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Deep Silver

Deals photo

$7 Metro Redux Bundle, $8 Saints Row Ultimate Franchise Pack in Deep Silver Sale

Sure, I'll add more to my backlog
Oct 07
// Dealzon
This week, popular digital retailer Green Man Gaming launched a Deep Silver Sale. The sale was OK, but nothing exciting (else we'd have mentioned it earlier). Things changed today as most of the titles listed below ...
Mighty No. 9 photo
Mighty No. 9

Mighty No. 9 has settled on a release date

Here comes the shade
Sep 25
// Jordan Devore
Mighty No. 9 has a new release date: February 9, 2016 in the Americas, and February 12, 2016 everywhere else. That goes for physical and digital versions on Xbox One, PS4, and Wii U, and digital only on Xbox 360, PS3, PC, and...
Dead Island photo
Dead Island

F2P MOBA Dead Island: Epidemic is shutting down on October 15

Dawnstar, Infinite Crisis, Epidemic
Sep 17
// Joe Parlock
Anyone with a Steam account is probably aware of the MOBA Dead Island: Epidemic. A while ago, the game flooded inventories with multiple beta invitations. I’ve still got five of them, and now that the game’s in op...
PONIES photo

GOTY contender Horse Life 4 galloping to 3DS

Sep 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Horse Life 4, the most anticipated game of the year, is trotting to Nintendo 3DS on November 13, and not even the cover girl's demonic eyes can bridle my excitement for this game. Sure, her colt blue peepers might be the stuf...

Dead Island 2 photo
Dead Island 2

Techland says it'd take over Dead Island 2 if asked

'Dead Island is our child'
Aug 14
// Brett Makedonski
The status of Dead Island 2 is up in the air after publisher Deep Silver took developer Yager off the project last month. Chances are that it's not dead given that Deep Silver has already sunk money into the project and ...
Homefront gameplay photo
Homefront gameplay

Who is building all the damn metal ramps in Homefront: The Revolution?

Also, it's a stupid game
Aug 05
// Steven Hansen
I noticed this watching Homefront: The Revolution's trailer live at gamescom: there are a ton of convenient, incredibly sturdy corrugated metal ramps, bridges, and walkways in occupied United States. It seems like 40% of the...

Homefront: The Revolution is very different than when we last saw it

Aug 04 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]297199:59800:0[/embed] When I first played Homefront: The Revolution, the world felt lived-in. The oppressive themes were apparent, but the citizens seemed to accept it and go about their daily routines (except for the ones sparking the revolution in secret, of course). I believed that this was a city I could change the face of. I saw the potential to revolt and to do so in creative ways. The chunk I recently saw was more chaotic than that. Things are on fire and smoke billows on the horizon. All those people doing everyday stuff don't exist anymore. There are a few freedom fighters, but not many. It's mostly an empty playground for me to ramp my motorcycle off stuff. Rather than showing off a functioning city, this version of Homefront: The Revolution opted for sporadic waves of enemies. Many battles took places in warehouses, often around large crates that are meant to scream "industry!" It was all just so boring. It was like a Call of Duty where you traverse more ground before the next section of bad guys with guns. The world was still open, but the enemies acted with the scripted ways of a linear game. The player reached the top of the stairs, so it's time to charge through the door. That is to say, this demo largely erased my positive attitude toward Homefront: The Revolution. I'm not going to care about liberating a city if there's no one in that city. Its lifelessness reminded me of every shooter I've played for the past ten years and then immediately forgot about. The thing is, this can't be the true Homefront: The Revolution. Its premise is one with promise, but this slice shows none of that ambition. There's no way the game's skewed this far from concept. I guess I'll chalk this up to another misrepresentative demo, and hey -- I just broke the rule I spent the first paragraph talking about.
Homefront preview photo
But not necessarily better
Sometimes when you see a game at a preview event, you don't even want to write about it. You just know that what was shown wasn't a good representation of the final game. Malicious intent isn't always to blame, either; there ...

Homefront photo

Homefront: The Revolution is doing an Xbox One exclusive beta

Can you feel the excitement?
Aug 04
// Kyle MacGregor
Guerrilla warfare shooter Homefront: The Revolution is getting an exclusive multiplayer beta this winter on Xbox One. Until then, watch some propaganda about our faceless Korean overlords.
Risen 3 photo
Risen 3

Risen 3 rises on PS4 in the least-asked-for port yet

Risen 3: Titan Lords Enhanced Edition
Jul 31
// Steven Hansen
Risen 3: Titan Lords was panned by critics on release after the just above average, piratical Risen 2: Dark Waters, but what else does Deep Silver have to release this year with Dead Island 2 losing its developer? It's this ...
Yager photo

Fired Dead Island 2 team files for insolvency

After being dropped as developer
Jul 29
// Steven Hansen
Yager (Spec Ops: The Line) was recently fired from developing Dead Island 2 by publisher Deep Silver as the companies' "respective visions of the project fell out of alignment." Last week, July 22, Yager Productions filed for...
Dead Island HD photo
Dead Island HD

Dead Island: Definitive Edition listed by South African retailer

PC, Xbox One, PS4
Jul 22
// Steven Hansen
What happens when you have nothing to show at E3, delay Dead Island 2, and then fire the developer of Dead Island 2? HD remake! HD remake! South African retailer listed (now removed) Dead Island: Definitive Edition for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. It would certainly make sense while Deep Silver figures out how to get Dead Island 2 and silly ass Homefront into 2016. via @lifelower
Dead Island 2 photo
Still doing Dead Island 2
Deep Silver has announced it is parting ways with Dead Island 2 developer Yager (Spec Ops: The Line). Just a few months ago, Deep Silver delayed the game into 2016 over quality concerns. The publisher made this announcement w...

Metro Redux demos photo
Metro Redux demos

The Metro games have hours-long demos on PS4, Xbox One

Sharing is caring
Jun 03
// Jordan Devore
4A Games has rolled out demos for the revamped Redux releases of Metro 2033 and Last Light on Xbox One and PlayStation 4, each offering "about one-third of the total game." For free. The trial for Metro 2033 Redux covers the ...
Bloodstained photo

Deep Silver is most likely publishing Bloodstained

It'd fall in line with Mighty No. 9
May 28
// Brett Makedonski
[Update: Doug Wolf, the attorney of record, called us back and confirmed that he filed the trademark on behalf of Koch Media. It looks like this rumor pans out, although Deep Silver has yet to respond.] When Koji Igarash...
Dying Light DLC photo
Dying Light DLC

Dying Light's new DLC is called The Bozak Horde

Gee, I really wonder what it could be
May 15
// Joe Parlock
I’m going to play a little game with you called "guess the DLC". Dying Light is an open-world, cooperative zombie game with a heavy emphasis on parkour and violently slaughtering zombies in as many different ways as yo...
GOG photo
GOG adds five DRM-free games to its catalog

From Deep Silver and Nordic
May 11
// Chris Carter
GOG prides itself on offering up a completely DRM-free service. Thankfully, there are now five more DRM-free games on the portal as of today, compliments of efforts between GOG, Deep Silver, and Nordic Games. Those titles inc...
Dead Island 2 photo
Dead Island 2

Deep Silver delays Dead Island 2

Pushed back until 2016 over quality concerns
Apr 30
// Kyle MacGregor
Dead Island 2 was supposed to release this spring, but that's no longer in the cards, as Deep Silver has announced the open-world zombie game has been delayed until 2016. The publisher and development team at Spec Ops: T...
Mighty No. 9 dated photo
No more April/May window
Development for Mighty No. 9 was coming along nicely earlier this year. We got a look at a bunch of levels, and developer Comcept noted that they were "basically done" recently -- they just needed to figure out how to la...

Metro Redux photo
Metro Redux

Metro Redux irradiating Macs on April 16

я не говорю по-русски
Apr 15
// Joe Parlock
In the grim future of Moscow, 2033, people have taken to the underground like rats to avoid the devastation up above. Hunger, disease, infighting, mutants, ghosts; life in the tunnels is rough. People barter for goods with am...
Homefront delay photo
Homefront delay

Homefront: The Revolution delayed into 2016

Developed by Dambuster, which is comprised largely of Crytek UK veterans
Mar 12
// Steven Hansen
Homefront: The Revolution, the sequel to 2011's Red Dawn: The Game, has been delayed into 2016, according to publisher Deep Silver.  Deep Silver acquired the Homefront rights from Crytek in 2014. Crytek acquired the Home...

Saints Row IV: Re-Elected is a prettier mash-up of aliens and sex toys

Feb 02 // Brittany Vincent
Saints Row IV: Re-Elected (PlayStation 4 [tested], Xbox One)Developer: Volition/High Voltage SoftwarePublisher: Deep SilverRelease: January 20, 2014MRSP: $49.99 The "Re-Elected" edition comes packaged with the updated PS4 edition of Saints Row IV, all the previously-released DLC, the expansion Gat Out of Hell (which I enjoyed thoroughly), and the Enter the Dominatrix feature – one of the best reasons to check out this re-release, especially since it features a host of deleted scenes from what would originally become Saints Row IV. It's basically a faux documentary told in an engaging fashion, and one of the best aspects of the entire package – save for the actual game, of course. If you already played through the game, you won't find anything changed here. The boss of the Saints has somehow managed to strong arm their way into becoming the President of the United States. In a sense, you may as well be a superhero – perhaps that’s why you end up getting super powers later on in the game. The game is centered around making the player feel as awesome as humanly possible, which it does accomplish in several ways. Zinyak, the alien mastermind behind enslaving humanity and committing a hundred other heinous deeds, is a well-read megalomaniac who’s content to toy with the Saints leader in any way he can, including depositing him or her into a virtual Steelport that’s been conquered and is teeming with Zin soldiers. It's your job to take him down. [embed]287011:57124:0[/embed] You do just that while navigating a simulation of the Steelport you know and love from Saints Row: The Third, getting yourself into a bunch of situations such as the Saints boss being whisked away into a ’50s-styled sitcom world where “golly gee” is about as rude as one can get, the hilariously awful dubstep gun, and the text-based adventure game snippets found nestled within the game. The introduction of superpowers to the mix is what ends up making Saints Row IV what it is, however. It’s empowering to be able to leap up tall buildings, slam into enemies with a lethal ground pound, or sprint through Steelport faster than a speeding bullet. Ice, fire, and other elemental powers are instrumental in incapacitating Wardens, larger Zin soldiers that wreak havoc on you if you amass a full wanted rating, and jumping across the city can be pretty exciting. Unfortunately, super sprint renders vehicles virtually useless, so that's one less thing you've got to engage in, but the array of other powers makes up for it. The leader of the Saints is consistently witty and fun, whether you choose a male or female avatar, and one of the biggest attractions of the game. “Romance” options, some great retro gaming references, and an excellent soundtrack accompany your jaunts about town, and if you’ve ever wanted to smack someone in the head with a writhing tentacle sword, this is your chance, especially given the upscaled visuals, additional content, and the just-released Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell. There’s plenty to do in Saints Row IV: Re-Elected, whether you're coming in as a new player or are here strictly for the additional content. As an aside, I want to mention that I’m pleased with where Saints Row has taken me before, but I’m ready for a new frontier. A new city. A new crew to run with. I had my fun with Steelport and the Saints, but perhaps it’s time for a new story. We’ll always have long car rides, er, sprints through the city...and this is the definitive way to experience Saints Row IV.
Saints Row IV: Re-Elected photo
Good to go for a second term
Saints Row IV is absolutely crazy. It is, without a doubt, one of the most off-the-wall sandbox experiences you can have on a console or otherwise. It's an excellent cooperative adventure as well, and it delivers the franchis...

Review: Saints Row IV: Gat out of Hell

Jan 19 // Brittany Vincent
Saints Row: Gat out of Hell (PC, PS4 [Reviewed], Xbox One, PS3, Xbox 360) Developer: Volition/High Voltage Software Publisher: Deep Silver Released: January 20, 2015 MSRP: $19.99 The game opens on the gang aboard the Zin Ship during a celebration of Kinzie Kensington’s birthday. During the festivities, Matt Miller produces a possessed Ouija board that was previously owned by Aleister Crowley, and it opens a portal to Hell. The Boss (your player character in the previous Saints Row games) is sucked through the portal and kidnapped by Satan. Johnny Gat and Kinzie follow through the portal to save their friend, and upon arriving in Hell go to the biggest building in sight. Ultor HQ. Dane Vogel, head of Ultor Corporation and previous adversary of the Saints, has started his business anew in Hell and lets the duo know that Satan has arranged a marriage between The Boss and his daughter. Vogel has big plans to corner the real estate market in Hell, and he needs Satan out of the way to do it. He presents Johnny Gat with Lucifer’s Broken Halo, a powerful artifact that imbues the user with fiery wings and arcane power, to assist in the assassination of the Dark Lord. All of the previous statements contained a lot of names that you may or may not remember depending on which games, if any, you’ve played of the series. This is one of the biggest things that marks this as a standalone expansion. This game is very self-referential, and unlike the main entries in the series doesn’t ease players into the world of Saints Row. It makes the assumption that you’ve at least played Saints Row IV, and spends little time on exposition or background other than some short illustrations and voiceover. [embed]285618:56942:0[/embed] This was a bit frustrating, because even though I’ve played through all the Saints Row titles, it’s been a while. It would have made the game more inviting to have at least a short flashback when meeting a character from a previous title, and unfortunately many players might miss out on some of the enjoyment and nostalgia from not having just a bit more context. However, there are a few new characters, and they are a blast. Shakespeare, Vlad the Impaler, and Blackbeard all join the cast, and although this entry is a bit short, I hope that future iterations will introduce as interesting of a cast as this one did. The setting is where this game really shines though. Hell looks, well, hellish. Instead of another romp through Steelport, we spend our time in New Hades, which is dominated by the Ultor Tower. It’s sometimes hard to notice flying and sprinting at high speeds, but different sections of Hell have different aesthetics, and the whole map, although smaller than Steelport, feels more alive and organic from all the unique buildings. Gone also are the nameless civilian fodder, replaced by “Husks,” which are the souls of the damned who are made to feel pain for all eternity. The police are instead demons who drive monster trucks, and there are a host of flying, shielded, and gigantic enemies, all with their own styles and methods of attack. All in all they made a much more entertaining and interesting adversary than the Zin, and the whole world feels much more polished and finished than Saints Row IV’s Steelport simulation. Much like the last game, you have access to a host of superhuman powers. With Lucifer’s Broken Halo you can sprout wings to glide, sprint at high speed, stomp the ground with various elemental powers, call upon demons to fight for you, and turn enemies to stone with power blasts. Whether in a simulation or powered by a demonic artifact, the result is much the same: you’re pretty much the most powerful being in Hell. I think powers are much more interesting in Gat out of Hell. Something about the last game’s powers being due to computer hacking and being trapped in a simulation was insanely boring. These games are a zany good time, but when I play something like this I like to feel as though I’m actually affecting the world I’m playing in, and getting powers from the broken crown of the Morning Star himself is way cooler. I do have a bit of a qualm with the missing character customization element, though. I understand that the game centers around having to play as Kinzie or Johnny Gat; but it would have been nice to at least change their outfits or accessories. So everything seems pretty positive about this game, right? It’s a high quality production, and totally awesome, so what could go wrong? Well, that cool setting, low price point, and interesting gameplay came at a cost, namely in the form of content. Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell is short. Really short. The first time I saved my game I had been playing for about an hour, and I was shocked when the screen said that the game was already 14% complete. I figured it was like Saints Row IV where that number didn’t really mean a lot or indicate how much content was left other than at a superficial level. Well, I was wrong. Gat takes about 6-7 hours to complete the main plot, and it could probably be easily taken to 100% within 12-13 hours. Honestly, I’ve paid $20 for a lot less fun, and although the game is short, what is there is solid gold. Plus, if you’ve never played Saints Row IV, or just want it and all its DLC on latest gen consoles, you can get Saints Row IV: Re-Elected, which includes this expansion for about $50. Gat out of Hell was a great swan song for Saints Row IV, and it is now one of my favorite entries in the series. There are plenty of games out there about depression, sexuality, violence, politics, and so on, and sometimes it makes me tired. I love Saints Row because I never have to deal with any issues within. There’s no agenda and no life lessons to learn. There’s only pure escapism. which is what games are meant for in my view. If I wanted to worry about all that, I’d just go to a college campus and listen to people complain for a few hours. As it is though, I hope that more developers take a cue from Saints Row and realize that it’s still okay to tell jokes and implement cartoony violence that’s still ridiculous and fun. I know gaming as an industry is maturing and people want to present new ideas and make statements using the media, but luckily, whenever I feel like I need a break, I will have Saints Row proudly on my shelf. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
SRIV: Gat out of Hell photo
Like a sinner before the gates of Heaven
There’s something about a series that doesn’t feel the need to make a ton of social commentary, or really feel grounded in reality. The Saints Row series is like if the worlds of The Naked Gun and Grand Theft Auto...

Review: Escape Dead Island

Dec 27 // Brittany Vincent
Escape Dead Island (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC [reviewed])Developer: FatsharkPublisher: Deep SilverReleased: November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 The game kicks off with a small prequel scene cataloging the events just prior to the beginning of the first game. Xian Mei of the original Dead Island plays Halo's Cortana to your generic Commando. After infiltrating a top secret lab (the only kind of labs video games know about) the two discover that YouTube commenters are right and a big corporation is in fact part of some Illuminati clone, yadda, yadda, yadda. Then a Tyrant or something kills you. The real treat comes when you meet Escape Dead Island's star: the rich kid with daddy issues that is equal parts Frank West, Jason Brody, and Colonel John Konrad. He decides the best way to get his father to love him is to go to Banoi with his two friends/employees and solve the mystery. However, this game lacks the creative writing of Scooby-Doo and the plot only serves to loosely tie the haphazard gameplay together. The only vaguely interesting part of the plot is related to the increasingly tenuous grasp on sanity the main character has, but we’ll get into that a bit later. [embed]284108:56737:0[/embed] Okay, so the plot is a bit generic and uninspired. Common complaints at this point, so what about the gameplay? Well, Escape Dead Island seems to have a hard time deciding exactly what it wants to be. Is it a stealthy survival horror title like Alien: Isolation? Is it an over-the-top zombie-killing free-for-all with photography elements like Dead Rising? Is it a combination of stealth and action like State of Decay? Is it a commentary on the fragility of the human psyche like Spec Ops: The Line? An exploratory action-adventure like Castlevania: Symphony of the Night? It so badly wants to be all of those things, but fails terribly. In the beginning you’ll rely on stale stealth mechanics to channel that genre for good measure. The stealth sections exist solely just to be stealth sections. There’s never a sense of urgency or danger, just “If I don’t do the stealth then I lose.” This goes against any successful concept of stealth as the enemies are not smart or really ever too much of a threat. The photography elements are worthless as well, as there are no point or upgrade systems. Your character will just comment on specific items you take pictures of, and they’re not particularly inspired comments either. Near the end of the game, you’ll have plenty of weapons and will be going Rambo on some zombies, but the controls are so mushy that it’s not very satisfying and makes the previous stealth gameplay seem even more cliche and needless. Oh, and the backtracking. Get a grappling hook? Time to backtrack. Find a gas mask? Better backtrack. With a game like Symphony of the Night, backtracking doesn’t feel so much like a chore because the gameplay is centered and focused to the point where it seems like natural progression. In Escape Dead Island, I couldn’t help but feel like it existed to pad more gameplay time on. The one somewhat unique thing this game has going for it is the growing insanity of the player character. As time goes on, his mind becomes more and more unhinged, as an increasing amount of hallucinations encroach into the game. It's actually quite interesting. However, Escape Dead Island's pacing strangles the one element that could have set it apart as noteworthy. For the first quarter or so of the game, the insanity elements are few and far between and although they grow in note, it isn’t until the last quarter that they really blossom, but by then the build-up was too much and I had grown tired of the whole thing. I won’t ruin it because it is genuinely the one part of the game I found interesting, but unfortunately it was too little too late, and too static of an experience. If there had been a sanity meter a la Eternal Darkness, it truly could have saved the game for me. The visuals at least are non-offensive. They attempt to replicate the cel-shaded comic book appeal, but in this type of game, which tries to tell a gritty and tragic story, the graphic novel look is a bit of an odd choice. Unlike Sunset Overdrive which reveled in its zany disconnection from logic and the real world, or The Walking Dead, where its graphics are an homage to its graphic novel origins, Escape Dead Island seems content to piggyback off of the popularity of cel-shaded games that are far and away better than it could ever be. Last, but not least, the replay value must be discussed. It consists of a host of audio files and data on BigBad Co. experiments and postcards. There are also a ton of pictures that must be taken in order to see everything. The collecting is not terrible, but it gives nothing in return as there isn't anything to really connect you to this world enough to care about the tidbits of info you're after. Unlike the random notes and books in Dragon Age: Inquisition, or the audio logs in the BioShock series, I didn’t ever find myself caring enough to learn more about these people, thus making the collectibles completely superfluous. Escape Dead Island is what would happen if after all the big AAA games were born, after the doctors all shook each others' hands and the bouncy babies went home, someone scooped up all the afterbirth and tried to cobble together their very own abomination. The game in and of itself is serviceable enough, but it’s the lack of any soul that makes it so infuriating to play. There are plenty of games that in theory play worse that I enjoy infinitely more. The first Dead Island was absolutely ridiculous and quite flawed in my opinion, but because I can feel the love that went into the game and thus the care, it's a blast to play in some areas because the developers cared if I had fun. Unlike its predecessors, Escape Dead Island feels devoid of heart or identity. It is a cruel reminder of the shovelware that plagued the PlayStation, PlayStation 2, and the Wii and behind its generic facade hides a malnourished newborn of a game starved for nutrition and attention. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Escape Dead Island review photo
Run, you'll never escape
In my years as a freelancer and staffer at various videogame outlets, I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing a ton of great games. In fact, this year I had the privilege of reviewing pretty much every “AAA” game...

Saints Row photo
Saints Row

This is Saints Row: Gat out of Hell's musical number

When Clancy Brown tells you to do something, you listen
Dec 03
// Jordan Devore
"It's a whimsical, weird fucking game," former Volition creative director Steve Jaros said of Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell when I spoke with him about the Disney-inspired standalone expansion. It's true: there's a musical num...
Freebies photo

Metro 2033 free for 24 hours on the Humble Store

For ME?! Ahh, you shouldn't have
Nov 07
// Jordan Devore
The Humble Store is celebrating one year of existence and that means a sale. And since websites tend to give gifts on their birthdays rather than receive them, that also means a full free copy of Metro 2033 for everyone who s...
Saints Row photo
Saints Row

Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell leaves no deadly sin unchecked

Needs more sloth, to be honest
Oct 15
// Brett Makedonski
Johnny Gat's not a good man. Powerful, but not good. That's why he uses each and every of the seven deadly sins to send all of those already dead to the after-afterlife. Most of them look like they deserve it, to be fair. Especially those nipple-rubbing demons.
Gat Out of Hell photo
Gat Out of Hell

Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell takes us on a fly-by tour of the underworld

And re-murders the post-alive
Sep 24
// Brett Makedonski
Sprout some wings and take an aerial tour of Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell and New Hades with Johnny Gat acting as a murderous guide. When he's not perusing the underworld via an overhead view, he's running down demons in his rambulance or firing swaths of rockets from his armchair. Our promised musical number hasn't shown up yet, but so far, everything is so wonderfully Saints Row.

Saints Row: Gat Out of Hell was inspired by Disney movies

Sep 02 // Jordan Devore
In Gat Out of Hell, your player character from Saints Row IV, the President, is pulled into hell to marry Satan's daughter Jezebel. The devil believes the Saints boss to be the most dangerous person alive -- a perfect general to lead his army against heaven -- but Jezebel isn't interested. Johnny Gat and Kinzie Kensington journey to hell to save their fearless leader and from there, it's up to you playing as either character (or both, in co-op) to wreak havoc however you see fit. Perhaps you'll use some of the ridiculous new weapons based on the seven deadly sins. My favorite one shoots locusts, which is almost as good as a gun that fires bees. Almost. You're meant to run around -- or fly; you have wings -- and fill up a piss-off-Satan meter at which point the story will unfold as various milestones are met. Gat Out of Hell features historical figures and even characters from past games, including Dane Vogel and Dex, plus "well over 30 instances of open-world things to do," according to Jaros. After reaching 100 percent completion on a given island of hell, you'll be rewarded with an epilogue relating to its central character -- like spymaster general William Shakespeare, for example. Completionists will also be able to unlock a "crazy epilogue" for the full story. Asked if Gat Out of Hell was considered canon or if it'd have an impact on the series' story going forward, Jaros just kept saying "I recommend that you play it" with a smile on his face. "It is not a Saints Row V. It is not a sequel," he said. "It's a fun thing for our fans. A new place to go and play around with super powers. Another city to go and terrorize. [A chance to] play as a character that people really seem to dig, and just have another excuse to have a lot of fun and do some shit that we're able to get away with." [embed]280509:55544:0[/embed] Okay, so about that Disney connection. "I'm pretty certain that we'll be the only open-world game that comes out with a full-blown musical number in the middle of the critical path," Jaros told Destructoid. "One of the things that we lean on [heavily] for inspiration for this is Disney movies. I'm a big Disney fan. For instance, if you remember stuff like in Sleeping Beauty or Cinderella, the beginning of the movies [have] the ornate story book that opens up. It's illuminated text and story-book pictures, and a narrator -- that's kind of our story structure. Jane Austen narrates you through this fairy tale; Jezebel is very much a sort of Disney princess." The creative director made it clear that "It's not a parody of Disney at all, but it echoes some of those themes." There aren't any talking animal buddies here, but Gat does have a talking gun who wants to help him become the ultimate killing machine. Basically, Gat Out of Hell is what a fairy tale would look like in the Saints Row universe. "It's a whimsical, weird fucking game."
Saints Row photo
There's a full musical number and everything
I've played and enjoyed all of the Saints Row games to date, but wonder how much longer this can last. How much more ridiculous can the series get, and even if there is room to up the insanity, do we even want that? Where Vol...

New Saints photo
New Saints

Volition announces standalone Saints Row expansion Gat Out of Hell

Also, Saints Row IV for PS4 and Xbox One
Aug 29
// Steven Hansen
At its PAX panel, Volition announced a new Saints Row, a standalone expansion of Saints Row IV called Gat Out of Hell (PC, PS3, 360, PS4, Xbox One). It has you travelling to Hell, is half the size of Steelport, and feat...
Escape photo

Escape Escape Dead Island's time loop on November 18

There's a Rupert Holmes song here somewhere...
Aug 27
// Brett Makedonski
Do you like piña coladas and getting caught in zombie-infested time loops? Are you not into yoga, but into land masses that are surrounded by water on all sides? Deep Silver took out a personal ad. It wants ...

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