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Apple announces Metal to bring console-quality graphics to iOS

Dramatically reduced overhead
Jun 02
// Dale North
Apple announced their new technology, called Metal, today during their press conference in San Francisco. Metal reduces the overhead between game and hardware with up to ten times faster draw recall rates for A7-powered Apple...

Use an open world to fight for freedom in Homefront: The Revolution

Jun 02 // Brett Makedonski
Because the American citizens are at a serious disadvantage in this scenario, any hope of regaining their freedom must be done through guerrilla tactics. This aims to be Homefront: The Revolution's calling card. Rather than engage in constant over-the-top first-person shooting sequences, Crytek wants to push the battle to asymmetric warfare. One such example is equipping a remote-controlled car with explosive devices, driving it under a moving North Korean vehicle for cover, and then detonating it at a gate to both gain access and cause panicked mayhem. This is only a single example of the many possibilities for igniting an uprising. To keep things from becoming too scripted, Crytek's creating an open-world game that puts the players in charge of the revolution. As different areas of town are hit by the revolution, everything evolves accordingly. When actions like taking out guards and smashing security cameras are performed, uprising points are awarded, presumably bringing that particular section that much closer to liberation. It also means that the North Koreans will be on their toes, and more wary of your presence. No one will have to fend for themselves though, as resistance cells can be formed in online cooperative play. [embed]275756:54145:0[/embed] While the resistance may be sort of a ragtag lot, they're still equipped in their own special way to deal with opposing forces. The world is replete with resources that can be scavenged to create improvised weaponry. However, it may be cellular technology that proves the most useful. The phone seems as if it'll be a central device to Homefront: The Revolution, as it not only serves as a map, but also as a gadget for identifying and marking enemies. Crytek seems as if it has the right take on Homefront -- after all, do we really need another linear first-person shooter? But, it's the implementation of the studio's engine that strives to pull everything together. CryEngine 3 (which is already known for creating some of the most stunning visuals in videogames) is in use, and looks to add a sense of believability to the open-world through day/night cycles and changing weather effects. Whether that believability is achieved remains to be seen. Crytek has an ambitious project on its hands. One that could easily change the legacy of the Homefront name, or one that could just as easily succumb to overextending itself. When it hits PC, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Mac, and Linux in 2015, we'll know if this is a revolution worth fighting for.
Homefront: The Revolution photo
Developed by Crytek
As a result of THQ's fire sale at the beginning of 2013, several IPs were ushered off to new homes, just waiting for someone to advance their stories while being published under a new banner. One such example is Homefront, wh...

Arena of Fate photo
Arena of Fate

Crytek's Arena of Fate pits legendary characters against one another

A roster from both history and fiction
May 22
// Brett Makedonski
What would it look like if Frankenstein fought Little Red Riding Hood? Or if Jack the Ripper and Robin Hood teamed up to take on Nikola Tesla? Crytek's newly announced game, Arena of Fate, is going to make these scenarios ha...
CryEngine photo

Crytek to offer royalty-free CryEngine subscription

It's a good time to be an indie developer
Mar 19
// Jordan Devore
Well, would you look at that. After hearing Epic Games has plans to roll out a $19.99-per-month subscription plan for Unreal Engine 4, we've know learned Crytek has announced a similar approach for its own CryEngine. But unli...
Crytek photo

Crytek adds native Linux support to CryEngine

Angry toad is pleased
Mar 11
// Jordan Devore
In detailing its plans for next week's Game Developers Conference, Crytek has announced native Linux support for CryEngine. The newest iteration of the engine will also include the features that made Ryse: Son of Rome's creat...
Ryse photo

Challenge editor for Ryse has been scrapped

'Oh no that's horrible news' said no one
Feb 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Remember that challenge editor that was supposed to be added to Ryse: Son of Rome after launch? Well it's been scrapped. Microsoft spoke with Polygon, stating that "after careful consideration, we have decided to cease devel...
Xbox One photo
Xbox One

That Ryse Xbox One discount is the first deals 'test'

Microsoft could discount more titles in the future
Feb 18
// Chris Carter
Yesterday, we reported that Ryse was getting some DLC, and a hefty discount down to $40. Xbox studio manager Mike Ybarra has revealed that this $40 deal is a result of a "sales test." Ybarra goes on to explain,...
Ryse DLC photo
Ryse DLC

Ryse DLC adds new mode and maps, game going on sale

Ryse DLC: It's tricky
Feb 17
// Steven Hansen
On February 28, Ryse is getting DLC. It'll run (DMC) you $9, unless you have the Ryse season pass. No one has the Ryse season pass, right? Leading up to the release, the Games on Demand Ryse will go on sale from February 18 t...
Warface photo

Free-to-play Warface Xbox 360 beta now available

Haha, of course you need Gold membership to play
Feb 08
// Harry Monogenis
Well, it's finally here; the Xbox 360 beta for Crytek's first-person shooter, Warface, which was announced back in August, has now launched.  In order to participate in the free-to-play Warface beta, you'll ne...
Dtoid in The Collectables photo
Dtoid in The Collectables

Don a Dtoid shirt and gun in Crytek's The Collectables!

Blast through the upcoming free-to-play shooter in style
Jan 30
// mrandydixon
Our friends at Crytek are currently accepting pre-registrations for their upcoming iOS and Android shooter The Collectables, and they've created an exclusive in-game shirt and gun just for the Dtoid community! By heading ove...
Crytek photo

God of War: Ascension director joins Crytek

Working on 'unannounced project'
Dec 02
// Harry Monogenis
Todd Papy, as some may recall, recently left his position at SCEA Santa Monica (where he worked as game director for God of War: Ascension) without revealing what he'd be up to next, except that he'd be relocating to Ger...

Review: Ryse: Son of Rome

Nov 21 // Chris Carter
Ryse: Son of Rome (Xbox One)Developer: CrytekPublisher: Microsoft StudiosRelease Date: November 22, 2013MSRP: $59.99 Let's get the good stuff out of the way first. As you can probably tell from the above screenshots, Ryse is a great-looking game. With a combination of motion capture and CryEngine 4, Ryse is very close to looking like a film, down to the dirt and grime on each soldier's piece of armor. Watching hundreds of soldiers battle each other at once is not unlike the first time you saw the cinematic armies fighting in the backgrounds of Final Fantasy VIII. It's stunning, to the point where you'll no doubt look out into the scenery and watch in awe at the engine more than a few times. The environments are similarly detailed, and it's insane how much effort was put into some of the areas, especially considering the fact that you may only pass through them for a few seconds. Combat is a bit of a mixed bag, with mostly solid ideas. Much like Arkham games, the crux of Ryse's action system lies in parrying, with an enhanced focus on dodge rolling. Enemies have two types of attacks: weak and strong. The former can be parried with the A button, while the latter is dodged with the B button. It's a very simple system, and it does work more often than not. [embed]265770:51460:0[/embed] One thing I really liked is that even on normal, there's no goofy "counter" icon appearing above any enemies' heads -- you have to always be aware of what's coming at you at all times. You'll also have a "Rage of the Gods" type super attack at your disposal, that slows down time and allows you to get out of a jam. So far, so good -- you're always on your toes to survey the battlefield, and the combat mechanics in general are reliable. But then you get to the execution mechanic, and the game falls off from there. When an enemy is on their last bit of health, a skull icon will pop up above their heads. Pressing the right trigger will instantly queue an interactive execution animation that not only makes you invincible, but it's also impossible to fail. By pressing the direction pad at any time, you can switch what type of stat bonus you'll get. This system is not new -- it was even in games as recent as Killer is Dead. So where does it go wrong? Well, the fact that every enemy in the game has a lengthy execution QTE, for starters. While Crytek is quick to disguise them from being presenting as QTEs (and cleverly ditched a button icon in favor of painting enemies blue or yellow), they're still very much quick-time events. For every enemy you execute, you'll press a combination of buttons that results in an instant kill, while everyone else in the fight stands there and watches. If you press the buttons correctly -- great! You'll earn a bonus in whatever stat you chose. If not, no worries -- they'll die instantly anyway. Point blank, executions should have only been used for boss fights. There's a reason many other games (God of War) sparingly use mini-games like these -- any normal gamer doesn't want to have to go through a five- to ten-second scene for every single enemy in the game. It just doesn't make sense, and it boggles the mind as to why the developers thought it would be cool after the first two or three instances. Now, one thing I did discover on my own is that you do not have to use the executions every time. If an enemy has a skull icon over their head, you can simply continue to hack at them and they'll eventually fall over. But you won't get any of the stat bonuses (thus discouraging you from doing it), and some of the sturdier enemies in the game take forever to kill normally, while offering you the option to execute them instead. One enemy in particular -- a fighter with two swords -- essentially requires you to execute him, as he dances around for quite some time otherwise. Another major selling point is "ordering your troops," and engaging in team-based combat like initiating phalanx formations. But these events are all highly scripted, and can only be used in certain situations throughout the campaign. The gameplay here is also painfully simple. You can't control where your formation moves on the battlefield -- you can only charge forward. When an enemy is readying their bows, you press a button to raise your shields, and then strike back with spears. You'll do this a few times in the campaign, and that's literally it. In the opening stages of the game, there is an opportunity to order troops around somewhat using both the controller and barking orders via Kinect. But it only gives off the illusion that you're going to have more control throughout the rest of the story. Instead, those choices are always relegated to "move your archers to one of two locations," both of which have little relevance on how the battle plays out. These features feel more like checkboxes, as in the end, you can just take out every enemy on the battlefield yourself. In practice, the roller coaster gameplay is also wasted on the poor excuse for a campaign. Clocking in at around five hours, there's no point in the game's story where I actually felt compelled to keep playing. In fact, if it wasn't for this review, I probably would have stopped at multiple points. Simply put, it's boring, most of it feels pointless, and none of the characters are worth caring about. Try to think of the biggest Roman period piece films ever created. Now take most of the plot of Gladiator, then take out anything that made those films memorable, and add a dash of deus ex machina moments where "the gods" interfere to piece together the poor writing. The solution to said equation is Ryse: Son of Rome -- a script so devoid of life that it feels like it's constantly going through the motions as a proof of concept rather than an actual game. At the core of the conflict is the confrontation between the Roman army and a collective of barbarian hordes. It sounds like a setup for a halfway decent action flick, but the problem lies in the fact that the barbarians are not only boring to watch, but they also aren't any fun to fight. Do you remember Criterion's console FPS Black -- the one that used the same few enemy models over and over, like "shotgun guy" and "melee guy"? That's basically what Crytek did for Ryse. As you're fighting enemies throughout the story, you'll frequently encounter the exact same "bald double-sword" guy, the same "shield-toting bearded guy," and so on. Even the grunts only have a few different models between them, and it's almost comical to fight the same enemies over and over. I get that there are technical limitations involved, but there's a point where it just comes across as lazy. The lead, a Roman general named Marius Titus, is definitely selling the "hard action hero" concept pretty well, but nothing about him is interesting, as both a player in the story, and in terms of his acting prowess by way of motion-capture technology. Ryse's story is billed as an "epic tale of revenge," but you're not really given much development for Marius outside of one predictable tragic event that you've seen a million times before. But other than the lackluster campaign, there is one shining light of gameplay in Ryse -- the two player co-op arena mode -- which took me completely by surprise. This portion of the game is much more interesting due to the fact that it takes a page from many online shooters, adding in different objectives like "hold the point" or "assassinate specific targets" in addition to your typical "kill all these dudes" missions. The best thing about this scheme is that no one round is the same. Pretty much every time you play you'll see new objectives in different parts of the arena with different enemy groups, forcing you to change your tactics on the fly. There's a surprising amount of modifications to be made in multiplayer, and really, this is where you'll want to spend the bulk of your time, especially if you can find a reliable partner. The arena itself is packed with a cheering crowd (that actually looks good for once), a halfway decent Emperor narration, and a clockwork-like mechanical floor that changes out different bits of scenery. One minute you may be battling in a forest-filled location, the next, you'll be battling through a giant sandstorm, and later, it'll morph into a more like a traditional gladiatorial arena. It's not only a fun mechanic due to the fact that it changes up gameplay dynamically, but it's also a sight to behold visually, as the floor drops and changes on the fly. You can play this mode online (no split-screen) with one other player, or by yourself -- the latter of which is a great option for those of you who may be the only Xbox One adopter in your group. All in all, co-op is a pleasant surprise compared to the rest of Ryse, but you'll want a partner to keep the good times rolling. In some ways the greatness of this mode is a shame though, because I would have rather liked Ryse if the entire game was just a giant extension of this mode. It's almost like a fighting game that has a non-existent or otherwise horrible single-player mode but a serviceable multiplayer component -- only it's limited to two players, and you're forced to partially pay for the campaign. Microtransactions are also present in the form of "booster" packs, which I'm uncomfortable with, even if they don't ruin the game. Considering Ryse has no competitive element, and thus the only person you're really cheating is yourself, it's not that big of a deal in the sense that it doesn't influence anything other than your own playthrough. In fact, the promising arena mode is the only saving grace of Ryse. The campaign may as well not even be there, and having to fight the same handful of enemies over and over on top of a trite, stereotypical narrative is not an example of a good time. Ryse looks great and has a lot of great ideas, but it falls flat in nearly every respect in regards to its core story. If you're a hardcore action fan you may get some satisfaction on the highest difficulty setting, but even then I'd wait for an equally hardcore price drop.
Ryse: Son of Rome photo
Don't bother getting up
Crytek has quite the reputation for crafting some of the most visually advanced games on the market. The Crysis games have been a consistent benchmark for PC fans, and even if you don't enjoy their work, it's always interesti...

Ryse photo

Fight for the survival of Rome in Ryse later this week

Because a slowly decaying civilization is totally preferable
Nov 19
// Conrad Zimmerman
There's no argument that Ryse: Son of Rome is pretty, and more evidence of that has been made available through the launch trailer released today. Visually, it's downright gorgeous, but doesn't look like it's particular...
Ryse challenge editor photo
Ryse challenge editor

Ryse: Son of Rome will add challenge editor after launch

Create battles someday, but not at launch
Nov 07
// Joshua Derocher
A challenge editor will be released for Ryse: Son of Rome sometime after launch says Michael Smart, the associate producer for Ryse. He talked about it with Digital Spy, saying that you'll be able to create your own mult...

Ryse: Son of Rome: A time of great unrest

Nov 06 // Dale North
Ryse: Son of Rome (Xbox One)Developer: CrytekPublisher: MicrosoftRelease Date: November 22, 2013 First, let's clear the air. Ryse: Son of Rome is an action game. While early showings may have had gamers thinking that the gameplay centered around QTEs, the final version had me taking on hordes of invading warriors in an effort to help defend my city and my emperor. Swinging a sword to engage any enemy feels like any hack-and-slash, though the hits feel slower and more deliberate. Slow bordering on clunky, really. Ryse kicks off with a combat tutorial that encourages blocking incoming attacks with a shield, and then returning with your own hits when the attacker has been properly deflected. It's not the deepest combat system, but it's effective and it feels decent. Some of the spirit of QTEs live on in Ryse's finishing system, which ties cinematic kills with battle perks. Beat an enemy down enough and an icon will appear above its head, telling you to move in for a finisher. While you won't see button prompts in these slow-motion sequences, you will see faint colored auras around the enemy. Press the corresponding controller face buttons to match the colors in time, and you'll execute the finisher properly.  The perks you generate from this properly executed finisher are of your choosing. By pressing one of the four directions of the d-pad, you can set your perk to what you might need. You can put a charge into experience or attack-power boosters if you'd like. Slowing down time is possible with another perk. The one I used most saw a small hit-point refill with each successful finisher.  And that's Ryse's gameplay in a nutshell. As I worked my way through the first three levels I learned that basic combos can be executed, and that precisely-timed blocks can stun enemies. Add in blocking breaks and secondary weapon use (spears), and you have combat that is quite a bit more interesting than an endless string of QTEs.  My problem with Ryse is that the battle system is not fully matched to the wave-based hack-and-slash gameplay. It's a swing and a miss, if you will. As elements of the combat system are introduced, it's fun to try them out and eventually implement them, but the fun only lasts for so long. My main problem is that there is really one way to engage an enemy (run up and slash at them), and really only one way to finish them off. To be clear, the finishing sequence is not optional. You can choose not to press the prompted buttons, but if you engage the enemy at all when they have the finisher icon above their head, you'll be thrown into slow-mo time. What's strange is that, even if you skip pressing buttons, the slow-motion hit sequence continues to play out. You won't get your perk charge from the kill, but you're still forced to watch it. Imagine watching these slow-mo kills 50 times in a row. Worse, when you engage an enemy, your stance is locked in fighting mode, and you're forced to face them until you kill them. Ryse has no problem throwing multiple attackers at you while you're trying to finish one off, though. While the system does a good job of passing the fight from one enemy to the next, trying to do anything other than killing them all in sequence is frustrating. And forget trying to break away use an alternative tactic; there was more than one instance where I wanted to step away from an encounter to pick up spears or take cover, but the locked fighting stance would not let me. It's not that the battle system is poor. It's just that there's no flexibility to it, and that the lack of options and freedom begins to wear on you after awhile. In playing for almost three hours over five levels, I can tell you that I wanted to put the controller down and play something else.  Ryse is difficult. Between waves of multiple attackers and the lack of freedom in combat, I died more than 20 times in my hours of play. In one of the more difficult levels from later in the game, I started over from a checkpoint after setting the game on the easiest difficulty. I still died so many times that I felt that something was wrong with me. I felt a bit better after seeing others around me dying frequently. I'll admit that I'm not the most skilled gamer out there, but Ryse was grating on me in a bad way. I've been writing about games professionally for almost a decade now, but this is only the second time that I was so frustrated that I had to rage quit at an event.  On a positive note, Ryse: Son of Rome is beautiful. Holy hell this game looks great. If you want a title in your library to show off what your shiny new Xbox One can do, Ryse it it. It has that big-budget polish shine, plenty of photorealistic set pieces, and outstanding voice work. No expense was spared on its presentation. Ryse needs more time in the oven, I think. It's probably a worthwhile play to enjoy the production quality Crytek pumped into it if nothing else (again, it's gorgeous), and it would be a fun co-op romp with a buddy. But it's also a mess, and your $60 might be better spent on another launch game.
Ryse full preview photo
Battle system isn't QTEs, but still isn't great
People keep asking me about Ryse: Son of Rome. I think everyone has questions because we've heard so many conflicting things about the Xbox One launch title since its announcement. Is it a string of quick time events? How doe...

Arkane Studios photo
Arkane Studios

Arkane Studios is making its next game with CryEngine

Maybe a new Dishonored?
Nov 04
// Brett Makedonski
Whatever projects are on the horizon for Arkane Studios, it looks like CryEngine will play a significant part in at least one of them. ZeniMax is looking to hire developers who have experience with the engine for both Arkane ...
Ryse: Son of Rome photo
Ryse: Son of Rome

Ryse trailer promises as much blood as you can handle

Salute your new centurion
Oct 18
// Brett Makedonski
You know what next-generation console launch title hasn't been delayed? Ryse: Son of Rome. That one's truckin' right along as expected. Microsoft released a new story trailer today in case you need some context for your cont...
Crytek photo

Crytek's free-to-play Warface launches next week

Are you still interested?
Oct 15
// Jordan Devore
After what feels like years of hearing about Warface -- it literally has been that long, if you count the original release for Asia -- the free-to-play shooter is nearly ready for players in North America. More recently, the...
Women for Warface photo
Women for Warface

Crytek's Warface is getting playable women soldiers

It's still a dumb name; also, the ladies are sexualised because of fan feedback
Oct 09
// Steven Hansen
Warface, which I still can't say with a straight face, is adding playable women avatars to the fray. According to executive producer Joshua Howard, speaking to Games Beat, the "female characters are a big hit" in Russia, wher...
Dumb Ryse contest photo
Dumb Ryse contest

Ryse wants you to name one of its QTE finishers

A QTE by any other name would smell as sour
Sep 09
// Steven Hansen
Crytek wants you to name one of the QTE finishers for Xbox One exclusive Ryse. My theory is that the team ran out of manpower to name them all itself because the game is basically a giant quick time event.  Follow GameS...
TimeSplitters PS4 photo
TimeSplitters PS4

TimeSplitters Rewind in development for PlayStation 4

Time keeps on splittin', splittin', splittin'
Sep 03
// Steven Hansen
Early this year, TimeSplitters fans got some decent news when it was announced that Crytek, owner of TimeSplitters developer Free Radical, was okaying a venture by fans and some former Free Radical employees to mash up the or...
Crytek photo

Crytek bringing free-to-play FPS Warface to Xbox 360

Next year
Aug 28
// Jordan Devore
Okay. I'm willing to admit it -- for as silly as the name Warface is, it's fairly memorable. In a sea of free-to-play first-person shooters, this is among the first (and only!) to immediately come to mind. Not that I've ever ...
Ryse: Son of Rome photo
Ryse: Son of Rome

Crytek upped Ryse's AI difficulty to offset QTEs

Now it just takes longer to get to the quicktime events
Aug 28
// Brett Makedonski
Ryse hasn't exactly been perceived as the Xbox One's darling as Microsoft had hoped, and Crytek seems aware of the criticisms. After the game's less than warm reception at E3, the developers took steps to alter the most ...

Ryse will have multiplayer microtransactions

Just more reasons to pass on this one
Aug 22
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
[Update: Microsoft has released a statement addressing exactly how microtransactions will work in Ryse. “The progression system in ‘Ryse: Son of Rome’s’ cooperative multiplayer experience offers player...
Graphics photo

Yep, it's pretty: New CryEngine demonstrated

Current- and next-gen supported
Aug 22
// Jordan Devore
Here's a tech demonstration out of gamescom for the latest iteration of CryEngine, which supports current-gen, PS4, Wii U, PC, and Xbox One, with further platforms to come. Calling it simply "CryEngine" is not an oversight o...
Ryse: Son of Rome photo
Ryse: Son of Rome

Crytek made Ryse so you can just mash buttons if you want

Press X to express more disappointment
Jul 09
// Brett Makedonski
Ryse: Son of Rome is already on thin ice with a lot of people. Between the incessant quick-time events and the bland-looking gameplay, there doesn't seem to be a lot of excitement for this title. Some information recent...

Ryse: Son of Rome looks to be sinking

Jun 11 // Brett Makedonski
One of the most eyebrow-raising aspects from the press conference was the amount of supposed quicktime events in the game. The developers took particular care to explain to me that these weren't true quicktime events, but rather an execution that was entirely optional and helped the player progress. A failed execution has no consequence, but a successful one comes with perks such as added health. Despite their insistence, they were totally quicktime events. Worse yet, their inclusion (complete with the contextual buttons) was a constant blemish on an otherwise beautiful game. Each time an execution was begun, it focused the camera on that particular unfortunate subject, completely ignoring any other enemies that had been engaged. It's a situation that we've seen enough, and has never been great. Ryse also seems to be very unimaginative in its structure. The demo consistently bottlenecked the player into the next narrow setting to engage the enemies in a completely pre-determined way. Maybe this was just for the purpose of the demo, but it feels as if the game could utterly negate any freedom that the player has.  For what it's worth, Ryse looks great. It doesn't come as much of a surprise given that it runs on CryEngine 3. Crytek has a stunning game on its hands with regard to visuals, but graphics don't make a great game. There probably isn't a whole lot of time before Ryse: Son of Rome makes its appearance on Xbox One. Hopefully something comes out soon to quell these problems. As is, there's not a whole lot to look forward to.    
Ryse Preview photo
At least it looks pretty
Microsoft likes Ryse: Son of Rome enough to put it in Monday's press conference. If my hands-on time was any indication of the final product, there's no reason to be so keen on it. Despite having only five minutes with t...


Ryse: Son of Rome, father of quick-time-events

Press B for a chance to press Y!
Jun 10
// Jim Sterling
One of the all-new IP revealed at Microsoft's Xbox One E3 press conference was Ryse: Son of Rome. As if the name couldn't clue you in, Crytek's on the case. It's a third-person action game in which you command Roman troops a...
Ryse gameplay photo
Ryse gameplay

Crytek shows off first actual gameplay for Ryse

Smash people with quick-time events
Jun 10
// Joshua Derocher
Crytek unveiled gameplay from its upcoming Roman-combat game, Ryse, during the big Xbox conference today. It showed lots of hacking and slashing with Roman guys jumping off from a ship. At first glance it looks...

Crysis 3's multiplayer expansion heads to The Lost Island

Four new maps, new weapons, and two new modes
May 30
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Crysis 3 is getting some downloadable content in the form of The Lost Island. This pack will include four new maps, plus new weapons, and two new modes called Frenzy and Possession. Want to know more all about these new featu...

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