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PAX East 2015 plans photo
PAX East 2015 plans

Destructoid's PAX East 2015 schedule is here!


Party with the best damn community on Earth
Mar 07
// mrandydixon
PAX East 2015 is happening RIGHT NOW! And just like years past, the Destructoid community is there in a big, big way. Did you make the trek to Boston this year? Then check out our daily meetup schedule below! And be sure to j...

The Destructoid Guide to Community Podcasting

Mar 05 // Stephen Turner
For your podcast, you will need: 1 Skype 1 Microphone/Headset 2 Recording Apps (CallBurner or Pamela) 1 Editing Software (WavePad, Vegas, Adobe, etc.) 3-4 Human Beings 1 File Storage Platform As you can see, you don’t need to go overboard with your equipment, and a good podcast always boils down to great chemistry. Let’s look at that list in a little more detail: Getting a Skype account is easy. If it’s not built into your Windows, go to the website. Podcasting is, simply put, talk radio done over the phone. It’s a group chat edited into a listener’s digest. Most community podcasts are done over Skype – it’s a bit of a rarity for everyone to be in the same room – so obviously you’ll need a quality headset. Something comfortable in the £20/$25 range will do just fine. MY PRO TIP: Console headsets are no-no; too cheap and nasty. But if you’re on a shoestring budget and looking to reduce the popping effect on your mic, the foamy bit from an old 360 headset is well worth salvaging. A bit of a “No Shit, Sherlock” but you’ll also need a Skype recording app. Different podcasters use different recorders, e.g. Radio Destructoid uses CallBurner and Scary Granules uses Pamela. I’m sure audiophiles will tell you one is better than the other, but they’re both solid, accessible recorders for first timers. LAURA KATE’S PRO-TIP: Always have at least one guest recording the whole call with one of those Skype recorders. They've saved my life more than once when someone's local recording broke. The amount of people on your show can vary, but four is the golden number. More experienced podcasters are lower in number because they’ve built up a rapport. If you have a whole gang, then some voices tend to get lost. I find four is the best because you can tag in and out without interrupting the flow, like them wrestlers on TV. Editing software is the real deal breaker here, since that’s where the real work begins. For Menage-A-Toid, I used a free version of WavePad Sound Editor; very newb friendly and it comes with video tutorials. STRIDER HOANG’S PRO-TIP: Before Fapcast's hiatus, I actually used Vegas to edit my podcast on my old laptop. After the hiatus I had been using a new laptop and didn't have Vegas anymore. So I managed to use Adobe Audition which works great. Best of all, you can shell out for the modern version or simply download an older version for free. I believe Audition is currently version 5 but I found version 3 for free. Lastly, you’ll need a file storage site for streaming and downloading. Mediafire, Soundcloud, iTunes, all good platforms. YouTube’s also an option, but that’s really more for VODcasts like the awesome OSW Review. As anyone who’s podcasted before knows, getting the band together is the worst part. Lots of group emails, lots of scheduling, lots of last-minute cancellations. It’ll either be smooth sailing or plain frustrating, but always be mindful of other people’s time. Eventually, you’ll all come together for a show bigger than 10 Super Bowls! Now I don’t want to oversell it… KYLE MACGREGOR’S PRO TIP: Record at a decent hour. We record Podtoid in the early afternoon on Sunday and I'm so much more coherent than when we record Radio Dtoid (late at night). Look, don’t jump in, half-cocked. ALWAYS BE PREPARED. One time, when I was in the Cub Scouts, we didn’t heed our own famous motto. Several of us were mauled by a bear, and we lost another group to a time loop in the woods. Hell, two Cubs didn’t even bother showing up. So use this quick prep to honour those poor, poor souls: Test your equipment an hour before recording. Always call Echo/Sound Test Service on Skype. No feedback means a loose lead/Hardware & Sound problem. When all else fails, Skype has its own comprehensive troubleshooting guide. It’s pretty damn useful. Make sure those call recorders are activated. Fire it up along with Skype. It’ll auto-record all calls, including that “Meow Meow Meow” song you sung to the Echo lady. Remember: sound files are found in the designated recorder’s folder, not Skype. Group Call, test, test, 1, 2, 1, 2! Your first group call is a rehearsal. Here’s where you’ll iron out any sound issues. Don’t just say everyone sounds okay. If someone’s quiet/loud, let them know. They can cap the levels in Call > Audio Settings tab. End the call and play the audio file back. If it sounds fine, you’re ready to go. Remember: A small delay is nothing, so figure out the kinks before you all get settled in. You’ll be surprised how many mishaps occur before you go live. DARREN NAKAMURA’S PRO TIP: Have everybody record locally and stitch the audio together in post. It helps to easily silence background noise coming from one person, and gets rid of any latency effects (robot voice). With switches flicked and dials reading normal, the next group call will be The Big One, the ol’ “live in five.” Don’t worry, without fail, every podcast starts off with a lot of rambling and someone saying, “Are we ready yet?” Professionalism, huh?! This is the part where you’re probably thinking, “Oh, great, now they’re going to tell me how to make my show!” To which, I’d say, “No! Make whatever you want, just be original and fearless about it! If you’re not having fun, we’re not having fun!” That said, uh-oh, it’s best to have a structure. How Did This Get Made? is a great show, but bloody hell, it’s a mess at times. You could’ve seen Sleepaway Camp twice in one night and still have trouble following their time-skip observations. If you want to keep the listeners around, there needs to be a sense of direction. MIKE MARTIN’S PRO TIP: Having an overview/structure laid out helps immensely. Don't script things, unless you are really great actors. It comes off unnatural. Let conversations flow naturally. You can always remove rambling later, but you don't know what gem might pop up in off topic conversations. DARREN NAKAMURA’S PRO TIP: Don't ever think that "let's get drunk and record something" is an original idea or a good one. It almost never is. ANDY DIXON’S PRO TIP: Yeah, drunkenness is A-OK as a by-product of having a good time podcasting. It just shouldn't be the reason for the podcast :) Sure, have a drink, but don’t go nuts. Two beers are more than enough to calm your nerves and wet your whistle throughout the entire show. As the de facto host, it’s your job to introduce the show, the guests, and the topics, steer the conversations, and end it on a bang. Your presentation style is yours and yours alone.  You’re the Dungeon Master, the Conan O’ Brien, even the Awesomely Bearded Captain of the Titanic. The key is to be assertive once in a while. Also, make sure you write up a “Things to Say and Do” list in Word. So for structure, let’s look at Menage-a-Toid’s second episode. As you can see, it runs on a simple magazine format; an easy fill for 75+ minutes. It doesn’t even have to be this rigid.  As long as you know your A to B’s, everything else is a lovely scenic detour. *drives innocently away to the rocky valleys of The Hills Have Eyes* So how exactly do you converse with an audience in mind? Be engaging for one, but if you’re the de facto host, be sure to keep these tips in the back of your mind: Introduce the topic, along with your own opinion, before passing the buck along. Always keep things on the move. You know, like that infamous football scene in The Room. If anybody goes quiet for a while, bring them back in by asking for a thought. Conversations always go off on a tangent. Still, be mindful of the original point and bring it back to some conclusion before things get exhausted. Skype Messenger a valuable and silent tool. Write down your directions and queries there, as not to interrupt the conversation. If the topic is running dry, wrap it up. It’ll save you from dead air and repetition. Listener Questions are always welcome. Get the word out early and be sure to remind everyone again before recording. More interaction means more empowerment for your audience, which means regular retention for you in the long run. As a guest, it’s your job to be a lovable smart-arse like our very own Occams. Okay, maybe not that extreme, but ALWAYS BE ENGAGING. Popular podcasts pride themselves on a strong cross-section of personalities. Someone will always have you covered with trivia, gags, opinions, and general buffoonery. And no doubt, you’ll be covering their arses with own brand of wit, guile, or plain old sensibility. There aren’t any real no-no’s to podcasting, just some easily tamed bad habits. Here’s some I’ve encountered in my time: No snacks while recording. Drinks are fine. Snacks are for pre-production only. No distractions like clickable nibs. Trust me, even a crappy mic will pick up your fidgeting. *whispers*Sorry, Secret Moon Base guys*whisper* Brevity is the soul of wit. Rambling is bound to happen, but don’t hog the mic. The key to keep things snappy. Sure, you might have to explain the mechanics of something, but you don’t need to go into the exact specifics. People tend to zone out if you’ve been talking for 10 minutes straight. Don’t turn the conversation into a “schmohz.” Nobody likes a messy pile up… of noise. It’s an early evening bar conversation, so be polite in addition to being fun, and be mindful of the listener. It’ll also save the editor a headache or two. CONOR ELSEA’S (BAD) PRO TIP: Helps to live near an airport and leave your windows open. No matter the show, you’re looking at a three-hour recording session at most. Make sure you have a break in that time. Remember to have fun with the content and say everything you need to say. Nobody cares if you suck or not. Plus, there are plenty of chances at Destructoid to hone your craft. Just ask around! Editing eats up your time like nobody’s business. But stick with it because this is where your well oiled vision comes to life. Whatever you have planned: Don’t be afraid to kill your darlings. Guests will say a lot, but not all of it will make the cut. Some jokes work, some don’t. Some get to the point, some take longer. It’s all clay, baby. If you’re confident enough, you can even shave off seconds of dead air. Don’t worry about hurt feelings. Find a balance of voices, and do what’s best for the listener. Even out those sound levels. Sometimes, someone or something will be louder than the rest. You can actually reduce the decibels and keep everyone audibly in-line. Sure, it’s more time in the editing process, but you’ll end up producing a higher quality show for it. Music is a useful punctuation. Cues break up your topics and keep the listener engaged. No need to play an entire piece. Learn to fade early on for the maximum effect. Always make notes. As you continue to edit, something important at 1:30 will end up at 1:26. It’s a no brainer. Keep some sticky notes at hand. Treat milestones like separate save games. Overwriting’s fine for minor changes, but for the end of a session, it’s advisable to save your work as separate audio files.  That way, if anything irreversible comes up, an older edit will be close at hand. Send a rough cut to your guests. They don’t need to hear all of it, just the intro.  Everybody’s their own worst critic, so shake them down for good advice. Once you’ve nailed the opening half-hour, you won’t need any hand-holding for the rest. After you’ve uploaded your final cut, write a community blog with all the relevant links.  Don’t just say, “Here’s our podcast, listen to it.” Sell it to us in 200-300 words. If you want to promote yourself further, then by all means, make a trailer and send a message to our Community Manager/Podcast Recapper. Who knows? You might even get up getting a radio spot on another community podcast. It’s all about that networking, baby! Oh, and don't forget to check out the Podcast boards in our forum! Always remember: great podcasting comes with experience. You know, like that thing your mum and the milkman talk about on the sly. Well, you’re on your own now. Hopefully, this guide has either given you a shot of confidence to give it a try or it’s helped to refine your skills. Maybe you’ll think, “Wait, podcasting doesn’t sound so scary after all. In fact, it’s a genuinely great way of getting involved with the Destructoid community. Gee Willlikers, Mr. Turner! It’s just like being in a knife-fight gang down by the beach!” And I’ll look at you and say, “It sure is, Billy. It sure is.” We look forward to give you a spin. In my case, while doing the shopping. Or photoshopping myself into Sarah Koenig's "started off great then lost the plot" Serial. What about that Jay fella, huh?
Podcast Guide photo
The call is coming from inside the house!
So you wanna be a podcast superstar? And live large, a big house, five cars, you're in charge? Comin' up in the world, don't trust no body, gotta look over your shoulder constantly? Well, it probably won’t happen unle...

MAGFest photo
MAGFest

At MAGFest? Find Conor!


He's recording an episode of Radio Destructoid and we want you to be the star
Jan 23
// mrandydixon
Dtoid Community Monster and all-around nice guy Conor Elsea is at MAGFest this weekend. ARE YOU?! If so, you should totally find him, because he's recording an extra special episode of Radio Destructoid with Radio D alumn Aar...

Vote now for your 2014 Game of the Year!

Dec 09 // mrandydixon
[embed]284535:56598:0[/embed]
Community Choice Award photo
The Destructoid Community Choice Award
Another year has come and gone and holy sh*t were a lot of videogames released in 2014. Did you folks play any this year? I played a few, but mostly I just watched Netflix because it has achievements now. Anyway, some of you ...

Promoted Blog photo
Promoted Blog

The competitive conundrum


Promoted from our Community Blogs
Nov 19
// TheAngriestCarp
[Dtoid community member TheAngriestCarp waxes poetic on the trials and tribulations of competitive gaming. I feel like we can all relate to at least some part of this blog. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page...
Promoted Blog photo
Promoted Blog

Giving Thanks: What videogames have done for me


Promoted from our Community Blogs
Nov 14
// Dreamweaver
[Dtoid community blogger Dreamweaver shares with us all the ways he is thankful for video games. I think we can all relate in some fashion to his words. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write some...
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Promoted Blog

Giving Thanks: Video Game Music


Promoted from our Community Blogs
Nov 13
// ooktar
[Dtoid community blogger ooktar is thankful for video game music. I think most of us can agree that it has bettered our lives in some way or another. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write somethi...
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Promoted Blog

Giving Thanks: Turning over a New Leaf


Promoted from our Community Blogs
Nov 12
// StriderHoang
[Dtoid community blogger StriderHoang is thankful for his lady. Though distance may keep their bodies apart their love blooms in the world of Animal Crossing. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go writ...
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Promoted Blog

The Quiet Return of the Composer


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Nov 11
// Alphadeus
[Dtoid community blogger Alphadeus creates the most lovely music. He is a prime example of a truly talented community member sharing his gift with us. It's an honor and pleasure to share this on the front page with all of you...
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Promoted Blog

Our Halloween costumes 2008 to 2014: a Destructoid tribute


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Nov 08
// craineum
[Old-school Dtoid community blogger craineum shares his last seven Halloween adventures with us. What an awesome dad! Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something! --Mr Andy Dixon] I haven't written...
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Promoted Blog

Giving Thanks: Wii U


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Nov 07
// ocelot89
[Dtoid community blogger ocelot89 is thankful for the Wii U. There's no better feeling than embracing something and feeling like you have come home. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something...
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Promoted Blog

Agency and Gaming: Are you the hero of your own life?


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Nov 05
// AvtrSpirit
[Dtoid community blogger AvtrSpirit examines his relationship with video games and if they have affected his waking world.  Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something! --Occams Elec...
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Promoted Blog

New Xbox One game simulates what itís like to own a PS4


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 31
// CJ Andriessen
[Dtoid community blogger Its About To Get Gay In Here is quickly becoming our resident satirist blogger. Here is a lovely example of them bringing both the funk and the noise. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front pa...
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Promoted Blog

Fangs for the Memories: P.T.'s View to a Kill


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 30
// SpaghettiOReilly
[Dtoid community blogger SpaghettiOReilly was creeped out by the P.T. demo and rightfully so. It wasn't just what they saw but what they heard as well. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something! --Occams Electric Toothbrush]
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Promoted Blog

My Life as a Catholic Gamer


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 29
// CarltonMcHard
[Dtoid community blogger CarltonMcHard talks about what its like to be a Catholic and a gamer. It's an interesting read from a perspective that isn't discussed all that often. Want to see your own stuff appear on the fro...
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Promoted Blog

Fangs for the Memories: Two Way Mirror of Terror


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 28
// TheDustinThomas
[Dtoid community blogger TheDustinThomas shares with us his memory of one of the best jump scares in the entire Resident Evil series. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something! --Occams...
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Promoted Blog

5 spooky places that should be in a videogame


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 27
// SpielerDad
[Dtoid community blogger SpielerDad offers up some real life spooky places that would be a perfect setting for a horror game. Warning: Pseudo-NSFW images below. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? G...
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Promoted Blog

Fangs for the Memories: Shock 2 the System


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 26
// CleverName
[Dtoid community blogger CleverName takes us on a journey of discovery, excitement and fear with a dear friend.  Kinda like high school but less heavy petting.  Want to see your own stuff appear on the front pa...
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Promoted Blog

Fangs for the Memories: Silent Hill 3


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 26
// RainsOpacity
[Dtoid community blogger RainsOpacity talks about how for a horror game fan who has seen it all, sometimes the Devil in the details is the most memorable scare there is.  Want to see your own stuff appear on the fro...

10 things to enjoy for your gamer Halloween

Oct 25 // SeymourDuncan17
Killer Instinct's Spinal Musical Theme Goddamn skeletons. Easily the spookiest of all monsters. You hear the rattling of those bones, and it can only be one thing: Your worst fear, with death to soon follow. Alright, that's two things. Actually, a skeleton may not even be able to physically kill you as they have no muscles.  But, look at them! Ug-o! It's like being ultra-naked.  One of gaming's most famous skeletons being KI's Spinal and as a huge fan of the franchise, it felt appropriate to feature him in some way. This "complete" version may drag on a fair amount for those first 4 and a half minutes, but it still comes together quite nicely. The video's cheesy visuals help a great deal. Make sure to read the top comment for a little bit of insight into the creation of the track.  I need to get me a leg bone flute.  Silent Hill While everyone fondly remembers the highly-influential Silent Hill 2, remember that those same people also seem to forget that Silent Hill 1 exists. Jerks. It's like shoving your mother into hospice over a common cold. Sure, it's aged a little bit, but, then again, so has Silent Hill 2. There's something to appreciate in both. Personally, while Silent Hill 2 has the industry significance, the OG Silent Hill is where all the super spooky frights are. From the very beginning, the game is intense and doesn't waste any time. First, you are killed, but actually not. Then, you're attacked by motherfucking pterodactyls! Immediately afterwards, you try to find your bearings amidst the empty and fog-infested streets of Silent Hill as you're mauled by rapid dogs! Don't even get me started on the elementary school. I still haven't gone back to finish the game since completing that section over two years ago. Someday, though. Someday. Perhaps once I forget how outrageously terrifying it was.  This hilarious Erie commentary Some time ago, I hastily threw together a blog detailing my top playthroughs by one known as Cr1TiKaL. Since discovering his Octodad playthrough a couple years back, I've been a ginormous supporter of his work and I'm here to once again try to get some more of you into the club.  What makes Cr1TiKal so unique to your average LP'er is in how much he downplays everything that happens. You can literally count the amount of times he's either laughed or screamed on your two hands. He often emits sarcasm and seems to effortlessly form both hilariously crude, yet varied and intelligent sentences in regards to what's happening on-screen. All the while, he is totally monotone. So oddly charming. He doesn't pander to the usual LP schticks. He just plays and makes light. Oh and every cent of his partnership funds go directly to charity. Why aren't you already a fan? Darksiders II It may not be a horror game, but the Darksiders franchise still has got a devilish, monstrous universe with tons of violence, gore, and gritty settings. It also features a player character who looks suspiciously like Slipknot's Mick Thompson.  The original Darksiders is sort of a cult favorite amongst gamers. It was incredibly derivitive, but there was also a lot of charm to it's darker take on the Legend of Zelda formula. Its sequel, though, was much more of its own thing. While still taking inspiration from other titles, it became more of an unspecified open-world brawler with a focus on loot.  It does get shaky for a while around four fifths of the way through, but it's a thoroughly awesome experience that more should have picked up on around its release. The developers didn't just haphazardly pump out a sequel, it's clear they gave it their all and that should be rewarded.    This year's JonTron Halloween special How many of you were honestly aware the original Clock Tower also released on the SNES? I sure wasn't! Then again, I also kind of sometimes confuse Clock Tower with Alone in the Dark. So, that means I'm just stupid.  JonTron gives us a lovely and humorous look at what was arguably one of the first "survival horror" videogames. Although, it seems much more like a straight up point and click adventure that just so happens to focus on horror. Either way, it has a villain that reminds me that I haven't yet thought of every possible awful way to die.  The Typing of the Dead: Overkill I experienced a handful of the original House of the Dead: Overkill via the Wii version. I haven't touched too many light gun games, but this one was some good fun. However, I think I enjoyed its self-aware sense of humor a little more than the actual gameplay. Making light of classic grindhouse and horror films as well as itself, you'll find yourself basking in whatever crap the game decides to throw at you. Context is this game's strong suit.  The "Typing" iteration of Overkill not only includes a way to play it as it was originally intended, but gallantly brings back an old favorite pastime of mine: typing games! I used to love the mini-games we were rewarded with during my high school's typing course exercises. Heck, I considered even the basic exercises its own sort of videogame. I needed speed, I needed precision, I needed to be totally in the zone, and I wanted to beat every new "high score" I achieved. To think, I was simultaneously improving a skill that's actually of use in the real world! What a great time it was to be a growing boy.  If the above paragraph speaks to you at all, you literally cannot go wrong with Overkill's PC port. It's pretty cheap considering how loaded with content it is, and it's pretty darn hilarious to boot.  Silent Hill (Film) I haven't played every installment or obsessively Wiki'd all I could about it, but the Silent Hill franchise is one I have a great amount of respect for. That it's even still around and that its latest installment is looking pretty fucking good so far makes me so happy.  So, you may not have assumed as such, but I do actually sort of enjoy the first Silent Hill film. What can I say? I ain't gonna lie. It's not amazing, it's not even strictly faithful, but as far as film adaptations of videogames go, well... it goes without saying that you can do much, MUCH worse. It's a nice little horror film with tons of Silent Hill-y elements. No more, no less.  The hilariously terrible sudden exposition spout towards the end kinda makes you want to write a passive aggressive email to whoever wrote the screenplay, but it's worth supporting as a videogame adaptation that doesn't soil itself.  Imscared: A Pixelated Nightmare If you're looking for a horror game both easy on your hardware and easy on your wallet, not only does this little diddy's visuals amount to buggerall (it's kind of in the title), but it's totally free! Here's a dirty little secret, though: I haven't played it. I've only ever watched it being played. However, I think I can at least say you can find far less digified free PC horror experiences than this. It looks pretty interesting. It even involves adding files to your computer (don't worry, it's safe) that are contextualized as the game's antagonist (seen creepin' above) trying to interact with you as the player.  Sort of brings back memories of the 4th wall-breaking Psycho Mantis of Metal Gear Solid, doesn't it? Sounds like a heck of a thing. Give it a shot and tell me how it is because I'm far too much of a wuss.    [embed]282959:56119:0[/embed] Game Theory's unsettling look into Five Nights At Freddy's  It's no fun admitting defeat.  That the biggest and most seemingly overhyped indie horror craze since Slender is actually a little spooky, but after watching the Game Theory's latest video...I can safely say I will never ever play this game. This all could be chalked up to "thinking too much" about some likely meaningless details, but that's where things can get interesting!  When they make this much sense, it also gets incredibly unnerving.  As much as I sort of wish I had never watched this video, more should revel in creativity like this! Those who are especially weak-willed, get ready to scroll that wheel. Gotta get to 10 things. No matter what it takes. Alien: Isolation I'm sure you were expecting this to pop up at some point, like a Xenomorph dropping suddenly from the vent above to claw and host it's way into your tummy. Enjoy the rest of your very short life as an egg, buster. I've already gone at length about why the alien's AI in Isolation is so bloody brilliant, but seeing as how much your time on the Sevastapol is spent on the synthetics, the humans and exploring, I thought it'd be appropriate to tell you why the rest of the game is also pretty nice.  While the humans can, sadly, only offer minor thrills with their incredibly rudimentary AI, the synthetics, ironically, feel that much more realized in how they fight and maneuver. Sometimes they won't bother you, but usually, they're out for blood. Not quite intentionally, though. They're just a little overprotective is all.  They're also pretty damn resistant. Set them ablaze and they'll just keep coming (athough, it is an especially awesome visual treat). Fire at their noggin and they'll just stumble a bit. Melee them? Hah. Don't even try. You'll have to expel one of your stun baton charges first, and only then will a barrage of melee attacks do just one of them in. They're a riot.  Simply walking around the Sevastapol may get very tiresome during the game's final hours, but for the vast majority of the experience the atmosphere and level of detail/graphic fidelity got me hooked as well. Even ignoring that, a lot of the time an Alien is literally stalking you throughout every forward progress or backtrack; it's an absolute joy to witness what Creative Assembly have done with the visual stylings of the original Alien film. It's not only incredibly faithful, but wholly its own thing. You'll find yourself both absolutely giddy and terrified in believing you're actually in the same universe as the films/comics. It has its pacing issues, but Isolation deserves your time and money. If any game released in the last few years is going to make you wet or poo poo yourself, it's this.  ---------- That's it for my list. If you have of your own suggestions, tell me about them! 
Gamerween photo
Promoted from our Community Blogs!
[Dtoid community blogger SeymourDuncan17 suggests 10 delightfully spooky things for gamers to enjoy this Halloween.  Give it a read and throw your suggestions in to the comments.  Let's all share what makes us ...

Weekend gaming photo
Weekend gaming

Hey, Destructoid! What games are you playing this weekend?


I'lll show you mine if you show me yours
Oct 19
// Rob Morrow
Covering the PC gaming news beat requires that I spend a lot of my time researching the newest titles and the latest industry happenings for the site. Admittedly, I love to learn about new things and I especially enjoy sharin...
Smash Bros Dibs photo
Smash Bros Dibs

Attention Smash Bros players: better call dibs now!


Before someone else beats you to the punch...
Sep 28
// mrandydixon
In keeping with Dtoid tradition, several community bloggers have begun calling dibs on their favorite Smash Bros fighters! ShadeOfLight: Luigi Salvador Sandoval: Ness GoofierBrute: Little Mac StriderHoang: Diddy Kong Wrenchf...
Dtoid at PAX Prime photo
Dtoid at PAX Prime

Dtoid's community meetup plans for PAX Prime 2014!


Bookmark this page for guaranteed fun!
Aug 29
// mrandydixon
[Update: Our big party is tonight! Hope to see you there!] PAX Prime 2014 is happening right now! We're armed to the teeth with meetups scheduled for Thursday, Friday, Sunday, and Monday, a badass party we're co-hosting with ...
Dtoid PAX Prime 2014 photo
Dtoid PAX Prime 2014

Are you going to PAX Prime? Let us know!


Join in the fun!
Aug 18
// mrandydixon
PAX Prime is in 10 days! Every year, Dtoiders from across the entire known universe make the trek to Seattle, WA to hug each other and then get hungover (and then hug again), and 2014 will be no different! This year's convent...
10 Things photo
10 Things

10 things you didn't know about practically everyone


An archive you'll want to bookmark
Jul 13
// Morty
[Dtoid community blogger Morty compiled every 10 Things blog he could find into one handy place. What a guy! --Mr Andy Dixon] Hello, my fellow Dtoidians. If you're like me, then you love to read the more personal blogs about ...
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Who's that new Destructoid editor?


It's Grimecraft!
May 08
// GRIMECRAFT
Greetings humans My name is Grimecraft (aka Clarke) and I am the new music editor here at Destructoid. I am a DJ/Producer on Dj CUTMAN's record label GameChops and formerly a super cool artist at Harmonix, Crystal Dynamics, a...
High Strangeness photo
High Strangeness

High Strangeness lets you shift between 8-bit and 16-bit


High Planes Riffin'
Apr 17
// Steven Hansen
Longtime Destructoid community member AgentMOO's High Strangeness was back at PAX this year with a nearly done build. With the help of indie publisher Midnight City, High Strangeness is coming out late this year on PC and consoles. Holmes and Ben "AgentMOO" Shostak talked about the "12- bit" adventure and enemies that get more nefarious and capable as you do when you switch to the 16-bit world.
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Old Dtoid Story Time: Destructoid Cards


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Apr 14
// Char Aznable
[Dtoid community blogger Char Aznable takes us on a journey to 2008 when something unique and wonderful happened on Destructoid. Stay awhile and listen! --Occams Electric Toothbrush] Gather 'round, young Dtoiders, and sit on ...
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Here are Destructoid's PAX East 2014 plans!


Party with your community!
Apr 12
// mrandydixon
Update! Our meetup dates/locations for Friday and Saturday have changed. (E&C is now on Saturday.) See below for more details! PAX East 2014 is just a week away in two days TODAY! As is the case every year, the Dtoid comm...
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Get to know Dtoider chicagOriginal!


Community member highlights
Mar 30
// mrandydixon
Dtoid community member chicagOriginal has been lurking around our parts for a little over four years now, but it wasn't until recently that I discovered what a badass he is! A lifelong gamer, breaker and skater, "Junebug" (as...

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