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EVE Online

EVE Online photo
EVE Online

EVE Online at its lowest playercount since 2008


Space is getting a little bit smaller
Jun 29
// Joe Parlock
Everyone’s favourite spreadsheet simulator EVE Online might not be everyone’s favourite anymore, according to graphs made by EVE player Jestertrek. The graphs show that the amount of people concurrently playing t...
PLEX for Good photo
PLEX for Good

PLEX for Good: EVE Online players can donate to the Nepal earthquake relief fund, too


PLEX writes checks
May 04
// Brett Makedonski
Doing good sometimes has a domino effect. That's the case with contributions to the Nepal earthquake fund. First, the Far Cry devs started matching donations. Then, Bungie sold t-shirts to help the cause. Now, CCP's hype...

EVE Online's new focus is putting power in the players' hands

Mar 26 // Brett Makedonski
Nordgren said that this was "a huge step" for CCP. She cited it as the developer's way of saying "What you see in space should be much more in the hands of players." But, it's not necessarily as simple as CCP providing the sandbox for pilots to play in -- that might threaten the very foundation which EVE Online was built upon. "We're going more and more in that direction," Nordgren remarked about the possibility of an open sandbox. "But, it'll never completely get there," Nordgren continued. She elaborated "We’re going more toward a place where we want to control the reality of the New Eden universe, how it works, and what’s possible. Ideally, players should control anything that players can build, for example. And, then they can work with what you can do in that reality. It’s a fictional space universe, and it makes sense that we as a developer are responsible for the world, and we should give tools to the players to do stuff in it." If the change to structures is the functional example of this mindset, the customization to spaceships is the creative embodiment of it. It's borderline silly how big of a deal this is to the EVE Online universe; after all, nearly every other game on the market is chomping at the bit to offer (in most cases read: sell) extra skins. [embed]289358:57918:0[/embed] Even Nordgren had to chuckle a bit when I asked why this was such a monumental step. As it turns out, it's less about the actual aesthetic, and more about what they represent. "The game is 12 years old, and we have a very ambitious art direction for it as part of why it looks really good. We haven’t really given players any means to stand out or customize their stuff. Players have been asking for this for a long time," she explained. "You had some options before, but it was mostly through acquiring completely different special ships rather than changing your ship. This is a huge upgrade to that. Also, it’s really reflecting that the players are getting more power in the universe. These almighty space pilots get to finally decide what their ships look like." All-in-all, it boils down to CCP becoming less rigid as the gatekeepers to EVE Online. It seems as if the developer strives to draw attention away from the idea that the game has limitations, and enforce a mentality that it just exists as the player wants it to. This is apparent by looking at the roadmap to changing EVE over the years, which has moved from two major updates each year, to ten updates per year, and now, a constant stream of new features. Nordgren says that CCP found this evolution of its features model to be "a natural progression" because it would want to release updates that weren't necessarily thematically tied to whatever happened to come next. This left a lot in limbo, which is a pointless problem in an ever-changing, living, persistent world. But, mostly, CCP found itself in a weird place where players only paid particular attention at certain times. Nordgren said "In the past, we’ve trained people to really care about these release dates because we had two per year, and features would only come on those days. So obviously, people would invest a lot and care about those dates. But then, a bunch of features actually become available in between. So, it's like 'Well, they’re not exactly part of the release, and they’re not part of the next release, so how are we going to tell people about them?' We release a bunch of stuff, but people barely notice because it’s not on this big date." The solution? As Nordgren, with a grin on her face, brazenly put it "Shit's gonna change all the time." She added "You’re probably going to care more when it’s big features, so let’s focus on the features instead of the dates. Instead of trying to teach everyone that this date has this name and then talk about what’s in it, we just talk about features." So, if EVE Online feels like a more fluid entity beginning in the coming months, that's because it is. A lot of care and planning has gone into making it seem like a game with less monumental changes. Those changes are still happening, they're just not telegraphed the same way. It's all part of an ever-evolving model to put power in the players' hands and to make the EVE universe as closely rooted to the possible and the achievable as it can be.
EVE Online photo
New directions for New Eden
The developers at CCP face a unique challenge with EVE Online that other studios don't necessarily face. Its players expect an incredibly deep and detailed experience, which means that evolving the game is particularly d...

EVE Online Fanfest photo
EVE Online Fanfest

The Fanfest 'Worlds Collide' event wasn't the Powerman 5000 concert I was expecting


What is it really that is going on here?
Mar 21
// Brett Makedonski
It's no secret that I hate spiders, but there's one spider I adore. That's MC Spider, the frontman of Powerman 5000. That's why I was raucously excited to hear about the "Worlds Collide" event at Fanfest 2015, obviously a PM5...

EVE: Valkyrie wants to be the leader in VR eSports

Mar 20 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]289262:57848:0[/embed] Odds are decent that Valkyrie might hold that ambitious mantle because of the inherent nature of VR. One thing that O'Brien's CCP Newcastle team quickly found out is that VR works best when there's a minimal disconnect between the real and the immersive world. "For every bit of immersion that you're getting in this other world, there's less and less of the real world there. We're going for full immersion, because if you end up somewhere between the two, that can make simulation sickness worse and you'll feel weird. Like, we really avoid, for example, big hand movements or your character doing something that your brain tells you you’re not doing. Even our controller is positioned not in a joystick position, but in the position of the console controller. We very minimally move the pilot. I mean, the ship moves, but we don't do any touching other screens because that really jars you out of the experience. So, I actually think in our experience, the more immersed you are, the less likely you are to get simulation sickness." That's the kind of learning on-the-job that CCP (and, really, all VR developers) have had to deal with. As O'Brien says "It's becoming less and less true, but a year ago, there were no real VR experts. We're kind of learning, and talking to the manufacturers, there aren't any hard and fast rules. They have guidelines of what to try to do or what to try to avoid, but really, we're all still learning." And, it's that learning curve which hamstrings a current eSports favorite: first-person shooters. Developers are working on integrating FPS to virtual reality, but no one's done it particularly well yet. O'Brien thinks it'll eventually happen, but he's not sure when. "I'm sure at some point, someone will crack FPS, but they haven't yet. FPS in VR is very disorientating because your body is doing things that you're not doing. There are set ups that you can get where you're walking on a treadmill, but one of the disconnects that breaks immersion is when your body is doing something in the immersive world that you're not doing in the real world. It's little things, like in most first-person shooters, the gun is your hands, but in real life, you could be looking around. There are a lot of things to solve there. But, the main thing is locomotion. You're running and jumping in the virtual world, but you're really seated in a sofa. That's very disorientating for the body." For all the extra time that CCP has had to spend on Valkyrie, it legitimately seems like time well-spent. The game running on the new Crescent Bay headset is a significant upgrade over what we've seen in the past. Despite being a space dog-fighting game, the world is now filled with enough debris and objects to feel occupied. There's also a new emphasis on color that makes the world vibrant and enjoyable to cruise around in. Even dying is neat because the respawn screen puts you inside a pod that seems like it's ripped straight out of Alien's Nostromo. However, even if Oculus launched, say, six months ago, O'Brien is confident that Valkyrie would've eventually ended up where it is today (and, further, where it'll eventually go). "We would've shipped a smaller experience and built on it," he said. That building could go in any direction, but an obvious one is to connect it to the greater EVE universe. O'Brien would like to eventually do that, but it's not a priority now. "We have a small team, and I want to stay focused on making a great competitive multiplayer game," O'Brien stated. He continued, "I think you need to focus on one thing: the game, rather than what's the link to the EVE universe. I think once the game's up and running and working well, then we can look at longer term things. Ultimately, I don’t know how many years hence it'd be, but it'd be great if the battle you just saw was real capsuleers there, as well. But right now, I want to give that experience in the EVE universe without actually getting hamstrung by a direct connection." He's right; talking about melding Valkyrie into EVE Online is kind of putting the cart before the horse. For the time being, getting this game into people's hands is the main priority. O'Brien acknowledges that it won't be easy, but that road is getting less rocky. "There are more and more people coming into the arena, and that can only be good for VR in general. There are a lot of people that are starting to invest because the tech does work now," O'Brien commented. "I think the key to adoption is going to be facilitating easy trial, because I haven't met anybody yet who has tried one of these headsets and gone 'eh, it wasn't great.' Once people have done that, as long as it's at the right price point and not too hard of a tech setup – right now, I think it's more about making it easy for the consumer rather than the quality of the experience, because the quality of the experience is definitely there." But, virtual reality is nigh impossible to convey second-hand. It really is something that needs to be personally experienced. O'Brien concluded the interview by empathizing with anyone who's VR-wary, even if he's a believer. "There are two types of people in the world: There are people who have tried a VR headset and those who haven't. People who have tried are all converts, and people who haven't are all skeptics because VR has already been the next big thing so many times."
EVE: Valkyrie preview photo
Ambitious, for sure
It was almost a year ago (ten months, more accurately) when I sat down with EVE: Valkyrie's developers, and they told me "We're ready to ship when Oculus is ready to ship." At the time, Valkyrie was considered a flagship...

CCP's found the best use for Xbox One's Kinect so far

Mar 20 // Brett Makedonski
The Atlanta studio put together three demos, and used Rift DK2 and Microsoft's Kinect for all of them. While it's a suitable use of the VR peripheral, it's the integration of Kinect that pushes everything to the next level. Taking the controller out of your hands and replacing it with actual movement goes a long way toward achieving the ever-sought-after "immersion." I dare say that these three demos are the best use of Microsoft's Xbox One Kinect yet. Speaking with Atlanta's executive producer Morgan Godat, he shed some light on the developer's decision to make use of the Kinect. "We said 'What comes next?' Our assumption was that the Xbox controller was kind of the first generation of VR like you're seeing with Valkyrie. But, what might come after that?" he said. The result was what Godat described as a "Frankenstein setup." The team started with a PC, Oculus Rift, PlayStation Move controllers, and a Kinect. It just threw everything together to see what worked and what didn't. As Godat put it "Some of the hardware has fallen off, but Kinect has made the long haul. It's really impressive." It's the piece that, for now, is crucial in taking that next step in VR development. When standing in front of the Kinect with an Oculus strapped to your head, it's apparent how important that proverbial (and, in this case, literal) next step really is. Hands-down, the most impressive and enjoyable game was a player-versus-player contest named Disc Arena. The only way to paint a mental image of the aesthetic is to call it "overtly Tron." Standing across from another person in the futuristic corridor, you're tasked with flicking a disc toward your opponent. If you hit them, you get a point. The challenge comes from the fact that you're both "equipped" with a shield that can be held up with the left hand. Blocking will break the disc; swiping at the disc with the shield reflect it back. At first, it's easy to get caught up in the simple exchange of flick a disc, block a disc. It's boring, simple, and basic. But, then a disc goes astray and you learn that the walls can be used to bounce the disc and disorient your opponent. Suddenly you have to watch all directions for incoming projectiles, throw your shield everywhere, and still find time to shoot off your own discs. When you score a point, it feels like an actual accomplishment. It's just great. (And, I won six points to five, by the way.) Ship Spinner was the most experimental of the three titles. There wasn't an objective, but rather exploration was the focus. With a detailed spaceship hovering in front of you, you were asked to swipe it around to change the orientation. From there, leaning into the ship completely changed the view and offered insight as to what's actually happening aboard. All the rooms were detailed in their own special way. At one point I triggered lounge music. A colleague of mine found a dead guy. I raised the ship as high as I could, and explored the underbelly and furnace of the ship. There wasn't really any point, but that's what made it great. The last of Atlanta's demos, called The Workshop, let me grab fire and throw it. Putting elements on a literal pedestal, I just picked up fire or electricity and lobbed it about as I felt fit. Then, a stack of boxes appeared and I kicked them as far as I could. It was neat, but nothing on the level of Disc Arena or Ship Spinner. The Shanghai studio went in a very different direction and ended up developing an untethered VR experience. Using GearVR, it created an on-rails shooter named Project Nemesis. Originally codenamed Invaders, it's simple to grasp where it draws inspiration from. It's essentially a VR conceptualization of Space Invaders which requires tapping on the side of the headset to dispose of waves of ships circling in patterns. Admittedly, there's a good chance that none of these demos will ever see the light of day as some sort of consumer release. That's fine with CCP, though; that was never the intent. As Godat emphasized, the point of making these one-off experiences was to get creative and see what the developers could do with virtual reality. It's all a part of CCP's ultimate goal of "finding a future vision within the EVE universe with a laser focus on VR."
CCP does VR A-OK photo
CCP's VR Labs
It’s no secret that virtual reality is quickly making its mark on the videogame industry. If that weren't evident before, GDC 2015 kicked the door wide open. That's why, with numerous developers turning their attention ...

EVE Online photo
EVE Online

EVE Online has plans for exclusive ship skins, here are 11 new ones


'These almighty pilots finally get to decide what their ships look like!'
Mar 19
// Brett Makedonski
The EVE Online keynote at Fanfest 2015 just wrapped up, and one of the major themes was that CCP wants to put more power in the hands of the players. A popular way of accomplishing this is by finally releasing unique shi...
EVE Valkyrie trailer photo
EVE Valkyrie trailer

New EVE: Valkyrie trailer starts with a routine escort mission


'See you in the next life'
Mar 19
// Darren Nakamura
EVE Valkyrie has come a long way since the footage from last year's EVE Fanfest. The trailer above shows a more fleshed out mission, beginning with a mundane escort and ending with, well, something a little more exciting. Th...
Fanfest 2015 photo
Fanfest 2015

What does the future have in store for EVE Online?


Fanfest 2015 holds the answers
Mar 18
// Brett Makedonski
Greetings from Iceland, Internet dwellers. I'm in a hotel room in Reykjavík eating a pepperoni dog and drinking a ginger beer. Someone wrote a super friendly message on the wall just outside my window. There's a handle...
Eve Online photo
Eve Online

Schadenfreude alert: EVE Online pilot loses $1,500 after attack on unarmored ship


PerPLEXing strategy
Jan 05
// Brett Makedonski
You know what seems like a sound strategy for getting robbed? Try taking $1,500 cash out of the bank and transporting it elsewhere by walking down the street at night and waving that money in everyone's faces. Oh yeah, do all...
EVE Vegas photo
EVE Vegas

Big changes are coming to EVE Online, and they're all being streamed here


Live from EVE Vegas
Oct 18
// Brett Makedonski
CCP holds a few events for fans of EVE Online every year. Alongside Fanfest in Iceland, EVE Vegas is one of the major spectacles and it's kicking off today. If you aren't fortunate enough to be in Sin City to celeb...
Fanfest 2015 photo
Fanfest 2015

EVE Online's Fanfest 2015 officially slated for March 19-21


In Reykjavik, Iceland as always
Oct 02
// Brett Makedonski
Pilots in EVE Online might feel like they're on top of the world when they're flying their spaceships through the galaxy, but if they want the full and authentic treatment, they have to make a voyage to Iceland for Fanfe...

EVE Valkyrie is the best use of the Oculus Rift so far

Jun 12 // Steven Hansen
My time with Valkyrie was short, a two-on-two deathmatch. I spent a lot of the time marveling that I could look up through the clear cockpit and out into space. Then suddenly remembering that I should probably be watching the (space) road so I don't run into debris or opposing missiles. The space dogfighting was straightforward. Thrusters to accelerate, a brake to slow down. The ship was equipped with missiles and a machine gun. The missiles can shoot up to five at once if you paint your target long enough. I managed a kill and two deaths. Looking up and seeing the missiles that are coming to kill you is pretty neat. When your cockpit shatters and you lose control of the ship and you've been killed, it feels odd. And then you're back in runway and ready to rocket out to space again. It's a neat experience, one the Rift is tailored for. 
EVE Valkyrie photo
Hands-on at E3
EVE Valkyrie is super neat. It looks like a cool dogfighting-in-space game when you watch a trailer, but actually being in the cockpit with the Oculus Rift? It's a trip and used to great effect. Looking down at your fake che...

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CCP layoffs: 49 employees cut today


Current projects not affected
Jun 05
// Dale North
Development of MMO World of Darkness shut down about a month or so ago. Now it seems that CCP is preparing to cut 49 jobs as part of a restructuring. Polygon has learned that a meeting at CCP's Icelandic offices is curre...
EVE Valkyriet photo
EVE Valkyriet

This is the thought process behind making EVE Valkyrie


Five devs talk about making a VR game
May 29
// Brett Makedonski
For a panel at EVE Fanfest 2014, some of the developers at CCP's Newcastle studio sat down to discuss what exactly goes into making EVE Valkyrie. The long version's in this video. The short version is that whatever they're doing, it's great so far.
EVE Online photo
EVE Online

CCP permanently bans players that vandalized monument in Iceland


Goonswarm's a bit smaller now
May 08
// Brett Makedonski
Remember that EVE Online monument that CCP gave to the city of Reykjavik? Yeah, that's been defaced already. Shortly after Fanfest ended, some players placed a Goonswarm sticker on the monument and scratched out a player...
EVE of Destruction photo
EVE of Destruction

Yeah, so no EVE developers came close to beating MMA fighter Gunnar Nelson


What a shocker
May 03
// Brett Makedonski
This might blow some fragile minds, but none of the CCP developers who went up against undefeated MMA fighter Gunnar Nelson at the Fanfest '14 EVE of Destruction event tasted the sweet nectar of victory. No one really ca...
EVE Online photo
EVE Online

EVE Online plans to have approximately ten annual updates from now on


Kronos is numero uno
May 02
// Brett Makedonski
EVE Online has one of the most dedicated communities in all of videogames, and CCP is reciprocating that with some dedication of its own. Whereas most massive multiplayer online titles have a few large updates a year at ...
EVE Valkyrie footage photo
EVE Valkyrie footage

Can you EVEn handle footage of EVE Valkyrie on Unreal 4?


Muscle memory got me typing 'Valkyria'
May 02
// Steven Hansen
Destructoid's Brett Makedonski is over in Iceland for EVE Fest contributing to the over fishing and extinction of whales. He also brought us a meaty (not whale) preview of EVE Valkyrie and I'm not sure if I'll ever write it ...

Project Legion is CCP's new first-person shooter for PC

May 02 // Brett Makedonski
According to Gaudechon, Project Legion is being build around three pillars (videogame buzzwords!) of gameplay. The first, and probably most important for an FPS, is that the developers want to make a game that is a deep and balanced competitive shooter. Second, sticking true to the core tenets of the EVE Online universe, they're striving to create a true sandbox in New Eden for players -- one in which they're less crafting a set experience, but instead acting as custodians of a game that allows experiences to happen. Lastly, again remaining in sync with EVE Online, they want a player-driven economy. Truth be told, there's really not all that information about Project Legion available yet. That's most likely because CCP hasn't necessarily nailed down the specifics yet. It's just a prototype, after all. Gaudechon off-handedly mentioned that CCP wants this to be a "re-imagining of what a first-person experience in EVE is," and it's easy to pick up on the fact that the re-imagining is still far from complete. As such, there are plenty of questions still in the mix. Will Project Legion adopt the same free-to-play model of Dust 514? Are they going to attempt to integrate the gameplay into the greater EVE Online universe? And, maybe most tantalizingly, what does Project Legion's existence mean for Dust 514? There's no denying that Dust 514 hasn't exactly panned out to be all that it was hyped to be. Will Project Legion's release be the coup de grâce for the PlayStation 3 title? Unsurprisingly, Gaudechon denies this, remarking the CCP is seeing a solid user base for Dust, largely attributable to the dedicated EVE community. When asked if the two games will be different enough that people would be inclined to play both, he responded in the affirmative. Despite those replies, it's hard to shake the feeling that this very well be the beginning of the end of the road for Dust 514. It seems that CCP is looking at Dust as a learning experience, and taking that information to a new game on a platform where its players are. Regardless of what the future holds for Dust 514, Project Legion proves that CCP isn't giving up on the first-person shooter genre anytime soon.
Project Legion photo
What does this mean for Dust 514's future?
The exciting news out of the first keynote presentation on Friday at EVE Fanfest 2014 has to do with first-person shooters. Maybe surprisingly, that doesn't mean Dust 514. Rather, CCP's working on an entirely new ga...

EVE Valkyrie photo
EVE Valkyrie

Katee Sackhoff is the voice behind EVE Valkyrie


She's Rn
May 01
// Brett Makedonski
EVE Fanfest's keynote on Thursday was dedicated to EVE Valkyrie, and CCP revealed it has finally pinned a voice for soon-to-be virtual reality dogfighters to listen to. Katee Sackhoff will assume the role of Rán, the V...

EVE Valkyrie's moved to Unreal 4, and is looking amazing

May 01 // Brett Makedonski
For anyone that doesn't know what Valkyrie's all about, Dale covered that in substantial depth last year. He was impressed then. After talking to a developer about the changes that have happened since, it sounds like CCP has come a long way. The biggest move to hit Valkyrie was the switch from Unity to Unreal Engine 4. According to senior programmer Sigurdur Gunnarsson, the reason for this hinged largely upon the console scene, specifically because it's easier and a more certain prospect to publish on PlayStation 4 in Unreal right now. Apart from that, Unreal gives them the ability to add assets more quickly and generally speeds up development time. If it sounds like a lot of work to completely rebuild a game, it is. CCP Newcastle has a team of about 23 people currently assigned to Valkyrie, and it took three to four months to make the transition. But, Gunnarsson remarked that the benefits of Unreal Engine 4 at this point are too great to ignore. Besides, it's not like Valkyrie's in a finished state right now, anyway; it's still constantly being changed. While the engine change shines behind-the-scenes, it's the new hardware up front that makes the most noticeable difference. The Oculus DK2 was being used for the demo, and it made for a much more immersive experience, one that Gunnarsson was quick to talk about. He remarked that the better resolution, tracking ability, and reduction of motion blur made this build of Valkyrie better than anything that had been shown in the past. I'm inclined to believe him, because everything felt so incredibly smooth, moreso than any other Oculus title I've seen before. Although it seems to be in good shape right now, Valkyrie's far from done. There are lot of gameplay decisions that are still being made. Our demo was four versus four, but that's not what we can expect in the finished product. According to Gunnarsson, CCP's looking at numbers like 16 or 24 total players, but it completely depends on what makes sense from a gameplay perspective. If increased numbers make it less fun, they're not going to make that sacrifice. CCP's also adding variation in a couple of areas. Internally, the team's looking at different classes of ships such as a heavy, and a support that could provide medic or logistical assistance. The maps will also be themed, with some adding different environmental hazards. One example I was given was a map where sections are prone to electrical storms. Given that CCP has more than 500,000 subscribers that play EVE Online, it's easy to see the direction it might eventually go with Valkyrie. For now, Gunnarsson insisted that the company is treating its titles separately, and isn't concerned with melding them. However, does CCP envision a future where all of its players have a Rift unit strapped to their head as they pilot their spaceships? It's certainly an intriguing possibility, one that almost has to eventually be entertained to some extent. There's a lot going on with Valkyrie, and Oculus VR appears to fully understand its potential. Gunnarsson commented that CCP interacts with Oculus daily, and they're very supportive with regard to resolving any issues that CCP might have. Gunnarsson also added that Oculus completely trusts CCP and hasn't ever tried to influence the direction of Valkyrie.  That's impressive given how EVE Valkyrie might be the game that drives consumer adoption. We don't know when the Oculus Rift will eventually release, but I was told that Valkyrie will launch right alongside it. Judging by the demo at Fanfest, I'd be hard-pressed to think that any early adopters would be disappointed in that investment.
EVE Valkyrie preview photo
It's the smoothest Oculus game I've played so far
Of all the things going on at EVE Fanfest 2014, I was most excited to get my hands on EVE Valkyrie. There are a few reasons for this: I've heard it steals the show at every event it's at. I'm excited by anything in the v...

EVE Online photo
EVE Online

EVE Fanfest 2014 kicks off with kickass monument


Worlds Within a World
Apr 30
// Brett Makedonski
"It seems kind of silly dedicating a monument to a computer game," Hilmar Veigar Petursson, CEO of CCP said to begin the ceremony for a statue erected in the honor of the EVE universe. Anywhere else and that might be the...
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EVE Fanfest takes place May 1-3, 2014


In sunny Reykjavik, Iceland
Feb 27
// Dale North
CCP Games has a big shindig planned this year for Fanfest 2014, set to take place on May 1-3 in Reykjavik, Iceland. This year, they have a triple threat lined up, with Eve Online, Dust 514, and the delicious EVE: Valkyrie lin...
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CCP erecting a real monument in Iceland for their fans


It's not like there's anything else is happening in Iceland
Feb 05
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
So wow, here's a crazy story. CCP is erecting a real goddamn monument dedicated to their entire player base in Reykjavik, Iceland. It will "honor those who have participated in establishing the massive virtual universe." The ...

Oculus VR to co-publish CCP's EVE: Valkyrie

Feb 05 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
[embed]260395:50111:0[/embed]
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First title to be published by the VR maker
Oculus VR has announced they'll be co-publishing CCP's EVE: Valkyrie. The space flight dogfighter will be part of the launch lineup exclusively for the Oculus Rift whenever that's released. This marks the first game to be pub...

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A missed bill payment started latest war in EVE Online


57 Titans valued at $200,000 have been destroyed so far
Jan 27
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
EVE Online, your world is so goddamn fascinating. So, here's the story straight from CCP Games. The N3 coalition made up of the Pandemic Legion, Nulli Secunda, Insdious EMpire, and other smaller groups missed a bill payment f...
The Yule Lads photo
The Yule Lads

EVE devs dress up as Yule Lads to hand out presents


Iceland must be weird
Dec 19
// Joshua Derocher
I love CCP. They are a bunch of crazy guys, and every time they come out with a video it's always bizarre and amazing. To celebrate the holiday's in EVE Online, the guys at CCP are giving out in-game gifts on an advent calan...
EVE and Dust 514 photo
EVE and Dust 514

EVE Online increased incentive to attack Dust 514 players


Blast the planets!
Dec 11
// Joshua Derocher
EVE Online has been tweaked a bit to change-up how players interact with Dust 514 players. Dust 514 players used to earn orbital strikes be earning points during their match, but now they have to rely on EVE pilots to decide ...
EVE and Twitch photo
EVE and Twitch

EVE Online adds Twitch integration


Stream yourself dying in space
Dec 11
// Joshua Derocher
Joining the ever-growing ranks of games that support Twitch, EVE Online just added in streaming support. Pilots can now activate Twitch streaming right from the Neocom panel by logging into their Twitch account. This function...

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