as Thief looks great on the Xbox One, PC, and PS4. It sports an insanely detailed lightning system that directly influences gameplay, and the fog effects are top notch, adding to the atmosphere in a big way. To drive that point home, at one point while a major event was happening on-screen I didn't realize I had direct control yet. The only thing that bothered me in particular with the presentation is that occasionally the audio levels for character vocals would often be so low that the music would boom over it. That's definitely an oversight, and a prime candidate for a patch. So how does Thief play? Well, a lot like a first-person Assassin's Creed, actually. One button (LT/L2) controls running, climbing, jumping, and pretty much everything having to to with movement, just like any Creed game. Garrett will climb any pertinent fixtures, jump across an gaps he can reach, and so on. It's really weird to get used to at first since you don't have the direct ability to jump in place like most first-person affairs, but it works well enough once you realize levels are designed like jungle gyms, with room to move around. Again, stealth is everything in Thief. You don't want to fight, and you'll use the shadow meter on the HUD (a light that reads white or black) to ensure that you're always lurking in the dark. Crouch-walking is also key, as is the full management of an analog stick to ensure you're not slinking too quickly over loud objects like broken glass. Forcing you to look at the ground and be aware of all of your surroundings is a rather unique feeling in gaming, and it represents what Thief does best: the little things. Things like always making sure you close doors behind you, blow out errant candles, or hide bodies in the shadows -- actions like that really help make Thief shine. It's also a thrill to pick up the hundreds (if not thousands) of pieces of loot scattered across the game, hidden in drawers, safes, behind paintings, and pretty much everywhere someone would feasibly hide valuables. Stealing loot (and thus earning gold) is directly tied to upgrades so it makes sense on multiple levels -- it's not just a way to role-play as a thief, it's a character progression mechanic. Lest you groan at the idea of picking locks, the act is actually fun and easy, and all of the game's gadgets like water arrows and fire arrows, are just as easy to use. But after experiencing all those fun little moments, you'll get back to the big picture of the game's missions, which aren't all that exciting. A great deal of stages involve a standard "get here" goal at the end of a maze, leaving you to stumble across tiny corridors from one challenge room to the next. While a few stages are open-ended in the sense that you can devise your own way to get from point A to B, a lot of them only have one solution -- and the only brainstorming you'll have to do is how to get past (or take out) the guards. It's disappointing, because the original Thief series had stages that felt like giant sandboxes, really putting you in control of your own destiny. To get through said levels, you can upgrade pretty much every facet of Garrett, from his melee damage to his defense, including his magic-like "Focus" powers that he's bestowed with at the beginning of the game. While this initially just seems like it's a rip off of the Arkham series' "Detective Vision," there's actually a lot more to it. Focus upgrades allow you to pick locks better, gain more combat prowess, slink better in the shadows, and more. It adds a lot of variety to Thief, but if you really hate the idea, you can turn it off. One of the best parts of the game is the ability to completely customize the difficulty. You can do things like disable manual saves, turn off Focus powers entirely, allow stealth takedowns only, or eliminate the ability to takeout enemies at all. There's also extended options like an Iron Man mode, where you're required to beat the game in one life without saves. It's insane how many options there are, and gamers who are looking for a challenge will find it with Thief. Content-wise there's a lot here to augment the roughly 10-hour campaign, as the optional underground network offers up a multitude of sidequests to take up your time. The other big addition is a fully-fledged Challenge Mode, which operates very similarly to Resident Evil's "Mercenaries" gametype -- but with a focus on stealth instead of combat. Across two maps you'll be able to play the "Chain" mode (grab as much loot as you can with a multiplier for quick steals), and a mode similar to "hot and cold" where you have to scavenge for singular pieces of loot. These modes are surprisingly fun since they're different every time -- the game randomly scatters loot around and scores you accordingly with full leaderboard support. I would have loved to have seen this arcade-like feature expanded up further beyond a mere two locations at launch though, since it adds a lot of character to the underperforming campaign. It looks like more maps are coming by way of DLC though, if you're into that. Thief is a great escape for those of you who yearn for more stealth experiences, but it doesn't really offer up anything exciting. The story and characters are somewhat forgettable, most of the missions are straightforward, and the locales tend to blend together after a while. Having said that, there's a lot of potential here if you dig deep down into the game's ingenious difficulty sliders and challenge modes. In that sense, Thief succeeds as a bold stealth game, despite its bruises.
Thief reviewed photo
Steal all the shinies
The original Thief was one of my favorite PC games of all time. It was unique in that it completely focused on stealth -- a mechanic that wasn't used often at the time outside of a few select games like the original...

Thief photo
Thief

Watch what Thief is all about in this new launch trailer


Hint: he steals things
Feb 20
// Chris Carter
Thief is almost here, and you can get a glimpse of a bit of gameplay (but not much) from its launch trailer above. As expected, there's tons of looting, sneaking, and swooping, compliments of the master thief and hero o...
Thief photo
Thief

Steal everything in sight in this Thief gameplay video


The shinier the better
Feb 18
// Brett Makedonski
There doesn't seem to be any doubt about it, Thief will certainly live up to its namesake. In this 17-minute video that shows the game's first mission, Garrett gets his klepto on and does his best magpie impression, as ...
Thief photo
Thief

New Thief video teaches how to steal in style


Any way you want it
Feb 04
// Brett Makedonski
The title of this Thief video calls it a trailer, but I'd be hard-pressed to classify it as such. Not many trailers run six minutes, but whatever this is, it remains interesting the whole time. I guess badass thievery a...
Thief photo
Thief

Let's look at the customization options for Thief on PS4


Iron Man mode still scares me
Jan 27
// Alasdair Duncan
We already knew that the upcoming reboot of Thief was going to have lots of customization on PC, but it's good to see the PlayStation 4 (and presumably all console versions) will have those options too. From the start of the...

Preview: The first four hours of Thief

Jan 24 // Alessandro Fillari
Thief (PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 [previewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One, PC)Developer: Eidos MontrealPublisher: Square-EnixRelease Date: February 25, 2014 After a long absence from a job gone wrong with a reckless protege, Garrett returns to The City looking for answers about what happened. Finding the metropolis in a state of decay from a mysterious plague, Garrett must re-establish himself and discover the mysteries of the sickness along with its possible supernatural origins. Along the way, he'll pillage and loot the wicked and wealthy of the city while restoring his reputation as a master thief. Ever since their showing at last year's E3, the developers at Eidos Montreal have been mindful of fan reactions towards the game, and they've since made a number of changes to the game's design and structure. One feature that received backlash from fans and critics alike was the experience points and leveling system. This element came off as jarring and broke the immersion of a stealth action game, as Garrett would receive headshot bonuses as if he were a soldier in a Call of Duty game.  As of last year, this facet of character growth has been entirely reworked and designed around a more grounded system, and of course by how much coin you've got on hand. Many of the items and gadgets that Garrett could level up and acquire before have been made available to various black marketeers and item shops, creating an in-game economy based on player needs. In addition to this, new items known as trinkets will decorate Garrett with accessories that give subtle increases to his abilities and skills while in the field. Right from the opening menus in the title screen, Thief allows players to tailor their experience however they see fit. In the options screen, you can customize the HUD and gameplay by removing indicators and clues from the game world, and even turn off gameplay features such the Focus mode, which augments Garrett's sight and skills for duration of the focus meter. To take the customization even further, you can even fine tune the difficulty and style of game to your liking. Along with the standard easy, medium, and hard (called Master Thief), there's an option available for Custom difficulty. When the custom mode is selected, you can set it to any of the previous difficulty modes in addition to a number of tweaks and changes to the style of game you're looking for. Want to play on Master Thief difficulty with instant game over upon harming and/or alerting enemies? You can do that. Want to increase the challenge by raising the prices of black market items across the board and make a no-damage run through the game? Sure, absolutely you can. Want to do all the scenarios I've just listed and more in a single run? Go right ahead. The designers were clear to let players know that they can play the game in any way they want, and Thief will accommodate and provide the challenge. During the opening hour of the game, players much venture through the streets of The City as martial law has been put in place. Garrett observes dialog from the guards and citizens learning what happened while getting back into the swing of things. Although this may sound restricted and guided, and it was -- because it was still the tutorial sequences -- there were plenty of moments to take your time and explore the space. While entering a jewelry store, you can choose to loot the whole place, even though you only needed one item. Learn to use the shadows and Garrett's agility to move in and out of cover, and you'll have the guards none the wiser of your presence. The controls are fluid and swift, and players can move in and around the environment with ease. The light gem makes a return, which helps players see if they're visible or not. A new skill known as the 'swoop' allows Garrett to make swift dashes in any direction during stealth and combat to evade attacks or the eyes of people on watch. Keeping on the move and at the ready is a key part of the stealth gameplay. While there is a focus on contextual situations for certain actions, such as jumping, I didn't find myself missing the option to jump manually. I found moving around with the sprint, maintaining momentum, and vaulting over objects with the contextual actions to feel pretty smooth. It's certainly different, but I honestly didn't feel too restricted by this approach, as much of the depth and level design was still dense with options.  It's clear that a lot of thought has went into the design of the stealth system for Thief, as each situation and setting features a variety of options for the player to engage in. While there’s plenty of stealth options on the streets, vertically also plays into it and you can observe situations and avoid enemies from the rooftops and rafters of buildings. Playing for skill is a big focus of the stealth gameplay, and after each central mission in Thief, players are graded and scored on their performance. Moreover, stealth gameplay is judged between three styles of play. Ghost style focuses on not engaging enemies and staying unnoticed; predator style takes the aggressive approach rewarding players for stealth takedowns and combat; and opportunist is a mix of the two previous styles. How you play is up to you, and Thief's gameplay system will judge you accordingly. If you have any desire to repeat main missions, you can do so immediately after completion or in the main menu. Upon arriving at the The City's clock tower, which also serves as Garrett's base of operations, the game opens up considerably, as the markets and streets of the city are densely packed with content. These streets serve as the HUB area of the game, where players can venture out and move towards new areas. Eventually, players will take Garrett to abandoned mansions used for nefarious purposes, and a brightly-lit brothel doubling as an opium den. Many of these players are a refreshing change of pace from the dark and dank streets of The City, and allow for players to adapt to new enemies and settings. While there is a clear objective and destination, you can venture out of your clock tower and discover hidden treasure spots and optional quests to uncover in the nearby areas. It felt very open, somewhat like a sandbox. Some homes can even be entered and looted for valuable collectables. Deciding to take time away from your current objective can reward players with new side-quests and other missions. Another new feature to spring out of the game's removal of the experience system are Focus Points. Throughout Garrett's quest around The City, he can meet certain characters that will reward him after quests with FP that can upgrade his core abilities. These points can go towards upgrading Garrett's skills in marksmanship, stealth, intuition, dexterity, speed, combat, sense, and his overall efficiency in completing jobs. Though keep in mind that FP are somewhat rare, and they'll have to be spent wisely. How you manage resources is one of the most important skills players have to pick up. Thief takes a more classic approach to health and resource management, where health and focus meters need items to restore to full strength. Items such as arrows or potions are a risk, as being out in the field during main missions will leave you no access to vendors. Visually, the game looks stunning. As I was playing this on PS4, I took advantage of a number of features using the touchpad. When you place your finger on the touchpad, a mini inventory grid pops up in real-time and sliding your finger across the pad can select items. It was a pretty neat feature and a cool way to use the touch capabilities, but I still found the traditional inventory screen (which can be switched to in the options menu) to be more my thing. The stealth gameplay is very sharp and requires a lot of careful planning as there are a number of obstacles that can trip up Garrett. Some guards and houses in The City keep bird cages nearby, and any frantic action will cause the birds to panic and alert anyone nearby. Even during lockpicking, players must endure the risk of being spotted or altering guards -- messing up during opening safes will make noise and catch the attention of nearby guards. Though if worse comes to worse, players can utilize Garrett's skills and gadgets to subdue foes. The thief's trusty blackjack and bow (with multiple arrow types) allows for both melee and ranged options. Moreover, focus mode during combat allows for Garrett to target specific enemies for an instant takedown. To be totally honest, I found very little to enjoy about actual combat. I can understand Garrett's reluctance to engage in actual fights -- he's just not good at it. Fights feel clunky and cumbersome, attacks lack any sense of feedback, parrying with your blackjack comes off as awkward and futile when facing multiple foes, and the dodge feature can leave you in a sketchy spot while evading the enemy attack can cause you to lose track of where they are. I found myself avoiding fights and sticking with stealth takedowns, just so I wouldn't have to endure the fights. Despite this, I still found much to like about my time with Thief after about four hours of play. During this period, I examined how I tend to play stealth games, and how this one manages to nudge me out of my comfort zone in places. Sometimes it pays off to be aggressive and forceful, but other times it's best to let things pass and be passive. It's rare when a game makes you analyze how you play, and Thief tasks players with making unique choices. It's very clear that the developers at Eidos Montreal spent the last year looking at their game and fine tuning it with fan feedback and criticisms in mind. Even after his long absence, Garrett still has got some neat tricks up his sleeve. If you're of an open mind and willing to try out this new take on a classic series, you may find more to like about it than you think.
Thief preview photo
Sneak, loot, adapt
Back in October, I got the chance to sit down to chat with members of Eidos Montreal after a lengthy session with the new entry in the Thief series. Since the reveal in 2009, the game has gone through many different iteration...

Thief PC requirements photo
Thief PC requirements

Out of the shadows: Eidos reveals Thief PC requirements


Here is some information please feel free to take it or ignore it
Jan 20
// Steven Hansen
Eidos posted system requirements for the upcoming Thief, the PC version of which is done with the help of the team that did Tomb Raider and Deus Ex: Human Revolution on PC. And then I posted the requirements here. You are now...
Deus Ex: The Fall photo
Deus Ex: The Fall

Deus Ex: The Fall is now on sale for a buck


$0.99 until January 2nd
Dec 20
// Chris Carter
That Deus Ex mobile game The Fall is now $0.99 on iTunes, which is a decent price to check it out at. It basically pares down the Human Revolution experience into a mobile offering, but it still has that "steal...
Thief photo
Thief

New Thief trailer introduces us to the Queen of Beggars


Could Garrett be just a pawn in a larger game?
Dec 19
// Alasdair Duncan
As one of the first big titles coming out in 2014, it's no surprise to see another trailer for Thief arrive on our doorsteps. This time we're being introduced to the secretive Queen of Beggars as she narrates the woe of The ...
Thief story trailer photo
Thief story trailer

New Thief trailer shows the death of Garrett's apprentice


Generic story looks generic
Dec 09
// Joshua Derocher
Anyone who played the old Thief games might remember Garrett taking on a young apprentice. Apparently, Eidos Montreal doesn't want to have a young thief following him around, because during VGX they released a trailer for th...
Thief photo
Thief

The UI and difficulty levels in Thief are moddable


You can create some hardcore modifications
Dec 04
// Alasdair Duncan
Some of the worries about the new Thief title from Eidos Montreal come from how a studio can make a big-budget stealth game that will appeal to a mass audience. Hardcore fans of the series worry that the game will watered dow...
Thief drops QTEs photo
Thief drops QTEs

Thief dropping QTEs because everyone hated them


You won't have to mash the X button anymore
Nov 15
// Joshua Derocher
Thief, the sequel/reboot of the classic stealth game, had a demo awhile back that had some people upset over the use of a quick time events (QTEs), which had players smashing buttons to complete scripted parts of the game. No...
Thief photo
Thief

Feast your eyes on these new Thief screenshots


Before Garrett steals them, anyway
Nov 13
// Alasdair Duncan
Thief might be the game I'm most excited about from 2014, so Eidos Montreal knows exactly how to tease me by releasing some screenshots from early in the game. These are all from an initial level of the game called Lockdown; ...
Thief photo
Thief

Here's a look at the world of the new Thief game


Shifty fence
Nov 04
// Alasdair Duncan
I'm eagerly anticipating Eidos Montreal's reboot of Thief but I've had my concerns. Despite the studio's good work with Deus Ex: Human Revolution, I worried about how the team would follow on from Thief: Deadly Shadows. This...

Eidos could be next in line to make a Final Fantasy game

Oct 29 // Abel Girmay
Considering the way the series has been going, a change of studio could be the best move at this point, though it remains to be seen how well Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn will live out the rest of its days, and what the Tetsuya Nomura's team manages to do with the re-branded Final Fantasy XV. Picture it if you will. Dim house lights at E3 2017 as the words, "From the studio that brought you Deus Ex: Human Revolution, comes the next entry in the Final Fantasy series" adorn the screen. It can't be the worst idea in the world, right? Lighting Returns: Final Fantasy XIII is set for release in Japan on November 13, 2013, and February 2014 everywhere else. Eidos Montreal's Thief is also set for release in February 2014. Square Enix has "discussed" letting Eidos work on Final Fantasy - could be "very interesting" [OXM]  
Eidos Final Fantasy? photo
Kind of, sort of, maybe...yes please
Handing off the development of an established Japanese series to a western studio isn't the most shocking idea around. When both Silent Hill and Devil May Cry were feared long in the tooth, Konami and Capcom, respectively, le...

Thief photo
Thief

The experience points system is gone from Thief


Eidos Montreal devs listen to fan feedback
Oct 16
// Alasdair Duncan
In a Q&A session on its forums, Eidos Montreal confirmed that the experience points system is gone from the upcoming Thief reboot. Fans were concerned after the E3 trailer showed XP being awarded for performing a headshot...
Deus Ex photo
Deus Ex

How to upgrade Deus Ex PC with the Director's Cut content


I couldn't not use that image
Oct 11
// Jordan Devore
On PC, new players can dive right into Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut with a full $19.99 purchase, but there are other money-saving options for the rest of us who own the base game already and want that new content....
Deus Ex photo
Expect to pay more than the Xbox 360, PS3, and PC versions
Looks like Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut is going to cost extra if you're planning on getting the Wii U version. Nintendo Everything has checked prices at a few retailers and it turns out the final price ...

Thief photo
Thief

This gameplay trailer for Thief ticks all the right boxes


Eidos Montreal's reboot/sequel is still on track for February 2014 release
Oct 09
// Alasdair Duncan
There's a fairly short list of things that I'd want to see in a new Thief game: water arrows, sneaking past guards, shiny trinkets ripe for the plunder, some casual pickpocketing, and a city shrouded in a seemingly endless n...
Human Revolution photo
Human Revolution

Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut out on Oct. 22


Extended edition of the 2011 title will add considerable touch screen support
Oct 02
// Alasdair Duncan
We've already learned of the next stage in the Deus Ex franchise but Eidos Montreal isn't forgetting about Human Revolution. The Director's cut of the game will hit current consoles and PC on October 22 in North America and ...
New Deus Ex photo
Multi-game Deus Ex: Universe planned
That Deus Ex: Universe trademark? It's not what it might've sounded like. Eidos Montreal has lifted the lid on its future plans for the franchise, which include multiple games for PC/consoles as well as mobile titles, books, ...

Thief photo
Thief

The Bank Heist is your Thief pre-order DLC


Garett will take on the impregnable Stonemarket bank in this pre-order bonus
Sep 25
// Alasdair Duncan
The thing that surprised me about the trailer above is not that there's going to be pre-order DLC for Eidos Montreal's upcoming Thief title but that the game is set for a February 25, 2014 release. I thought I had being payi...






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