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City Interactive

Enemy Front is a fresh approach to World War II shooters

Jan 30 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Enemy Front (PC [previewed], PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)Developer: CI GamesPublisher: CI GamesRelease date: June 2014 Enemy Front has you playing as a resistance fighter, traveling to different parts of Europe over the course of the game. From the Warsaw Uprising, taking out a factory in Norway, sabotaging rockets in Germany, to joining the resistance in France -- expect to see various locations over the course of the 12 missions. You can also expect to see some lovely visuals. CI Games was wise to go with a vibrant color palette instead of the brown and grey like WWII shooters of the past, especially with this being the CryEngine 3 engine. That said I wouldn't say it looks just as good as Far Cry 3 visually, but it comes close. Also I can't believe how garbage these screenshots are that we were sent to go along with our coverage. Trust me when I say the screens don't do the game any justice. From the levels I saw they're wide and open similar to the missions of the Bad Company series. As for the enemy encounters, they'll remind you of Far Cry 3's Outposts that were scattered across the island. You can go in hard, guns blazing, or you can carefully scout the area and stealthily take out enemies one by one. With the levels being fairly open you have many options, like going to a nearby ridge to snipe enemies, or go right into the camp to perform stealth kills as the enemies are out on patrol. Oh I should mention the sniping system from CI Games Sniper: Ghost Warrior series is in Enemy Front. Holding your breath will slow down time, and wind resistance will be a factor when you aim your rifle. Guns blazing can work, but if an enemy is really close to you just one well-placed shot will instantly kill you. If you do get caught -- from letting the enemy dedication meter get completely full or an enemy spotting a body you didn't bother hiding -- all the enemies in the vicinity will hunt you down at your last known location. Eventually they'll stop hunting for you, but their guard will be up so long as they're alive rather than eventually going back to a complete relaxed state. Another level saw me taking on a mass of enemy soldiers with fellow resistance fighters, so there will be at least some levels where you'll be taking on waves of enemies. After that I went to another section of the game where I needed to infiltrate a base. I was doing pretty good quietly making my way through, throwing rocks to distract guards and such, but I got cocky and spotted. Thankfully, there is no fail state for getting caught, but I quickly got swarmed by guards and died. I wasn't expecting to like Enemy Front at all going in and now I'm looking forward to it. The Outpost stuff from Far Cry 3 was one of my favorite things about that game so getting to do that again but this time sneakily stabbing Nazis in the back is enough for me to want to get back into a WWII shooter. There is a multiplayer mode, by the way. It offers three modes with deathmatch, team deathmatch, and a domination-like mode called Freedom Fighter. There's support for up to 12 players and I have know idea what it plays like as CI Games wasn't showing anything off in that regard. Is there a market for World War II shooters this day and age? It's been so long since there was a good one that CI Games may get lucky and capture a good audience here with Enemy Front.
Enemy Front preview photo
Think Bad Company 2 mixed with Far Cry 3
Back in 2011 CI Games announced Enemy Front, a World War II shooter that was being worked on by Stuart Black who was the guy responsible for Black. It's funny how over-hyped that game was looking back. Anyway, Black left at s...

Lords of the Fallen photo
Think world exploration like Zelda with fights in the style of a fighting game
A couple of weeks ago I wrote up this little story asking for CI Games to show us some real gameplay footage of Lords of the Fallen. Well, there's still no footage but at the very least I got to see the game in action earlier...


Hey Lords of the Fallen, show us actual gameplay already

More like Lords of the Tease
Jan 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Hey City Interactive, I'm really interested in Lords of the Fallen but enough with just releasing screenshots like the two new ones in our gallery. Yeah, you released a neat looking teaser, but where's some actual gameplay fo...

Lords of the Fallen keeps looking better and better

Aug 30 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]260399:50113:0[/embed] If Lords of the Fallen comes off as punishing, there's a fair chance that you're doing something wrong. Dying will happen, but the developers don't view deaths as a failure; they view it as part of the learning process. If you're repeatedly dying, try something new. Be more patient, learn the patterns of your opponent, and try to limit battles to one-on-one. There are times when you'll encounter multiple enemies at once, but those will likely be few and far between. The developers think that the majority of the game will be spent engaged in single-enemy affairs. "I may be prone to exaggerating, but we want every single fight to feel sort of like a Tekken or Street Fighter battle," one developer told me. It's obvious that combat is the primary concern in Lords of the Fallen. Actually, the developers went so far as to say that it really isn't story-focused. Sure, there will be a narrative, cut scenes -- everything needed to make it a coherent experience -- but, Deck13's putting more emphasis on ensuring that the fighting sequences are up to snuff. However, exactly how those fighting sequences play out are entirely up to the player. Magic spells looks as if they'll play a big role, but the game can be beaten strictly with conventional melee attacks. Each class will have a few unique spells, which appears to be the only way that players are barred from complete customization. As shown at E3, changing gear can effectively switch the player's class on the fly, but these magic spells are a way to lend weight to the class decision made at the beginning of the game. We're still a long ways away from Lords of the Fallen's release, as it's slated for late 2014, but any action RPG fan needs to keep tabs on this one. Every time we see it, it's looking better and better. Hopefully it can deliver on all this promise it shows. 
Lords of the Fallen photo
Start keeping tabs on this one
Lords of the Fallen looked good at E3; it looks even better at PAX Prime. After another hands-off demo, the next-generation action role-playing game really seems to be coming along nicely. Admirably, it seeks to improve,...

Lords of the Fallen photo
Lords of the Fallen

Lords of the Fallen debut: Smash monsters with a hammer

More like Lords of the Ballin'!
Aug 20
// Steven Hansen
I forgot Lords of the Fallen was a thing at this recent E3 and announced a month earlier for PC, PS4, and Xbox One. Maybe because it didn't get any sort of snazzy trailer, like this crazy, CG debut trailer. A man with a gian...

Lords of the Fallen shows a lot of promise

Jun 19 // Brett Makedonski
The demo displayed the combat's overarching strategy component to a tee. Lords will rarely throw more than a handful of enemies at you at once, but that doesn't mean that they're pushovers. Each enemy requires methodical dissection to best; rushing in with a hack-and-slash technique will lead to nothing more than certain failure. One boss was shown, and he exemplified the necessary play style. The developer that was leading the demo let it strike a few times to simulate the player "learning" where the gaps in its attacks were. Once these were understood, he jumped in at every apt opportunity, slowly chipping away at its health until it was bested. As long as he remained patient and didn't get greedy, the boss was definitely beatable. Lords of the Fallen takes place in a medieval fantasy setting where the gods have failed mankind. Some sort of "unstoppable supernatural force" has taken over, and Harkyn, our protagonist, is called upon to save the land. The developers didn't go into too much detail regarding the plot, opting instead to focus on the game's core mechanics. As Lords begins, the player must choose to play as a Warrior, Rogue, or Cleric. However, this decision only affects the weapon and armor sets that the player starts with. Later in the game, players can effectively switch classes by using different equipment. Further, skill points can be put into any combination of three trees. This all keeps the class role very dynamic and never locks the player into one specific direction. Lords of the Fallen is aiming for PC, PS4, and Xbox One, and won't release until sometime in 2014. There's still a ton to learn about this title, but what's been shown looks really promising. Right now, it's shaping up to be one of the games on a short list that action-RPG fans adore.
Lords of the Fallen photo
There's method to the madness
Action role-playing games are usually hit-or-miss in the way that they're received. The slightest deviancy in mechanics can turn a thrilling affair into a mundane and unexciting one. For the past few years, From Software's De...

Review: Sniper Ghost Warrior 2

Mar 21 // Allistair Pinsof
Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 (PC [reviewed], Xbox 360, PS3)Developer: City InteractivePublisher: City InteractiveRelease: March 12, 2013MSRP: $39.99 I like those on-rails stealth sequences in Call of Duty 4 and Killzone 3, as they break up the action setpieces and add variety to the campaign. Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 is what happens when you stretch those sequences across an entire campaign. Although it's a short one at four hours, the redundancy, lackluster visuals, and banal story make it feel like it goes on forever. Instead of taking breaks from mental exhaustion, I felt it necessary to walk away from the game out of absolute soul-crushing boredom, hoping I'd magically rediscover some joy in it upon returning from a sulk. That did not occur. The meat of SGW2 comes from the long-distance shooting galleries where a teammate calls out specific targets to shoot, stifling any creative input from the player. When you go against orders, you will fail or the game will fail via a weird glitch, like one where enemies in the next area didn't spawn properly, failing to trigger an event. For what it's worth, these shooting galleries are fun in short bursts. Wind and distance alters the trajectory of bullets, so the player needs to account for reticule positions and readjust. Noscope bros may want to look elsewhere. If you hover over a target or hold your lungs (which also slows time), a red circle will show where your bullet will hit. This takes some of the fun away. Sniper Elite V2 offered a much smarter system for this -- it showed where your last bullet hit, leaving it to the player to figure out how far off they were -- making it a much better sniper-centric shooter. For many reasons. Limiting SGW2 to shooting galleries may make it a glorified iPhone game, but I'd prefer that to what it is: a painfully dull and badly designed Call of Duty clone that offers nothing unique, while poorly replicating the experience you get in those titles. Every mission in SGW2 involves following an NPC (odd since you are commanding them in many operations), following a specific linear path, performing stealth kills on enemies that are permanently turned away, and holding when your NPC leader tells you to. Nothing is wrong with this in small measure, but this is all that SGW2 consists of, outside the shooting galleries. More importantly, it's awful when all you care about is getting to the next shooting gallery. Frequent glitches only further sour the experience of walking in line and waiting on the epic sniper quest from A to B. I expected, in the very least, SGW2 would offer some stunning visuals out of CryEngine 3. In truth, the only stunning thing about it is that City Interactive managed to make a game that looks like CryEngine 1 at times. Foliage looks like cardboard, pop-in occurs even on PC (which also lacks anti-aliasing support), facial models make your heroes look like mongoloid freak things, and the textures are PS2 quality. The worst offender is how lazy the programmers are, leaning on CG scenes so that they don't have to code basic situations that every FPS includes these days. Instead of rendering large areas, awkward CG scenes split the load. It can get downright laughable at times, like a 10 second CG scene of the hero jumping into a lake below. Even worse, the CG looks hideous and has all sorts of nasty compression on it. I feel like I'm watching someone's 240p YouTube playthrough. If only. What else? The voice sync is off, crouching/prone requires a staggering 4 keys (despite only 1 button on console), checkpoints are far and few between and usually placed before scenes, enemies awkwardly jerk to a standing position to accept the stealth kill you kindly offer, killing the wrong guy can often break the game when it doesn't summon instant death, the physics is so bad that a crumbling cave looks like an Ed Wood set, a heartrate/exhaustion mechanic makes the frequent escape sequences even more insufferable, there are 2 - 3 sniper rifles and a side pistol and nothing more -- you get the idea. There is an enjoyable camp quality to the script, which is full of nonsensical twists and tough guy talk ("We've got a major shit sandwich!") that takes itself way too seriously. I can see some appeal in getting together friends and having some drinks while playing. The constant waypoints and enemy icons make me think that being inebriated would make for an acceptable challenge. Nevermind online, which is composed of 2 maps, 1 mode (Team Deathmatch), and 0 active servers. The task set before Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 is not a hard one: make sniping fun. Apparently, City Interactive didn't get the memo, filling the game with a never-ending sequence of following an NPC guide through uneventful, recycled, and ugly environments. Even at four hours, Sniper Ghost Warrior 2 requires a level of patience and commitment that even the best snipers won't be capable of.
Wesley Snipes photo
"I love recycling strategies"
Sniper Ghost Warrior 2 is not better than any Call of Duty game -- okay, maybe Declassified. Despite developer City Interactive copying its formula, beat for beat, there are some readers that will grimace at this comparison. ...

Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 photo
Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2

Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 debuts generic launch trailer

'There are soldiers, and then there are snipers'
Mar 08
// Chris Carter
Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 is nearly here, and you can check out what it has to offer with the new launch trailer from City Interactive. Unfortunately, it doesn't really do a good job of conveying what makes this game different...

Step into a World of Mercenaries

May 23
// Daniel Starkey
The closed beta for the new MMOFPS, World of Mercenaries opens today. Created by Polish Developer City Interactive, WoM is a "teamwork focused" shooter based on Unreal Engine 3.  Seeking to enter the super-crowded class-...

In what can only be described as truly serendipitous, City Interactive has just wrapped their first media tour for Enemy Front and it's shaping up to be not half bad. Stuart Black, the brains behind Black and ...


Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2 is deserving of your attention

Mar 22
// Tara Long
The first Sniper: Ghost Warrior holds a special place in my heart. It certainly wasn't without its technical problems, but the prospect of a game focused purely on sniping, my favorite weapon specialty, was intriguing e...

New multiplatform FPS Enemy Front looks nice

Nov 17
// Dale North
City Interactive has announced a new WWII shooter called Enemy Front. It comes to us from the creator of Black, Stuart Black, and City Interactive's UK and Poland teams. Black joined the CI team earlier this year and has been...

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