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Creative Assembly

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Alien: Isolation's new mode asks you to sacrifice success for security


That Xenomorph's as lethal as ever
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Creative Assembly's Alien: Isolation is a constant struggle for survival, and maybe more precisely, a neverending search for those few fleeting moments when you feel safe, even if you know danger's probably mere seconds...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Creative Assembly sees opportunity in an Alien: Isolation sequel


*Spoilers ahead*
Dec 15
// Brett Makedonski
[Update: As expected, Sega's official comment to Destructoid is "Creative Assembly is focused on their post-launch content for Alien: Isolation, and have no comment on plans for a sequel.] Without doubt, Alien: Isolation...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Attention all masochists: Alien: Isolation has a Nightmare difficulty now


Because that game isn't hard enough
Dec 09
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone that's tried tackling Alien: Isolation on the toughest difficulty knows that it's a painstakingly hard endeavor. There's little room for error, as the alien is quite adept at adapting to your strategies. As if it ...
Total War photo
Total War

Total War: Attila releases February 17 and so does its first DLC


Pre-order or buy the game at retail for access
Nov 24
// Jordan Devore
We haven't heard much about Total War: Attila since Creative Assembly announced the strategy game back in September but it's coming along. To catch you up to speed: the year is 395 AD, family trees are back, and you can burn ...

Review: The Art of Alien: Isolation

Oct 17 // Alasdair Duncan
The Art of Alien: Isolation (Book)Author: Andy McVitiePublisher: Titan BooksPrice: $34.95/£29.99Released: October 7, 2014 Despite being set 15 years after the first film, Alien: Isolation copies the design and art style of the movie almost exactly. This is still grungy, industrial, workman-like sci-fi, not flashy, shiny space opera. Each chapter of the book shows that plenty of thought went into making every visual element stand out and fit in with the style of the original Alien. The book is a good opportunity to get a better look at protagonist Amanda Ripley, who only fully appears in the game's cutscenes. There's a whole heap of costume designs and concept art that looks like it came right out of the sketchbook of either Ron Cobb or John Mollo. You're given a better sense of what went into attempting to make the art of Isolation have that "lived-in" feel. There are also quite a few drawings of various space craft, which is just like catnip to me. The center piece of the game is the one thing you don't want to see, the Xenomorph itself. Again, the concept art does a fine job of showing the changes in design the team went through. The initial sketches depict a more muscular alien, whereas the final model ended up being a thinner, more lithe creature. Of course, if you've seen any of the films, you'll already be very familiar with the design of H. R. Giger's iconic monster. On that note, the only really disappointing element is how familiar much of the artwork feels. For fans of the Alien franchise or gritty sci-fi in general, there isn't anything unexpected here. The team at Creative Assembly has done an excellent job recreating the look of the original film but it's a shame there aren't more surprises to be found. There is artwork of sequences cut from the game, like a brief zero-G section and storyboards for unused dialog sequences. Still, Alien: Isolation is undoubtedly a faithful recreation of a beloved film and this art book shows how dedicated Creative Assembly was in making the game.
Art of Alien: Isolation photo
This art book is much less scary than the game
Alien: Isolation has received a lot of praise over its faithful recreation of the original film's lo-fi take on science fiction. "Truckers in space" was the aesthetic director Ridley Scott set out to capture and the decks and...

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

I got chills from the music in this Alien: Isolation launch trailer


So good
Oct 06
// Brett Makedonski
Man, there sure have been a lot of Alien: Isolation videos lately. I guess that's the rote cycle of triple-A games marketing. Here's one more. But, this launch trailer may be better than all the other ones that have rel...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Playing Alien: Isolation on a convention floor isn't the best idea


Turns out demoing a horror game isn't easy
Sep 29
// Alasdair Duncan
Demoing a game like Alien: Isolation at a convention such as EGX or PAX has always been problematic since horror works best when there's time for quieter moments between the scares. There has to be a period of tension buildin...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Something's stalking us in Alien: Isolation's television ad


I bet it's an alien
Sep 26
// Brett Makedonski
The latest piece of media for Creative Assembly's impending Alien: Isolation prods "How will you survive?" It's a fair question. With that hulking Xenomorph nimbly crawling out of the airshaft, stalking its prey before terrifyingly ending its life, it'll certainly be a tough task. When the game releases on October 7, the most likely answer will probably be "There's a good chance we won't."
New Total War photo
New Total War

Set the world on fire in Total War: Attila


Warning: CGI trailer
Sep 25
// Jordan Devore
I didn't throw out any guesses for what the next Total War would be, but if I had, wow, I would've been way off. Creative Assembly's next installment, Total War: Attila, will follow none other than Attila the Hun when it rel...
Alien photo
Alien

Most of Alien: Isolation's Survivor Mode will be DLC


And not the free kind
Sep 17
// Jordan Devore
Survivor Mode in Alien: Isolation, as described here in this video and further detailed in Steven's hands-on coverage, sounds cool. You'll have to complete certain objectives on a timer while being hunted, and factors like w...
Total War photo
Total War

Creative Assembly will unveil the next Total War this month


Is it that time already?
Sep 09
// Jordan Devore
Later this month at EGX London (formerly Eurogamer Expo), Total War studio Creative Assembly will "reveal" the next installment in its popular strategy franchise. The announcement will be a part of a developer session schedul...
Alien photo
Alien

How not to survive in Alien: Isolation


The game has gone gold
Sep 09
// Jordan Devore
From everything I've heard of Alien: Isolation, it's best not to run around when you think the coast is clear much less when the Xenomorph is right there in the same room. See: the trailer above. Creative Assembly plans to put out more of these videos throughout the month, and I have to imagine most will end with the demise of Amanda Ripley. It's just like playing the game, then.

Alien: Isolation is haunting and uncompromisingly scary

Aug 13 // Alessandro Fillari
Alien: Isolation (PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 [previewed], PC, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Creative AssemblyPublisher: SegaRelease Date: October 7, 2014 Back when the uproar over Aliens: Colonial Marines happened, the developers at Creative Assembly were hard at work on Isolation and waiting for the time to unveil their project. "No one ever made the Alien game I wanted to play, which was about taking you back to the roots of the series -- which is one Alien, who is really meaningful," said creative lead Alistair Hope. "What would it be like to encounter Ridley Scott's original Alien? Who's massive, intelligent, and just something that's hunting you down." First off, forget everything you know about the sequels to the original Alien. This game is set several decades before those events, and many of the buzzwords, tropes, and other plot points for the colonial space-marines don't exist yet. The ship from the original film, the Nostromo, is destroyed, the Alien was blown out of the airlock, and the fate of lone survivor Ellen Ripley is unknown. Taking place 15 years after the original film, Alien: Isolation tells the story of Amanda Ripley, the daughter of the series' central character. After receiving word that the space station Sevastopol has recovered the Nostromo's flight recorder, she hurries to the station to learn of her mother's fate. Upon arriving, she finds the station in chaos as staff have gone into disarray after an Alien has taken up residence there. Now with the lives of herself and her crew on the line, Amanda must venture through the Sevastopol looking for answers, while evading the near omnipresent Alien. Now when I first heard that we'd be playing as the daughter of Ellen Ripley, I sorta rolled my eyes and thought of it as a gimmick to eek some connection from the first movie. But I was wrong -- in the few hours I had with the game, I saw a lot to like with Amanda's character. She's scrappy, determined, and can definitely handle herself. "We wanted to tell a story that had an emotional connection to that first film, to focus on someone who actually cared about the Nostromo," said Hope. "She has a lot of the same qualities of her mother, but she's taken her own path and she's very much her own character." With more people clamoring for strong female heroes to play as, Ripley is exactly the kind of character many would like. Not only does she set herself apart from her mother by being more talkative, and more knowledgeable and handy, but she feels like a unique character that works well on her own. It's refreshing to play as a regular character with an unusual history brought into a trying circumstance, as opposed to just another space-marine that you'd likely forget about by game's end. In more ways than one, Alien: Isolation is very much a throwback to the bleak and haunting sci-fi and horror films of the 1970s. Everything from the character look, atmosphere, and visual style have been recreated to match the tone and style of the original Alien film. To take things further, film grain and the color palette match with what many fans saw from the first film, and Creative Assembly wanted to recreate the same atmosphere for this new game. "One of the big things I love about Alien is that '70s view of the future," said Hope. "That low-fi sci-fi. It's cool because it owns its own space, it's not the style of science fiction that we're used to, and it looks great and very immersive." One of the big takeaways I had from this game is the art design. Isolation's aesthetic comes from the past's view of the future. As future prediction is relative to the times, the 1970s view of the future features structural designs and computers that feel analog and mechanical, CRT monitors with charming and antiquated graphics are placed in every room, and multilingual welcome signs show a coalesced human society of the future. The developers at Creative Assembly did an admirable job with replicating the "used" future look, as seen in Alien, Moon, and Star Wars. And it definitely makes for a more visually appealing haunted house. In case you haven't figured it out by now, Alien: Isolation is almost the opposite style and tone seen in James Cameron's Aliens, and from all the derivatives that followed. While Aliens emphasized action-horror with powerful characters stretched to their limits, Alien is a horror-thriller with characters who are outmatched by an unknown force. Creative Assembly wanted to return to the original tone and atmosphere, as it's still largely unknown for gaming. "One of the things we put up on the wall [during initial design] was to 're-Alien the Alien'. You can go back to the original Alien, which is over 35 years old, and even though it's old you can still get an emotional response from it," Hope stated. "And it's a testament to the power of the craft. It was important to me to have the Alien not run around your waist like a rabid dog, but to be big and imposing, that commanded your respect." Respect is a great way of putting it. In the previous games, players are used to mowing down swarms of aliens without feeling any real fear. It's very ingrained, when you think about it. This aspect of the human vs. alien conflict is what CA wanted to change, and in order to do so, players had to be knocked down a few pegs. "Horror I think is about small victories. It's those tiny moments where you think 'maybe I can make it,' and if I keep doing it maybe I can." In an atmosphere filled with dread, the tension is incredibly heavy. You're not playing as a badass space-marine with ammo and firepower to blow away swarms of Aliens; you're a regular person with limited resources that has to think about firing a shot or even whether to make the tough decision to peek around a corner to see if the enemy is near. You're vulnerable, and the odds are against you. And the creature you're up against is intelligent, cunning, and unkillable by conventional means. And encountering it is quite possibly the worst thing that can happen to your character. During my session, I had to find a trauma kit to heal an injured crew member. I carefully made my way through an abandoned crew's quarters, and suddenly the Alien crashed down from a shaft in the ceiling. Not noticing me, I ducked under a table and watched as he lurked through the halls, looking for a new prey. For most other Alien games, we would've ended the encounter there with a few shots from a pulse rifle. Not so here. Stealth and careful use of your gadgets, such as the invaluable motion tracker (which shows movement and objectives) and noisemaker gadget (which does exactly that) are necessary for survival.  Once the Alien discovers you, you're pretty much done for. Within the first ten minutes of encountering this thing, I was killed twice. Both times featured unique death animations, one where the Alien yanks Ripley and finishes her with a single bite, and another where the Alien crawls on top of Ripley and goes for the kill. It was certainly humbling to face against something that I was no match for, I was definitely on edge throughout my few hours with the game. In keeping with its "throwback" style, the gameplay feels very much like a return to classic survival horror. Specifically in the vein of early Resident Evil titles and Alone in the Dark. Your resources are limited and sparse, you face unrelenting and powerful odds, and you're vulnerable to attack at the unlikeliest of moments -- to say things are tense would be putting it lightly. Moreover, Isolation also uses a fixed save point system. Creative Assembly cited this as a design choice to get players to think about where they want to set their flag, but also to prevent players from taking advantage of checkpoints and save-anywhere options, which would mitigate the tension. There were definitely times where I felt too nervous to make a move, as the Alien would have a general sense of where I was and stay around the area. And no, it usually won't go away if it knows you're there. Safety feels like a luxury, and moments that felt like downtime only resulted in the creature re-emerging from its hiding spot, almost as if to remind players who's boss. "We certainly don't want players to feel 100 percent safe, however this game has to be about tension and release," said Hope, while discussing the balance between creating tension. "It can't be unrelentingly oppressive and constantly overbearing, you need to be able to breath, before you can embark into the unknown." While he's definitely correct about striking a balance between tension and release, I myself was mostly tense throughout the experience. One major criticism I had was that the objective locations are kept fairly vague while only giving you a general direction to head to. Picture this: you're looking for a small keycard located in a hallway with multiple rooms. You don't know where it is, and you have to sneak through each room searching for it, all the while having the Alien lurking about. You begin to get frustrated, you can't find what you need to leave and you start to panic, you knock over a nearby object (objects create noise which attracts the Alien), and the creature rushes off to your room. At times, it felt like I was in a hopeless situation and that a restart was necessary. I was stuck in a supply closet and the Alien stuck its head toward the vents of the closets to see if I was inside. During this point, you can hold your breath and wait for the Alien to pass, but I let go of the button and let out a big gasp for air -- of course, the Alien heard it, ripped the doors off its hinges and dragged me to my death. It's moments like these that make the experience incredibly suspenseful, but in order to survive, you have to be prepared. To get the upper hand on the Alien and overcome many other obstacles, Ripley must use her engineering skills to craft items and weaponry to survive her trek through the Sevastopol. The in-game crafting system allows players to make Medkits, ammo, and other tools to survive. While you will acquire core weaponry, such as the revolver, stun-baton, and flamethrower, many other gadgets like the noisemaker and Molotov cocktails require components that are found from looting dead bodies and crates. Though be careful, crafting will not pause the game and if you're in an unsafe location, you can be easily picked off by the Alien. While the Alien is unrelenting and intimidating, it isn't the only enemy you have to worry about. Throughout the station you'll find other humans doing whatever it takes to survive the chaos. Even if means taking out Ripley. While there are people that players can peacefully interact with, others will attack on sight. Which is not only a problem, but the noise from this conflict will also attract the Alien. Though depending on how you play, this can work to your advantage. If you're clever enough, you can lure the beast out of hiding with gadgets and use the humans as a distraction. If done right, the Alien will leap out from whatever vent or rafter it's hiding from and make quick work of them, allowing you to pick up resources after the carnage. "It's not about killing, it's about survival. It felt like there had to more interaction with this creature than just pulling a trigger," said Hope while discussing the different options you have for combat." You can actually finish the game without killing anyone, so it's down to your choice. It's a big part of the game experience, we put these situations in your hands." Another enemy to watch out for are the Working Joes, or synthetic androids as seen from the films. Throughout the Sevastopol there are Working Joes on standby, and in some cases players can activate them for assistance, such as locating and procuring sensitive equipment. However, the Working Joes are also kept to maintain the integrity of the station, and if players tamper or destroy sensitive equipment, the androids will treat you as a hostile threat and enter a search-and-destroy protocol. While they appear slow and crude, they're extremely powerful and possess some sharper senses than the creature. The Alien is intimidating and scary, but Working Joes are just plain creepy. I came in expecting a game that would be better than the previous titles by default, but I ended up playing a game that not only surprised me with its cleverness and complexity, it gave me a greater appreciation for the original film as well. Alien: Isolation knows exactly what it's doing, and its approach to offering an uncompromising and harsh experience that'll frighten and humble players should win over many who wrote off the series. With its release on October 7, Isolation's return to classic horror will likely give gamers looking for a survivalist experience -- and those in need of a good scare -- something to look anticipate. And with the Alien lurking the halls of the space station, the odds will certainly be against you. But to quote the cunning android Ash from the original film, "I can't lie to you about your chances, but … you have my sympathies."
Alien: Isolation photo
Admire its purity
Though it was initially seen as "Jaws-in-space," the legacy for Alien is certainly much more pristine than the one with the giant shark. Originally released in 1979, the first Alien would eventually become a much-loved horror...

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Original Alien cast discuss how great the movie was while voicing Isolation


Makes you want to go watch it again
Jul 24
// Brett Makedonski
While voicing lines for the upcoming Alien: Isolation pre-order DLC, the crew of the original Alien took a few moments to compare the movie and videogame mediums while also reminiscing about the 1979 classic. Tom S...
SEGA at Comic-Con photo
SEGA at Comic-Con

Go play Alien: Isolation at Comic-Con


Sonic and Hatsune Miku, too, I guess
Jul 16
// Steven Hansen
SEGA has announced its plans for San Diego Comic-Con, which is to chill at some place called Nerd HQ ironically held at the San Diego Padre's baseball park.  With how much videogame nerds try to bully sportsters for soci...
Alien DLC photo
Alien DLC

Alien Isolation Ripley DLC not pre-order exclusive, will release later


Could do better than that
Jul 11
// Steven Hansen
I think that Alien: Isolation could be great. Pre-order DLC is bad. Especially when it's actually cool sounding content, like a few missions starring the original Alien cast in the upcoming Alien: Isolation. After a...
Alien pre-orders photo
Alien pre-orders

Here's what Ripley and friends look and sound like in Alien: Isolation


Must. Stay. Strong.
Jul 10
// Brett Makedonski
Someone needs to take Sega aside and politely inform it that pre-order incentives aren't actually supposed to be enticing. Years of custom gun skins and XP boosts have made the whole affair predictable and boring, and then S...
Alien: Isolation preorder photo
Alien: Isolation preorder

Original Alien cast returns for Alien: Isolation bonus content, available for those who pre-order


Believe it or not, you can play as Ripley
Jul 09
// Darren Nakamura
Alien: Isolation is supposed to be more like the 1979 horror film Alien, and less like the action shooter that some other Aliens game tried to be. Thus far, it looks like it has stuck to that design philosophy well enough, an...
Alien: Isolation VR photo
Alien: Isolation VR

Alien: Isolation on Oculus Rift won't see the light of day


That's a bummer
Jul 07
// Brett Makedonski
One of my favorite experiences at E3 was playing Alien: Isolation on Oculus Rift. The extra layer of immersion that virtual reality could provide did wonders for an already terrifying game. Unfortunately, it seems as if...

Our personal game of the show picks for E3 2014

Jun 18 // Steven Hansen
Night in the Woods At E3 this year, there were plenty of big, loud action-packed games that got my attention with their ridable elephants, exploding testicles, and crapping horses, one game managed to stand out as something special. A Night In The Woods is a platformer adventure game in which players take on the role of a ennui-laden twenty-year-old cat named Mae, who's stuck living in a small town at her parents house, suffering the same existential crisis that many twenty-somethings experience when they don't immediately hit their stride after high school. In my time with the game, I hopped around exploring the world, examining objects, and talking to townspeople. One of my peers had been forced into therapy after getting caught stealing codeine cough syrup. In an attic, I found some baby rats living in a decommissioned parade float. The subject matter and tone was reminiscent of movies like Adventureland, Ghost World, and Girl, Interrupted, but with an aesthetic and sense of humor more in line with Guacamelee. I ended up putting my controller down before the demo was even complete, because I didn't want to spoil anything else before I had the full game in my hands. E3 is one of the biggest, loudest, most commercial events I've ever attended. Sure, I'm still stoked for the games with the explosions and guns and ninjas ripping out peoples' spines, but it's refreshing to come across something so weird, personal and human. Even if you play as a cat. Far Cry 4 I had so so so much fun with Far Cry 3 that I'm beyond excited to get my hands on Far Cry 4. The team at Ubisoft know how much of a success that Far Cry 3 was, and they're expanding on the core elements in lots of fun ways. Ridable elephants, semi-auto grenade launchers, cutting the breaks on cars -- tons of small touches on top of a system that was near perfect already, at least in my opinion. The new setting completely encourages vertical play, so you'll be getting that awesome wingsuit way earlier this time around. Plus grappling hooks! What's even more exciting is that you can invite your friends on the PlayStation 3/PlayStation 4 to help you play through the game in co-op even if they don't own a copy of the game. That's a concept that I really hope becomes a trend going forward. Other favorites: Metal Gear Solid: The Phantom Pain, Titan Souls, Bloodborne, Super Smash Bros, Hyper Light Drifter, Batman: Arkham Knight, Splatoon, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse No Man's Sky Exploring is the best, isn't it? My favorite part of Minecraft is walking around caves and land masses just seeing what's out there and more often than not being totally amazed. No Man's Sky elevates that exploration to a whole new level. Exploring new planets and then exploring what's on those planets sounds like too much. In fact, it does sound like too much, at times. However, I know with Hello Games behind the helm that No Man's Sky will deliver. It may sound odd saying that, since their only track record is the Joe Danger series, but after meeting and chatting with Sean Murray at E3 2012, I know this ambitious title is in good hands. Plus, the Joe Danger games are amazing. Hello Games is like Thomas Jefferson, asking us, Lewis and Clark, to explore the Louisiana Purchase, which is No Man's Sky. It'll be ambitious, scary, but in the end, totally rewarding. And I'll take this moment to ask Steven Hansen to be the Meriwether Lewis to my William Clark [I do! - Ed.] If When Hello Games delivers, No Man's Sky will be their defining game, and the defining game of a generation. Assassin's Creed Unity Believe it or not, I'm still not tired of Assassin's Creed. Ubisoft has brought the kind of iterative design process you'd normally see in franchise shooters or sports games, but amazingly, managed to make it work on the scale of these open worlds, and it's working (for the most part). If Assassin's Creed Unity can provide on the fronts we've come to expect from a new entry in the franchise, while improving on what came before, then next year's romp in the chaos of the French Revolution should be pretty boss. Plus, being that far out should hopefully give the many Ubisoft teams at work on Unity time to course-correct after the debacle that is their current stance on having playable female characters. That's a real shame, considering that in the triple-A development space Assassin's Creed has been a somewhat reliable property to pay attention to diversity, at least compared to other mega-franchises. Other favorites: Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Akiba's Trip: Undead and Undressed, The Order: 1886, No Man's Sky, Destiny Destiny The phrase, "From the creators of Halo," has been prominently featured in just about every piece of Destiny marketing, and for an unabashed Halo fanboy such as myself (yes, I even liked Halo 4 and ODST), the phrase commands a level of trust in what Destiny could be. As time went on however, it felt like little more than a marketing tagline. You see, the problem I, and many others, have had with Destiny was how coy Bungie was being with the details. Considering the game's title and first details were forcibly outed via a court document during the West-Zampella vs. Activision lawsuit, this isn't incredibly surprising. But when you invite an army of press up to your offices, and make an appearance the previous E3, I shouldn't still be confused as to what the game is. For me, E3 2014 was Destiny's put up or shut up time, and by God, did they put on a show, not only on the show floor, but also with the recent alpha. While we knew that the game was some sort of mesh of first person shooters and MMO's, the brilliance of it can not be appreciated until you've sat with it for a few hours. With a quest filled open world, and dungeon raids with bosses who's strategies would be right at home in Guild Wars 2, Destiny has so far done an amazing job of introducing the better parts of the MMO genre to an audience, like me, who's been typically disinterested. Don't misunderstand me either; I'm well aware that Destiny's MMO sensibilities are standard fare in any proper MMO, but the way it's brought together with the familiar Halo-feeling shooting gels into something great. It also helps that the game world does a great job of, while aesthetically science fiction, invoking the mystery and intrigue of a fantasy setting. Not enough can be said for the music either. Marty's ambient, soft chanting choirs, and dramatic swells during combat make me feels some type of way. Virtual Reality More interesting than the individual games that are revealed each year at E3 are the trends that dominate it. It gives a glimpse to the direction of the industry and what we can expect more of in the near future. This year, thanks to a strong showing, it's tough to not be convinced that the virtual reality space will be a very serious one very soon. It's not surprising that those working on virtual reality had an impressive E3; almost every single show turns out that way. But, it's the strides that are being taken to make the likes of Oculus Rift and Project Morpheus more monumental each time we slide that peripheral over our eyes. Lucky's Tale and Alien: Isolation are games that look to be light years ahead of where the technology was when it was first introduced. When will it plateau? When will we stop noticing such grand advancements with relative frequency? I don't know, but it's sure exciting to watch. Other favorites: Assassin's Creed Unity, Super Smash Bros., Alien: Isolation, Titan Souls, Far Cry 4, Metal Gear Solid V Master Chief Collection If you had any friends at all whom you wanted to play games with in 2004, they were playing Halo 2. It was a phenomenon; the masses bought an Xbox for the original Halo, and they purchased Xbox Live for Halo 2. And there was good reason for that. Bungie created a multiplayer experience that, to this day, is unmatched. It was simple, classic arena style multiplayer that has somehow been lost -- even within the franchise itself, unfortunately -- in the RPG class progression system of the modern multiplayer experience. Persistent lobbies and integrated clan systems were also breakthroughs in console online experiences, all backed up with the most memorable map design in any game, ever. After the original Xbox server shutdown a few years back there's no easy way to play Halo 2 online these days. However, later this year we get to do it all again with Halo: The Master Chief Collection. It encompasses all numbered entries 1-4 in the franchise, with the focus being on the sophomore entry's visual overhaul. From the screenshots so far, ten years has made it look like that original target render from its first E3 teaser debut. It looks incredible, but is going to play exactly the same with all the original super bounces, glitches, etc. going untouched. That's everything I could hope for. The rest of the games are also there with their respective engines, multiplayer maps (over 100), and campaigns; all accessible at any time without having to switch games at 60 frames per second in 1080p. Nothing like that has ever been done, and that's why it's incredible and exciting. I've put in what has to be thousands of hours in the franchise over the years, so there's no reason I should be that excited to do it again, right? Well, that's exactly why I am. I can't wait to play countless rounds of Capture the Flag on Blood Gulch, Team Slayer on Ivory Tower, Team Swat on Terminal, and everything in-between. I'm ready to be excited about playing a stellar arena style online FPS again, even if it means being so about games that I already have a decade ago. Others I'm excited for: Final Fantasy Type-0 HD, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, Mortal Kombat X, Phantom Dust, and Xenoblade Chronicles X DOOM 4 I play a lot of DOOM. As in, present tense. Just last month, in fact, my brothers, my dad and I all huddled around my Xbox 360 and super shotgunned our way through the entirety of DOOM II in four-player co-op -- a memory I will not soon forget. To say that id's seminal All-Father of the FPS genre holds a special place in my gib-loving heart would be a gross understatement -- I live for DOOM, even 20 years later. So when Bethesda booted up their brief-but-badass CGI teaser for the new DOOM at E3 this year, I literally punched the air above my head and shouted "YES!" Everything about this trailer excited me; from the cheesy voice over to the slow crawl across the surface of the newly-designed Cyberdemon to the quick shots of the Union Aerospace Corporation logo on its armor, I was sold. And when the video closed with the classic DOOM shotgun pump and door-opening sound (oh my god that sound) and a next-gen Cyberdemon standing ready to fill my ass full of rockets, you couldn't have put a bigger smile on my face if you had showed me John Romero's head on a pike. We still don't know much about DOOM 4 -- including if it's even called that -- but hopefully Quakecon 2014 and the upcoming beta will duct tape a flashlight onto our eyes so we can peer into its shadows and reveal a bit more about what we can expect. Until then, if you need me you can find me watching the E3 teaser on repeat in between a replay of DOOM 3: BFG Edition. Because hey, DOOM 3 wasn't that bad. Other favorites: Bloodborne, Crackdown, No Man's Sky, Splatoon Bloodborne I love all of the Souls games in my own way, but out of the current triumvirate, Demon's is still my favorite. Naturally, my interest was piqued when I heard that From Software would be working on a spiritual successor for the PlayStation 4, helmed by director Hidetaka Miyazaki. What we got was something different -- something that doesn't necessarily follow the Souls formula as closely as Demon's successors, and I'm perfectly fine with that. The long rumored Project Beast was unveiled as Bloodborne, and it looks fantastic. Guns are a go, as is a newly minted 19th century Victorian-era town called Yharnam -- which is enough to set it apart from its predecessors right there. The good news though is that the tried and true strategic combat system returns, described as a "life or death struggle." Details are still being worked out on Bloodborne (we don't even know what the death system will be like), but you'll be hearing all about them as soon as we find out, because Miyazaki and his team have once again stolen E3, and my curiosity. Other favorites: Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Super Smash Bros., Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Bayonetta 2, Zelda Wii U, Halo: The Master Chief Collection Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker Super Mario 3D World was an amazing experience. It had so many memorable moments; I could just go on about it for days. The Captain Toad stages, though, those were among my favorite parts of the game. From the moment I first experienced one of these inspired diversions, wherein players take a breather from the breakneck action to explore and solve puzzles, I longed for Mario's diminutive pal to get his own spin-off. Little did I think it would actually happen. Nintendo is actually making my dreams come true, though. Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker is coming to Wii U this winter and it looks like the developers have found plenty of ways to flesh out the concept and craft a varied, full-bodied product. I couldn't be more happy about that. Other favorites: Xenoblade Chronicles X, Bloodborne Metal Gear Solid V I could talk about my love for the Metal Gear franchise stemming from the very first time I popped Metal Gear Solid into my PlayStation, set a hard limit of two days, and finally completed it. I could go on for hours about the cinematography, the heartwrenching and yet totally engaging journeys I've gone on throughout the series, or even the fact that I can always count on a Kojima game to show me something I've never seen before. I could elaborate on how the very first full-length trailer sent actual chills down my spine, something I haven't felt from early game footage in quite some time. There are plenty of reasons why Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain remains my favorite game of E3, but the most succinct reasoning I can give boils down to four simple words: "We are Diamond Dogs." And I think I speak for every Metal Gear fan when I say that the phrase "next year" has never felt so incredibly poisonous. Other favorites: Bayonetta 2, D4, Devil's Third, Halo: The Master Chief Collection, Xenoblade Chronicles X, Amiibos, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, Splatoon, Cuphead Starwhal: Just the Tip What's better than intergalactic Narwhals fighting each other to the death with their glorious horns? Nothing. That's what. Out of all of the games that I played at E3, the one that I had the most fun playing was Starwhal: Just The Tip. Outstanding name aside, it's actually an extremely fun multi-player battle free for all. The level of customization you can do with your respective Starwhal is pretty darn impressive. Not only can you change the basic color of you Starwhal but you can also add accessories such as... wait for it... a lightsaber for a horn. Yes. Your Starwhal can impale other Starwhals with a lightsaber. You can also dress like a Jedi, put on a Jayne hat if you're a Firefly fanatic, and you can even don a fez and bowtie like the 11th Doctor if you really want to look cool. All of my nerd senses were tingling pretty hard during just the character select. If I was having this much fun in the character select screen, I could have only imagined how awesome the game would actually be. The game did not disappoint. Your target is a giant throbbing heart (which is also customizable!) right in the Starwhal's chest unit. Your goal no matter the game mode: STABBITY THE HEART. Granted, the controls were a little difficult to get used to at first and felt a little clunky but it was still an extremely enjoyable experience. Once you get accustomed to the controls you could really have a lot of fun stabbing your friends repeatedly with your own unique Starwhal. It's a very basic set-up. You use one analog stick to move forward and another to move from side to side. There's also a taunt that you can use to troll your opponents or strike fear into their hearts. Either one. You're a fancy dressed Space Narwhal. You do what you want. Sunset Overdrive Sunset Overdrive had me more excited than anything at E3. From the giant Fizzie balloon that hung intimidatingly above the convention center to the costumed staff and giant projector in which the game was shown on the show floor, its clear Microsoft has a lot of faith in the title. From what I saw and played this past week, it pretty much delivered on every level. Insomniac Games has been building their knowledge of shooters for years and Sunset Overdrive is the perfect execution of everything they have done right over the past two decades. The shooting/platforming/grinding mechanics are solid and I was more than impressed with the fluidity of the combat. The weapons will put any Ratchet and Clank fan right at home and the platforming/grinding feels like what would happen if you mixed Jet Grind Radio with Titanfall. The game screams with neo-punk attitude, and the world is absolutely stunning and full of character. Sunset Overdrive certainly sets the bar for current gen stylized games and I have high hopes for the final release after getting my hands on it this E3. Ori and the Blind Forest Since Nintendo and Konami seem set on never returning to 2D Metroid or Castlevania, we have had to rely on independent developers to deliver that experience, and Ori and the Blind Forest looks like it will excel in that space. Combat is fast and impactful without being too easy. Traversing the environments is intuitive with impressively precise control. But what really gets people to notice are the gorgeous, hand-drawn, never-repeated visuals. Each screen in Ori and the Blind Forest is a work of art, not only making great use of color and effects, but also providing the skeleton for challenging platforming. In motion, the artwork comes together even better than it looks in still frames, and the fluidity of its gameplay complements the artwork perfectly. Other Favorites: Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Sunset Overdrive, Super Smash Bros., Tales from the Borderlands Grim Fandango I was surprised as anyone when I heard that an HD remastered version of Grim Fandango would be appearing on the PS4 and Vita. The final notable adventure game from LucasArt's golden era has been out of print for a while now and has been absent from online stores like GOG.com and Steam. Fans have demanded an HD re-release but let's face it, those demand are seldom met. What's even more surprising is a one of the big three console makers having a 16 year old adventure game being worthy of appearing at their E3 press conference. Tim Schafer's final game for LucasArts was a wonderfully atmospheric mix of Dia De Los Muertos mythology and classic film noir style. It tells the story of afterlife travel salesman, Manny Calavera, who stumbles on a mystery that's seeing the dead stripped of their just rewards. Grim Fandango innovated in a quite a few ways, stripping away a lot of the interface that was a LucasArts trademark and fully 3D environments. I'd be lying if I said I thought Grim Fandango is going to shift a lot of PS4s and Vitas but hey, it's good to see one of the big three understand that re-releases of classic games like these are a great addition to a console's library. Splatoon I love Nintendo, wait no, that’s not right. What I meant to say was, I absolutely adore Nintendo, and everything they do. I also love to shoot stuff (in videogames that is). Imagine how excited I was when Nintendo announced Splatoon at this year’s E3. Two of my favorite things, shooters and Nintendo, brought together in one solid looking package. For those of you, who may have missed this amazing looking game, Splatoon is a third-person shooter starring a group of squid kids who set out to paint the playing field in as much colorful ink as possible. Now, this being Nintendo, there are no “headshots” full of blood, no gore, no limbs flying everywhere, nothing gross; instead we are treated with supersoakers full of brightly colored ink wielded by kids who can literally turn into squids to swim through their ink and sneak-up on their enemies. Although we only had the chance to view a couple of different maps, I am already sold on Splatoon and cannot wait to see how the game changes and takes shape. There’s something magical that happens when Nintendo makes games, the care and polish they put into everything they do oozes with love and I have no doubt that Splatoon will turn out any different. Color me interested, Nintendo. Other favorites: Zelda Wii U, Hyrule Warriors, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Bayonetta 2, Yoshi’s Wooly Word, Rainbow Six: Siege Smash Bros. The Year of Luigi may be over, but Nintendo is far from done with passionately and unabashedly embracing their current outsider image. While nearly every other big budget publisher put realism and ultra-violence at the forefront, Nintendo returned fire with... the God damn Pac-Man. Nintendo showed a lot of awesome games at E3 this year, with Zelda for Wii U, Splatoon, and Star Fox hitting particularly hard, but no other game sums up exactly where Nintendo is at this moment that Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and 3DS. It's a new spin on the old classics, fresh and exciting while familiar and comforting, completely ignoring the latest trends in AAA gaming while offering something that has more mainstream appeal than nearly anything else at the show. Smash Bros. is a perfect fit for E3. It's a celebration of videogames as a whole, and a extreme example of a feeling that only videogames can provide. A feeling that something shouldn't feel real, but it does. A feeling that all of the ingredients should taste right together, but they do. Sonic, Mega Man, Mario, and Pac-Man all kicking the crap out of each other doesn't make any sense. It also doesn't make any sense that we would want it more than anything else in the world right now, but we do. We really do. Alien: Isolation I've already written about Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain for our official Game of the Show, so for my personal pick I'll go with the other title on the tip of my tongue anytime anyone inevitably asked last week, "So, did you play anything good?" Yes, you nosy, banal bastard, I did. Alien: Isolation. It was terrifying and left my hands mildly shaky and my chest heavy. I swore a lot, but with headphones on, you never know how loud or who is hearing. How the entire game is paced out will be important, but the focused challenge map I played did well to distill the essence of Alien. You are completely, hopelessly outmatched by a superior being that lumbers with great size yet zips off into the ship's underbelly with quickness. Sitting there with the motion tracker out, wondering if you're screwed, is like Jaws' orchestral tension at all times and much bleaker. Stealth by way of survival horror rather than MGSV's stealth by way of empowerment. I really hope Isolation lives up to this showing. Other favorites: Metal Gear Solid V, D4, Cuphead, Grim Fandango, No Man's Sky, Night in the Woods -- Ciao, amiche
Favorite E3 games! photo
And then he said, that's not my podiatrist, that's my mother!
You saw our E3 2014 Game of the Show. It was Metal Gear Solid V. Saved you a click.  Now, it's a good one. In fact, I wrote about why it was our Game of the Show in that very post you just didn't click. But E3 was full o...

Alien trailer photo
Alien trailer

Run, hide, survive: Good advice, Alien: Isolation trailer


Don't touch Willie...
Jun 16
// Steven Hansen
That's the coolest SEGA logo ever. I've always liked when a logo is altered to tonally match whatever it's slapped on.  This Alien: Isolation trailer doesn't divulge too much, which is good for a horror title, thou...

Is-elated: Alien Isolation surpassed my expectations, approached my wildest hopes

Jun 12 // Steven Hansen
I mentioned reaching and turning on a generator, which opens an elevator. Have I just been floundering hopelessly? Actually, I had almost finished, he told me. I actually did better than most people. Only about 14 people had made it to the end of the demo all show. That was encouraging. I did one more run and finished in around 1 minute and 57 seconds. A few seconds off the best time. I'm bragging, but not (just) because I'm an egotistical fishsock. It's a challenge mode, not the main game, but I love how hard it was. How stressful it was. My first time through, I alerted the alien, freaked out, and tried to run away. A squelch and I couldn't run. The camera panned down a bit to the spiked tail that pierced me. It retracted, leaving a a blood red hole. A hand crept in front of my face and the screen faded to black. It was chilling and oddly calming. Some of the alien kills were much more brutal. There was so much to like here. The map gave you a flamethrower at the onset, but I quickly learned it had as much gas for one, maybe two blasts. And because of the short range, you need good timing as the alien charges you. A well-timed blasts of fire will get it off your case for a little while, as it retreats into vents. Entering a vent to get around? Terrifying. Initially, I tried sneaking around in vents to make my way through the demo, but the idea of being cornered in the vent or turning the corner and it being there freaked me out. The alien is huge, occasionally lumbering if you see it walking the halls, but also wicked fast, prone to disappearing and horrifyingly reappearing somewhere else. The motion tracker is invaluable.  When I took my reprieve, I also asked the developer for some tips, maybe something I wasn't doing well. Use the motion tracker to see which direction the alien is going and go the other way, I was told. Sometimes it will sit in a vent, unmoving. It won't show up on the motion tracker. You'd only know it's above you by a thin line of spit hanging from above. Walk under and it will get you. I love that Isolation has thoughtful, idiosyncratic mechanics. The tracker is one. While you're holding it up (R1) and focusing on it, you lose depth of field. If you tap L2, the background will come back into focus. If you're hiding in a locker or box and the alien is looking for you, you can hold L2 to hold your breath and use the left stick to lean away from the front of the door. Sometimes he'll still find you.  The alien is on point. It cuts an impressive figure. It moves fast. It kills quickly. The tone is right. You are constantly under extreme pressure. The sound design is excellent. Alien: Isolation has the potential to be the second best piece of media in the series. Ten minutes after my heroic 1:57 run, after 30 minutes of intense failure, terrified "oh f**ks," my hands were still a little shaky. My adrenaline was pumping. Please be as good as this demo.
Alien Isolation hands-on photo
Weaver? I hardly even know her
I've been treating Alien: Isolation coldly. If I don't let myself get invested or excited, I can't be hurt. I think Alien is a perfect piece of film making. That doesn't need, should never have been, a franchise. I played one...

The three Oculus Rift games at E3 are all amazing

Jun 11 // Brett Makedonski
The first game, Superhot, was a concept title meant to showcase an interesting use of VR tech. It's a bullet time simulator where you walk down a hallway as three enemies shoot at you. The neat thing here was that Superhot only moved as fast as you did. If you ran full speed ahead, it'd be impossible to weave or lean around the bullets, because they came at you at full speed. If you crept along slowly, it was much more manageable as the bullets also crawled toward you, nearly completely still. Methodically leaning around bullets was supremely enjoyable, and almost made me feel as if I were dissecting the situation like I were solving a puzzle. Once in the rhythm of things, it wasn't too tough to advance, but it still required great care. About three-quarters down the hallway, a gun rested on the floor. After carefully firing three bullets at the assailants, I moved just enough to let them reach their targets, which ended the demo. Even though it was short, Superhot is the type of game that encapsulates the Oculus experience, especially for those that haven't tried it before. It'll be turned into a full production, as it recently met its Kickstarter goal. Superhot struck me as the exact type of title that Oculus VR wants in its stable as it introduces the Rift to the world. The next game was by far my favorite of the three. Actually, it's my favorite Oculus Rift title I've ever played. That game is Lucky's Tale, and it's basically Super Mario 3D World  in virtual reality. It's just as amazing as it sounds. Controlling an adorable cartoon fox donning a cape, I worked my way through a level by leaping over gaps and power slamming on enemies. Obviously drawing from Mario, there were blocks to jump and break, spilling collectable stars all over the place. Eventually, bombs needed to be picked up and thrown at targets, with the head-tracking serving as the method of aiming. Nothing in the demo was necessarily challenging, but that wasn't really the point. The world on display simply popped with vibrant color. I found myself spending plenty of time staring in all directions to take in the scenery. I realized halfway through that I was leaning forward to get as close of a look as possible. Lucky's Tale isn't the type of game that you can just look at and understand the magic of. Well, you could, but you wouldn't fully understand. It's just great to experience first-hand. And, it begs the question: If a small team can make something like this, what could a company like Nintendo do if it threw its vast resources at virtual-reality gaming? The last title was the one that I was most intrigued by -- Alien: Isolation. Having previewed the game twice, I have a good idea of how it works. The demo was a three-minute affair, and the goal was only to survive. Equipped with my motion tracker, I crept along, trying to get a glance at the Alien, but without it seeing me. The Xenomorph instills the same terrified sense that it does without a VR headset on. The atmosphere may be more immersive, but not significantly so. However, I didn't die before the three minutes ran out, so maybe that would've upped the ante. Given that it's just a very brief slice of what Isolation could be, it's difficult to gauge what the full version that Creative Assembly's working on may end up like. But, it's on-track to offer a different approach to Alien: Isolation that's equally as impactful. Those are the three new games that Oculus wanted to show off at E3. It makes sense why they chose those ones. All three offer a glimpse at different uses for VR and some of the directions that the technology is set to go in. Judging by these titles (and many that have been shown in the past), it's tough not to anxiously await the widespread adoption of virtual reality.
Oculus Rift previews! photo
Superhot, Lucky's Tale, and Alien: Isolation
I've had a chance to check out quite a few games on Oculus Rift. From Japanese indie projects at BitSummit to the latest build of EVE Valkyrie, I've gotten a good look at the progress of developing virtual reality games from ...

Alien: Isolation is more than just you and a Xenomorph

Jun 10 // Brett Makedonski
Being dumped into this slice of Isolation with prior experience gave me a sense of comfort as if I already knew what to expect. Motion tracker out: check. Crouch-walk everywhere: check. In the opening minute, there was nothing on my radar, so I figured I wasn't in any real danger. Not yet, anyway. I broke my strategy and ran to where I thought the next objective was. Big mistake. The Alien came running out of nowhere to violently emphasize that it was in charge of this demo, not me. With my confidence sufficiently shattered, I took to it again, knowing I would no longer stray from my tried-and-true technique. Methodically moving from room to room and corridor to corridor, I was focused partially on moving toward my goal, and maybe moreso on creating distance between myself and the Xenomorph. When I got to the area of my objective, I accidentally triggered a giant explosion. Oops. "Well, if this doesn't kill me, that pesky Alien surely will," I thought as I sighed in defeat. Oddly enough, it never showed up. As the demo progressed, I soon encountered my first human. As I hid behind some crates with a flamethrower I picked up, she yelled at me to show myself. She wasn't some space marine barking orders. There was panic in her voice. She was as scared as I was. A trickle of empathy spilled into my mind. We were kindred spirits in that moment, only I was much more well-versed in knowing to keep my mouth shut. [embed]275906:54249:0[/embed] Sure enough, as if on cue, the Xenomorph appeared and did away with the aggressor. Learning and adapting just as any good survivalist would, I took a mental note. Let it do the dirty work. Playing cat and mouse is hard enough when you're the rodent; there's no need to wander into mousetraps. Moving forward, I made my way to a medical ward, and found a gun. This wasn't a smooth-shooting assault rifle, though. It was a pistol that felt incredibly unnatural in Ripley's hands. Bulky and unwieldy. Like something she'd never held before. Like something she didn't want to hold. Like something I didn't want to hold. As I crept along, I came across more humans. They were idly chatting with trepidation in their voices. I had no idea if they were friendly or hostile. With no way of knowing and not particularly inclined to find out, I slithered around them and toward the next waypoint. After all, why tempt fate? The next section locked me in a giant room that was aflame. "Great," I thought. "This is practically inviting the Alien to feast on me." After pushing buttons on opposite sides of the room, there was a center console to hack. Unbeknownst to me, the buttons also freed a synthetic from his holding pod, and he was on a mission to choke the life out of me. I was at a loss for ideas as I took laps around the room to stall. Any weapon would attract the Alien, that much I was sure of. I tried the flamethrower, but with my limited fuel, it wasn't enough to put the android down. Shit. At least the Xeno hadn't appeared. Time to try the pistol. A few rounds with that didn't seem to faze him. I found a Molatov cocktail hidden by a box that eventually did the trick. Thoroughly relieved that that little snafu was over, I couldn't come to terms with why the Alien hadn't shown up. It had dropped out of the ceiling mere minutes before to surprise me (which literally made me jump in my seat, by the way). It showed up after I jogged for ten seconds earlier. Yet, as a giant explosion goes off or I'm pinging bullets off an android, it can't be bothered? How is Isolation going to frame the experience so we know what are acceptable ways to deal with these situations? Or, is that dissonance going to run rampant, making everything a frustrating game of trial and error? After handling the synthetic, a checkpoint popped. Checkpoints are a big deal in Alien: Isolation; every single one is a miniature victory unto itself. However, I could also sense it would signify the last section of the demo. In the first build of the game, the final bit was by far the toughest. I expected no less this time 'round. That expectation proved to be correct. It began with two humans that detected my presence. Just like before, I let them shout at me, effectively devoting their life's purpose to becoming Alien fodder. This is my design. From here, one of two things would happen: either the Alien would branch off to patrol some rooms on my left, or it'd come down the hallway toward me. The times it'd approach my location, I just had to give up. There was nothing I could do. Those attempts were essentially "unwinnable." Yes, that's as disheartening as it sounds. However, when it broke off to the direction I needed it to go, that frustration melted away and was immediately replaced with perseverance. I gritted my teeth and vowed to get past that bastard. The atmosphere of Alien: Isolation is just too immersive to rip you out of the game for long. Cautiously advancing, I took to sticking to every object I could. Sure, the motion tracker was out, but the Xenomorph has a habit of changing position quicker than I can process what's happening. As I took refuge under a medical cart, the perfect scene played out. The Alien approached from behind as I silently wondered if this is where this run would conclude. Turning my field-of-view with it, I watched as it slinked past me mere inches from my hiding spot, its tail slithering perilously close as it grew ever more distant. That moment felt like a personal victory against the Alien. Like I was the champion of our persistent game of Hide and Seek. It was simply chill inducing. I held my breath just knowing that within fractions of a second, it'd whip around and rush toward me. When it didn't, I couldn't help but break out in a grin. At least a half hour after beginning, I finally completed the demo. My many failures left me feeling like I took a long time -- maybe too long. Looking around the room, I was actually one of the first to finish. It seemed that everyone else was having the same issues I was -- maybe I was just luckier. Ultimately, the crux for Alien: Isolation is going to be how the player learns as the game progresses. If the player can adapt to the Alien adapting, Isolation could turn into a cerebral chess match, a true thing of beauty. If the adaptive Alien just means that the game's going to reward the lucky and occasionally be unfair, well, that'll be tougher to stomach. Whatever the outcome may be, this demo did a lot to further my confidence in Alien: Isolation. Seeing first-hand that interactions with other humans don't devolve into shoot-em-up segments was entirely helpful. Experiencing the same terrified sensation that the first build evoked was essential. The atmosphere that the game cultivates is so on-point that it may detract from some of its issues. That is, as long as those issues aren't hulking monstrosities like Isolation's Xenomorph. 
Alien: Isolation preview photo
Everything else is mean too
At the reveal event for Alien: Isolation, we were shown a lengthy demo that got right to the heart of the conflict at-hand: Amanda Ripley trying to navigate a space station as a very aggressive Xenomorph hunted her. In our fi...

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Sound might be the key to survival in Alien: Isolation


Don't scream, that's a dead giveaway
Apr 04
// Brett Makedonski
Creating atmospheric tension isn't exactly easy. If it were, every survival horror game would be a hit. There are several elements that have to be closely tended to, one of the most important ones being sound. In making ...
Alien: Isolation release photo
Alien: Isolation release

Alien: Isolation set for October 7 release


Almost in time for Columbus Day!
Mar 31
// Steven Hansen
Alien: Isolation is coming out on October 7 for PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and PC. So no need for a PS4 or Xbox One yet? Though I suppose Infamous: Second Son is quite nice. But I'm waiting on The Witness. And yes, I am av...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

How Creative Assembly is designing their Alien for Alien: Isolation


Smart, aware and invincible
Mar 13
// Conrad Zimmerman
Sega has released a new video featuring members of the development team at Creative Assembly working on Alien: Isolation, as they describe their goals and approach toward designing the lone Xenomorph stalking the player thro...
Total War: Rome II photo
Total War: Rome II

Rome II update replaces Indian elephants for African ones


You'd think Creative Assembly would have checked that?
Feb 10
// Alasdair Duncan
In his review of Total War: Rome II, our own Josh Tolentino was left unhappy at the buggy state of the game but was happy with the level of historical accuracy displayed. I wonder if he would have docked the game an extra poi...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

New Alien: Isolation screens spill the android fluid


Hang on Xeno, this is a slip hazard
Feb 06
// Brett Makedonski
If you came here looking for more images of Creative Assembly's terrifying Xenomorph in Alien: Isolation, no such luck. And if the Alien isn't in front of you, that means that he's either behind you, or above you, or in the v...
Total War: Rome II photo
Total War: Rome II

Mod tools for Total War: Rome II are now in beta


I'm hoping someone mods Asterix and Obelix into the game
Jan 16
// Alasdair Duncan
Total War: Rome II was one of the games I'm kicking myself for passing over in 2013; I didn't think I was going to be able to commit to a vast strategy game in a series that has shown me no mercy in the past. However, the new...

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