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Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

EA opens more Stars Wars Battlefront PC servers

Trooper or a rebel?
Oct 09
// Vikki Blake
Electronic Arts are opening more PC servers to cope with demand for the Star Wars: Battlefront open beta. In a recent tweet, the official Star War: Battlefront said that owing to "a lot of interest around the beta," it will s...

Mirror's Edge: Catalyst feels different to the first game, but still fun

Sep 30 // Joe Parlock
The demo for Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst started off with an exposition cutscene. I play as Faith (same protagonist as the first game), and am being released from a prison in the city of Glass (not the same city). If I don’t find employment within two weeks, I will be re-arrested and taken straight back to the slammer. The setup felt a lot more in-your-face than the subtlety the original game’s backstory had; gone is the covert government surveillance and governmental corruption, and in are the contact lenses which project advertising into your eye. But whatever, I had running to do and only 13 minutes of demo to do it in. After a short tutorial, I was let loose on a small area of the map. The area itself wasn’t too big, with the rest of the city available and open in the full release of the game, but it was still an order of magnitude bigger than any space I’d seen I the first game. It was almost daunting, being presented with such a big space when I was used to the linearity of the first game. I was given the choice of three different missions: I could hack a billboard to put my own pro-Runner propaganda up, I could deliver a memory stick for the criminal underworld (and fight a load of guards at the same time), or I could just race Icarus, my new runner buddy. The map system is nicely done, and it gives the game’s iconic runner vision a whole new lease of life. Faith’s ability to see where she needed to go in the world has always been designated by objects tinted red. Catalyst takes that originally fairly useless but still pretty effect from the linear first game and puts it to great use in this open world successor. A lot of previews of Catalyst have said the game feels more or less exactly like the first game. The controls have been retweaked slightly, but other than that I’ve been led to believe Catalyst just expands what the first game did. While that may be true for those who only played Mirror’s Edge a few times, I did notice some very big differences in how it felt to play. The biggest one is the entire thing felt kind of floaty. Jumps lasted longer, climbing over fences took longer, and a lot of your movements are based around getting higher in the space. For example, in the original game if you hit an object like a fence or a vent at the right height, you would quickly vault over it to maintain your momentum. In Catalyst, the vault is still there, but holding down the jump button (like I was used to in the original game) made me climb up onto the object and jump off of it to get a bit of extra height. It was a change that took a lot of getting used to, but once I had it opened up plenty of new routes for me. The cost of this new maneuverability is Catalyst doesn’t feel as grounded as Mirror’s Edge did. There was originally a lot of weight to Faith’s movements, and you couldn’t build up that much height without using bars or ledge, but in Catalyst it sometimes felt like gravity didn’t really matter to Faith, and that she’d float off away from Glass at the first chance she was given. Another major difference to Catalyst is the massive changes to combat. The new combat is built around maintaining flow and momentum, rather than having to stop and do a lot of punching like it was in the first game. It all seems to be context-sensitive as well; when I was nowhere near any guards, pressing the attack buttons would do absolutely nothing. So does this new system actually let you incorporate combat into your flow? Not really. It feels so much better than the first game, for sure. I wasn’t pissed off when I had to fight, and it was incredibly cool pulling off the cinematic takedowns. It’s fun, but it still has the problem of stopping you dead in your tracks. One positive thing is triggering attack animations extended my jumps too, and even saved me from one point where I was certainly about to die. Picture it as a less extravagant version of the homing attack in modern Sonic the Hedgehog games, and it’s easy to imagine where the uses for combat would come in. It’s worth keeping in mind the original game is absolutely ingrained into my muscle memory at this point. On the whole, it plays just like the first game: once you’ve got flow built up, traversing this open world feels fantastic, and the new skills Faith has really add to the experience. Swinging around vertical pipes, leaping off of chain-link fences, and incorporating some combat into my run were a lot of fun. Catalyst more than feels like a decent successor to Mirror’s Edge. The plot elements from the first game are taken and expanded to make Glass an interesting world to explore, and the most obvious parts of the movement in the first game are still there and have been refined. The combat is better (though not as improved as I was hoping), and the controls definitely feel less awkward. I genuinely did enjoy my time with Catalyst a lot more than I was expecting to. There’s just a few changes to it that make Catalyst feel like a simplification of the original game's systems. People who have played the original once or twice will certainly appreciate those simplifications, but for me it felt like the potential skill ceiling was a fair bit lower than the original game. I can't see myself pulling off the same sort of stuff I can in the original, because of the very small ways freedom is taken away from you. We will see whether I’m right when Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst releases on February 23, 2016. It's still definitely one of my most anticipated games, that's for sure.
Mirror's Edge: Catalyst photo
I've played 250+ hours of the original
When Mirror’s Edge came out in 2008, nobody really knew what to make of it. The game was a valiant effort at doing first-person parkour well, but a lot of people were put off by some awkward controls, bad combat, and pe...

Battlefront photo

Star Wars Battlefront won't have a server browser

Because matchmaking always works...
Sep 02
// Joe Parlock
DICE has a history of controversy when it comes to server browsers in its games. Before release, there was a lot of criticism of Battlelog in Battlefield 3, which saw the server list removed from the game and shoved into your...
Hearst's Kingdom photo
Hearst's Kingdom

Kingdom Hearts 3 news next month alongside playable Star Wars

Hearst's Kingdom
Jul 13
// Steven Hansen
We previously anticipated some Garrison Hearst Kingdom Hearts 3 news in November courtesy of Kingdom Hearts at the D23n event in Japan, but the Disney/Square crossover will be at Disney's American D23 Expo next month with "ne...

DICE's Star Wars Battlefront feels like a half-assed Battlefield mod

Jun 17 // Jed Whitaker
Air support has to be called in by finding tokens placed throughout the battlefield that randomly give you either a special weapon or a ship to fly, thus removing the need to rush for a vehicle to have the chance to pilot one. The flying mechanics feel a bit better than Battlefield games, where I typically can only stay in the air a few moments before crashing, but the hit detection was shit. As I flew my Y-Wing around Hoth, I tried to get a bit closer to the ground to lay down some fire for my comrades below and my ship inexplicably exploded -- I was told I'd killed myself. I'd estimate that I was at least 100 feet off the ground, so I'm not sure what I could have possible collided with. [embed]294292:59136:0[/embed] Upon starting each spawn you can select from loadouts, of which we had two to choose from. A primary weapon can be selected, and then the actual loadout is basically support options including: grenades, bubble shields, and short-use jetpacks. One particular option let you lob three explosives a great distance and this was typically an instant kill if aimed correctly. I fell to this the most. Gun-wise, there were a few different blasts available, none of which felt much different in third-person view, but had different scopes in first-person view. The former option felt similar to the old games: holding the left trigger allowed you to focus your shot while slowing down your movement speed. First person felt ripped from Battlefield, with aiming down sights or through scopes. In one of the trailers it shows swapping seamlessly from third person to first, but I couldn't figure out how to do it for the life of me other than using a menu, only taking effect after respawning.  Aim assist was on by default which had the crosshair sticking to enemies and turning red whenever aiming relatively close to one of them, which would be fine except for most shots miss if they are moving. This aim assist issue happened in both third and first person, causing me to have to fight with aim assist to try to line up shots for moving targets. After turning it off it felt a bit better, so perhaps for less advanced players it will be a great option, but more serious players will want to shut it off. I found myself dying far more often than I remember in classic Battlefront games, and that has been a problem for me in Battlefield games as well. Indicators that you're taking damage aren't obvious enough and by the time you do realize you're taking fire, you're dead. While there is a health meter that ticks down, I still felt like I was dying nearly instantly as if I were playing a Battlefield game. The demo I played was presented on PlayStation 4, and the amount of graphics popping in just a few feet ahead of my character was disturbing. I realize this is an early build but it was still shocking. There was a choice between locking the game to 30 frames per second and having better graphics or playing at 60fps. I didn't get a chance to test if the pop-in still happened at 30fps before the battle was over, but I certainly don't want to play a shooter at 30fps in 2015. Overall I wasn't impressed with what little time I spent with DICE's Star Wars Battlefront. It really did feel like a half-assed mod slapped onto Battlefield 4, and I'm surprised modders haven't created something better already. That being said the game was still enjoyable -- it looked and sounded like Star Wars -- but this is not the Battlefront you're looking for.
Battlefront preview photo
Not the Battlefront you're looking for
Ever since the announcement that EA's DICE studio would be developing Star Wars Battlefront, fans of the series -- myself included -- have feared it will be "Star Wars Battlefield" and it seems like our fears have come t...

Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

EA debuts survival mode in Star Wars Battlefront

Beautiful '70s explosions
Jun 15
// Darren Nakamura
We saw a bit of Star Wars Battlefront's competitive multiplayer earlier today, but at Sony's press conference tonight, Patrick Bach of DICE showed off its cooperative survival mode. A small team of rebels fight off the Imper...
Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

Star Wars Battlefront heads to Hoth with its E3 trailer

Star Wars Battlefront multiplayer video
Jun 15
// Steven Hansen
Here's some 40-player, Hoth-reminscient battles from EA's Star Wars Battlefront trailer. "As the Empire, you must accompany AT-AT walkers as they march towards the Rebel base to destroy it. And as a Rebel, you must do every...
Mirror's Edge 2 photo
Mirror's Edge 2

EA CEO Andrew Wilson is the bad guy in Mirror's Edge Catalyst

Mirror's Edge 2
Jun 15
// Steven Hansen
Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

Star Wars Battlefront will lack space battles

At least Star Fox is still coming this year, right?
Apr 17
// Jed Whitaker
The official Twitter account for all things Star Wars from EA confirmed today that there will be no space battles in Star Wars Battlefront. When asked "space battles or not" EA responded: We’re focusing on air battles ...

We got a first look at gameplay from the new Star Wars Battlefront

Apr 17 // Mike Cosimano
[embed]290584:58214:0[/embed] Star Wars Battlefront (PlayStation 4 [previewed], Xbox One, PC)Developer: DICEPublisher: Electronic ArtsRelease Date: November 17, 2015 During the preview event, we were shown what DICE claims was pre-alpha PlayStation 4 gameplay. It all felt too staged to be a live match, but there was just enough roughness to the visuals that I could maybe buy it. The gametype we were shown was called "Walker Assault," which was not explained in depth but seems to be an asymmetrical mode similar to Battlefield Hardline's "Heist." The Empire has an AT-AT, and the Rebels are activating Uplinks to summon Y-Wing bombers so they can destroy the AT-AT? Maybe? It wasn't explicit, but that's what I took away from both the match & the pre-rendered trailer we were shown. The Endor map also feels too detailed; there's too much going on visually and it feels like the camouflaged Rebels will have an enormous advantage. The other major thing I took away from the gameplay video was how much it looked like Battlefield, even with the Star Wars trappings. That's not to say it's a re-skin of Battlefield 4 or anything; it's just that the game looks almost exactly like how you'd expect a hypothetical Battlefield Endor game to look, right down to the experience gain. Battlefront gives you a 25 point bonus for a headshot, eh? That sounds familiar. Even the gun sway animation feels like a holdover from the recent Battlefield titles. However, all of that changes in third-person. For me, Star Wars Battlefront has always been a third-person shooter. It looks like players will be able to switch at will between the two modes of play. Heroes and villains will make a return, as we saw at the end of our demo when Darth Vader showed up and annihilated the player character. Boba Fett will also be playable, because this is a Star Wars thing. There's currently no word as to the rest of the game's roster, but I'd have to imagine some of the new characters from The Force Awakens will make an appearance. If DICE insists on gametypes with limited respawn tickets, a super-powerful character laying waste to an enemy team would certainly reduce average match times. One thing we didn't see was any specifics how ship-to-ship combat would be implemented. The reveal trailer included footage of dogfights, but I am very concerned by the lack of space combat gameplay being shown. I remember when I realized I could break into the enemy ship and sabotage it from within in the original game. How cool that would be with the 40-player count DICE is citing for Star Wars Battlefront? In fairness, there is a criminal lack of dogfighting in videogames these days in general. At this point I'll take just about anything I can get, especially if the fights are accompanied by that iconic TIE fighter scream. At the end of the gameplay demo, Battlefront design director Niklas Fegraeus took the stage to discuss some of the more technical aspects of the game. He showed off something called Dolby Atmos 3D, which just amounted to slightly better sound rendering. I bet if you've got a surround sound system or some killer headphones, that'll make you a very happy person. Most of my online gaming happens with the volume off and a podcast on in the background, so an otherwise indistinct difference in sound just didn't grab me. What I did find interesting was the mandatory part of the conference where the licensor talks about how much they love the licensed product and how faithful they want to be. When it came time for DICE to visit the Lucasfilm archives, they incorporated a technology called Physically Based Rendering -- PBR for short. As Fegraeus put it: "You have a [physical] object, you take a bunch of pictures and then a special software converts it into a digital object." The models we saw looked fantastic, and that level of detail was certainly visible in the demo. I was also quite taken with the new "partner feature," an option in multiplayer that allows two buddies to form a tag team. In-matches, you will always spawn near each other and you can always see where the other person is on the map. Outside of the match, if one of you is playing and the other comes online, you'll automatically be matched up. As somebody who doesn't make very much use of clans in console shooters, it's possible all of these features have been well-tread already, but to me this implementation felt new and fresh. But the most impressive aspect of this feature for me was the unlock sharing. If you get access to a sick gun before the other member of your tag team, they get access to it as well. This is both a cool way to make sure your team is perpetually strong while making the game accessible to more casual players. It's the best kind of change -- the kind that has no real downside -- and I'd like to see it pop up under a different name in a Call of Duty or Battlefield somewhere down the line. If competitive multiplayer isn't quite your bag (and if that's the case, why do you care about this game?) there will be missions inspired by battles from the film series that can be played solo or co-op (either online or local). One such mission is a free add-on entitled The Battle of Jakku, and takes place before the events of The Force Awakens, setting up the desert planet seen in both of the film's teaser trailers.  The latest iteration of the Frostbite engine seems well-utilized, but it's somewhat difficult to tell if I was being tricked. Although I firmly believe the match was choreographed to hell and back, the visuals had just enough jank to them that I also believe the game will absolutely look fantastic upon release. Now, will it hit the benchmark set by the demo? Not likely, but we know DICE can make a fine-looking console game. This is all somewhat irrelevant: how pretty the game will be is not the sticking point here. When you consider just how god damn broken Battlefield 4 was, I was genuinely surprised our demo didn't even nod at that ever-present sting. At time of writing, the DICE panel at Star Wars Celebration has not occurred, so there's a chance the team will still address the wampa in the room. But even if they manage to address it in a way that feels satisfactory, will that be enough to rake in the pre-orders? I think DICE has a solid core here, partially in thanks to its experience with multiplayer shooters. I've never played a bad Battlefield from a design standpoint (although I'm sure the comments will tell me otherwise), so there's no way I was going into Star Wars Battlefront expecting a mechanical disaster. My apprehension comes from the remaining blank spaces. Will this game be able to pay tribute to its predecessors and the franchise without letting reverence smother progress? And -- more importantly -- will the game work on day one? Neither of these questions can be adequately resolved before copies start getting out, but I think it's reasonable to get your hopes up just a little. As long as we've got space battles, everything will be fine. ...there are space battles, right DICE?
Star Wars Battlefront photo
There has been an awakening
I have very fond memories of Star Wars Battlefront. Well into my adolescence, whole summer weekends were lost to split-screen tournaments; when you lost a game, you lost the controller. Familiar Star Wars icono...

Battleflub photo

DICE: Battlefield 4's bad launch 'absolutely' damaged trust

But, you know, promises not to do that again
Oct 08
// Steven Hansen
I think it's nice that we've finally managed to hold EA accountable to something. Can its ripoff sports game releases be next? Well, I guess it's been DICE falling on the sword and profusely apologizing more than EA.&nbs...
Battlefield & Dead Space photo
Battlefield & Dead Space

EA: Hardline doesn't mean annual Battlefield, new Dead Space possible

A new Dead Space will 'absolutely' happen at some unknown point in the future
Jun 17
// Steven Hansen
Still confused about how Hardline -- the Battlefield game, not Destructoid's podcast -- came to be? EA Studios executive vice president Patrick Söderlund explained to Polygon: "Karl-Magnus [Troedsson], who...

Battlefield Hardline: First hands-on impressions

Jun 09 // Dale North
The idea started as a dream when DICE and Visceral studio heads met in Barcelona a couple of years ago. Big fans of each others' games, they started talking about games they'd like to make. A crazy idea snowballed into a full-on plan. But Visceral, the team behind the Dead Space games, knew third-person shooting better than first-person. So as a way of learning the ropes, Visceral did a Battlefield expansion pack, End Game.  After that, they started on the concept work for what would eventually be Hardline. In a pre-E3 reveal, Ian Milham, Creative Director on Hardline, explained that his team at Visceral had been working on a new IP following the last Dead Space. He put his presentation together for executives after working on it for a few months, but it got a mixed reaction. The execs brought up making a Battlefield game instead. Milham says he has been a franchise fan for a long time, but he did not want to do another military shooter. Milham talked about how modern military shooters were going science fiction lately. He wanted to do something different, fun, and relatable -- no grizzle-voiced heroes or private armies. His dream was to make something that played off backyard fantasies. Robbing banks, relatable places, real weapons -- no fancy equipment or high-end squad tactics.  We had a chance to spend some time with Battlefield: Hardlline's multiplayer a few weeks back. playing a couple of short matches in two newly revealed game modes. The game does have a full single-player component, but Visceral wanted to show multiplayer first to show the direction they're going with this project. Milham noted that they've done a lot of single-player games in the past, so we know they have that side covered. The cops in Hardline are pretty militarized, so armored cars and helicopters are the norm in battle. On the criminals side, these guys are pros, so they have a bunch of handy technologies and automated gear like grappling hooks and ziplines. Cops have ballistic shields, gas masks, flash bombs and more. For vehicles, my hands-on time felt like anything goes in Hardline. Cops have fast interceptors that can zip around town while a partner hangs out the passenger side window, shooting. Criminals have muscle cars as a parallel, but they also have their own armored transports. I was suddenly dropped into just about every vehicular situation you could imagine in one match that had both factions fighting over control points in a city. I went from being on the ground, to manning a turret on top of a transport, to shooting a machine gun from an open helicopter door, all in a scramble. I played in a large group multiplayer session to try out the Heist mode. This has the criminals trying to break into a defended area,  gathering loot, and then working to escape safely. They have to get to vaults, arm charges, and defend them until the charges explode. From there, they'll take their loot to a drop-off point. Meanwhile, the cops are working to intercept these transports and halt escapes. In this mode I had fun as a cop, running down criminals with cars, or picking them off after they've worked so hard to crack a vault. Another mode, called Blood Money, has cops and robbers fighting over stolen loot. A transport was stopped mid-route, and the cops have to try to secure the transport while the criminals try to steal from it. The criminals have to take the stolen money, bag by bag, to their vault and protect it. But the cops can raid this vault and steal it back. Nothing is safe, and the line, measured in money, is constantly shifting.  This mode was even more fun than Heist. The map, a large city with plenty of damaged buildings and roadways, has plenty of hiding places and alternative paths to sneak away in as a criminal. Despite the large number of cops running, I was able to steal loads of cash for my team by keeping low and taking underground passageways. Above ground, gun fights, helicopter patrols, and crazy setpiece events, like crashing buildings, kept the tension up.  From my short time with it, Hardline feels more relaxed and approachable than the multiplayer in past Battlefield games. There's quite a bit more character and personality as well, which had these matches feeling less competitive and more enjoyable.  Battlefield is a huge franchise, but Hardline feels like a departure from the big budget, super serious games of late. Hats off to Visceral and DICE for taking the opportunity to try something different. We hope to see more of Hardline in the coming weeks.
Battlefield hands-on photo
Details on how Hardline came to be
I was pretty excited to be able to be the first to tell you about Battlefield Hardline, the new team up cops-and-robbers title from Visceral (Dead Space) and DICE. But trailer leaks, detail leaks, and even gameplay video lea...


Watch the D.I.C.E. Awards live right here!

See who wins
Feb 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
[Update: It's over, see the full results below. The Last of Us won 10 of the 13 awards they were nominated for, including Game of the Year. Congrats, Naughty Dog!] The 17th Annual D.I.C.E. Awards are happening live in Las Veg...
Rockstar photo

Rockstar founders will be inducted into AIAS Hall of Fame

The Houser brothers and GTA producer Leslie Benzies will receive the honor on Thursday
Feb 04
// Alasdair Duncan
Dan and Sam Houser, founders of Rockstar Games, and GTA producer Leslie Benzies will be the latest inductions into the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences' (AIAS) Hall of Fame at the D.I.C.E. awards ceremony on Thursday....
The Last of Us photo
The Last of Us

The Last of Us leads D.I.C.E. Awards with 13 nominations

Awards to be livestreamed on February 6 at 7:30PM PT
Jan 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The 17th Annual D.I.C.E. Awards take place in Las Vegas from February 4 to February 7 and the nominations have been announced by The Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. Last year the Sony exclusive Journey was up for...
Battlefield 4 photo
Battlefield 4

Battlefield 4 double XP event delayed

More trouble for the ailing shooter
Jan 02
// Harry Monogenis
As many Battlefield 4 Premium players are aware, the double XP event that was scheduled to occur at the end of December never actually happened. As it turns out, said event, which the Premium calender still shows as havi...
Battlefield photo

China bans Battlefield 4

Surprise, surprise
Dec 28
// Harry Monogenis
I remember browsing the Origin store a few days ago to see if EA was going to at least try and compete with Steam's Holiday Sale when I came across the Battlefield 4: China Rising expansion in the 'New Releases' sec...

Here is yet another patch for Battlefield 4

Keep rollin', rollin', rollin'
Dec 21
// Harry Monogenis
DICE has rolled out a new Battlefield 4 update for the Xbox One, several days after pushing out another one for PC. Much like the latest one for PC, this Xbox One patch fixes the "kill-trading issue" where two ...
Battlefield 4 photo
Battlefield 4

New Battlefield 4 patch launches on PC

Fixes client crashes among other things
Dec 10
// Harry Monogenis
With future DLC on hold, DICE have been busy trying to fix the many issues that Battlefield 4 has been suffering from since its launch. Part of that effort has been reflected in their latest PC patch, which aims to fix a...
EA Star Wars photo
EA Star Wars

EA isn't making any games based on new Star Wars movies

Mesa like dis
Nov 20
// Joshua Derocher
EA's Chief Financial Officer Blake Jorgensen talked about Star Wars games during a presentation on Tuesday, and he made it clear they don't want to make a movie game. Jorgensen said, "We've done movie games over the years and...
BF4 China Rising map list photo
BF4 China Rising map list

Alleged map list for Battlefield 4: China Rising leaked

Also includes five new weapons, Air Superiority mode, more
Nov 13
// Brett Zeidler
A picture sent to MP1st contains an alleged screenshot of a post on Battlefield 4's Spanish Facebook page. It states that the four multiplayer maps added by China Rising will be Taklamakan, Altai Range, Guilin Peaks, and...
Battlefield photo

Operation Metro returns in Battlefield 4: Second Assault

Second Assault to your wallet
Nov 05
// Abel Girmay
Remakes of any kind are a tricky thing, but trickier still when it comes as DLC. Battlefield 4: Second Assault is a prime case of this. On one hand, it's nice to revisit your favorite maps from previous games, with all the L...
Tell me more about your AXE body sprays!
Hey kids, do you want to look at something stupid this morning? Look no further than this juicy slice of video idiocy, courtesy of Battlefield 4 and AXE's pore-closin' smell juice! Together, AXE and BF4 celebrate men and wom...

Battlefield photo

This is Battlefield 4's chaotic multiplayer

Our review is coming!
Oct 29
// Jordan Devore
I didn't pick Battlefield 3 up until well after its initial release, but after running into launch-week issues for more than a few of DICE's games now, I'm surprised. I was not expecting to be able to get into Battlefield 4 ...
Battlefield 4 graphics photo
Battlefield 4 graphics

DICE: Battlefield 4 platform parity 'the cowards way out'

Would a coward do this... BYE!
Oct 17
// Steven Hansen
Battlefield 4 executive producer Patrick Bach expects a slew of complaints when Battlefield 4 launches on October 29. Then another slew of complaints when the game re-launches on next generation hardware. It happened with Ba...
DICE on BF3 mistakes photo
DICE on BF3 mistakes

DICE: 'We should be slapped' for Battlefield 3 unlocks

Glove slap, baby glove slap
Oct 03
// Steven Hansen
Remember when Battlefield 3 came out and all everyone was doing was impotently running helicopters into the ground? DICE wasn't happy with the its flying learning curve, according to Battlefield 4 creative director Lars Gust...
Battlefield photo

What happens when you're in BF4's collapsing buildings

Turns out you just sort of shuffle and die
Oct 02
// Abel Girmay
Remember that crazy Battlefield 4 E3 demo where the skyscraper came tumbling down and "leveloution" became a word? Yeah, that was great -- the collapsing building, not the buzzwords. But have you wondered what it looks like ...
Battlefield not annual photo
Battlefield not annual

Slow your DICE roll: Battlefield not being annualized

Aug 29
// Steven Hansen
After EA decided to pull Medal of Honor from its stables, there was fear that Battlefied would be annualized to continue to try and contend with the Call of Duty juggernaut. Speaking to Videogamer, Battlefield 4 executive pro...
Battlefield 4 photo
Battlefield 4

Battlefield 4 beta coming in early October

Full release at the end of October
Aug 20
// Darren Nakamura
In today's press conference at gamescom, EA announced that the Battlefield 4 beta would roll out in early October, with the final game shipping for current generation consoles on October 29th in North America and October 31s...

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