Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Devil May Cry

Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition is ridiculous and over the top in all the right ways

Apr 20 // Alessandro Fillari
Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition (PC, PlayStation 4 [previewed], Xbox One)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomRelease date: Summer 2015 Set some time after the events of the original Devil May Cry, the devil-hunting half-demon Dante investigates the mysterious Order of the Sword, a religious sect that worships his demon father, Sparda, as a god. After an infestation of demons swarms the island of Fortuna, causing mass panic and bloodshed, the Order sends a young holy knight named Nero, who may have some demon lineage of his own, to find the source -- whom they believe is Dante. But along the way, Nero discovers that things are not what they appear, and that the Order of the Sword may have sinister motives in mind for him and the son of Sparda. Taking cues from Devil May Cry 3: Special Edition, the developers chose to include more supplementary features for DMC4:SE, while retaining the core structure of the original game. Using the excellent PC version of DMC4 as a base, the Special Edition now features Turbo Mode (20% increase to game-speed), Legendary Dark Knight mode (Hard mode with larger crowds of enemies), higher texture and visual fidelity, and tighter performance and framerate for both PC and console releases. But of course, the SE also brings additions that are brand new to DMC4, such as playable Vergil, Trish, and for the first time ever, Lady -- along with new cutscenes, new costumes for every character, some slight gameplay tweaks, new art to unlock, and some other surprises neat to find. However, it should be stressed that the core structure of DMC4 is almost exactly the same, and anyone expecting new bosses, monsters, and areas to travel to will likely be disappointed. It's still DMC4 through and through. I know many DMC enthusiasts were worried about what balancing tweaks were made to the game, particularly with Dante and Nero. With exception to general tweaks such as quicker Speed boost, faster Orb and Proud Soul acquisition, and some other minor tweaks and adjustments, the core gameplay for the original duo is largely untouched. So anyone who's mastered the intricacies of Guard Flying, Interia, and the incredibly tricky DRI (Distorted Real Impact) should rest easy knowing that they're intact and ready to take advantage of. Truth be told, though, I was a bit surprised by how much of the game was kept as is, even after eight years worth of feedback and cool PC mods that have surfaced. I'm bummed out that the new modes from DmC: Definitive Edition, such as Must Style, Hardcore, and Gods Must Die weren't included either. It seems like a missed opportunity, and DMC4:SE could have really taken advantage of them in a cool way.  With that said, I was impressed with the new content that awaits players in the Special Edition, and the folks at Capcom have put in the work to make it just as rad as ever. The focus of my session was checking out how all of the playable characters stacked up in DMC4:SE, and I was quite pleased to see how much diversity was offered here. Rest assured, these aren't some cheap additions to the game. The new characters feature their own unique playstyle and strategies that set them apart from the rest, which is a welcome change of pace for those who've clocked hundreds of hours into Bloody Palace. Moreover, they all have their own unique movesets to unlock, which is just as expansive as the original characters. I played with all five characters fully maxed out, so I got a pretty unique opportunity to see what they were like at their best. As you no doubt saw from the many teases we've seen over the last few months, Vergil is back, and this time he's more motivated than ever. Set many years before the events of DMC4, we find a young Vergil investigating the Order of the Sword. Not long after his arrival, demons invade the island and Vergil must put them in their place while uncovering the truth behind the mysterious group. Though his progression follows the Dante/Nero campaign beat for beat (sans original cutscenes), they feature all new opening and ending scenes to bookend his experiences. And we may even find some answers regarding his connection to series newcomer Nero. Many fans adored DMC3's incarnation of Vergil, and DMC4:SE continues his stoic and composed sense of combat, while upping his versatility to new heights. Wielding his standard Yamato -- along with the Beowulf gauntlets and Force Edge/Yamato combo from DMC3 -- Vergil dispenses his calm and uncompromising style of action that sets him apart from the others. Though fans will likely have reservations about Vergil possessing these weapons at this point in the timeline (before DMC3), the developers hope that the ambiguity of the plot and his expanded moveset will give them a pass in the eyes of fans. And after playing with Vergil, I'm certainly cool with the liberties they've taken.  Essentially the antithesis to Dante's bombastic and machismo combat style, Vergil feels more composed and cunning than his brother, which in essence lies the true genius of his style. This is reflected in the brand new Concentration meter, which rewards calm and precise combat. As you connect with strikes and dodge attacks, you build Vergil's Concentration level, which boosts his attack power and speed. Once you build it up to the max level, Vergil becomes a serious force in combat, and even unlocks special moves to use in his Devil Trigger phase -- such as the Judgement Cut End, an ultimate attack that slashes all foes at the cost of your DT gauge. I was supremely impressed with how much the developers had expanded Vergil's gameplay. The new Concentration meter makes combat feel more rewarding and satisfying, and keeping my meter full made fights more tense, as getting hit or missing an attack would decrease the meter. Thankfully, Vergil is still a beast even at the lowest concentration. In addition to incorporating DmC Vergil's sword teleportation move, which allows Vergil to teleport to enemies hit with his sword illusion skills, his weapon combos have also been fleshed out more. With Yamato using new ground and aerial combos, including aerial variants of Judgement Cut and also Vergil's take on Nero's Roulette, Force Edge also employs new combos paying homage to DMC3's Agni and Rudra moveset. Not to mention, his DT phase enhances his abilities and combos, giving him faster charge time and reduced cooldown, along with replacing his side-roll with the Table Hopper evade. I know I won't be alone in saying this, but I would've been plenty satisfied with just having Vergil as a new character. But of course, Capcom decided to take things a step further by including two more characters to the roster with Lady and Trish. Though Vergil has the campaign all to himself, Lady and Trish will share a campaign mode similar to Nero and Dante's story. With two new cutscenes, their story focuses on their exploits in the background as Nero and Dante are getting into trouble throughout the island. Lady's portion takes her through Nero's missions, using her grappling hook for traversal, while Trish cleans up in Dante's later levels. This is the first time Lady has been playable in the DMC series, and as the sole human character in the roster, the developers had to rethink how combat would work for her. Focusing more on her firearms, and employing a keep-away style, Lady is at her best while at a distance. With her only melee weapon being the massive and lumbering rocket launcher Kalina Ann, which feels fairly limited compared to other melee weapons, it's quite clear that players will have to adjust how they engage their foes with Lady. Thankfully, her arsenal of firearms and gadgets, including the Kalina Ann's grappling hook which pulls in enemies, offers more than enough stopping power to take down whatever comes her way. While it's easy to assume that her combat mechanics are a carbon copy of Dante's gunslinger style, there's definitely a lot of nuance to be found in the human devil hunter's fighting style. Using pistols, a shotgun, and the Kalina Ann as her primary weapons, Lady's focus on range gives her an edge that the other characters do not. Taking some inspiration from Nero's exceed gauge, Lady is able to charge her weapons up to three levels, which boosts her attack power significantly. When charged, the bullet icon on the HUD will show how much juice is left in the charge, giving players an idea of how much time they have for their attacks. Not only is Lady able to charge her weapons much faster than the other characters, her weapons react differently with a full charge. For instance, a max-level charge for the Kalina Ann sends out a super-charged rocket that pierces through multiple foes. And yes, she does have a double jump and also a neat spin on the Devil Trigger phase. Her take on double jump has her rocket launcher firing off a shot, propelling her upward and damaging foes underneath (which has damage jump cancelling potential), and her spin on the Devil Trigger is essentially a volley of grenades that clears out all nearby enemies. I adored the character in DMC3, and finally getting the chance to play as her was such a blast. Granted, it was an adjustment. I had to resist the urge to use melee attacks with Lady -- it was quite clear they weren't her strong suit -- which in itself was a bit of an oddity for DMC. While every character thrives on getting up close and personal, Lady is the polar opposite. Many of her moves even focus on getting her in and out of the action when the need arises. For instance, her take on the shotgun's gunstinger move has her charge in gun first for a deadly close-range blast, then follows up with another shot that her launches back out of the fray. Another example is her R1+ Back + Jump move, which replaces the typical backflip and causes Lady to jump backwards while tossing a number of grenades to the foes in front of her. Ultimately, I found Lady to be a very technical character, and she's arguably the most unique choice in the roster. I'm usually a player that uses firearms somewhat sparingly, but playing as Lady offered some inventive ways to use them. Which I certainly appreciate. Finally, the last new character to grace the Special Edition is long-time femme fatale Trish. She was last playable in Devil May Cry 2, and thankfully the developers sought to flesh her out. Using her fists, the sword Sparda (the Force Edge's transformed state), the pistols Ebony and Ivory, the super weapon Pandora, and her demonic lighting powers, Trish is essentially DMC4: Special Edition's wildcard character. On the surface, she seems to be there just for eye-candy -- but in truth, Trish is one of the deadliest characters in the roster. With her focus being primarily on crowd control and group combat, many of her moves attack multiple foes at once, due in part to her range and lightning imbued attacks. To be totally honest, I initially I felt that Trish seemed overpowered, given that she has pretty easy access to such powerful weapons. Moreover, she's an incredibly flashy character, which has her pulling off a number of elaborate combos with ease. While developing DMC4:SE, the creatives wanted to have a character that allowed newcomers to get in easily, which meant removing the weapon-switch options and keeping her arsenal present at all times. Now before you grab your pitchforks over the thought of accessibility tied to DMC, do know that selecting Trish does not mean you picked the "you win" character. As I got more comfortable with her, I found a lot of nuance that required knowledge of enemy placement, range, and sheer timing on my part. Her moveset is very robust, and features larger depth in crowd control and focused attacks than the others. Her primary weapons are her fists, called Bare Knuckle, and it's the most robust unarmed moveset the series has ever had. Bare Knuckle takes advantage of her lighting powers, and gives each of her attacks a serious boost. Along with Sparda, which is set to the Style button (Circle on PS4), Trish uses the legendary sword as is with strikes and launchers, but she can also treat it like a boomerang to keep enemies locked in place with Round Trip, or to scoop up a group of foes towards her from a distance. Her ultimate move, however, is truly a sight to behold. As one of the longest combos in the game, Trish uses almost all of Sparda's moves in an intensive flurry, finishing off with her calmly using the legendary weapon as a golf club against the unfortunate foe. Simply put, she's a badass and an utter joy to watch cut loose. Fans of her Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 appearance will be pleased to know they've incorporated her moveset into DMC4:SE. One of her Bare Knuckle moves called Inazuma is an aerial kick that leaves streaks of energy in the environment, which can trap enemies in their place. Add in Sparda's round-trip ability, along with Trish's glorious take on Chun-Li's Spinning Bird Kick, and you've got potential to dish out some gnarly damage. During a quick trip into Legendary Dark Knight mode, I went to Mission 17's street area, which is notorious for featuring the largest number of enemies in the game. While other members of the roster may take some time to clear out the mobs, Trish was in her element and laid waste to the masses in a way that would make the characters from Dynasty Warriors sit down and watch her at work. Seriously, using Sparda's round-trip, along with Inazuma and Pandora's beam cannon (which uses some DT meter) against the mobs was like witnessing Satan's weed wacker at work. It was brutal, incredibly satisfying, and it was clear they didn't send enough enemies to fight. I remember playing as Trish in DMC2, and I was really disappointed that she was a reskin of Dante. Thankfully, DMC4:SE does the character justice. With the entire roster in mind, I felt that they all complement each other, and bring levels of panache that feels special, especially if you're willing to invest the time to learn and grow with them. But what truly impressed me the most was that each character brings something unique to the table. None of them felt half-baked or intended as a diversion from the other more established members. I was quite blown away by how much we're getting here. I spent about two hours tooling around with all the characters, and while Nero and Dante feel just as sharp and versatile as ever, I anticipate the newcomers will get all the attention come release, and with good reason. Although I was initially worried that the new characters would compound the tedium of the recycled environments, I was pleased to find that the new playstyles help to offer a refreshing take on the old encounters. That will certainly take the sting out of backtracking. Hopefully, anyway. But I still have to express my disappoint in that no new modes were added. However, this is one of the great aspects of the remaster trend. Much like its companion title DmC: Definitive Edition, it's allowing games from the previous gen that may have missed the mark to reach a greater potential and be the game fans want it to be. It's been such a long time since Capcom came out with a follow-up to the original DMC series, and Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition shows that it hasn't lost its touch one bit. It's looking to be an incredibly enticing package that revels in gloriously stupid action, and ain't that the best kind? As the Street Fighter of the action genre, this franchise has a large legacy to uphold. And if you were among those who weren't too keen on DmC Devil May Cry and yearned for a return to the classic series, you've now got your shot to do so. So take it. And don't forget to turn on Turbo Mode in the options menu. 
Devil May Cry photo
The time has come, and so have I
The Devil May Cry franchise has experienced some strange happenings in recent years. After the release of Ninja Theory's reboot and many debates among fans about what direction it should go next, the future of the franchise f...

DMC4 photo

Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition will be digital-only in the west

But Japan is getting a physical version
Mar 24
// Chris Carter
I couldn't be more excited for Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition, but sadly, I won't have a physical copy to add to my collection. Apparently in the west, the newly minted remaster will only be present in digital form. Japan h...
Devil May Cry 4 photo
Devil May Cry 4

Details revealed for Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition, including three new playable characters

Including Real Dante
Mar 23
// Chris Carter
Hot damn! It's about time we got an info drop for Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition, a remake that made headlines with the inclusion of Vergil into the mix. The PlayStation Blog has spilled the beans on pretty much everything...

The DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition changelog is extensive

Mar 10 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]288866:57701:0[/embed] With Hardcore Mode being the highlight of Definitive Edition, you'll want to enable that as soon as possible, especially if you're quite familiar with the game or are otherwise up for the challenge. Though if you enjoyed DmC before as it was and just want to be able experience it with a new visual fidelity, you can by all means do so. Ninja Theory's Rahni Tucker, who was the combat designer on the original title and now serves as the creative director on Definitive Edition, commented on a number of the upgrades DmC gained. "The point of HCM is to create an experience that [is] still [Ninja Theory's] DmC, but with a bit of a throwback to the classic DMCs in terms of balance," she said. "We didn't make these changes to the default game, because there are a lot of players who enjoy the current balance; and we didn't want to alienate those players. This way everyone has the option to play the game with the difficulty/balance that suits them. The hardest felt changes in this mode are those to the style system. Getting a SSS, and keeping it, is a lot more difficult in Hardcore Mode. Devil Trigger also throws-back to original DMCs with HCM active, so the player will need to stay on their toes after activating it." Here are a few examples of what's been altered for Hardcore Mode. General Toggle-able on all difficulty levels, for both Dante and Vergil. Does not affect mission unlocking Unique style pars and leaderboards for Hardcore Mode on every difficulty Style Rank Style Rank System re-balanced for HCM Style Rank decay rate on hardcore mode increased further. On hardcore mode, penalties on the Style Rank gain for repeating the same move multiple times is significantly increased. Balance No auto-parry from prop/shredder. Only the 1st strike in an attack can perform a parry. + 5% damage for all enemies. Dreamrunners can parry the Arbiter Flush projectile 3 times on DMD.  One of the biggest changes in Hardcore Mode that I'm sure many will appreciate are the infamous color enemies. With the modifier enabled, players can use whatever weapon they want against these specific enemies, however the like-element weapon is still best for the situation. Red/Blue enemies Frost/Hell Knights can be struck with any weapon. They take reduced damage, and do not react, when hit by weapons that do not match their color (unless Devil Trigger is active)  Ghost/Hell Rages can be struck with any weapon. They take reduced damage, and do not react, when hit by weapons that do not match their color (unless Devil Trigger is active). They are still partially invisible unless in the correct mode.  Hell Rages have 10% less health to accommodate use of any weapon against them. "This was always a controversial point," said Tucker. "On the one hand, DMC is all about variety and being able to creatively mix combos, and the red/blue enemies deflecting Dante's attacks went against that; however, we found during focus testing that players were confused about which weapons to use, so for clarity and feedback purposes the deflection was much better. In the end, after seeing fan feedback, we've changed it for DE so you can hit any guy with any weapon. Using the correct weapon causes hit reactions (they don't get interrupted by the wrong weapon) and still deals more damage." And that's just the tip of the iceberg. You can find more info about the changelog on Capcom-Unity's blog, featuring details about parry windows, Vergil gameplay, and the finer benefits of having an increased frame rate to work with. After reading through the changes, and getting a sense of the developer's view on DMC, I have an even greater appreciation for the game. It's not often we got a detailed look like this with developer commentary, so it's definitely something I respect Ninja Theory for. Also, the launch trailer is excellent. '80s gothic rock from The Lost Boys is such a great fit for DmC.DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition - Change Log [Capcom-Unity]
DmC Devil May Cry DE photo
Sans fedora and color keys
With DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition out now, fans of the series have another title to keep them satiated till the next one is ready. As you've likely read, Chris gave his impressions of the game earlier. He was im...

DmC Devil May Cry's story still blows, but the Definitive Edition is more fun

Mar 10 // Chris Carter
DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition (PlayStation 4 [tested], Xbox One)Developer: Ninja TheoryPublisher: CapcomRelease date: March 10, 2015MSRP: $39.99 Yep, this is the same bad story and bad characters as the original -- nothing substantial is changed on that front, except for the removal of Vergil's fedora. Ninja Theory's take on They Live was neat enough at first, but it quickly grew flat over the course of Dante's stereotypical hero's journey. I don't need my Dante to have feelings or curse every five seconds -- I just need him to be badass. Actions speak louder than words. Having said that, aesthetically the game is as gorgeous as ever in 1080p and 60 frames per second. At long last the latter figure comes into play, and DmC is all the better for it. The club scene still stands out as one of the coolest-looking action sequences in recent memory, and the constantly shifting Limbo setpieces are seamlessly integrated into the platforming (although they overstay their welcome hours in). So what's different? Capcom has made a lot of adjustments to gameplay that core fans have wanted the entire time. For starters, lock-on returns to the series, and I for one am damn happy about it. It's completely optional -- if you think that lock-on doesn't have a place in action games (you're wrong), that's cool, you can just not use the button for it. Since the original oddly had two buttons for dashing, it feels like it was always meant to be in there anyway and was cut for time. [embed]288347:57552:0[/embed] Combat in general is vastly improved thanks to the 20% faster "Turbo" option. I recommend everyone immediately go to this checkbox and click it, since it makes the game much more fun on every level. Combat feels so much more fluid, challenging, and hectic -- it's like playing a new game. Chalk another win up to the modders, who Capcom got the idea from. The "Hardcore" modifier is another must-play, as it remixes enemy movements and subtly shifts frames around, creating a different experience than you're used to in DmC. Add on top of that the "Must Style" modifier (all three can be enabled at once, mind) that requires you to use combos of S rank or higher to even do damage, and you have a great combination. I don't dabble in Must Style on a consistent basis, but I enjoyed levels more in general with Turbo and Hardcore on, especially on the higher difficulties. Speaking of difficulties, there are still eight of them, and in tandem with all the other options there's plenty of replay value to be had. This is particularly true since the Definitive Edition bundles in the Vergil's Downfall DLC storyline, which I liked better than the core game. It removes all of the bullshit character growth and terrible dialog in favor of letting Vergil kick ass and accept his inner demon. Again, I love the touch at the end where his original skin is re-dubbed "Weak Vergil." It really encapsulates what made Devil May Cry so special in the first place. Keep in mind though that Vergil's Downfall is only a scant few levels, and if you aren't keen on replaying them over and over on higher difficulties, you'll run through it in seconds flat. Vergil also now has his own Bloody Palace mode, but sadly it only supports 60 floors, not 100 like Dante's. Still, each floor has more variety than the standard Palace, so it's enjoyable -- especially with Vergil's skillset. For those of you who can never complete it in time, you can now disable the timer. A great touch for newcomers. As far as the legacy of DmC goes, no one would argue that making Devil May Cry more accessible after four rather hardcore entries is a bad thing, but Ninja Theory failed to address the fans that made the series so successful in the first place. Take the Bayonetta franchise, two of the best action games ever made (outside of Devil May Cry 3). They allowed for systems that welcomed newcomers and provided a high skill ceiling. While DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition's ceiling doesn't reach nearly as high as the current queen, it's a better effort than the original package, and does a better job of appeasing both types of fans. I'm kind of torn on the "Definitive" concept given its price point, though. In many ways much of it could have been delivered in a free update (especially if there's a PC version in the works, which hasn't been confirmed yet), but if you haven't already experienced DmC, getting this package at a discount would be the best way to do it.
DmC Devil May Cry DE photo
Vergil's DLC is the highlight again
You've heard the criticisms for Ninja Theory's take on Devil May Cry a million-trillion fucking times. So let's just dive into the Definitive Edition, shall we?

Devil May Cry 4 photo
Devil May Cry 4

Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition may be getting a PC release

In addition to PS4 and Xbox One
Mar 03
// Chris Carter
It was easy to miss the announcement for the PS4 and Xbox One version of Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition amidst the DmC re-release, but it happened. We don't know a whole lot about what the Special Edition actually...
Run DmC photo
Run DmC

DmC Definitive Edition wants you to visit Vergils Bloody Palace

Hard enough?
Feb 09
// Steven Hansen
Vergil's Bloody Palace is a 60-floor combat arena coming to the current generation remaster for Ninja Theory's DmC, which Alessandro took a long look at a couple weeks back.  Unlike Dante's, which progresses t...
Devil May Cry photo
Devil May Cry

New Devil May Cry video will melt your face

Wub wub wub wub
Feb 04
// Robert Summa
For me, it's really hard to drum up a lot of excitement for remakes or remasters. If I've already played them, then why do I need to play again? And if I didn't play the first time, then why would I want to now? I'm a discer...

DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition goes above and beyond

Jan 22 // Alessandro Fillari
DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition (PlayStation 4 [previewed], Xbox One)Developer: Ninja TheoryPublisher: CapcomRelease date: March 10, 2015MSRP: $39.99 In this remaster of the Devil May Cry reboot, players take on the role of Dante, a young rebel who learns that the world around him is not what it seems. With demonic and angelic powers at his disposal, along with a serious talent for combat, he'll have to team up with his long-lost brother Vergil to battle hoards of demons that have invaded the real world. Along the way, he'll come to terms with his family's past, and face the demon king behind it all. Though these remasters, revisits, and enhanced releases seem all the rage nowadays (Capcom just released one this week), Definitive Edition has been making the most of the opportunity. Besides offering the complete DmC experience (all DLC packs included), uprezzed graphics and sharper visuals, and new costumes for both characters, Ninja Theory also jumped at the chance to put its action-brawler through a heavy round of retuning. We're talking Street Fighter-level rebalancing, here. The studio even flew out DmC combo video masters to its offices to offer some feedback on the new build of the game. In many ways, this is the Director's Cut. As much of a fan I was of Ninja Theory's take on Devil May Cry, I can't deny that it certainly had issues. Not only was the difficulty knocked down several pegs, which wasn't in keeping with series tradition, but many of the combat design choices, like the elemental-specific foes, added more annoyances than challenge. But Definitive Edition aims to remedy many of those problems. No more instant SSS ranks from mashing the same moves, no more easy parries, and no more infinite flights in Angel form to be had here. You wanted DmC to play by DMC's rules? You got it. But let's get this out of the way: anyone expecting a complete reworking of DmC and its gameplay system to fit exactly how the previous games felt will be disappointed. Despite what many of the more cynical fans assumed, this is not DmC: Apology Edition (Haha, so clever). DmC: Definitive Edition is still very much Ninja Theory's Devil May Cry. Capcom producer Rey Jimenez spoke with me at length about the reception DmC had, and how this remaster might even make the harshest cynics look at the game in a new light. "I think a lot of the negative reaction from the game came from the early announcement, which there were definitely problems with," Jimenez said while reflecting on the infamous debut at TGS 2010. "The end product was something that definitely appealed to a wider base -- but we really wanted to do this particular game [again] because it would really benefit from the jump [to current-gen]. There was some performance lacking that really affected the previous systems," he explained."This was something that could be revisited." According to Jimenez, "The guys at Ninja Theory always had confidence in their work, and [...] the reaction we've seen so far has been encouraging. [The developers] are very proud of the work they've done, and Capcom has been behind this product since day one." On new tech, DmC runs at a brisk 60 frames per second. Understandably, the original release on Xbox 360 and PS3 ran sluggishly, especially when put side by side with the superior PC port, which Ninja Theory used as the base for Definitive Edition. Moreover, the developers wanted to take advantage of the PS4 and Xbox One's social functions to allow players to share combo videos and other exhibitionist gameplay more easily. Jimenez called working on the port "a fairly quick process," but noted there were challenges. For starters: "Getting it to 64-bit, and adjusting the framerate and physics changes. Since Unreal 3 isn't officially supported yet on PS4 and Xbox One, we had to do a bit of modifications to the engine to make run on the new systems. On the new consoles right now with social integration as a default, anyone can make a great combo video, and since you don't need to capture footage, I think that will be phenomenal for players." In the hour I spent with the game, I was completely taken with it. DmC: DE felt sharp and on point. Though some changes are fairly subtle, such as the complete removal of Vergil's fedora (which Ninja Theory hated, by the way), many others will be instantly noticeable, particularly during combat. I constantly felt as if I was rediscovering aspects of the game I was already comfortable with, which was an awesome feeling. While the folks at Capcom were not keen on sharing the complete changelog just yet (it's apparently over six pages long), they were glad to talk about the success they had with the PC release. Did I mention how great the PC version of DmC was? Capcom and Ninja Theory thought so too. More importantly, they loved all the cool mods players created, such as Turbo Mode (increasing game speed by twenty percent) and a number of unofficial patches and tweaks like the removal of weapon-specific enemies. A number of these mods were so well received by the developers they decided to implement them for this remaster. The work put into the Definitive Edition was equal parts developer iteration and incorporation of fan feedback. Among these are the inclusion of the much-demanded lock-on targeting (complete with hold or toggle options) and a remappable button layout. For the latter, you can swap around most every action and ability. Want to recreate the layout for classic DMC? Go right ahead, and what better way to put the lock-on to use? Though initially it felt a bit jarring as the free-camera setup had to readjust itself, I quickly got my bearings. I still found myself going without it for the most part, but the addition of the lock-on became useful during encounters with elite enemies. By far the most impressive feature added to Definitive Edition is the Hardcore Mode. Intended for combat enthusiasts who clamor for classic DMC, the new gameplay system addresses a number of criticisms from the original while also incorporating modifications to the current system. Firstly, Hardcore Mode is not a standalone difficulty mode akin to Dante Must Die or the brand new Gods Must Die modes, but an optional gameplay modifier activated before mission start. If you weren't a fan of the original's design choices for combat and wish for things to be a bit more akin to the original games (such as no enemy launch on devil trigger), this mode is for you. "All of the changes and tweaks we've made, we've done them into two categories," said Jimenez. "A bunch of tweaks that are for the default game make it a better title -- and all the other changes that make it more like the classic DMC series are all placed into Hardcore Mode. We did this to allow people who loved old DmC to continue on with the same mechanics, but also have a title that has the best of old and new DMC. We definitely didn't want to have people adhere to new changes if they enjoyed the original game itself." In addition to Hardcore Mode, another challenging option is Must Style Mode. With this modifier active, players need to reach S rank and above to damage enemies. Initially, I found this to be a simple affair given the number of enemies to take on. But then things changed once I was alone with a chainsaw-wielding Ravager. Each hit takes you back several ranks, and you have to work your way back up to S level while switching up moves to keep style growth healthy. This encounter took me several minutes, and it was a real wake-up call that I had to step up my game. These modifiers add a whole new layer of depth. Without Hardcore Mode active, DmC reverts to its original combat balancing (save for a few additions and tweaks). Enabling it felt like stepping into a new game, and coupled with turbo mode, combat was bombastic and intense. DmC's Hardcore Mode brings out the best in Ninja Theory's game, and its level of refinement and polish shows great potential for combat exhibitionism. Not content with just rebalancing the combat engine, the studio also added a brand new Bloody Palace mode for Vergil. Just like the original mode for Dante, you'll have to fight through a gauntlet of enemies and bosses while dealing with varying conditions and obstacles. Interestingly, Vergil's take on BP mode only features 60 levels as opposed to the standard 100 for Dante. While this may sound disappointing, several levels have multiple phases that require you to warp to different areas and fight extra waves of enemies. While the number of stages are shorter, there is definitely a lot of variety to be found here. And yes, you can now turn the timer off in Bloody Palace. It's definitely reassuring to see the game in such solid shape, though I'm a little perplexed about the lack of a PC release being announced so far. Its absence is strange given how much of an influence the PC port of the original DmC was for Definitive Edition. While this recent trend for bringing ports to new tech has gotten somewhat of a bad rap, it certainly has its advantages. Not only does it allow newcomers to get their hands on a spruced-up version of the game on their new consoles, it also allows games to have a second chance at being something truly exceptional. As much fun I had with DmC on PS3 and PC, there were a number issues I wished were ironed out by the developers. And now with the release of Definitive Edition, it's finally coming to pass. It's an exciting time to be a Devil May Cry fan. Despite what you may feel about DmC, its developer, or what Capcom's true focus should be for the franchise, it's hard to deny that a considerable amount of attention and care went into this remaster. If you were one of the many who couldn't come around to giving the original a shot, then Definitive Edition will be your best opportunity to do so. Say what you will, but it's easily the most content-rich Devil May Cry game released in a very long time. And that's nothing to turn your nose up at. 
DmC Definitive Edition photo
Reach out and touch faith
It's been just over two years since the release of one of last gen's most polarizing titles. Back in 2010, Capcom made a bold and wildly unexpected decision to hand one of its most-loved franchises to a Western developer, and...

DmC photo

DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition pushed up a week

That means 'not delayed'
Jan 14
// Chris Carter
Maybe Capcom is confident in its build of DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition for the PS4 and Xbox One, because the company just pushed up the release date by a week. While it was originally slated for March 17, it wil...
Devil May Cry photo
Devil May Cry

Do these DmC: Definitive Edition screenshots do anything for you?

Coming to Xbox One and PS4 on March 10, 2015
Jan 12
// Jordan Devore
While I'm far more interested in this summer's Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One (Vergil's playable!), I am still curious about DmC: Definitive Edition. Never did get around to playing the origin...
Devil May Cry photo
Devil May Cry

Man at Arms crafts Dante's Rebellion Sword from Devil May Cry

Featuring Real Dante
Jan 06
// Chris Carter
The Man at Arms series is badass. The recreated weapons are incredibly faithful, and next up is another videogame themed episode -- this time based off of the Devil May Cry series. This rebellion blade has been featured in Devil May Cry 2, 3, and 4, as well as the anime. Get a look at the creation process in their newest video above, or skip straight to 11:00 to see the finished sword!
Mon Hun dress-up photo
Mon Hun dress-up

Felynes can dress up as Dante, Blanka, and Chun-Li in Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate

Nice chest hair, Blanka
Dec 15
// Jordan Devore
I'm no Monster Hunter player but I'm liking the cross-game costumes for Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate. Well, most of them. In line with today's Devil May Cry re-release news, Capcom has shown a Felyne outfit based on Dante. That...

Capcom re-releasing DmC and Devil May Cry 4 on PS4 and Xbox One with new content

Dec 15 // Jordan Devore
DmC developer Ninja Theory has shared specifics about the Definitive Edition on PlayStation Blog: 60 fps and 1080p resolution — It looks and feels super smooth to play. Uprezzed Graphics — Including textures, characters, and cinematics. Big Bundle of Content — The game includes DmC: Devil May Cry, plus all released DLC: Vergil’s Downfall campaign, 3 Dante skins, 3 Dante weapon skins, and the item finder. New Skins — 2 new character skins. Devil May Cry 1 Dante and Classic Vergil. Turbo Mode — Turbo Mode returns to the Devil May Cry series, with the game running 20% faster in this mode. Hardcore Mode — Hardcore mode retains the experience of DmC, but with a throwback to the classic Devil May Cry games in terms of balance. In this mode, which can be toggled on all difficulty levels, the style system has been rebalanced to make ranking up much harder and ranks deteriorate much quicker. In addition, Devil Trigger doesn’t launch enemies into the air, parrying takes more skill, and all enemies hand out more damage. Manual Target Lock — We’ve seen more requests for this than any other feature! The manual target lock works as closely to the classic Devil May Cry lock on as possible and has fully configurable controls. Vergil Bloody Palace — Only second to Manual Target Lock in terms of the number of fan requests! This is a new Bloody Palace mode featuring 60 levels and Vergil as the playable character. Must Style Mode — This is a hardcore modifier on an epic scale that can be played over any difficulty level. Players must be at an S rank or higher to deal any damage to enemies. Gods Must Die Difficulty Mode — This is DmC Definitive Edition’s hardest difficulty mode. It takes DmC’s ridiculously hard Dante Must Die mode and adds a touch more punishment: All enemies spawn with Devil Trigger active and no items or health drops can be used. Rebalanced and Retuned — We’ve studied fan feedback and made a whole host of tweaks and balance changes. The style system has been rebalanced, as have bosses. Exploits have been fixed in combat and some of Dante’s moves rebalanced, such as the Demon Evade. Gameplay tweaks have been made following hardcore player testing; frames have been removed from Kablooey shots, Parry/Evade windows adjusted, and collectibles, keys and doors redistributed. Integration of Popular Community Mods — DmC Definitive Edition includes community mods such as an optional timer disable for Bloody Palace Mode, a triple dash for Angel Evade, and the ability to hit red and blue enemies with any weapon. New Cutscene — an added cinematic scene that never made it into the original. You interested in one, both, or neither?
Devil May Cry photo
Vergil playable in Devil May Cry 4?
Devil May Cry returns next year but not with an all-new installment. I know, I know. But this is the age of higher-res re-releases, after all. Capcom will launch DmC Devil May Cry: Definitive Edition ($39.99 / €39.99) o...

Videogame swords photo
Videogame swords

Check out this amazing gallery of real-life videogame swords

The Soul Reaver is easily my favorite
Jun 13
// Chris Carter
Late last night a friend sent me over an imgur gallery by a user that I couldn't look away from. He is known only as Michaelcthulhu, and he has a pretty rad collection of swords that he's made over the course of a few ye...
PS+ free games photo
PS+ free games

PlayStation Plus freebies: Don't Starve (PS4), DmC (PS3)

DMSee you tomorrow
Jan 06
// Steven Hansen
Engorged on the blood of holiday sacrifice, PlayStation Plus is back tomorrow with free games and assorted discounts. The two you really need to know: Don't Starve will be free for PS4 users and last year's DmC will be free f...
Capcom photo
Producer ponders revival for Final Fight and Dungeons & Dragons
With the arrival of the new generation, Capcom is looking to try new strategies for how to better satisfy its audience. And while Deep Down is an interesting experiment, a producer at Capcom has some other ideas in mind -- an...

Contest: Win a copy of DmC: The Chronicles of Vergil!

Sep 17 // mrandydixon
About the book: Taking place a few months before the smash-hit reimagining of the videogame series, DmC: The Vergil Chronicles unveils all-new aspects of Dante's reimagined world! In a world controlled by demons, Dante is humanity's last remaining hope. But Dante is lost, imprisoned far from the human world. Accompanied by Kat, a human psychic, and nearly driven insane by his inner demon, Dante's twin brother Vergil must now attempt a rescue! Discover the shocking secrets behind the stunning new Capcom videogame, DmC: Devil May Cry! A complete story in a single volume, this story provides never-before-seen information on the iconic characters of the game.
DmC Graphic Novel Contest photo
The graphic novel prequel to DmC
[Update: Contest over! Winners are Scield, HammerShark, and Sephzilla!] Our friends at Titan Books have given us three copies of their new graphic novel DmC: The Chronicles of Vergil to hand out to the Destructoid community! ...

Capcom photo

Capcom Essentials bundles five games in one for $59.99

Still a rather tepid offer
Aug 14
// Abel Girmay
With the new consoles in spitting distance, Capcom is releasing some of its works of this generation in the Capcom Essentials. For $59.99, this compilation packages in Resident Evil 6, Super Street Fighter IV, Dead Rising 2, ...

Retailer outs Capcom bundle featuring five major games

Devil May Cry 4, Dead Rising 2, Super Street Fighter IV, Resident Evil 6, and Mega Man 10
Jul 30
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
[Update: Capcom has confirmed that this bundle is the real deal.] EB Games Canada has a listing for Capcom Essentials, a 5-in-1 pack containing five of Capcom's biggest franchises. The pack is planned for the Xbox 360 and Pla...

DmC and all its DLC 40% off over on Steam

Plus Alan Wake franchise is 90% off
May 31
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
DmC: Devil May Cry is 40% off for Steam's weekend deal. You have until June 3 to score the game at $29.99. Plus, the same discount is applied to all three downloadable content offerings. Vergil's Downfall, the story expansion...

10 games bundled with all their DLC discounted on PSN

Assassin's Creed III, Persona 4: Arena, Metal Gear Rising and more
May 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The PlayStation Store is rolling out a new sales promotion that's packing ten different games with ALL of their downloadable content offerings. The Ultimate Edition bundles are all being offered at 65% off, with PlayStation P...
GDC photo

Ninja Theory talks reboot and shows off unseen Dante art

Dreams and Madness
Mar 29
// Alessandro Fillari
Just two months ago, DmC: Devil May Cry was released and caused quite a ruckus. While this unique entry in the Devil May Cry franchise didn't exactly light up the charts, and remains a contentious title with series fans, at t...

Guide: DmC: Devil May Cry: Vergil's Downfall DLC

Mar 06 // Chris Carter
Tame non-story spoilers incoming. I’d recommend saving this article if you get stuck, and need a quick reference: Do yourself a favor and keep all the tutorials on. You'll want a refresher on how Dante operates, and in particular, that he has the angel air dash, which you'll need. Speaking of air dashing, use Vergil's teleport ability (the dodge button) in tandem with his angel dash in order to reach some otherwise inaccessible platforms. Don't forget to check the store! Odds are most of you won't need consumables, but there are helpful health and Devil Trigger increasing items to buy with your cash. If you need to retreat, use Vergil's teleport to get some breathing room, but make sure you're constantly throwing spirit swords along the way to maximize your damage output. Don't underestimate the power of Vergil's Devil Trigger sword aura move -- use it to stun-lock the more formidable enemies in the DLC. The raven humanoid enemies (Wisps) need a steady flow of spirit swords in them to keep them vulnerable. Since the game doesn't have a lock-on system, you'll have to make due with using the right stick to change airborne enemies. Yep! This is a thing in DmC because they didn't feel like adding in a lock-on system, which would have done wonders on higher difficulty levels. The Imprisoner, the other new enemy that looks like a giant beast, can be bested with patience. Just continue to throw swords in him, and after he attacks, slash him up -- retreat before you get bashed and repeat. When he puts his rock shield up, just bide your time and kill other enemies in the area while keeping an eye on his projectiles. If you remain in the neutral position and press the left dash button, you'll dash straight upwards. Use this to avoid situations where you're being swarmed from all sides and need to go vertical. This also is a great way to dodge The Imprisoner's projectiles -- jump, then teleport dash upwards for more vertical distance. Level up your basic combos and spirit swords first, as they're going to be doing the bulk of your damage initially. Remember you can respec your skills at any time if you're dissatisfied. Hell and Hell Mode will be harder than Dante, as your spirit swords are inherently slower than firearms. Play it safe here -- use spirit swords as often as possible (claw-hand it if you have to keep your finger on the button!), look for openings to use your angel dash attack (Angel button + Y/Triangle), then teleport away.
Vergil's Downfall guide photo
Tips on how to get the most out of Vergil
Vergil's Downfall is finally upon us, and after some Bloody Palace tips, I figured it would be a good idea to revisit DmC. When you think about it, tons of people let their games collect dust in a corner somewhere, waiting fo...

Review: DmC: Devil May Cry: Vergil's Downfall

Mar 06 // Chris Carter
DmC: Devil May Cry: Vergil's Downfall (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Ninja TheoryPublisher: CapcomReleased: March 6, 2013MSRP: $8.99 (720 MSP) Here's the deal. For $8.99, you're buying an all new six mission long campaign (sort of, more on this later), with a brand new playable character that takes place after the core story. Vergil has a completely separate main menu, doesn't interact with the original game in any way, has a limited amount of hidden items to find, his skills level up on their own, and so on. Similar to his incarnation in Devil May Cry 3, Vergil will wield his Yamato (with the addition of angel and demon attacks), and his projectile spirit sword attacks. At first, Vergil feels extremely dull, in that you're mostly going to mash the attack button and utilize the one or two combos you have in total. But once you get angel and demon abilities starting in Mission 2, things get more exciting, as they unlock fun moves like dash attacks, area of effect strikes, and more intricate combo opportunities. Instead of using grappling hooks to get to and fro, Vergil does the same thing with angel or demon sword throws, playing on his emphasis on teleportation. He also has a small store to buy items in, an ability chart, and outside of combat, he functions very similarly to Dante's control scheme. From a gameplay perspective, he's a bit like Dante but a bit trickier in nature. The big difference is when he dashes, he teleports. Remember in DmC when the game had two redundant dash buttons when one of them could have been used for lock-on? Well, Vergil's two dash buttons serve a purpose, as the left dash button serves as an upwards dash in the neutral position, and the right dash button is a downward dash if you're in the air. It sets up some pretty neat combo opportunities, and I'm glad to see Ninja Theory actually work this previously useless button into gameplay. He's also a bit more balanced, as he lacks broken weapons like Dante's Kablooey, and you'll have to use all of his arsenal to complete more challenging difficulties. He also has more than one Devil Trigger ability, and they're not nearly as boring as Dante's "win button" time stop. There are a couple of new enemy types, but the supporting cast is mostly from DmC vanilla, which is a letdown as I expected this add-on to make a unique mark on the franchise. You're going to want to play Son of Sparda (Very Hard) mode to get more enemy remixes, but not everyone is going to do that, and it should have offered more new content up front.All six levels are limbo based, which leaves your enjoyment entirely up to how much you enjoyed it from the main game. My issue is that every single stage feels the same, and since Mission 5 is just a boss fight, and Mission 6 is a Mission 1 re-tread, saying the game has "six new Missions" isn't really the whole truth.There is a very small story, but like the core game, the acting and delivery is still terrible. Thankfully though, it is kept minimal, and the story is told outside of missions through animated cutscenes. I'm just glad it's not integrated heavily into each level like Dante's story, so I don't have to wait constantly for Kat to tell me something redundant before I can keep having fun. Speaking of the story though, Vergil's Downfall could probably be summed up in two entire sentences. But at the same time, DmC's They Live rip-off got extremely grating at times, and at the end of the day, Devil May Cry is an action oriented series -- so I was fine with the reduction narrative wise. One of my principle problems with DmC is that I didn't feel like a badass with Dante, because his character is so plain and wooden. By the end of Vergil's Downfall when I obtained the doppelganger ability, the game actually recreated that feeling of old. Vergil, unlike every character ever in DmC, eventually ceases to be melancholy and annoying, and embraces his inner demon. To drive this point home, you unlock a new skin that re-titles Vergil's old look as "weak Vergil." Yes! It takes until the very end of the DLC to really unlock all of his goodies, but if you opt to replay through every difficulty, you'll reap the benefits of a fully powered Vergil. Personally, using this Vergil on the DLC's higher difficulties was pretty damn fun, I just really wish he was usable in Bloody Palace, as the omission is a huge shame (perhaps a future patch?). Length wise, as I stated earlier there's six missions, all of which are 30 minutes or less. Overall it took me around two and a half hours, but I quickly ended up replaying it on a higher difficulty right after my first completion. Vergil's Downfall has the same number of extra difficulty levels as the core game (four on top of the original three), so there's a lot of replay value here.In a way, Vergil's Downfall represents the game DmC might have been -- less fluff, more style. But at the same time, like many areas of DmC, it lacks substance. You'll fight very samey enemies across five areas that also bear a resemblance to stages from the core game, which at the end of the day, just isn't quite enough to justify DLC pricing for everyone. If you loved DmC, you really can't go wrong here. But if it wasn't everything you had hoped for, Vergil's Downfall will do little than give you a glimpse into the stylish Devil May Cry of old, at least from an aesthetic perspective.
DmC DLC review photo
A brief, familiar journey
Ninja Theory had a lot to prove with DmC: Devil May Cry. Not only did they have to appease their fans, but they had to live up to an already existing passionate fanbase, who had come to expect a level of quality worth to the ...

New releases photo
New releases

New releases: Construction finishes on SimCity

Plus Tomb Raider, Naturo, and Castlevania
Mar 04
// Fraser Brown
This Monday heralds a week of mayoral responsibilities and the raiding of trap-laden tombs, both of which undoubtedly require similar skill sets. As much as I'm a big fan of Ms. Croft, and it seems like her latest outing is ...

DmC: Devil May Cry's Bloody Palace tips and impressions

Feb 21 // Chris Carter
The Bloody Palace isn't part of the recent title update: it's free DLC that you need to download manually. If you can't find it on the marketplace, here's the link for the 360 version, and the link for the Steam version.You'll also find that the Samurai Pack (pre-order DLC), Golden Pack, and Bone Pack have gone live for $1 each (80 MSP per pack, or a "buy two get one free" bundle for 160 MSP), which grant you new weapon skins, and a few extra items -- specifically, the item finder, orb harvester, and three extra upgrade points. These items are essentially cheat codes. The Orb Harvester grants you 20% more Red Orbs from enemies and objects, and the Item Finder beeps when you're near a key or a lost soul. Thankfully, you can turn these off if you want. Ok, enough talk about ancillary add-ons, how's Bloody Palace? Fans of the franchise will recognize the floor by floor flow instantly, but the way it appears changes from game to game, ranging from 100-9999 levels. In this instance, it's 100 floors, and you need to beat the game to unlock it. Every 20 floors or so, you'll fight a boss from the core game, the locale will cycle to something new, and the difficulty will increase. Occasionally, hazards will appear, like fire on the ground or the deadly spinning carousel from the first stage of the game.Things don't really get difficult until level 50 or so, which I was able to coast to on my first try. By then, you're battling with attrition, as your health starts to slowly drop as enemies do more damage. As is the case in Devil May Cry 4, the controversial timer is back. It's exactly how it sounds -- there's a timer running down that can be replenished with killing enemies, and if it runs out, you close. It's not a huge deal for me, but needlessly to say it doesn't measure combat skill in any way, and is a trivial addition. Despite basically being exactly what was advertised, there are a few missed opportunities. For one, there's no new achievements, trophies, or anything of note to unlock by beating it -- those are coming later with Vergil's Downfall. Additionally, the boss of the final floor is just the final boss of DmC -- nothing more, nothing less, which doesn't really make your completion feel that special. They missed out on a really cool opportunity to add a classic boss like Nelo Angelo, for instance, or make a new mark on the Bloody Palace, and make the package that much sweeter with a new skin or character unlock. The Bloody Palace update also comes with a few fixes and a patch of its own, most of which serve to make the game a bit more challenging. For one, the SS and SSS rankings now properly deteriorate, making the SSS rank harder (but really, not that much harder) to reach. The infinite glide glitch was also fixed, as were general damage values for weak enemies, and damage rates on Nephilim and Son of Sparda modes. Although it's a bit hard to complain about free DLC, this really should have been part of the original package from the get-go, for Capcom and Ninja Theory's sake. At this point, many people have all but traded in their copies of DmC, or bought into some of the negative fallout from the game's release, and won't care about this add-on. Although this iteration of the Bloody Palace isn't a game changer by any means, it's still a nice free addition to the game, and helps augment the original release quite nicely. If you have the game, skip the skin packs and give this DLC a try. Here's some tips if you need them: Conserve your Devil Trigger for when you need health, or when you tangle with a particularly tough enemy. Additionally, don't be afraid to use your Devil Trigger to heal when your meter is full, as you won't get any items while playing the Bloody Palace, and very few enemies drop health. Find out what enemies drop health (most of the flying ones), and use them strategically. If the game had a lock-on system, it would be easier to pick out non-flying enemies and save them for last, so just be aware that the game automatically favors flying targets and adjust accordingly. Be aggressive against bosses. You don't want to waste a lot of time on them, and waiting too long will slowly depreciate your health. Whenever possible, buy and use Roulette -- while in the air, Y, Y, hesitate, Y, Y (Triangle). It's a cheap move that allows you to get some breathing room in the sky without getting swarmed on later levels. Use Aquila's B/Circle attack to stun enemies in the arena whenever possible, to avoid getting swarmed. In fact, just use Aquila a lot for groups or otherwise, as it's fairly overpowered. Same goes for a fully upgraded Kablooey.
DmC Bloody Palace update photo
A little sauce on a medium cooked steak
Capcom and Ninja Theory have recently provided a free add-on to DmC: Devil May Cry called the Bloody Palace, to help extend your replay value a bit. For those of you who have never played a Devil May Cry game before, the Bloo...

Vergil DLC video photo
Vergil DLC video

Gameplay videos for DmC's Vergil DLC are surfacing

Watch this 18 minute video while you can
Feb 21
// Chris Carter
If Capcom's short teasers aren't satisfying you while you wait for DmC: Devil May Cry's upcoming DLC, Vergil's Downfall, a few users in Europe have redeemed their codes before the March 5th release date, and have uploaded so...
DmC DLC photo

DmC: Devil May Cry's Vergil DLC launches in March

Also, a free Bloody Palace update releases today
Feb 20
// Chris Carter
[Update: the official trailer has been added] Last we heard, the Vergil DLC for DmC: Devil May Cry was supposed to come out at some point in February, but Capcom just let us know today that the final release date is March 5t...

DmC's Vergil DLC about 3 to 5 hours of new content

Feb 14 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
DmC: Devil May Cry: Vergil's Downfall (PC, PlayStation 3 [previewed], Xbox 360)Developer: Ninja TheoryPublisher: CapcomRelease: February 2013MSRP: $8.99 I went hands-on with just the first level of the new downloadable content, and it begins with Vergil being transported to the house he grew up in as a child. Don't worry though, you'll be exploring new environments and you quickly discover this isn't just a repeat level from the main story. In fact, areas in general have a more abstract feel to them, similar to the secret areas and challenge rooms as Ninja Theory wanted to do a slight shift in tone with this content. Plus cutscenes are all more like a motion comic crossed with an anime now, as opposed to in-game animations like before. Combat wise, at its core Vergil has the same basic traits as Dante. He has his main sword attack, a projectile sword attack, plus his Angel and Demon sword attacks. All of this will be upgradable the same way as Dante, just not as deep and with less weaponry. He won't have access to his Angel and Demon attacks at first, but he is able to use their pull moves and that's where you'll see the biggest difference between to two brothers. Vergil will teleport for his dodges, and his pull moves. It's quite jarring at first, especially after you got so used to the way Dante did it. With Vergil, he's able to teleport enemies to himself, or he can teleport right to them. The same goes for when you're using Angel or Demon pulls on platforms. As for the story, you're playing as a very disheveled Vergil. Downfall aims to wrap up the story between the brothers as Vergil tries to make sense of what went wrong. Vergil doesn't think he's a bad guy, he was trying to do what was best for humanity. Dante will be making appearances in Vergil's Downfall, but it doesn't look like it's actually the savoir of humanity. This hell-like dimension appears to be screwing with Vergil, and after a little challenging fight with a new enemy type, Vergil is stabbed once again by what I'm guessing to be a Dante imposter. Or maybe it's all in Vergil's head? We'll know for sure when the new content is released later this month.
DmC photo
Vergil's Downfall
The upcoming downloadable story content for DmC picks up right where the game finishes, so needless to say this will be one spoiler filled preview.      At the end of DmC, Dante plunges his sword into...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...