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Dragon Quest

Dragon Quest Heroes II photo
Dragon Quest Heroes II

Cor blimey! More characters revealed for Dragon Quest Heroes II


But where's Yangus?
Feb 13
// Ben Davis
We just got our first look at the new characters to appear in Dragon Quest Heroes II: Twin Kings and the Prophecy's End a few days ago. According to a page from the latest issue of Weekly Shonen Jump, it seems Dragon Que...
Dragon Quest photo
Dragon Quest

This Dragon Quest Builders display was built with lots of blocks


Go on, take a piece
Jan 25
// Jordan Devore
Last year, Square Enix promoted Dragon Quest Heroes in Japan with a huge wall of poppable slimes at a metro station. It was the stuff of dreams. (For me, anyway, but then again I see strange things when I sleep.) A similar ca...
Dragon Quest Builders photo
Dragon Quest Builders

You can pick up a Dragon Quest Builders demo in Japan


Coming next week in the east
Jan 22
// Chris Carter
Dragon Quest Builders is massively intriguing. While most Minecraft-like games are usually just straight-up clones from smaller developers, here we have Square Enix and a massively popular property meshed in, and wh...
Dragon Quest photo
Dragon Quest

Square Enix is going all out for Dragon Quest's 30th Anniversary


So many games coming in 2016
Jan 13
// CJ Andriessen
2016 marks the 30th anniversary of Dragon Quest in Japan, and Square Enix is going all out for the celebration. During a live press event this morning, series creator Yuji Horii and producer Ryutaro Ichimura detailed the...

Dragon Quest Builders photo
Dragon Quest Builders

Dragon Quest Builders will not support PlayStation TV


This thing is so confusing
Jan 11
// Chris Carter
When you pick up a game on Vita, it should inherently just be supported on the PS TV, right? Well that's not the case in a number of instances, and it's really starting to get confusing. For instance, just recently, Square En...
Dragon Quest photo
Dragon Quest

These Dragon Quest wedding invitations are adorable


In PS2 boxes
Dec 28
// Chris Carter
Planning a wedding is one of the toughest things I've ever done (with help, of course), but finding fun ways to get through it is one of the best parts. That's just what one Japanese couple has divined, crafting PS2 box invit...

PC Port Report: Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below

Dec 05 // Joe Parlock
Rig: AMD FX-8320 3.50GHz Eight-Core processor, 12GB of RAM, AMD HD 7970, Windows 10 64-Bit. Framerate measured with Raptr. Game played at the “High” graphics preset. First up, the options available leave a lot to be desired. Initially even finding some of them was a challenge, as while the basic settings like resolution and some limited graphics quality settings are available both in-game and in an external application, other settings like camera sensitivity are nestled within a maze of menu screens found once you’ve loaded up your game. While Heroes has settings for some less familiar settings like ambient occlusion and even what languages character speak in, it manages to entirely miss some of the more crucial and needed options. The two largest offenses are there being no way to control vsync, and anti-aliasing seems to be completely absent. The result is that while on a TV, the game looks perfect, but when you look at it up-close on a computer monitor, the jaggedness of the characters and environments is incredibly noticeable. Other than the anti-aliasing problem, it's gorgeous: great lighting effects, a fantastic art style, and high-quality textures. The game otherwise being so pretty makes the masses of jagged edges all the more disappointing. Framerates above 60 appear to be impossible. You’re given the option of locking the game at 60, 30, or strangely 20 FPS, but there's no option for a truly unlocked framerate. While on most configurations locking the framerate to 60 will achieve the same effect vsync would, good luck getting anything out of your expensive monitors with a higher refresh rate. In other words, if you want more control over the graphics, you’ll want to see what settings your video card’s control panel has available. While Heroes’ options aren’t exactly lacking, they aren’t comprehensive and often aren't the settings you'd most like to have control over.  As a positive, the game does have key remapping, which is nice. There’s also the ability to bind some of the usual keyboard functions to mouse buttons instead, which for some people would make things a lot easier.  [embed]324536:61395:0[/embed] Despite the generous remapping capabilities, I heavily, heavily recommend you use a controller if at all possible, because the controls are by far the biggest issue with the port. Playing it with a mouse and keyboard is uncomfortable at best, and almost impossible at worst. For starters, none of the menus can be controlled using the mouse, but require you to use the keyboard instead. It’s a massive pain considering just how many menus, maps, and dialogue sequences there are. The map even relies on you positioning a cursor over the location you want, so no mouse control just feels lazy. A bigger problem is that all the input icons show the Xbox controller buttons as opposed to keys -- even when you don't have a controller plugged into your PC. Last time I checked, my keyboard doesn’t have a right bumper, so the tutorial telling me to dash using it is a total waste of time. The only way you’ll have any luck playing Heroes with a keyboard and mouse is if you memorise the big list of key bindings. I haven't even mentioned how awful the game feels playing with a keyboard and mouse. The camera doesn’t stay rigidly locked to the character, so moving side-to-side will make them slowly drift to the sides of the screen, which means mouse control for the camera feels disjointed and fiddly and when in a hectic encounter, it can make you flat-out lose your character on the busy, cluttered screen. Even once I’d played with the settings, the mouse sensitivity feels completely off. I found it would pick up even the slightest movements and judder all over the place, and eventually it made me feel slightly sick. It wasn’t a fun experience trying not to vomit, and I found myself fighting with them more than the masses of monsters I was meant to be focusing on. After about two hours of trying to fight with the mouse, I gave up and used my Xbox 360 controller instead. The controller works far, far better and my queasiness instantly went away, so if you do decide to pick up the game, make sure you plug in a controller too. As far as optimisation and performance go, Dragon Quest Heroes ran incredibly well for me. It’s worth noting that my rig is getting on a bit now, so I’m only slightly above the recommended settings. Even then with all the settings at the highest possible, I consistently had around 45-50 FPS. Everything ran smoothly even in busy and detailed environments with tons of enemies. However, there is a huge caveat here. I’ve been playing on a system with an AMD card, but there have been complaints from some players that the game has much worse performance on Nvidia cards, especially in laptops. I’m unable to confirm this for myself as I don’t have the hardware to test the game on, but there are enough comments mentioning Nvidia performance problems for me to suggest being cautious when buying the game. Overall, while the port for Dragon Quest Heroes leaves a lot to be desired, it definitely didn't verge into unplayable territory for me. The biggest problem I found was the keyboard and mouse controls being pretty awful, but once I swapped over to playing on a controller, I found the port fine. For those who don’t like playing on a controller under any circumstances, the problems with Heroes will get very annoying very quickly. I have a slight confession to make: this is my first ever Dragon Quest game, and I only have a little experience with Dynasty Warriors. I’m by no means an expert in either series, so I won't be able to really assess how it stands up in comparison to its parents. Despite that, I did genuinely enjoy my time with Heroes. You don’t need to have ever played a Dragon Quest game to understand the story, but those who are familiar with the series will probably get more pleasure out of seeing characters from totally unconnected games meet at last. I have no idea who characters like Yangus, Nera, or Alena are in their original games, but I don't need to know to like their inclusion in Heroes. Going into it blind, I was struck by just how charming the entire thing is. Heroes is at its core about a lovely cast of characters who are all voice-acted incredibly well, going on an adventure in a very traditional, colourful and beautifully realised JRPG world. Compared to the few Warriors games I’ve played, Heroes appears to have a lot of influence from Dragon Quest’s JRPG foundations, insofar as you have to gather your party and manage their skills and equipment as they level up. Sometimes I felt like having to return to the base between every mission got in the way of the combat at the heart of the game, but ultimately it wasn’t too bad. The combat is utterly fantastic, as I would expect from a Warriors game. Mowing down dozens of enemies in flashy combos and watching as the damage counters filled the screen was brilliant. The large roster of characters all play very differently to each other, so the combat never felt repetitive or boring to me. One really neat feature is the monster coin system. Sometimes when you kill an enemy, they’ll be converted into a coin that, once used, can summon them to fight with you. Strategically collecting the stronger monster coins and redeploying them to get the tactical advantage over a wave of enemies gave the combat a bit more depth than just mashing the controller until everything died. Unfortunately while the combat never gets old, the mission structure certainly does. Sometimes you’ll get a cool mission where you have to fight your way through a level, and the boss fights are absolutely awesome. They’re often huge, and require you to think about the encounter in a new and interesting way. But after a couple of hours, you’ve more or less seen every type of mission the game has to offer, and most of them are simply variations on tower defence-plus-Dynasty Warriors. Even the progression through the chapters is often the same: head to a town in peril, fight your way through some enemies, protect a thing, and then fight the boss When the missions are good, they’re really good and a hell of a lot of fun. So it’s a huge shame that the remaining missions that pad those awesome moments are often just keeping enemies away from that level’s MacGuffin until you win. Considering how many optional side-missions there are, I would’ve hoped there was a bit more variation in what it was I was actually doing. I really like Dragon Quest Heroes. It’s colourful, cheerful, and is suitably camp for a Warriors game, and it also has genuinely involving yet accessible combat. It’s just a shame that after a few hours the missions began to feel repetitive, making playing for longer periods of time drag on a bit. Either way, as a total newcomer to Dragon Quest, it’s definitely got me interested in trying out some of the other entries in the franchise, and for long-time fans of the series there’s bound to be enough to keep you entertained for a while.  [This PC Port Report is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.] [This PC Port Report is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
A great game with some big port problems
Hot on the heels of Hyrule Warriors, Koei Tecmo released Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree’s Woe and the Blight Below. It takes the long-running and well-loved Dragon Quest series of JRPGs and throws them straigh...

Dragon Quest X photo
Dragon Quest X

Dragon Quest X is getting a Wii, Wii U, and 3DS bundle in Japan


Whoa
Nov 26
// Chris Carter
Another year, another lack of Dragon Quest X in the west. Square Enix has added insult to injury recently too, as it just announced a new Japanese bundle that includes the Wii, Wii U, and 3DS versions of the game. So if...
 photo

Just Cause 3 and Dragon Quest Heroes 28% off for PC/Steam


Fly? Yes. Land? No.
Nov 22
// Dealzon
With all the Battlefront and Fallout 4 news from the last few weeks it feels like the hype-train really never left the station. But in the deal train makes go on as December titles are now on the horizon. Square Enix's Just C...
Dragon Quest photo
Dragon Quest

Dragon Quest VII and Dragon Quest VIII finally coming to North America and Europe


YES! YES! YES!
Nov 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Good news, eveyone! Nintendo just announced plans to bring the Nintendo 3DS versions of Square Enix's Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past and Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King to weste...
PS Vita photo
PS Vita

That's a damn fine PlayStation Vita


Japan, though!
Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
I like this PlayStation Vita design even more than that metal slime PlayStation 4. They share a similar theme, but it's the little touches that matter -- the custom d-pad art, the liquid metal slime accessory for the headphone jack, the slick box the system comes in. All great.
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

Well well, it looks like Dragon Quest Heroes was just stealth confirmed for PC


Square Enix you bunch of rascals
Nov 12
// Chris Carter
Just moments ago I got a number of texts from friends telling me to boot up Steam to confirm a message they had obtained. Apparently, Dragon Quest Heroes is coming to PC, and Steam users are being asked to pre-purchase t...

The easy way to earn XP and mini medals in Dragon Quest Heroes

Oct 26 // Jordan Devore
[embed]317559:60858:0[/embed] Head to that level and zoom around to the different nodes. Doing so will cause a group of enemies to spawn and a metal slime may be among them -- if not, zoom to the next location. Once you've done that everywhere, select "Evac" from the start menu and try again. If you're struggling to kill metal slimes before they flee, try to land a critical attack. One should be enough. There are items that increase those odds, like the Raging Ruby, which is also used in mini medal grinding. You can also try raising the Deftness stat in your characters' skill trees. For farming mini medals, there is a very specific approach as outlined in this video. [embed]317559:60857:0[/embed] To recap, you will want Bianca outfitted with a Raging Ruby (lower damage, more criticals +5%), Ace of Spoils (extra spoils +10%), and Allure Ring (mini medal drop rate +2%). That last item is the most important one, and it's earned from the Yangus and Jessica quest line. With Bianca in your party, head to the "Caliburgh - Captain" map. Zoom to the Geargate warp and look for a group of red she-slimes. Swap to Bianca and use her R1 + Triangle attack, which launches a volley of homing arrows (note: you don't need to charge this move -- just press triangle once!). Keep using that attack until the enemies in that area are all dead, and then walk back the way you came to force the group to respawn. You'll do this over and over again and wrack up mini medals as well as some bonus XP and gold. This method is a slog, but it's by far the best option. If you're having trouble maintaining Bianca's mana, in the short term, just evac and start the map again. In the long term, make sure to unlock Powersaver and Critical Surge in her skill tree. She'll never run out of mana again as long as your attacks don't repeatedly miss. A note on new game plus: After the credits roll, you can tie up loose ends or begin a new-game-plus run, though I'd hold off. By starting fresh, you'll gain 50 skill points, but some of the best weapons and items in the game won't carry over. Your Battle Records progress for certain trophies won't transfer, either. It's inefficient. If you want that Platinum trophy, you can and should stick to a single playthrough. A note on those ridiculous post-story bosses: Bjorn is the easiest and should be your first target. Shoot him in the head with the turret on the left, and prioritize shooting down his boulder and fireball attacks. Eventually, you'll be able to hop on his head and stab him in the eyes for a bit. Nokturnus is no joke. Familiarize yourself with his moves above all else. The best advice I can give is to make sure your characters have Artful Dodger and Ace Evader in their skill trees. Without those upgrades, it's very hard to avoid his one-hit-kill attack from above. Atlas is unlocked after you beat all of the Veteran versions of the main story bosses (They're called Grudge Matches on the level select screen.) He has a stupid amount of hit points, but there's an easy way to bring him down: Terry! Equip him with a Mighty Armlet (critical hits on weak points +5%), Wrecklace (Coup de Grâce damage +7%), and Titan Belt (damage to weak points +6%). During the fight, use Terry's Falcon Slash (R1 + Circle) to create copies, then repeatedly spam Gust Slash (R1 + Square). This will rapidly build up his tension meter, at which point you can become invincible, activate his Coup de Grâce, stun Atlus, then repeat the process. You'll need to have Terry at a high enough level for him to kill the boss in time, but otherwise it's easy. (This tactic is super useful in most of the game, by the way.) Zoma is the biggest jerk of them all. He should be your final target. You won't win unless you have a high-level party and equipment to offset his magic. I gave my characters a Bunny Tail (reduced freeze time +40%), Lucky Dragon's Wing (magical resistance +20%), and Raging Ruby (lower damage, more criticals +5%). That finally did the trick.
Dragon Quest grinding photo
And tips for those final bosses
Dragon Quest Heroes made my weekend disappear. I had already invested enough time in finishing all of the side quests that I figured I might as well strive for full completion, but a few optional bosses stood in the way. They...

Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

Stop Dragon Quest Heroes from talking out of your controller


PSA
Oct 15
// Jordan Devore
Several hours into Dragon Quest Heroes, yeah, I should disable the sound emanating from my controller. Characters like to talk, a lot, and snippets of dialog regularly come through the DualShock 4's speakers. It didn't bother...
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

Take a look at the heroes and enemies of Dragon Quest Heroes


Memories
Oct 12
// Chris Carter
One of the first games I ever played was Dragon Quest on the NES, known as Dragon Warrior in the west. It was the game that gave me the RPG knowledge I have today, and I still have vivid memories of the colorful and...

Review: Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below

Oct 07 // Chris Carter
Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below (PS3, PS4 [reviewed])Developers: Omega ForcePublisher: Square EnixReleased: October 13, 2015 (US), February 26, 2015 (JP)MSRP: $59.99 Following a very cool opening cinematic, you're greeted with the same iconic designs from Akira Toriyama that we've all come to love over the years -- yes, this might be an Omega Force game, but it's still a Dragon Quest joint. The visual style has translated excellently to this new endeavor, and although I'm sure some will find the realistic regalia meshed with bright goofy enemies jarring at times, it looks even better in action. It's great to see the timeless designs for enemies like the skeletons and slimes still hold up. There's also a lot of detail present, such as the aforementioned skeletons taking off their heads, or golems losing their bricks at times. The writing and story however, are very basic and not indicative of the typical Dragon Quest experience. There's plenty of fun puns (a slime says things like "Goo and help him" a lot) so it is charming, but the dialogue itself never really has any chance to evolve from start to finish. What you see in the first 30 minutes or so is what you get, and it follows the same sort of heroes' "ragtag band" journey schematic throughout. It is a hack and slash game after all, but I expected a bit more. Getting right into the action, players are presented with two control schemes -- one is a standard Warriors setup, and the other literally allows players to mash one-button combos with ease. Given that you can choose between these and a male or female main character to start, new players will relish how easy it is to acclimate. Said combo system takes its cue from Warriors in that specific rotations of light and heavy will lead into new moves (such as a wave-clearing area-of-effect or a vertical launcher), but there's more variance here than meets the eye when it comes to weapon nuance. For instance, swords can parry, staffs impact a wide area, and then there's all sorts of outliers like boomerangs, fisticuffs, whips, axes, bows, deadly fans, and magic. If you're curious, yes some fan favorite characters pop up, ranging from heroes who appeared in Dragon Quest IV through VIII. Players can also block, make use of a fully-featured jump (not just a useless hop), and utilize a rather generous dodge in addition to the classic Musuo power mode after charging up. [embed]312829:60648:0[/embed] Due to the exaggerated nature of the dodge, it makes the proceedings a bit more action-oriented than a lot of games in the past, and leads to a less rigid style of gameplay. Plus, using Musuo mode when combined with Toriyama's designs basically turns you into a Super Saiyan. You can also get more advanced with air dashing, double-jumping, summoning minions (which can go into offensive or defensive mode), party member toggling, and queuing up spells both in combat and in non-action sequences. As for the AI who follows you into battle (there's a real-time party switching element with L2), not enough work was done considering that it's a rather essential element. The AI is mostly involved with the battles at hand, sure, but they tend to loiter far too often, and it can take you out of the game. Maybe it's to actually entice you to switch more often to fire them up, but I wish there were a Gambit system of some sort that allowed you to control their general actions. It's not just the party system that makes Heroes feel like a real RPG though, as the game sports a world map, a pretty deep stat and customization mechanic, skill trees, and shops. You're free to upgrade your armor, magic, and items, and visit the alchemist to create and synthesize new gear. Players can also chat with their party at the bar, use the church to pray and save the game, and eventually get an airship. The sidequests feel right at home and like an authentic Dragon Quest game, and trophies reward players directly -- a system more developers should implement. But while sidequests are generally fun, missions are shorter battles that are often a bit too linear. In other Warriors games you're usually completing multiple objectives on large, sprawling maps with plenty of side areas, but here in Heroes they feel more like arenas that sometimes only span a few screens. Thankfully the bosses are more involved as a result, sometimes featuring flying enemies or multi-foe fights. I won't spoil them here but suffice to say they all have strategies and weak points to discover, and are sufficiently formidable. You'll need to actually switch between party members and think tactically. Alongside of the more bite-sized quest structure though is a complete lack of multiplayer. Yep, that's right -- there's no split-screen or online play of any kind. Whereas it was easy to introduce people into the world of Zelda with some co-op Hyrule Warriors sessions, Heroes is definitely a tougher sell, as the vast majority of Warriors games are shipped with heavy multiplayer elements for a reason. It does have all of the current DLC from Japan bundled in though, which is a plus. Dragon Quest Heroes almost feels like a fully-fledged action RPG, but there are a few things holding it back from greatness. In the end though it still has its charms, alongside of a beautiful art style and a buttery smooth framerate. If you really dig Warriors games and can go at it solo, you'll likely enjoy it.
Dragon Quest review photo
That name though
Close your eyes. Imagine you're stuck on a deserted island for a year -- yes, in this situation, a year is a certainty. If you could only have one game with you for that entire period (and have a working power source, bear wi...

Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

King Doric is psyched to tell us about Dragon Quest Heroes


Take a breath!
Sep 29
// Jordan Devore
Chris enjoyed that last Dragon Quest Heroes trailer. I like this one even better. It's more comprehensive and the narration by King Doric is just so damn enthusiastic. The video covers the cast, monster summoning, shopping, t...
DQB photo
DQB

Dragon Quest Builders gets trailer, out January 2016


Dragon Quest meets Minecraft
Sep 15
// Steven Hansen
Square Enix showed off the opening cinematic for Dragon Quest Heroes and its director proceeded to explain block-building games as if Minecraft isn't also huge in Japan (it is). Builders is an in-house Square Enix projec...

Dragon Quest Heroes is a fast-paced, challenging spin-off

Sep 11 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]310289:60328:0[/embed] Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below (PS4)Developer: Omega ForcePublisher: Square EnixRelease Date: October 13, 2015MSRP: $59:99 Set in the kingdom of Erusaze, humans and monsters live in relative harmony with one another, until one day, the capital city of Arba is attacked by an army of monsters led by an evil sorcerer. Taking up arms against them are two heroes from the king's guard who must band together a group of adventurers, warriors, and even monsters of their own from across the land to combat the legion of foes seeking to destroy civilization. Given the scope and detail of both the Dragon Quest series and the Musou titles, the story does well to fit itself nicely into the themes and styles of both. With the vivid and colorful setting of the DQ games, which channels Akira Toriyama's signature art style quite well along with the vast number of foes to battle, there's a undeniable richness to the world. Exploring it was quite a treat. In traditional Dragon Quest fashion, players can name their central character and then proceed on their epic quest. However, Dragon Quest Heroes presents players with the choice of two unique characters, Luceus and Aurora, both of whom are fully voiced, have their own personalities, and posses their unique play-styles. Selecting one will allow players to view the story from their perspective, with the other serving as another member of the party. Much like other titles in the Musou series, players will be able to choose multiple characters with their own unique move-sets and abilities. Many of the classic DQ archetypes and classes are recreated with new fleshed-out characters, and even some returning from past Dragon Quest titles will join your party to battle the evils that corrupt the land. Moving away from the random battles and turn-based combat, the developers incorporated many of RPG systems from the series into their brand of Dynasty Warriors-style combat and gameplay structure. Battles are entirely action-oriented, using quick and strong attacks, magic, and even the tried-and-true Tension abilities from recent Dragon Quest games to beat down the legions of monsters. Stages take place with in vast open areas with waves of monsters, while tasking players with completing objectives from active quests. You'll have to manage your MP for magic attacks, and keep your inventory of support items well-stocked for when you travel out into the field. The gameplay is very similar to titles like Dynasty Warriors, but it still has the DNA of Dragon Quest. I was happy with the marriage of different genres. Even though I felt more a twitch-focused approach to gameplay, I still felt a sense of progression as I grew in power along with my party. Keep in mind, the general structure of Dragon Quest Heroes is focused on the singular adventure with your party. Unlike the other Musou titles, which focus on a particular characters and their campaign, your party of heroes in DQH will be with you throughout your journey, and while you can switch between them during battle with ease, your chosen characters are still the main focus. Eventually, your band of heroes will gain access to a flying fortress made of stone, which will serve as your base of operations as you travel around the world taking on new challenges. With the airship, you'll essentially have a mobile town from which you can shop, interact with other characters, find new quests, and perform any other needs you may need. Battles are much faster and to the point compared to most other Musou titles, which is great for the focus on narrative and the RPG systems. With its October release approaching, this title will be up the alley for both fans of Dragon Quest and the Musou series. For the classic RPG series, this is largely new territory to be exploring. Action-RPG gameplay with its rich and finely-tuned systems would be challenging to do justice, but I was pleased with how Omega Force made the transition. To make things more enticing for the Western release, all the released DLC from the original launch in Japan will be available for free to all players. Even with its new gameplay, Dragon Quest Heroes still exudes the same sense of adventure and wonder found in the much-loved series.
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Includes all bonus DLC for free
I've got quite the soft spot for Omega Force's series of Musou titles. If you've heard of or played Dynasty Warriors, then you know exactly what they are. As the popularity of the studio's games grow with every release, it br...

Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

Dragon Quest Heroes' DLC will be on-disc and free in the US


No waiting needed
Sep 11
// Chris Carter
When Dragon Quest Heroes arrives in the west in October on PS4, it'll sport all of the DLC so far that has been released in Japan, by way of free patches in that region. The game followed a similar strategy to Hyrule War...
Graphics, baby! photo
Graphics, baby!

Side by side Dragon Quest VIII 3DS and PS2 comparison


Graphics, baby!
Sep 08
// Steven Hansen
With Dragon Quest VIII's recent 3DS release in Japan, YouTuber user "ninten2tv" has put together a side-by-side comparison of the intro for both games. The 3DS is brighter. Too bright? It definitely lacks some tertiary detail, but it looks alright. The only thing that bums me out is how much that gorgeous sky gets smudged smooth. The 3DS does get a new ending, though. via [Nintendo Everything]
Tokyo Game Show photo
Tokyo Game Show

Square schedules 'secret' Tokyo Game Show event


If you schedule it is it a secret?
Sep 08
// Steven Hansen
Square Enix will have a bunch of games at this year's Tokyo Game Show and most of them have "Final Fantasy" or "Dragon Quest" embedded in their confusing titles. The company also just released a teaser video for its show hig...
Mobile focus photo
Mobile focus

Final Fantasy XV heads Square Enix's Tokyo Game Show 2015 lineup


A lot of mobile
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
Wow, just a few more weeks until I'm eating curry twice a day and peeing in sexy anime nurse urinals. Also, playing video games over at the Tokyo Game Show (September 17-20). Yes, I did reuse this intro from an hour ago, because I am writing another story about a company unveiling its TGS lineup and, like Japan, I am very efficient. Anyways, it's Square this time. No Call of Duty Black Ops III?
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

This is the best Dragon Quest Heroes trailer I've seen yet


Healix looks awesome
Aug 27
// Chris Carter
CGI-filled trailers often do a great job of building hype, but this gameplay-filled Dragon Quest Heroes video just does it for me. It shows a ton of characters doing their thing, provides a quick look at the English cas...
Dragon Quest photo
Dragon Quest

Tokyo shop to hold collaboration event with Dragon Quest this month


Starting on August 22
Aug 18
// Chris Carter
If you're near Chiyoda, Tokyo next week, you may want to check out the 3 Chome-1-10 Sotokanda Lawson shop, which is being re-decorated, Dragon Quest style, starting August 22 for a limited time. The store ...
Dragon Quest XI photo
Dragon Quest XI

Dragon Quest XI's first screenshots look amazing


No matter which version you choose
Aug 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Square Enix unveiled Dragon Quest XI for PlayStation 4 and Nintendo 3DS late last month at an event in Tokyo, where the publisher gave attendees a nice long look at the game. Today, the company has shared the first ...
Dragon Quest VIII photo
Dragon Quest VIII

Dragon Quest VIII on 3DS has a new dungeon, ending


'Surprise developments'
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
Dragon Quest VIII was released all the way back in 2004 on PS2, but its legacy has withstood the test of time. It's still regarded as one of the best entries in the series, and later this year in Japan, it will hit the 3DS. N...
Dragon Quest XI photo
Dragon Quest XI

Dragon Quest XI is simultaniously classic and modern


Two eras of JRPG united
Aug 02
// Jonathan Holmes
[Update: Siliconera reports that you will be able to switch between 2D and 3D diplays art any time. Thanks Omnes Morimur!] We already knew that the 3DS version of Dragon Quest XI allows players to explore in 2D sprites and 3...
Dragon Quest X photo
Dragon Quest X

Dragon Quest X now coming to Nintendo NX, PS4 (Update)


Wait, what?
Jul 28
// Kyle MacGregor
[Update: Speaking to IGN, Square Enix backpedaled, saying NX is only "under consideration."] In addition to revealing Dragon Quest XI, Square Enix just announced a pair of new platforms for its predecessor. Dragon Quest ...
Dragon Quest XI photo
And it looks fantastic!
[Update:  Speaking to IGN, Square Enix backpedaled, saying NX is only "under consideration."] Square Enix just officially announced Dragon Quest XI, the next mainline title in the publisher's storied role-playing ga...


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