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Daedalic Entertainment

Night of the Rabbit video photo
Night of the Rabbit video

The Night of the Rabbit trailer reveals plenty


A fancy rabbit, a magical hat, and mean crows
May 08
// Fraser Brown
After playing a wee bit last week, I'm pretty excited about Daedalic's The Night of the Rabbit, and even more so after watching the new trailer. I only got to solve puzzles and cast spells in the first sixth of the adventure...

An afternoon with Daedalic's The Night of the Rabbit

May 05 // Fraser Brown
The Night of the Rabbit (Mac, PC [previewed])Developer: Daedalic EntertainmentPublisher: Daedalic Entertainment Released: May 29, 2013 With only two days before the end of his summer holiday, Jerry Hazlenut is desperate for one last adventure before he goes back to the world of chalk and blackboards, and an invitation to become apprentice to a large bipedal rabbit magician, the Marquis de Hoto, gives him just the opportunity he was looking for. The Night of the Rabbit is shaping up to be a delightful journey through lavaishly detailed magical realms, and even manages to contain a protagonist who won't drive everyone insane -- unlike Daedalic's The Whispered World. My preview code only gave me a look at the first sixth of the game, following Jeremy from his forest bungalow in the modern world, to the Borrowers- and Redwall-inspired setting of Mousewood. It's an extremely strong start, with logical puzzles, a charismatic gallery of quirky characters, and stunning 2D art. Daedalic is well-known for filling its titles with challenging, sometimes even obtuse puzzles, but the ones in The Night of the Rabbit appear to strike a balance between common sense and quandaries that will leave you scratching your head for a few minutes.  In my short time with the game, I dabbled in riddle-solving, inventory puzzles, and a few conundrums involving a spot of physicality, and found myself more than satisfied with the variety and quality of them. However, even early on I found myself weighed down by trying to solve several puzzles at once, and I did wish that the journal -- which only chronicles the main story -- kept me abreast of the various requests that had been made of me, or the actions I needed to undertake. I don't have the best memory. It wasn't a serious issue, and I always keep a pencil and notepad on my desk when embarking on an adventure -- a holdover from the days when even short adventure games could take days to finish due to obfuscation of trickiness. Hints and encouragement have become popular features in adventure titles of late, and generally I find them to be a bit off-putting and immersion-breaking, so I tend to turn them off, even if it makes the game a bit more difficult. Daedalic has managed to craft such a feature absent these issues, however, and skilfully works it into the game's narrative. Jerry gets two tools to help him solve puzzles. The first is his magical coin, which, when gazed through (it has a hole in the middle) reveals objects hidden by magic, as well as any item or person that he can interact with. I appreciate the way it ties highlighting objects into the narrative, but it's improved even more when it's employed to solve puzzles. The second item is Jerry's wand. The Marquis gifts it to him just after they arrive in Mousewood, and the magical stick allows Jerry to summon his mentor's visage, wherever he may be, and get some advice. In my playthrough, the wand was entirely useless, and all the Marquis did was repeat his initial instructions, though it may become more helpful later on. I played for about two hours before the demo ended, somewhat abruptly, and most of my time was taken up by simple exploration of the absolutely gorgeous world and its many charming characters. I confess that even a grumpy sod like me wore a smile throughout the entire experience. Every area was sumptuous, with giant flora dwarfing the tiny, somewhat chaotic village of Mousewood and its homely wooden houses, a makeshift town clock that can only tell if it's day or night, and a cake shop -- run by a mouse on rollerskates -- that exclusively sells healthy herb cakes and sugar-free lollipops (gross). Though the primary quest was for Jerry to start preparations for in his inauguration as a Treewalker, a magician who travels between worlds, there are quite a few puzzles to solve along the way, most of which, of course, tie into the original quest. I needed to cross a river to get some juice for the celebrations, but a horrible little spoiled mouse child demanded a toll to cross the bridge, causing me to run around looking for an item to satisfy his sweet tooth. Easier said than done in a town filled with only healthy snacks. After helping the brat, I took out my anger on a foul crow, using nothing but a grappling hook and a radio antenna. Oh, adventure games.  In another part of town, an elderly mouse adventurer needed my help getting his boat, and the hedgehog brothers who were constructing the craft needed assistance to find their stolen tools which had been nicked by a deviant leprechaun. I had to chase him all over the damn place, as he kept vanishing the moment I caught up with him, the bugger. The Night of the Rabbit drips with whimsy, but there are slightly darker elements lingering in the background. There's a Treesprite who crops up a couple of times whose intentions are unknown, but he's certainly an ominous figure, hidden by magic, and exceedingly creepy with his twig body, and shamanistic mask. And then there are the crows, giant birds that have terrorized Mousewood for some time, and threaten anyone caught outside the town walls. The voice acting is a tad hammy, but it's mostly solid and at worse a little silly and inoffensive. There are some standout moments, however, notably a radio DJ mole who almost certainly worked for the BBC at one point, and the Marquis, who oozes flamboyance and mysticism and channels at least a small amount of the Doctor of Doctor Who fame, even dressing a wee bit like the Jon Pertwee version. I tend to enjoy Daedalic's adventure games, though each contains something offputting, whether it's the Dark Eye's obtuse puzzles, The Whispered World's ear-offending protagonist, or Deponia's douchey hero, but this glimpse of The Night of the Rabbit contained none of these problems. Here's hoping it stays that way.
The Night of the Rabbit photo
Exploring Mousewood and abusing crows
There're few things quite as enjoyable as spending a rainy afternoon indoors, playing a fantastical adventure game. I recently got my grubby mitts on a preview code for prolific adventure game studio Daedalic's upcoming magic...

Goodbye Deponia photo
Goodbye Deponia

Bid farewell to Deponia


Wave till your arm aches
Apr 24
// Fraser Brown
Cheerio, you sexy adventure game. Deponia's pretty groovy, just ask our (presumably) gun-toting Texan, Mr. Pinsof, who's been enjoying the series quite a bit. But all good things must come to an end, and with Goodbye Deponia&...
Blackguards photo
Blackguards

Hang out with drug addicts and murderers in Blackguards


From adventure to turn-based RPG
Mar 21
// Fraser Brown
Straying from its more worn path, Daedalic Entertainment is branching out from adventure games to tackle the world of turn-based RPGs in Blackguards. Set in the land of Aventuria, the setting of The Dark Eye: Chains of S...
Memoria announced photo
Memoria announced

Daedalic's new adventure game, Memoria, looks gorgeous


Pointing and clicking to adventure
Mar 18
// Fraser Brown
Indie adventure developer Daedalic is returning to Aventuria, the setting of last year's sumptuous, yet sometimes frustrating The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav, with Memoria. If it's anything like the previous installment, it p...
PUG! photo
PUG!

Night of the Rabbit has pug in it, so it's probably good


Color me bias
Feb 23
// Allistair Pinsof
Not since Spelunky have I been so excited for a game featuring a pug. The Night of the Rabbit is Daedelic's (Deponia series, Harvey's New Eyes) latest adventure epic and a welcome return to comedic fantasy after the underwhe...

Review: A New Beginning: Final Cut

Jan 04 // Fraser Brown
A New Beginning: Final Cut (Mac, PC)Developer: Daedalic Entertainment Publisher: Daedalic Entertainment, Lace MambaReleased: December 11, 2012MSRP: $9.99 The future is bleak. Isn't it always? Mankind is on the brink of extinction and a solar flare is about to wipe out the few remaining humans. Living underground, the residents of this apocalyptic world have come up with a zany scheme to save the world. It's time they took the "final step. The step back... to the past!" And with that cringe-worthy line the game chugs along, spewing out atrocious dialogue like it was going out of style. The plan, known as the Phoenix Plan (subtle), is to stop climate change and to get people to use algae instead of oil and nuclear power. A scientist from the '80s, Bent Svensson -- rocking a groovy porno mustache -- is roped into helping, and players are treated to ten or so hours of terrible pacing, energy mogul caricatures, and a lot of moaning. Oh yes, and they will have to hear the word algae repeated over, and over, and over again. Algae can bugger right off, at this point.   Characters generally fall into two camps -- detestable, or just plain stupid. There's some exceedingly forced character development, but it's quite hard to spot amid the dozens of schizophrenic, inconsistent buffoons that litter the game. These inconsistencies are noticeable almost straight away. During the prologue, Bent Svensson -- who has dedicated his entire life to developing a clean source of renewable energy -- laments the rise of pollution. He doesn't even like to kill fish, yet kills a bird with a machine that essentially poisons the avian bystander. His reaction is to not care at all, and he even mocks someone for feeling bad for the wee, dead fella. What a guy! He's the hero of the tale, by the way.      Honestly, I'm the sort of lazy "idiot" the game criticizes frequently. I don't bother to recycle, and I moan a lot about expensive energy-saving light bulbs, but I am interested in intelligent adventure games and hard science-fiction, which A New Beginning purports to be. It is neither of those things. The game's message is utterly inane and deals with the complex issue of climate change with the sophistication of an infant. It is very clear that the developers think that their message is important, and they go so far as to break the fourth wall and point out that a science-fiction thriller can make a difference. Maybe it can, but not this one. There certainly isn't a requirement to be environmentally minded to play the game, though, since even environmentalists will find the experience to be incredibly oversimplified.  When I think of time travel and adventure games I get all flustered. It's a combination ripe with possibilities and creative solutions to puzzles, thus I couldn't wait to see what Daedalic had in store for us. Not bloody much, apparently. It's employed twice in the whole game, but mentioned a hell of a lot, usually by Fay, one of the game's two protagonists, as she tries to tell everyone that she's from the future, so she knows stuff. World shattering stuff. There are no Day of the Tentacle-style puzzles here, that's for sure. In fact, there are no puzzles at all which involve the use of time travel. Baffling. Utterly baffling. Compared to the dialogue, the terrible story is award worthy. Daedalic needs to fire their translation team and their QA testers, because anyone with even a basic understanding of English would have been able to spot countless errors just within the first fifteen minutes. Sometimes it seemed like there was a mistake every time someone uttered a word. More often than not, the same mistakes reappear constantly, and the text frequently fails to match the audio.  In a genre unfortunately known for poor voice acting, A New Beginning takes the cake. Without fail, every single character proves to be incapable of sounding like an actual human being, or even a believable facsimile. I don't know if it was due to the poor writing, bad direction, or just doing it all in one take, but the whole thing just ends up being an auditory crime.  Fay is one of the worst offenders, in great part due to her being the most vocal character. In a ruined archive in the middle of a decaying San Francisco of the future, Fay manages to sound like she's having an orgasm not once, but two times. This would have been fine if the game had turned into a more blue adventure, but sadly this was not the case. In one instance it is the voice actor's interpretation of someone falling down mid-sentence, the other is just her trying to say "umm" when she's confused by an irritating computer program. Call me childish, but I found it hysterical. I suspect that this was not the reaction the developers had hoped for. In the puzzles there is some respite to be found, thankfully. Some verge on convoluted, but overall I found them to be organic, logical, and sometimes even quite clever. I must confess that a few stumped me, and I was really forced to wrack my brain for a solution. That doesn't happen very often in modern adventures. Lamentably, they do become somewhat repetitive, often devolving into twisting something and sticking it somewhere; the result is they aren't as satisfying or imaginative as they could have been. Regardless, they are a breath of fresh air at a time when puzzles often get far less attention than the narrative among A New Beginning's contemporaries.  The biggest issue with the puzzles is that I didn't really feel motivated to figure them out. I didn't care about progressing through the story, and I dreaded having to listen to any more offensively bad dialogue. If I hadn't been reviewing it, I'm sure I would have either skipped some of them (the trickier ones have this option) or tried to find a walkthrough. Actually, if I hadn't been reviewing it, I would have stopped playing after an hour. If I'd given up, I would have missed a lot of the absolutely gorgeous artwork, though. The hand-painted backgrounds and pleasing character art are by far and wide the best thing about A New Beginning. Detailed, striking, and full of color -- it's hard to believe that the rest of the game appears to be such a half-arsed effort. I'm afraid to say that this highlight is marred by extremely poor animation that makes the stop motion animation of The Lost World or King Kong look completely fluid and seamless. The cutscenes also compare very unfavorably to the regular art work, attempting to mimic a confused comic strip. These comic-style scenes are also rife with hilariously awful lip syncing that leads to most characters doing curious impressions of fish.  The German-language version -- which was the original -- is meant to be better, but alas I know about ten words in German so I really cannot confirm or deny this. It does strike me that the worst aspects of the game are due to the terrible effort made by the translation team and English-speaking voice actors, though.  If you are truly desperate for good puzzles and sumptuous art, then you could do worse than play A New Beginning, but I found it impossible to look past the many issues and really enjoy the few things it manages to do right. There are too many superior adventure games to count, and it's not even one of the better games with an environmental message.  
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Let it end, please
I've just saved the planet, and I couldn't be less enthused about it. A New Beginning is a self-styled eco-thriller with a spot of time travel and science fiction thrown in for good measure. It launched in Europe a couple of ...

Review: Chaos on Deponia

Nov 06 // Allistair Pinsof
Chaos on Deponia (PC)Developer: Daedalic EntertainmentPublisher: Daedalic Entertainment, Lace MambaReleased: November 6, 2012MRSP: $19.99Chaos on Deponia starts with a repeat of the first game’s tutorial. Deponia’s anti-hero, Rufus, immediately complains and points this out, making me feel that Rufus and I are on the same page. It’s a nice beginning but what follows is even better. The true opening of CoD (the non-shooting-dudes CoD) is one of the most knee-slappingly funny and creative intros I’ve seen in an adventure game. It brilliantly plays upon the tropes of the genre and established fiction of Deponia. Rufus is brought into the home of an elderly couple, who bicker and talk about Rufus’ as the player kills their pet, breaks their plumbing, and burns their house down. If only all of CoD’s puzzles were so humorous and self-contained. I would actively steer clear of giving spoilers, but CoD would have to have some significant plot reveals and progression first. For a sequel to a game that ended on a cliffhanger, CoD’s plot goes absolutely nowhere. Correction: It goes backward. The plot of CoD mirrors that of the debut: Rufus has once again damaged Goal’s memory implants and must traverse a large city hub to solve puzzles and piece her back together. There is a twist, however. Goal has been split into three personalities: spunky, lady, and child. All of the puzzles in the city progress Rufus in convincing each side of Goal to merge together again. It’s a good concept but I often grew tired of navigating the same dialogue options with all three versions of Goal. If the opening city hub of Deponia made you fall to your knees, you’re going to faint when you enter CoD’s main city that is double, if not triple, in size. CoD is not for the novice adventurer, since there are always so many locations, people, and items to factor into a puzzle. This is not the game’s problem. Its problem is that it frequently does a poor job in directing the player and subtly dropping hints. Perhaps something is lost in translation from the game’s original German, but I often felt lost and frustrated. Grim Fandango has a similar structure but I always thought it was my fault upon discovering a solution. I either wasn’t paying attention or listening to dialogue close enough. This is rarely the case in CoD and considering the game’s large world, that’s unfortunate. The structure of CoD can be frustrating, but the puzzles themselves are often fun and just challenging enough. As with other Daedalic titles, you can always skip a puzzle. But why would you want to skip battling as a platypus? Not all of the game’s puzzles and minigames are great, but they are interesting and nicely tie into the story. You’ll occasionally come across one that will drive you nuts. I feel almost obligated to give the solution to what is one of the most obtuse puzzle solutions ever put in a game. It gives Psycho Mantis a run for his money, that’s for sure. I’ll just say this: Don’t count out the options screen in your puzzle-solving. I nearly went nuts, so you don’t have to. Where CoD fails as a sequel, it succeeds with flying colors as a stand-alone, comedic adventure. Curb your expectations and you’ll discover a great cast of characters that are much better written and voiced than anything else Daedalic has put out. From Rufus’ hard-to-please father to the deluded renegade leader, CoD strives on the strengths of its outlandish characters and gorgeous world. As unlikely as it sounds, CoD manages to look even better than the first title. Secret of Monkey Island-style close-up dialogue scenes add some much needed variety and personality to presentation, and the large city hub is fantastic, full of color and detail. The backdrops still lack animation, though. The early press build I played features some typos and glitches but nothing game-breaking. As disappointed as I am that CoD isn’t more progressive in its design or storytelling, it managed to win me over with its characters, dialog, and slapstick comedy. There are few revelations and twists in CoD, to the extent that I’d recommended it to those that haven’t played the first. Although I loved the comedy and characters of this entry, I miss the scale and sense of adventure that the original game contained. In contrast to the first game, Chaos on Deponia leaves me a little less excited for the next entry, but it also leaves me a little more satisfied with the adventure I just had. If you are up for a serious challenge and some hearty laughs, you won’t be disappointed.
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A confederacy of dunces
Deponia ended right when things were getting good, and so that’s where Chaos on Deponia begins. Despite the first reaching the West in January -- or August, really, for us Steam-lovin’ folks -- a full, bona fide...

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Take a peek at Chaos on Deponia, coming Nov. 6


Daedalic's whimsical adventure returns sooner than we planned
Oct 12
// Allistair Pinsof
Daedalic's charming adventure series Deponia is making a return next month. Yeah, I had no idea either. The game is being labeled a sequel -- not a chapter -- even though the last one came out only two months ago. The above ...

Review: Deponia

Aug 06 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]231979:44497[/embed] Deponia (PC) Developer: Daedalic Entertainment Publisher: Daedalic Entertainment, Lace Mamba Released: August 7, 2012 MRSP: $19.99 Deponia smells like garbage, because it’s a planet made of garbage. Its citizens have made this supposedly uninhabitable junkyard of a planet into their home. Everyone except Rufus. Deponia to him is nothing more than the planet that his father abandoned him on. Now, he wants to return to his birthplace far away in the sky. Deponia (the game) is a lot of things: It’s an adventure, romance, and comedy all wrapped up into one goofy story. Rufus is a confident dope who bears much in common with Secret of Monkey Island’s Guybrush Threepwood. While his ambitions are a bit less, he possesses a similar wit and cluelessness in any given situation. He describes himself as “a cool version of herpes” but his friends and neighbors on Deponia would leave out the cool part. Though he is sympathetic, it took me some time to become attached to him. The same can be said about the game as a whole. Deponia has a lot more in common with Secret of Monkey Island than just sharing a similar lead character. Everything from the dialog to the comically-driven puzzles recalls LucasArts’s classic. As a result, Deponia doesn’t feel all that fresh. It doesn’t help that the game has serious problems with pacing and puzzle design in its first act (the lengthiest of the three). Things are slow-going at first. The game soon gives you a lot of ground to cover in a large city hub, but you’ll run into some obtuse puzzles that won’t make much more sense once you stumble upon the solution. The logic behind some puzzles relies too heavily on a comedic mindset rather than that of a sensible human being. LucasArts perfected their craft over the years, learning when to leave comedy out of the picture for playability. Deponia isn’t quite so discerning in its use of comedy nor is its comedic chops quite as cutting. The game prolongs dialog with bad joke after bad joke, at times. I can appreciate the spirit but I expect an adventure game to be more sparing in its humor. When every dialog option with a character doesn’t tell me anything about the game’s plot or characters, I start to become disinterested. I can’t stress enough though that these problems are mostly restricted to the first act. Even the comedy becomes stronger in the following acts -- it’s a very odd thing that makes me wonder what the production process was like behind the game. Rufus’ life becomes complicated once his plans to escape Deponia end up with him becoming responsible for a girl named Goal. He accidentally incapacitates her and decides to find a way to make her regain consciousness, hoping that she’ll help bring him back to his father’s home planet. While Rufus has some depth, he is a self-serving character that is hard to root for until the game’s second half. The main reason the first half sags, however, is that Deponia is kind of a miserable place. Rufus’ neighbors, ex-girlfriend, and even his best friend are all mean to Rufus and not very interesting characters. Despite Deponia being a rather nasty place, it's brought to life through a gorgeous hand-drawn aesthetic that recalls Curse of Monkey Island. The animation is very sub-par, with characters and backgrounds barely moving, but the design and art of the game’s locales are consistently interesting and eye-catching. Though the game is nice to look at, the dull animation is a constant reminder that this is developed by an indie with a modest budget. The same can be said of the English version’s hit-and-miss voice cast -- the game was originally voiced in German but there is no option to change to it. Thankfully Rufus sounds good and there are some quality performances later in the game, but it’s not top-caliber stuff. The grating voice effect on the game’s stormtrooper-esque Organon troopers is another chink in the game’s presentation. Despite a poor beginning and ending, I can’t shake off the warm feeling Deponia left me with. It’s a game with a big heart and some clever puzzles that recall a special time in the history of adventure games. The game lacks the consistency, quality animation, and hilarity of Tim Schafer and Ron Gilbert’s work, but Deponia is a charming and creative adventure that stands above many of its contemporaries. You can deduce the game to being a tribute to the golden years of LucasArts, but isn’t that exactly what so many want right now?
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LucasArts or Sierra: You could like both, but, more often than not, people tended to prefer one over the other in the golden age of adventure games. Though King’s Quest VI was my introduction to the genre (and the Windo...

E3: Daedalic and the return of the classic adventure game

Jun 08 // Chad Concelmo
The two games Daedalic Entertainment showed off were The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav and Deponia. The Dark Eye is a more traditional fantasy adventure game like King's Quest, while Deponia is a wacky adventure set in space that very much reminded me of Space Quest. Both games look absolutely gorgeous, with hand-drawn backgrounds and smooth animation. Just looking at the games for the first time brought back such memories of how beautiful adventure games used to look with their hand-drawn and hand-painted art. As great as the little I got to see of Deponia was, that game is still a little ways off. I will focus on The Dark Eye, as that is the game that featured an extended demo. It will also be available on Steam on June 22, so the release date is only a few weeks away! Like most point-and-click games, The Dark Eye involves a main character exploring a vast world, interacting with characters, and solving puzzles to reach the end of the game. Obviously, the first thing you will notice about the game is how gorgeous it looks. The fact that a small group of people made a game that looks this good really boggles my mind. It's incredible how talented some people in this world are. Exploring the world is as simple as clicking on any object or character you want to interact with. Again, it is classic graphic adventure stuff. In addition to this, a very large inventory system is also used. Like most adventure games, you can pick up a ton of items, some so random you won't even know where to use them until just the right time. One addition to The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav is a basic, yet effective magic system. Along the way, the main character can learn spells that will interact with the environment. One spell will break items. This can be used in many scenarios with no real result -- it is more of an aesthetic thing. But some items need to be shattered to solve puzzles. In one scenario in the demo, the main character was tied up and trapped in a cave. By using his magic power combined with many items in his inventory, he eventually escapes in a plan of almost Rube Goldberg-proportions. It was quite complicated, but very well-designed, so the solution could be figured out eventually with some focused thinking. In fact, all of the puzzles in the Dark Eye felt very challenging, but never too challenging to be frustrating. I am one of the first people to admit being driven to madness in some old adventure games, due to the puzzles being near-impossible. That is not the case with Dark Eye. Yes, the puzzles are tough, but they are never too daunting. If I had to have one negative about both the Dark Eye and Deponia, it would be the localization. So far, the localization is not perfect, leaving jokes kind of hanging and some dialogue very awkward. It is not a deal breaker by any means, but when the games are so visually strong and beautifully designed, you want everything about them to be perfect. The same can be said for the voice acting. While not bad, it definitely could use a little work. Outside of these small issues (or big, depending on what you look for in an adventure game), both The Dark Eye and Deponia look great. I adore adventure games, and I am very much looking forward to playing both of these promising games. Deponia is still in production, but The Dark Eye: Chains of Satinav is set to hit Steam on June 22. If you are a fan of classic adventure games, you will want to check this one out.
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One of my favorite things to do at E3 is visit the smaller publisher and developers and try out their games. Usually creative and made with such a large amount of heart, the smaller games at E3 are always a breath of fresh ai...

GC 10: Talking retro with Daedalic

Aug 20 // Daniel Carneiro
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Growing up in the hands of Loom and Day of the Tentacle, my heart always beats higher whenever I hear about a new point and click adventure coming out. One could say that Daedalic is like a dinosaur with lasers coming out of...

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Here are some new The Whispered World screenshots


Apr 17
// Brad Nicholson
It’s been a long time since we’ve shared some The Whispered World screenshots or information with you guys. Deep Silver and Daedalic recently released three new images -- I’ve included seven others that we&r...
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New screenshots of Daedelic's Whispering World look surprisingly good


Feb 19
// SRVSLPS
It's been quite some time since I've ventured into PC gaming territory, but adventure games of the fantasy variety have a way of tugging at my heartstrings. Throw in a jester on an epic journey to discover the meaning of life...
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Leipzig GC 2007: A New Beginning


Aug 25
// David Houghton
I've been ranting about the need for a resurgence in point and click adventures for a good while now. The genre's been forsaken as unfashionable for far too long, and in this Wii and DS-dominated climate, there's absolutely n...
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Like, omigod! Tween girls set to go wild over Dating Day on the DS


Aug 22
// Nick Chester
If there was ever a reason I'm completely bitter and miserable over the fact that I won't be covering Leipzig this year, it's this. German publisher Daedalic Entertainment will be revealing their Nintendo DS project, Dat...

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