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Dungeon Defenders

Dungeon Defenders II is shaping up nicely on both PS4 and PC

Jan 28 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]286809:57064:0[/embed] At PAX South I had the chance to check out the four player cooperative role-playing tower defense title. Okay, it might not fit nicely into a traditional genre, but it ends up making sense when you play it. Even for complete newcomers to the series, it works -- it just takes a bit longer than expected. Playing on the one PlayStation 4 build at the kiosk, the developers walked me through an introductory five-wave map of Dungeon Defenders II that proved to be challenging yet manageable. Eschewing the role of squire, wizard, and monk, I opted to play as a huntress, as I figured her bow would (hopefully) make for some interesting cross-map headshots. After setting down a smattering of traps to guard each lane, I initiated the action. Baddie after baddie swarmed the core I was assigned to protect. Damn. It took some brute force, but I eventually whittled their numbers done to nothing. Turns out that the pre-combat planning may be just as (or more) important than the actual fighting. Throughout the remaining four rounds, I set increasingly elaborate traps, combined them with my weapon's elemental buff, and made better use of the environment. It sort of clicked, and I got to imagining what playing as a full team might be like -- everyone wreaking havoc, causing even more bright swathes of color to fly across the already radiant screen. That was all before I got into the RPG elements of Dungeon Defenders II. I saw a fair amount of loot and currency dropped, but didn't have much of a chance to grasp how they could be set in motion to ensure constant progression. But, assuming it's as personal as customization in RPGs tends to be, it's easy to see how it'd be especially easy to get attached to the advancement of a particular character. Where Dungeon Defenders II's uncertainty lies is within the finer tuning of the PS4 adaption. While the action handled nicely enough, the button combinations for certain moves and trap placement felt cumbersome at times. Also, the menus sported a mouse cursor controlled by the analog stick (a feature which will presumably be swapped out for something more traditional and fluid). All that made a bit more sense when Trendy told me where its priorities were with Dungeon Defenders II. This one, unlike its predecessor, was build with mouse and keyboard in mind. Porting that all over to a controller scheme is a challenge that the developers accepted as a trade-off for making sure the PC version is ideal. While not many have tried their hand at the PS4, plenty have played it already on PC. At the Dungeon Defenders booth, an excited frenzy broke out as a team of players made it to wave five on nightmare mode. Everyone tending to the kiosk was beside themselves as this was the furthest anyone at the show had made it. I wondered if that were something truly special. I inquired as to whether the Early Access players had made it that far. Yeah, they had. Of course they had. In fact, they were doing things that were surprising the developers. After a very rudimentary go at Dungeon Defenders II, I can't help but think that if it's those players that are helping shape the game, it's probably in pretty good hands.
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The PC version's ahead by a light-year, though
Trendy Entertainment has already bestowed Dungeon Defenders II upon its most invested fans. In fact, they've had it for more than a month now. "Invested" is the only way to describe those people -- both financially and m...

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These dungeons aren't gonna defend themselves
For those of you who missed it, despite it being on almost every platform imaginable, Dungeon Defenders is masterful mixture of co-op, RPG, lootfest, tower defense action. Seriously, you can play it on your phone or it's fre...

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Dungeon Defenders

MOBA aspects of Dungeon Defenders II removed


Trendy is 'focusing on what fans really want to see
Oct 08
// Jordan Devore
There was backlash when Trendy Entertainment announced Dungeon Defenders II. While the game was always going to retain its tower-defense foundation, the studio was planning to add a competitive, MOBA-style mode. That didn't ...

Preview: The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot

Jul 26 // Wesley Ruscher
[embed]258649:49701:0[/embed] The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot (PC)Developer: Ubisoft MontrealPublisher: UbisoftRelease: TBA 2013 Now granted, being free-to-play is not an immediate death sentence for a game. Without a question, some of the industry’s biggest titles (League of Legends and Team Fortress 2, for example) have found the magic formula between free gaming and micro transactions. The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot is still trying to find that magic, and for the most part it does a good job in its current state at managing the quality of items paid for with those acquired from raiding castles. My only real complaint is the pay for convenience model the game is supporting when it comes to bypassing required build times for castle upgrades. In-game currencies, acquired from looting for example, can be used to purchase anything in the game; you just may have to wait a few hours before you can actually use it unless you're willing to fork over some real world money, giving the game a very Facebook feel to it. Putting that aside though, I can’t help but really like The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot. It’s two games in one, and while one (the dungeon defending) needs some work, the action packed portion offers a pretty solid expedition. I've been rolling a mage for the better part of the last two weeks and have had a hard time giving my mouse a rest. As the Earl of Evilosity, pulling enemies together into fiery explosions is quite satisfying. By no means is the hack n’ slash gameplay on par with titles like Diablo and Torchlight, but the relatively short but sweet loot escapades it offers are perfect for when there’s a moment to kill. What has started off as a quick jaunt on the more than a few occasions has become many lost hours trying to defeat a few dubious dungeons. These dungeons, or rather floating sky castles may actually be the true star of the game. While The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot is a strictly single-player romp when it comes to raiding dungeons, its brilliance lies in its asynchronous multiplayer competition that comes from building the perfect loot sanctuary to keep out would be thieves. Aside from a few areas in each zone that's on offer, the vast majority of dungeons are built by everyone playing the game. Get thwarted when running a rival dungeon, then steal their layout for your own. Better yet, when your hard work has been vanquished watch a real-time replay to learn your weaknesses for building a better strategy for next time. When you successfully smash through someone’s lair the feeling is instantly gratifying, but there is an even greater sense of pride when you know your deathtrap dungeon has left the most skilled deflated and angry. At its core, The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot shows a lot of promise. I love the dungeon building and the quick and instant gratification the hack n’ slash looting gives. Hopefully by the time the game leaves beta Ubisoft will have found the magical balance between pay and play. As of right now though, I can't shake that Facebook game feeling. If that indeed is a bad thing.
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It's like Diablo and Dungeon Keeper had a baby
It should go as no surprise that Ubisoft’s The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot caught a lot of people by surprise at this year’s E3. A clever combination of two genres that inherently belong together; this lovechild of...

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Trendy Entertainment

Dungeon Defenders' devs report atrocious work environment


These stories seem to pop up all too often
Jun 07
// Brett Makedonski
A lot of employees at Trendy Entertainment have had enough. They're fed up with the grueling work hours, disgusted by the gender inequality, and sick of the fear-mongering. And they're speaking up about it. An investigative r...
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Dungeon Defenders

Dungeon Defenders II video highlights the Apprentice


For the competitive MOBA mode, that is
May 10
// Jordan Devore
Trendy Entertainment has opted to focus on the multiplayer online battle arena component of Dungeon Defenders II in this latest gameplay demonstration. Yes, this probably isn't what you signed up for, but it makes sense from...
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Dungeon Defenders II

PAX: Dungeon Defenders II co-op mode revealed


Sequel stays true to its roots with four-player co-op
Mar 23
// Alasdair Duncan
We learned a few days ago Dungeon Defenders II would have a new competitive MOBA mode but today we had the reveal trailer for the traditional four-player co-op that hooked me and friends so well. It looks like we'll be playi...
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Dungeon Defenders

Dungeon Defenders II announced with MOBA mode


Playable at PAX East booth #968
Mar 19
// Jordan Devore
Ahead of PAX East, Trendy Entertainment has announced Dungeon Defenders II for Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, and web browsers. After a bunch of ports and even more DLC, it was only a matter of time before a follow-up happened....
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Dungeon Defenders is not coming to the Vita after all


Jun 15
// Chris Carter
In an effort to address some recent questions regarding the Vita port of the game, the community managers at the Dungeon Defenders team have erected a forum post to help shed some light on important DD happenings. A number of...
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Dungeon Defenders is the bargain in the May Hurray Bundle


May 03
// Alasdair Duncan
To be fair, many of the previous Indie Royale Bundles have left me scratching my head when I see the videogames they include. Most haven't appeared on Steam or received a lot of press coverage, so it was a big surprise to see...
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Trendy is hosting a Dungeon Defenders map contest


Apr 19
// Jordan Devore
I've been unable to keep up with the seemingly never-ending stream of new content for Dungeon Defenders, but I can always get behind a good ol' map-making contest. Trendy Entertainment is offering swag and cash as prizes to e...
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Penny Arcade skins come to Dungeon Defenders


Apr 02
// Daniel Starkey
This Friday, Dungeon Defenders will be getting new DLC that contains skins inspired by the Penny Arcade strip. Included in the pack are Tycho, Annarchy, Jim Darkmagic, and Gabe's alter-ego, the Cardboard Tube Samurai.If you'r...
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Play Dungeon Defenders for free this weekend


Mar 15
// Alasdair Duncan
To celebrate the release of the second installment of The Lost Shards of Eternia, developer Trendy Entertainment is letting you play Dungeon Defenders for free up until Sunday lunchtime. Not only is the game free this weekend...
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Dat DLC: Dungeon Defenders 'Barbarian Hero'


Feb 24
// Maurice Tan
[In "Dat DLC," we check out some recent downloadable content to give you an impression of what you may or may not have missed out on.] After tinkering with the gender-swapped versions of the existing four young heroes in Dun...
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It's Obama vs. Romney in new Dungeon Defenders DLC


Feb 20
// Alasdair Duncan
Not content with passing the one-million-download mark and celebrating Valentine's Day, the team behind Dungeon Defenders is unleashing more free DLC for the PC version of the game. This time, it's a political face-off betwee...
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Killing Floor & Dungeon Defenders have sold a million


Feb 14
// Alasdair Duncan
Developers Tripwire Interactive and Trendy Entertainment must be having a happy Valentine's Day as they've both announced that their respective games, Killing Floor and Dungeon Defenders, have hit the 1 million download mark....
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XBL sale: Dungeon Defenders, Orcs Must Die!, and others


Jan 10
// Liam Fisher
In case you haven't heard yet, Trendy Entertainment's RPG/tower-defense lovechild Dungeon Defenders is a pretty great game. And so is Orcs Must Die! At these discounts though, it can only get better. Gold members can nab...
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Loincloths and dual wielding in Dungeon Defenders


Jan 04
// Fraser Brown
If your New Year's resolution was to use more swords, you're in for a treat. Dungeon Defenders -- the ARPG/Tower Defense hybrid -- is getting some new DLC for the new year. Players will finally be able to scowl a lot and figh...
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A tour of the Dungeon Defenders: Lost Eternia Shards DLC


Dec 28
// Maurice Tan
Dungeon Defenders took over my life for a good week when I initially played the Xbox Live Arcade version, but sadly I never ended up playing it cooperatively as much as I would have liked. After some peer pressure and a daily...
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Dungeon Defenders Mistymire Forest DLC hit PSN, XBLA


Dec 22
// Conrad Zimmerman
I've become rather hooked on the charming action-strategy combination in Dungeon Defenders. While the latest new content for the game dropped last week, Xbox 360 and PS3 players have just now received access and it looks lik...
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Dungeon Defenders celebrates sales milestone with events


Nov 02
// Harry Monogenis
Well would you look at this, Trendy Entertainment's recently released hybrid between RPG and tower defence Dungeon Defenders has now surpassed 250,000 sales. 200,000 of those sales came from the PC alone, with those...

Pro guide to Dungeon Defenders: solo play & general tips

Oct 23 // Maurice Tan
Solo play When playing Solo, you'll want a way to lock down some approaches to your Crystals since you won't have anyone manually covering those. To that end Trendy recommends starting as the Squire or Apprentice. These classes offer a physical blockade early on to stall incoming waves from reaching your Crystals. Remember you can cross-class; change between your created heroes at the Forge during a Build Phase. Leveling up several different classes will make getting through some of the more difficult levels much easier in the long run. You'll have the easiest time in these harder levels when picking the Squire to start with. If you've put most of his level-up points into Defense stats, his Harpoon Turrets can keep enemies at bay and give you the necessary breathing room to switch to another heroes and give them some easy XP for a round. In case you only want to manage two heroes at the time, it's best to add the Apprentice in the mix. His Defenses have a lot of variety and scale well throughout the early game, and his Overcharge ability makes it easy to simply Repair all the Defenses and getting that delicious XP without requiring high level stats. If you want to throw a third class into the mix beside the Squire and Apprentice, Trendy suggests the Huntress be next. Her Inferno trap is a force to be reckoned with in the mid to late game, and since it is based on charges and not health points, the difficulty you are playing on will have much less effect on if you suddenly finding your Defenses are falling due to the high damage of more difficult enemies, or even Ogres. For players who don't mind a little micromanaging and parallel leveling of four different classes, it's recommended to leave the Monk for last. While his Defense Boost can provide much needed support even in Solo, he really shines as a Multiplayer Hero. His Defenses take much more attention and points to become useful early on and one of his more useful Defenses for the late game is not available until you are a few levels in, so it's better to use those Defense Units (the limit for Defenses in a level) on some other Defenses while soloing. You can still go all the way solo as a Huntress or Monk, but it will require some creativity and a lot of skill to pull it off on your own. The best class for manual damage would be the Huntress. Being ranged and applying constant damage with minimal DPS (damage per second) downtime is clutch. While the Squire will be applying a heavy load of DPS through more effort in upgrading stats, the Huntress will seem to simply pick up her total DPS through new drops and having the range to not require chasing down enemies. If you're new to the genre or a game like Dungeon Defenders, the Easy difficulty is the way to go. You'll still get a good amount of experience, but you'll have some more space to get a hang of the UI, the flow of gameplay, and to toy around with how each Defense works against different types of enemies. For the more hardcore players, you should have little problems going through it as the Squire or Apprentice. Moving to a higher difficulty is really up to whether you feel like you've collected enough good gear, and whether you've reached a certain mastery over a level to be able to beat it without almost losing. If you can't get a 'Flawless Victory' (i.e., receiving no Crystal damage at all) in a mission on Medium, it's recommended to wait a bit until you start trying it on Hard. Trendy's protips for survival Surviving can be hard enough, but knowing how to build your character when you're starting out can be a bit of a guessing game. Trendy Entertainment has these tips to help you out. Protip #1: Hero stats are exponential. Your first 8-10 points into a stat of any kind will yield a much higher result than the 50-60th point you put into that stat. Laying out a foundation of a few points into just about everything (sans Hero Health, Hero Damage) will help a ton. Protip #2: Repair. I cannot understate enough the importance of keeping your Defenses 'topped off'. Solo or online, even if the trap is only missing 1 charger, repair it. You will thank yourself later. Protip #3: Hunt Mages (those guys who summon skeletons). This becomes pretty evident from Alchemical Labs (the fourth level) onwards. Mages will avoid players if they can, and will keep a safe distance from most Defenses. Once they start to clump up, the AOE healing can become too much for some players and their Defenses to handle. Protip #4: Add a Monk Healing Aura to the mix. Even early into the game you will find yourself using Mana that would be better used in Upgrades or healing yourself. Having a Monk Healing Aura in the middle of the map or your most high player traffic area can save some mana that would often go into a clutch last minute upgrade to save a Defense. It's also the only Defense in the game that can intersect a Crystal. Protip #5: Upgrade, don't repair.Upgrading Defense will restore all of its health and boost its stats. In some cases where a Defense is low on health or chargers, it may cost just as much to repair as it would be to Upgrade it, so just Upgrade it! Alternatively, you may find that the whole process of just Upgrading takes less time than repairing a Defense, so its time and Mana better spent.Protip #6: Apply the first upgrade to new loot you like. Often the first upgrade of an item is very cheap and will give you an extra edge especially early on in the game.Protip #7: Elemental Damage levels faster. Using your weapon upgrades on a high elemental damage weapon's elemental stat will result in a overall higher increase in DPS. Even if 1/3 of the enemies are immune to that element, its better to do 200% more DPS to the other 2/3, than to only do 50% more DPS to all of them with the same amount of upgrade. After all, your Defenses can get the rest of them.Protip #8: Play the first level a couple of times. While this may seem daunting, setting yourself up to be 'ahead of the curve' in terms of levels will make all the difference when Soloing. General tips & tricks Pets Pets are fun and can give you a good buff in stats, but as you may have noticed they can become really expensive really fast. The shop only re-rolls items and pets after completing a mission. If you're starting out, beat Deeper Well (the first mission) and lock a cheap pet by clicking RS or the equivalent button. This way it won't re-roll if you complete another mission. These pets will be the cheapest pets you'll find in the game and although they won't give you a large amount of DPS support, they can give you some invaluable stat boosts that are well worth the price. Since the store re-rolls after mission completion, this ties into Protip #8 of doing the first mission several times; it gives you the best chance to find and acquire a good early game pet. The Tavernkeep The Tavern lobby's store owner can offer a lot of different items and pets, but it's not always easy to choose between spending your money on those or spending it on upgrades instead. There's a luck factor involved due to the random re-rolls of items, but as you've probably noticed the shop equipment will quickly become out of your financial reach. This is because Trendy wanted to encourage players to find loot rather than just buying loot in the early game. Saving Mana for upgrading the one awesome lucky weapon you find is the best way to spend your Mana. Later in the game when you earn more Mana and have stored some nice savings in your bank, you can spend some time replaying missions to re-roll the shop  That way you can try to luck out on a set item to complete a set or try to find the perfect pet. Defense placement When playing Solo traveling distance is always a factor. Placing Defenses at closer choke points will help keep them all in tip top shape. Lowering the amount of choke points is also just as important. For example, on 'Foundries and Forges', the second level of the campaign, placing your Defenses at the three choke points around the core (not on top of it but where they converge) is a much easier setup to maintain than placing them at the four choke points further out. All the same, since you are reducing choke points there will be more enemies per choke point and as long as you are able to soak up the damage with repairs you will be better off. Only in the first few levels will placing defenses near the crystal core be effective, players will have to rely on their speed and tact to keep things up in the later levels. While Trendy didn't want to give away all their secret recipes for Defense success, they do have a couple of handy tips. Magic Blockades: Don't forget that these strip enemies of their immunities! Placing some random Magic Blockades around doesn't hurt to not only distract the enemies but to help your elemental towers take them out. Magic Blockades are also a great Ogre distraction. Placed in their path they will usually want to smash them and it can save you time to rebuild or build more in the case of an incoming Ogre. Darkness Traps: This will become one of the most underappreciated Defenses in the game, but can really help lower the stress of a choke point by confusing the enemies and redirecting them to other Defenses or targets. Huntress Trap Placement: Pay attention to the effective radius and not just the area that triggers it. Also, stagger your traps. Putting the Inferno Trap further back from the Defenses will kill off most of the non-fire-immune enemies and the ones that are can walk into the Proximity Mine just ahead of it. Putting a Gas Trap further ahead of an Inferno trap can cause the enemies to cough and sit in the Inferno Trap even longer which can really help with higher HP enemies. Loot drops and quality modifiers The amount of players never factors into the quality of the loot, it is entirely dependent on the difficulty in which you play and the mission you are on. That said, having more players in the game will result in more loot drops due to the higher amount of enemies, which can give you a better shot at the 'lucky drop'. Later campaign missions will reward better loot and challenge missions do so as well. Survival, Mix Mode, and Pure Strategy will not award better loot than the level already gives. However, loot gets better as the waves go on, so if you play one of those modes into a deep wave you will find better stuff than you normally would otherwise. Not to mention the rare and exotic loot and pets that come from these modes. Scoring I could never figure out what actually defined my scores when playing Dungeon Defenders, but once again Trendy came to the rescue. Here's what they had to say. Score is determined in several ways: Speed to complete the mission:We award players for completing the missions as fast as possible. This is also intended to create some disparity in the leaderboards between two people doing the exact same setup and playing relatively the same. Player and Team bonuses:We added plenty of bonuses for the players to shoot for such as Flawless Victory (the crystal core never taking damage after the first wave) and Master Strategist (maxing out your tower units and not allowing a defense to fall during that wave). Killing enemies:Only you or your tower can gain you points for killing an enemy. If the environment (such as lava) kills an enemy you will not get the points and experience. Here is a list of the Wave Bonuses: Immortal - Did not die throughout the entire match Invincible - Did not take damage for an entire wave after the first Knight - Killed 10 enemies in 5 seconds Lord - Killed 50 enemies in 5 seconds Strategist - Scored the most tower kills Banker - Earned the most mana Trigger Happy - Most first to ready for Combat Phase Handy Man - Performed the most tower repairs Janitor - Scored the last kill in the wave Chillax - Moved the least distance in the wave Flawless Victory - No core damage after the first wave Most Valuable Hero - Scored the most player kills Teamwork - Completed a mission with 4 active players Skin of Your Teeth - Survived a wave after the first with <100 Crystal Health Points on at least Medium Difficulty First Kill - Scored the first kill in the wave Mechanic - Performed the most tower upgrades Boss Slayer - Your Hero or Defense landed the killing blow on a boss Master Builder - Kept full Defense Units throughout the wave Master Strategist - Only used Defenses to harm enemies after the first Wave Gunslinger - Only used Abilities/Weapons to harm enemies after the first Wave Most Valuable Player - Scored the most total kills And why not have some handy map layouts while you're here? Use them to plan ahead with your friends! The Deeper Well Foundries and Forges Magus Quarters Alchemical Laboratory Servant Quarters Castle Armory Hall of Court The Throne Room Royal Gardens The Ramparts Endless Spires The Summit Glitterhelm Caverns (bonus mission) Hall of Heroes (PvP) The Tavern (lobby) Hopefully these tips will help you on your way to victory in Dungeon Defenders. Stay tuned for another guide in which Trendy Entertainment gives you tips on how to get the most out of each class.
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Dungeon Defenders is a great game, but as you may have already experienced it can be very challenging. That's not a bad thing unless you're struggling with solo play, or have friends who are terrible at videogames. Or perhaps...


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